(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Grand Lodge of A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 1940"

Grand Lodge 



A.F.&A.M. of Canada 



In the Province of Ontario 




PROCEEDINGS 



-:- 1940 -:- 



1*^*1 




BROCK 

UNIVERSITY 

LIBRARY 



From the 
Masonic Library 

of 
Lav/rence Runnalls 
St. Catharines 
AuQust 1988 






x^^ 



. COLLEcr 






LIBRARY 
BROCK UNIVERSITY 



Digitized by the Internet Arcliive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Heritage Lodge No. 730 G.R.C. & Grand Lodge A.F.& A.IVI. of Canada in the Province of Ontario 



http://www.archive.org/details/grandlodge1940onta 




^^^^^^^^feS^^^^^^^g^jjS^^^g^g^g^g^^g^ T 



fes^&^fri^Sgi^f^'afe^^^^^ 



GRAND LODGE 
A. F. & A. M. OF CANADA 

In the Province of Ontario 

PROCEEDINGS 



EIGHTY-FIFTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 
HELD IN THE CITY 

of 

TORONTO 
July 17th and 18th, A.D. 1940 A.L., 5940 




The Property of and ordered to be read in all 
the Lodges and preserved. 



GRAND LODGE , A. F. & A. M. OF CANADA, 
in the Province of Ontario 



PROCEEDINGS 

At the Eighty-fifth Annual Communication of 
the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, in the 
Province of Ontario, held in the City of Toronto, 
commencing Wednesday, Julv 17th, A.D. 1940, A.L. 
5940. 

Present were: 

THE GRAND MASTER 
M.W. Bro. J. A. Dobbie, on the Throne 

THE DEPUTY GRAND MASTER 
R.W. Bro. J. A. McRae 

R.W. Bro. F. H. England Grand Senior Warden 

R.W. Bro. B. C. Beasley Grand Junior Warden 

R.W. Bro. Thos. Eakin Grand Chaplain * 

M.W. Bro. J. A. Rowland Grand Treasurer 

R.W. Bro. E. G. Dixon Grand Secretary 

R.W. Bro. H. R. Boal Grand Registrar 

PAST GRAND MASTERS 

M.W. Bros. W. H. Wardrope, J. A. Rowland, R. B. Dargavel, 
W. S. Herrington, F. A. Copus, A. J. Anderson and W. J. 
Dunlop, being all of the Past Grand Masters. 

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS 

Algoma O. F. Young 

Brant M. C. Hawley 

Bruce Wm. T. Baillie 

Chatham Dr. R. C. McCutcheon 

Eastern D. S. Macintosh 

Frontenac Wm. Chapman 

Georgian Dr. Frederick Spearing 

Grey : Thos. H. Reburn 



4 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS 

Hamilton "A" Geo. Walker 

Hamilton "B" William Davies 

London _ ;. D. A. Ferguson 

Muskoka Harold R. Hayward 

Niagara "A" _ Joseph Backus 

Niagara "B" _ _ Frederick S. Lane 

Nipissing East H. A. Batsford 

Nipissing West - Rev. F. W. Colloton 

North Huron Jas. Neilans 

Ontario Harvey W. Mitchell 

Ottawa _ Jas. E. Gamble 

Peterborough R. F. Downey 

Prince Edward Hilton McCartney 

Sarnia - W. J. Aitchison 

South Huron Stanley T. Loveys 

St. Lawrence Robt. Hawkins 

St. Thomas _ Arthur Petherick 

Temiskaming Chas. P. Ramsay 

Toronto "A" S. F. Albertson 

Toronto "B" _ G. C. Murphy 

Toronto "C" _ A. C. Norwich 

Toronto "D" _ E. W. Stoddard 

Victoria Wm. Greig 

Wellington John A. Leslie 

Western Arthur G. Holland 

Wilson H. B. Atkinson 

GRAND REPRESENTATIVE GRAND LODGE OF 

J. A. Rowland England 

W. S. Herrington Ireland 

W. H. Wardrope Scotland 

J. A. V. Preston New Brunswick 

R. B. Dargavel Quebec 

E. G. Dixon Saskatchewan 

W. T. Robb New South Wales 

John Boyd New Zealand 

Alex. Cowan Queensland 

A. M. Heron South Australia 

E. W. E. Saunders Tasmania 

A. B. Rice Victoria 

B. B. Hodge Alabama 

C. E. Kelly Arizona 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 5 

GRAND REPRESENTATIVE GRAND LODGE OF 

H. J. Alexander Florida 

T. C. Wardley „ Kansas 

J. R. Crocker Maine 

F. A. Copus „ Massachusetts 

J. S. McCullough _..... Minnesota 

Geo. DeKleinhans _ Missouri 

J. Birnie Smith Montana 

W. R. Ledger. „ Nevada 

G. C. Bonnycastle New Hampshire 

W. J. Moore .....New Jersey 

Wm. Bailey New Mexico 

A. J. Anderson , New York 

J. A, McRae North Carolina 

J. A. Dobbie _ North Dakota 

The M.W., the Grand Master, J. A. Dobbie, and 
the other officers of Grand Lodge took their places 
in the Auditorium of the Central Technical School 
at ten o'clock in the forenoon. The distinguished 
guests entered at the same time and were seated on 
the dais. 

GRAND LODGE OPENED 

As soon as the brethren had taken their places 
the Grand Master opened Grand Lodge in Ample 
Form and the Grand Chaplain invoked a blessing 
upon this session of Grand Lodge. 

GUESTS 

At the request of the Grand Master, M.W. Bro. 

R. B. Dargavel presented to him and introduced to 

Grand Lodge the following distinguished guests: 

M. Ex. Comp. L. F. Stephens, Grand First Princi- 
pal of Royal Arch Masons of Canada. 

M.W. Bro. W. H. Wardrope, Sovereign Grand Com- 
mander of A. & A.S. Rite for Canada. 

M.W. Bro. J. N. Nicholson, Past Grand Master of 
the Grand Lodge of Prince Edward Island. 

M.W. Bro. Duncan McLellan, Grand Master of the 
Grand Lodge of Quebec. 

M.W. Bro. J. D. McFadyen, Past Grand Master of 
the Grand Lodge of Quebec. 



6 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

M.W. Bro. Charles T. Sherman, Grand Master of 

the Grand Lodge of Michigan. 
R.W. Bro. D. H. Hesse, Deputy Grand Master of 

the Grand Lodge of Michigan. 
M.W. Bro. W. E. Hanmer, Grand Master of the 

Grand Lodge of Connecticut. 
M.W. Bro. Albert Knight, Past Grand Master of 

the Grand Lodge of Rhode Island. 
R.W. Bro. R. A. Rowlands, Junior Grand Warden 

of the Grand Lodge of New York. 
M.W. Bro. 0. Frank Hart, Grand Secretary and 

Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of South 

Carolina. 
M.W, Bro. Joseph E. Perry, Grand Master of the 

Grand Lodge of Massachusetts. 
R.W. Bro. Earl Taylor, Grand Marshal of the Grand 

Lodge of Massachusetts. 

After the Grand Master had extended a very 
cordial welcome to the distinguished guests Grand 
Honours were given. 

NATIONAL ANTHEM 

The brethren joined in singing one verse of the 
National Anthem followed by one verse of "My 
Country ; 'Tis Of Thee" and before being seated, led 
by W. Bro. D. S. Linden they united in singing 
"Unto The Hills". 

WELCOME BY THE MAYOR 

The Grand Director of Ceremonies introduced 
Bro. Ralph Day, Mayor of the City of Toronto, who 
was received by the Grand Master, and presented to 
Grand Lodge. He addressed the brethren as follows : 

MAYOR'S ADDRESS 

Most Worshipful Sir, Most Worshipful Sirs, Right 
Worshipful Sirs, Very Worshipful Sirs, Wor- 
shipful Sirs and Brethren All: 

I am honoured to again have the privilege of 
welcoming to the City of Toronto the delegates at- 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1040 7 

tending the 85th Annual Communication of the 
Grand Lodge of Canada, A.F. & A.M. in the Province 
of Ontario. On behalf of the Civic Administration 
and the citizens of Toronto, I extend greetings, and 
assure you of the cordiality of the welcome which 
is yours. 

While we meet in peaceful surroundings and 
comparative safety here, yet we gather on this oc- 
casion under ominous clouds of war, in which a good 
part of the world is engaged in a struggle for free- 
dom from domination of the forces of evil, as rep- 
resented by the mad dictators of Europe. 

We, as Masons, can realize one phase of the 
tyranny as applied by the dictators, knowing as we 
do that our Masonic brethren in Europe have been 
denied the privilege of free assembly. Masonry, as 
a universal brotherhood, cannot accept calmly this 
interference with the rights of its membership, no 
matter where located, to meet with one another in 
performance of the ritual of the Craft. 

The Anglo-Saxon race forms the last great out- 
post of democracy in this war-mad world, and it is 
essential that we face the struggle with confidence 
in the final outcome, so that sanity may once again 
prevail amongst the nations of the world. 

Masonry must, and I am sure will continue to 
give that leadership so vital in the counsels of our 
Nation, that British ideals may remain undimmed, 
and may germinate and flourish amongst the people 
of other races and ideologies. Masonry will always 
fulfill its destiny and play its rightful part in hold- 
ing aloft the torch of civilization. 

The Masonic Order has a great and important 
part to play in the world to-day in furthering a 
sense of kinship and mutual confidence among the 
citizens of every country. I firmly believe that the 
silent influence of Masonry is one of the most 
powerful agencies in the world for the promotion of 



8 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

the spirit of true brotherhood and of international 
peace ; for true Masonry exists in the heart and life 
of man, and is composed of those noble qualities of 
brotherly love, relief, and truth — those golden 
threads that strengthen and support the whole 
fabric of Masonry. 

Only last year, a most illustrious member of 
the Craft, in the person of His Majesty the King, 
accompanied by his gracious Consort, visited Canada, 
and created a resurgence of unity across this great 
land of ours. This furthered, in an amazing way, 
the quiet, unheralded influence that Masonry has 
exerted since its inception in this new land of op- 
portunity. 

Unquestionably, the ramifications of our or- 
ganization have contributed a major share to the 
national spirit that binds our people in an integral, 
unit of the British Empire. Masonry, whose origin 
is lost in the distant past, is, and will continue to 
be a great moral force in developing the high type 
of leadership that is so essential in these days of 
confusion and difficulty, even after the war has been 
brought to a successful conclusion. 

While our thoughts naturally are primarily 
centred on the prosecution of the war, yet we must 
not weaken our hold on the constructive forces at 
home. We must maintain Masonry in a strong and 
flourishing condition, in order that it may continue 
to attract to its banners a faithful and high-minded 
type of citizenry, so that its influence for good may 
not wane. 

It is consequently encouraging to know that the 
individual Lodges are maintaining their strength, 
and continuing their activities in their respective 
spheres of operation. 

While because of enlistments in the combatant 
services, and the absence of so many prospective 
candidates from civilian occupations, it may be that 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1S40 9 

we will not greatly increase our membership, yet, 
on the other hand, there is no reason why we should 
not consolidate our position in the fraternal life of 
the country. Under your leadership, Most Worship- 
ful Sir, I am sure that the Craft will continue to 
progress. 

To you all I extend cordial Civic greetings, and 
the wish that this Grand Communication may be 
attended with every success. 

I should like to say a special word of welcome 
to visitors from the Old Land, and from the neigh- 
bouring country to the South. We are indeed 
grateful that during these difficult times so many 
jurisdictions are represented at this Grand Com- 
munication. It does make us feel that in Masonry 
there is a deep and abiding friendship amongst the 
brotherhood, no matter where located. 

May each one of you enjoy your visit to this, 
the Queen City of Canada, and return to your homes 
refreshed in mind and spirit. 

REPLY OF THE GRAND MASTER 

The Grand Master replied thanking the Mayor 
for the most cordial civic welcome extended to 
Grand Lodge and invited Bro. Day to be seated on 
the dais and join in our deliberations. 

WELCOME BY TORONTO LODGES 

R.W. Bro. E. W. Stoddard presented the Wor- 
shipful Masters of the lodges in the four Toronto 
districts. W. Bro. Charles Scott on their behalf then 
extended a welcome to the Grand Master and Grand 
Lodge and presented the Grand Master with a 
beautiful leather bound copy of the address. 

REPLY OF THE GRAND MASTER 

The Grand Master replied thanking the lodges 
for the warm fraternal welcome and the readiness 



10 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

with which they received Grand Lodge at his re- 
quest when it was found impossible to meet in 
Ottawa this year. 

DELEGATES REGISTERED 

The following delegates from the constituent 
lodges were present and duly registered: 

No. 2, Niagara, Niagara. — J. H. Brown, J. D. Cooper, 
N. L. Caughill, A. N. Rogers, R. G. Dawson. 

No. 3, Ancient St. John's, Kingston. — W. E. Kidd, H. J. 
Page, W. J. Gibson, W. J. Saunders, T. A. Kidd, Wm. Y. 
Mills. 

No. 5, Sussex, Brockville.— W. C. Singleton, T. H. Guest, 
A. H. Gilham. 

No. 6, Barton, Hamilton.— J. W. Hamilton, W. H. Mc- 
Nairn, T. H. Riches. 

No. 7, Union, Grimsby. — G. B. Lipsett, D. Cloughley, C. 
W. Lewis. 

No. 9, Union, Napanee. — J. D. Mayhew, W. S. Herring- 
ton, C. W, Buchanan. 

No. 10, Norfolk, Simcoe. — H. P. Innes, J. Clarence King, 
H. A. Johnson, C. F. Misner, B. Pearce, W. Johnston, F. S. 
Kent, W. F. Tyrrell, W. G. Smith, J. Anguish, R. B. Kent, 
A. J. Peachy, U. C. Butler, H. L. Selby, W. C. Everett, D. 
F. Aiken, S. L. King, W. D. Stalker, H. M. Peachy, A. B. 
Jackson, C. S. Ryerse. 

No. 11, Moira, Belleville. — J. W. Cook, M. R. Anderson. 

No. 15, St. George's, St. Catharines.— C. A. Brown, W. 
E. Thompson, J. M. Shultis, C. H. Hesburn, W. P. Holmes. 

No. 16, St. Andrew's, Toronto. — G. M. McGill, B. E. 
Ekblad, W. J. Dunlop, W. F. Ronald, H. Haynes, G. A. 
Kingston, J. Pearson, A. G. Leitch, C. Howitt, L. D. Bickford, 
A. Macoomb. 

No. 17, St. John's, Cobourg.- L. E. Taylor, J. H. Ben- 
nett, C. W. Rothwell, W. S. Cooper, E. J. Wormington. 

No. 18, Prince Edward, Picton — E. Collier. 

No. 20, St. John's, London. — F. Muir, J. A. Lindsay. 

No. 21A, St. John's, Vankleek Hill.— W. R. Hall, A. D- 
MacRae. 

No. 22, King Solomon's, Toronto. — F. M. Byam, W. Daw- 
son, C. E. Elliott, A. C. Norwich, G. Hambly, H. E. Harmon, 
E. Manifold, C. B. Kay, R. A. Woodley. 

No. 23, Richmond, Richmond Hill.— A. R. Hill, H. R. 
Austin, J. E. Smith, J. R. Herrington, C. Swanson. 

No. 24, St. Francis, Smith's Falls.— J. A. Moir, R. Haw- 
kins. 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1940 11 

No. 25, Ionic, Toronto. — G. N. Hargraft, J. Q. Maunsell, 
J. A. Rowland, J. R. Roaf, F. C. Harrison. 

No 26, Ontario, Port Hope — W. A. Highfield, E. Ruth- 
ven, H. W. Mitchell, R. W. Smart, S. N. Haskill, C. E. 
Stephenson, H. Mitchell, H. G. Ballard, F. H- Batty, J. R. 
GiflFen, W. J. Wormington. 

No. 27, Strict Observance, Hamilton. — D. S. Stephens, 
T. H. McCann, L. F. Stephens, J. H. Gibson, H. W. Linton, 
W. F. Newman, J. A. Henderson, D. G. Mcllwraith. 

No. 28, Mount Zion, Kemptville.— F. Latourell. 

No. 29, United, Brighton.— G- F. Wright, C. F. Mikel. 

No. 30, Composite, Whitby.— J. M. RobUn, W. F. Harden, 
S. J. Spall, W. J. H. Richardson, J. W- Bateman, R. A. Sen- 
nett, H. L. Pringle, G. M. Goodfellow, F. T. Rowe, J. R. 
Frost. 

No. 31, Jerusalem, Bowmanville. — P. R. Cowling, G. C. 
Bonnycastle, E. Staples, J. Baker. 

No. 32, Amity, Dunnville.— O. M. Krick, J. B. Carter, 
D. Glenney, W. T. Robb, T. Camelford, J. E. Yocom, J. X. 
Allan. 

No. 33, Maitland, Goderich.— H. B. M, Tichborne, H. C. 
Dunlop, J. H. Vrooman, A. L. Cole, C. M. Robertson, W. 
Bisset. 

No. 34, Thistle, Amherstburg.— G. Somerton, C. F. 
Ayerst. 

No. 35, St. John's, Cayuga.— J. L. Mitchener, M. R. Bil- 
lings, R. H. Davey, M. H. Jarrett, W. U. Anthony. 

No. 37, King Hiram, Ingersoll. — J. A. Watmough, J. F. 
David. 

No. 38, Trent, Trenton.— E. A. Blakely, K. W. Crews. 

No. 39, Mount Zion, Brooklin.— A. J. Cook. 

No. 40, St. John's, Hamilton — C. E. Heal, E. B. Thomp- 
son, W. L. Sommerville, C. F. Marshall, W. Bailey, D. Turner. 

No. 42, St. George's, London.— H. F. Hill, L. A. Steels, 
H. Owen, S. A. Cawston, F. H. James, C. E, Ticknor, K, L. 

No. 43, King Solomon's, Woodstock. — B. R. Thomson, W. 
Graybiel, N. Weaklev, C. Blueman, F. Brabvn, J. Morris, 
T. A. Love, E. Kitchen, C. Kitching, H. B- Campbell. 

No. 44, St. Thomas, St. Thomas.— J. C. Smith, H. W. 
Scarff, T. L- Cochrane, J. H. Clinton, F. R. Palmer. 

No. 45, Brant, Brantford.— C. L. Gamble, S. W. Wilson, 
G. A. Bowden, R. W. E. McFadden. 

No. 46, Wellington, Chatham — H. D. Paulucci, R. J. 
Sanderson, W. J. McCall, W. A. Stewart, N. S. Mahon, J. A. 
McCallum. 

No. 47, Great Western, Windsor. — H. H. Amsden, H- G. 
Crouchman, A. R. Bourne, J. F. Reid, G. H. Arnott, T. 
Burton. 

No. 52, Dalhousie, Ottawa.— J. W. Tuck, C. M. Pitts, 
A. D. Flack. 



12 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

No. 54, Vaughan, Maple.— R. A. Bigford, H. D. Mc- 
Donald, M. J. Kinnie, I. B. Musselman, A. G. Jones, J. A. 
Rose, J. S. Kinnie, C. H. Bowman, N. J. McDonald, A. 
Cameron, N. Kerr, A. Wilson, E. A. Carson, J. B. McLean, 
M. Palmer, G. Brownlee, M. McDonald. 

No. 55, Merrickville, Merrickville. — F. W. C. Jackson, 
J. H. Kidd. 

No. 56, Victoria, Sarnia. — A. W. Waters, W. S. Gibson. 

No. 57, Harmony, Binbrook. — W. J. Harris, A. Hill- 
gartner, J. Forth- 

No. 58, Doric, Ottawa. — F. B. Dunn, J. A. Hocking. 

No. 61, Acacia, Hamilton.— V. N. Ames, W. H. Ward- 
rope, C E. Kelly, T. H. Simpson, G. F. Clark, W. D. Connor, 
W. M. Shaw, B. C. Beasley, E. K. Buckingham, R. E. 
Clemens, R. W. Treleaven, H. Hazell, E. A. Bottrill, J. H- 
Percy, A. N. Hill, J. Forth, A. Lavis, F. W. Davidson, S. 
Davidson, J. F- Walker, H. W. Temple, C. H. Knights, J. F. 
McDonald, C. H. Nix. 

No. 62, St. Andrew's, Caledonia.— T. J. Hicks. 

No. 64, Kilwinning, London. — R. W. Bedggood, W- L. 
Smith, E. C. Smith, A. D. Hodgins, W. Lancaster, J. T. May, 
W. G. Doidge, W. E. Summers, G. H. Martin. 

No. 65, Rehoboam, Toronto. — F. R. Workman, L. B. 
Allan, W. H. Smith, F. H. England, J. A. Troyer, J. O'Connor, 
G. W. Slack, S. J. Lane, W. J. S. Graham, A. L. Gallow, 
H. D. Bradley, F. W. Spry, R. W. Clewlo. 

No. 66, Durham, Newcastle. — C. M. Jones, L. Gaines, 
H. J. Toms, G. Gaines, F. Graham, D. V. H. Gibson, T. W. 
Jackson, F. Couch. 

No. 68, St. John's, Ingersoll.— E. G. Wilson, F. M. Smith, 
G. H. Allen. 

No. 69, Stirling, Stirling. — H. R. Tompkins, T. W. 
Solmes, P. C. McGuire. 

No, 72, Alma, Gait. — O. Rosebrugh, J. L. Daniel, A. L. 
Bennett, A. R. McFadyen. 

No. 73, St. James, St. Mary's.— D. C. White, A. G. Kir- 
stine, G. Glover, P. T. Coupland, J. W. Durr. 

No. 74, St. James, South Augusta. — E. C- McDougall. 

No. 75, St. John's, Toronto.— C. S. Jackman, D. F, Jack- 
son, E. J. Hicks, John Rogerson, E. S- Calder, J. W. Brader, 
R. R. Davis, A. L. Hayes, H. S. King, E. P. Smith, R. T. 
Hogg, P. H. Burt, C. F. Boddy. 

No. 76, Oxford, Woodstock. — D. MacDonald, E. E. 
Dougall, S. H. Black, A. W. Cole. 

No. 77, Faithful Brethren, Lindsay. — D. M. Quarrie, C. 
H. Heels, H. S. Johnston. 

No. 78, King Hiram, Tillsonburg.— W. D. Agur, C. E. 
Brown, W. H. Gibson, W. W. McGuire, G. G. Hollier, R. C. 
Crandall, T. L. Armstrong, A. L. Baker, C. S. Hogarth, G. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 13 

H. Hollier, T. W. R. Taylor, T. R. Winter, H. F. Johnston, 
S. Buckrell, R. E. Weston, S. G. Vance, W. H. Lindsey, R. 
A. McQueen, H. J. Alexander, D. F. Gibson. 

No. 79, Simcoe, Bradford — M. Bemrose, J. F. Hambly, 
C. C. Willson, A. V/. Spence, R. E. Bell. 

No. 82, St. John's, Paris.— H. K. Wheeler, M. C Hawley, 
H. Frosch. 

No. 83, Beaver, Strathroy.— J. T. Crawford, D. L. Craw- 
ford, I. L. Morgan. 

No. 84, Clinton, Clinton.— H. P. Plumsteel, A. C. Clark- 
son, G. H. Jefferson, 

No. 85, Rising Sun, Athens.— A. W. Reid. 
No. 86, Wilson, Toronto.- W. D. Proctor, P. G. Pickett, 
W. A, Drummond, J. L. Rook, C. Cook, H- Minchinton, W. 
V. McCIure, D. Maxwell, C. Spanner, A. L. Tinker, E. A. 
Lewis. 

No. 87, Markham Union, Markham- — M. Russell, T. 
Harding, G. C. Murphy, J. R. Smith, H. Warriner, J. W. 
Warriner. 

No. 88, St. George's, Owen Sound.— H. W. Dane, R. S- 
Browne, C. E. Chisholm, F. Robertson. 

No. 90, Manito, CoUingwood. — J. Bull, A. W. Lawrence- 
No. 91, Colborne, Colborne.— W. R. Baxter, W. W. Ives, 
A. Wolfraim, G. A. Brown. 

No. 92, Cataraqui, Kingston. — R. J. Pindred, Wm. Chap- 
man. 

No. 93, Northern Light, Kincardine. — J. A. Reynolds, 
J. R. MacKay. 

No. 94, St. Mark's, Port Stanley. — A. W. Ney, J. H. 
Burke. 

No. 96, Corinthian, Barrie. — H. J. Lougheed, D. Gauley, 
W. F. Ronald, J. F. Nelles. 

No. 97, Sharon, Queensville. — R. Cunningham, P. W. 
Mahoney. 

No. 98, True Blue, Bolton. — J. C. Goodfellow, C. A. 
Leggett, F. J. Henderson, W- H. Noble. 

No. 99, Tuscan, Newmarket.— C. Bovair, A. Mills, M. T. 
Moorley, J. 0. Little. 

No. 100, Valley, Dundas.— S. M- Hughes, W. J. Mulligan, 
W. H. McNairn, O. L. Ofield, A. N. Hill. 

No. 101, Corinthian, Peterborough.— C. A. Sollitt, R. F. 
Downey. 

No. 103, Maple Leaf, St. Catharines— J. Thomson, W. 
J. Davidson, A. J. Killop, R. G. Winter, W. H. Heisey, D. A. 
Robson. 

No. 104, St. John's, Norwich. — C. Culver, A. B. Arn, G. 
Young, G. W. Poldon, R. Warren. 

No 10.5, St. Mark's, Niagara Falls.— E. Hollinshead, W. 
B. MacCarthy, W. C. Pretty, C. L. Leys, B. F. Hetherington. 



14 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

No. 106, Burford, Burford. — R. O. Lawden, L. Bonney, 

F. F. Balsdon, A. Campbell. 

No. 107, St. Paul's, Lambeth — 0. Dale, G. Dickson, W. 
D. Love, W. Anguish, V. Joiner. 

No. 108, Blenheim, Princeton. — A. E. Evans, B. J. Force, 
H. D. Wight, H. Banbury. 

No. 109, Albion, Harrowsmith. — C. A. Copp. 

No. 110, Central, Prescott.— W. G. Webb. 

No. 113, Wilson, Wat«rford.— G- A. Allan, R. K. Robin- 
son. 

No. 114, Hope, Port Hope.— L. Watson, B. Hynes, W. 
Dear, G. Garnett, J. T. George, H. J. Tozer, T. Hutchings, 

G. Taylor, F. R. O'Neill, C. S. Hamley. 

No. 11.5, Ivy, Beamsville.— M. Mowat, W. H. G. Wilt- 
shire, A. J. Trevelyan, A. H. Taylor, S. Wood, H. H. Tuflford, 
H. Prudhomme, S- J. Wilson, F. Barraclough, W. D. Fair- 
brother, L. Lindner, L. E. Hippie, C. Stouck, S. F. Russ, H. 
Taylor, E. Gulp, F. J. Thompson, F. S. Prudhomme, N. D. 
Miller. 

No. 116, Cassia, Thedford.— G. Hamilton, A. Flynn, R. 
P. Bass, L. E. Davidson, J. D. Morrison. 

No. 118, Union, Schomberg. — H. N. Wauchope, J. Hart, 
W. B. Carr, R. W. Stewart, A. H. MacLeod. 

No. 120, Warren, Fingal.— E. S. Down, C. P. Silcox, P. 
S. Croft, R. A. Tufford, E. Hagerty, D. B. McPherson, A. A. 
Silcox, C. C. Minor, E. C. Moore, S. Gunning, W. A- Braddon, 

No. 121, Doric, Brantford.— W. McHutchion, H. S. Tap- 
scott, W. W. Linscott, H. S. Liittich, J. P. Temple. 

No. 122, Renfrew, Renfrew. — J. Conley. 

No. 123, Belleville, Belleville. — E. S. Fairman, C. W. 
Bird, W. D. Embury, C. D- Crosby, A. L. Hill, L Stephenson, 
J. Noakes, W. 0. Adams, C. H. MacDonald, F. Chapman, 

No. 125, Cornwall, Cornwall.— H. G. Williams- 

No. 126, Golden Rule, Campbellford.— S. W. Clegg, F. 
F. Long. 

No. 127, Franck, Frankford.— K. A. Faul, G. D. Wright, 
C. H. Ketcheson. 

No. 128, Pembroke, Pembroke.— A. Collins, V. E. Ives, 
A. Morris. 

No. 129, Rising S,un, Aurora — F. Butler, J. G. McDonald, 
F. W. Teasdale. 

No. 131, St. Lawrence, Southampton.- A. M. C. Wells, 
T. W. Darlington. 

No. 133, Lebanon Forest, Exeter. — C. Tanton. 

No. 135, St. Clair, Milton.— R. H. Philip. 

No, 136, Richardson, StouffviHe. — H. Sanders, M. Symes, 
K. R. Davis, 0. M. Madill, R. Yake, N. M. McLean, D. Mc- 
Donald, W. Griffiths, J. W. Ratcliffe, A. V. Nolan, J. Borin- 
sky, H. Slack. 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1940 15 

No. 137, Pythagoras, Meaford. — C. E. Brown, M. E. 
Peacock, J. N. Marshall. 

No. 139, Lebanon, Oshawa — G. H. Lander, H. Flintoff, 
H. A. Suddard. 

No. 140, Malahide, Aylmer.— S. E. Clarke. 

No. 143, Friendly Brothers, Iroquois. — I. Payne. 

No. 144, Tecumseh, Stratford.— G. S. Todd, R. Davies, 
F. A. Copus, S. W. Rust. 

No. 145, J. B. Hall, Millbrook — C. Thorndyke. 

No. 147, Mississippi, Almonte. — J. L. Joss. 

No. 148, Civil Service, Ottawa. — J. C. Browne. 

No. 149, Erie, Port Dover.— P. Brock, O. Charlton, J. C. 
King, E. M. Jaques, S. H. Moi-ris, M. MacDonald, J. C. King, 
W. J. Wamsley, T. B. Barrett, D. J. Cornish, W- A. Ferguson, 
S. A. Tuple, W. E. Cruise. 

No. 151. Grand River, Kitchener. — A. J. Carse, E. D. 
Cunningham. 

No. 154, Irving, Lucan. — E. Dundas, J. C. Murdy, D. 
Banting, D. E. Chown. 

Nq. 155, Peterborough, Peterborough. — C. H. Elliott. 

No. 156, York, Toronto.— C. Scott, F. 0. Gallagher, H. 
Gray, J. P. Maher, W. E. Hofland, W. A. Jamie?on, R. V. 
Harper, G. E. Rennie, G. Moir, R. Ferguson, A. Paton, B. 
Logie, W. A. Irv/in, A. B. Dalby, H. Jennings, E. A. Hor.-^- 
will, J. E. Dundas, J. D. MacGregor, W. H. Cochrane. 

No. 157, Simpson, Newboro. — F. Simmons, H. G. Shel- 
don, J. Simmons. 

No. 158, Alexandra, Oil Springs. — D. Turner. 

No. 159, Goodwood, Richmond. — J. W. Gamble. 

No. 161, Percy, Warkworth. — L. Darling. 

No. 162, Forest, Wroxeter.— E. Whitfield, C. Michel, J. 
H. Wylie. 

No. 164, Star in the East, Wellington.— D. H. Macdonald, 
H. McCartney, N. A. Tice. 

No. 165, Burlington, Burlington. — F. Virtue, J. A. Lind- 
ley, W. Wiggins, H. A. Graham, W. R. Leckie. 

No. 166, Wentworth, Stoney Creek.— J. A. Millen, W- S. 
Milmine, H. C. Freel. 

No. 168, Merritt, Welland.— L. R. Brennan, G. K- Brown, 
J. R. Scott. 

No. 169, Macnab, Port Colborne. — J. L. Stokes, J. S. 
Allen, D. C. Butcher, C. F. Rogers, J. R. Tuck, C. J. Augus- 
tine, D. McCracken, S. M. Young, C. Furry, M. J. Burden, J. 
Cuthbert. 

No. 170, Britannia, Seaforth.— W. A. Wright, R. Scott, 
G. D. Ferguson, C. Holmes. 

No. 171, Prince of Wales, lona Sta.— C. F. Reicheld, N. 
M. Morris, R. G. Little. 



16 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

No. 172, Ayr, Ayr.— J. D. Patterson, W. Woolner, G. S. 
Dalrymple. 

No. 174, Walsingham, Port Rowan.— H. C. linger, F. S. 
Newman, G. Brownlee, C. F. Luckman, D. A. Archibald, J. 
E. Biddle, F- E. Mason, H. R. Simes, R. C. Biddle, J. H. 
Anderson, W. Hunter, H. Boughner. 

No. 177, Builders, Ottawa. — A. Pepper, H. M. Herbst, 
D. A. Esdale, R. M. Stanton, T. H. Mansell, J. S. Nicholson, 
A. H. McKee, J. A. Dobbie. 

No. 178, Plattsville, PlattsviUe.— J. Bristow. 

No. 180, Speed, Guelph.— J. F. Heap, J. W. Mahaffey, 
A. H. Parker, W. J. Elliott, A. R. Rundle, W. G. Moore, T. A. 
Green, G. Fairley, E. G. Hayward, L. Wood, A. K. Clough, 

C. F. Griffenham, D. W. Bain, J. Goulden, J. Gould, E. R. 
Flewelling, J. MacCallum. 

No. 181, Oriental, Port Burwell.— R. W. James, H. Drew, 
A. J. Bodsworth. 

No. 184, Old Light, Lucknow.— 0. Crawford. 

No. 190, Belmont, Belmont. — C. Cousins, L. W. Steven- 
son, J. Ferguson, C. A. Campbell, E. E. George, F. Taylor, 

D. A. Ferguson, A. H. Welden, G. W- Church. 

No 192, Orillia, Orillia.— F. F. Eddington, C. E. Robert- 
son, M. Baird, N. R. Doolittle, W. Calvert, J. H. Haywood, 

E. E. Steacy, W. J. Boyle, R. J. Miller, H. R. Tudhope, A. 
McClellan, A. H. MacLean, G- C. Brown. 

No. 193, Scotland, Scotland.— W. R. Anderson. 

No. 194, Petrolia, Petrolia.— C. Goldsmith, W. T, Pauling, 
J. L. Williams. 

No. 195, Tuscan, London.— J. H. Gillies, N. C. Hart, H. 
W. Scarff, P. W. D. Broderick, H. C. McBride, T C. Benson, 
J. A. Gunton. 

No. 197 Saugeen, Walkerton.— E. H. Truax, W. A. Clark, 

F. B. James, A. E. Donald. 

No. 200, St. Alban's Mount Forest.— A. W. Perry. 

No. 201, Leeds, Gananoque. — J. D. Carmichael. 

No. 20.3, Irvine, Flora.- T. C. Wardley. 

No. 205, New Dominion, New Hamburg. — T. H. Peine, 
D. Eby, C. Ingold. 

No. 209, Evergreen, Lanark. — C. M. Forbes, H. C. 
Vaughan. 

No. 209a, St. John's, London. — J. G. Copeland, J. B. 
Smith, S. J. Martin, E. Smith, C. J. Atkins. G. F. Kingsmill, 
S. S. Hudgell, A. J. Smith, A. E. Santo, C. E. White, W. W. 
Scott, F. M. Clatworthy, R. J. Cushman. 

No, 215, Lake, Ameliasburg. — B- Redner. 

No. 216, Harris, Orangeville. — F. A. Kingshott, G. M. 
Fitzgerald, C. R. McKeown, J. A. Preston, A. H. Woodland, 
W. T. Robb, T. S. Parkinson, J. E. Smith, W. J. Price, J. M. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 17 

Aiken, J. T. Thomas, H. P. Darraugh, C- B. Gillespie, E. H. 
Sproule. 

No. 217, Frederick, Delhi.— J. W. Barnard, G. G. Kent, 
W. E. Sutherland. 

No. 218, Stevenson, Toronto. — N. Sandham, R. Compton, 

C. E. Woodstock, E. G. Hubbert, W. D. Sprinks, W. R. Kent, 
R. W. Hamilton, C. L. Johnston, A. J. Masson, W. W. 
Bamlett. 

No. 219, Credit, Georgetown. — S. Kirk. 
No. 220, Zeredatha, Uxbridge. — H. V. Watson, V. M. 
Hare, C. A. E. Wass, C. Feasby. 

No. 221, Mountain, Thorold.— W. W. MacDonald, J. D. 
Mable, 0- R. Steadman, N. Bye. 

No. 222, Marmora, Marmora. — W. L. Rundle, C. H. 
Buskard. 

No. 223, Norwood, Norwood. — G. R. Baker, D. H. Craig- 
head. 

No. 224, Huron, Hensall.— D. E. Kyle, J. P. Bowey, T. 
Chapman. 

No. 225, Bernard, Listowel. — F. P. Anderson, J. H. 
Blackmore, W. A. Johnston. 

No. 229, Ionic, Brampton. — A. McCieave, C. Allan, J. N. 
Moore, E. A. Hay, H. A. Wilson, 0. T. Walker, R. V. Conover. 

No. 230, Kerr, Barrie— R. W. Stewart, A. E. Stone, M. 
A. Adamson. 

No. 231, Fidelity, Ottawa. — R. Wilson, F. C. Horton, 
F. W. Smith, R. McElroy. 

No. 232, Cameron, Button.— W. Bobier, C. W. Buchanan, 
A. E. Roberts, H. Hockin, S. Howell, J. U. Brown, J. H. 
Ford, H. McCallum, J. E. Trothen, J. Bennett, M- S. Claus, 

D. J. Galbraith, J. G. McKellar, P. Lo^e, W. C. Morrish, A. 
T. McCallum, K. Campbell, M- Smith. 

No. 233, Doric, Parkhill.— G. A. Ronson, W. A. Suther- 
land, J. F. Gillies. 

No. 23.5, Aldworth, Paisley. — C. A. Eraser, W. Hopper, 
J. B. McKav, G. R. Grant. S. T. Ballachey, S. M. Hutcheson, 
J. Pace, A. McDonald, W. McKelvey, E. W. Grant, D. D. 
Campbell, J. A. Logie, J. E. Gumming, T. E. Rushton, J. D. 
Potts. 

No. 236, Manitoba, Cookstown.— T- Banting, F. Welch, 
T. Robinson, E. Morrison, I. Maw\ 

No. 237, Vienna, Vienna. — L. Walsh, A. Bartlett, P. 
Williams, J. L. Stansell, H. P. Grant, W. G. Mitchell, C. D. 
Coyle, E. Davidson, H. A. Ostrander, C. C. Beesley, G. Vallee. 

No. 238, Havelock, Watford.— W. Miller, M. Menzies, P. 
S. Kingston, A- Parker, N. Hawn. 

No. 239, Tweed, Tweed.— G. H. Cotton, T. S. McCrea, 
T. E. Rath. 



18 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

No. 242, Macoy, Mallorytown.— H. L. Scott, K. J. Big- 
ford. 

No. 243, St. George, St. George. — W. D. Taylor B. 
Stobbs, J. McNeilly. 

No. 245, Tecumseh, Thamesville. — M. F. Gillespie, E. 
Worth, J. H. Childs, D. M. Winter, G. Eobertson, P. Cameron, 
A. Graham, W. J. Challis, H. D. Atkinson, A. P. Hopper, W. 

E. Hopper, W. S. Montgomery, C. G. Shaw, J. M. Coutts. 

No. 247, Ashlar, Toronto.— A. J. Algate, P. F. Wayman, 
C. S. Hamilton, V. Boyd, W. H. Lyon, G. S. Pearcy, H. C 
Davies, E. W. R. Saunders, M. J. MacPherson, A. Dawson, 
J McKnight, T. H. Best, A. N. Mcintosh, F. J. Coombs, L. 

F. Riggs, W. D. Greer, L. A. Winter, J. F. Stewart, T. K. 
Wade. 

No. 249, Caledonian, Midland.— A. G. Sweeting, E. M. 
Soden, J. J. Robins, J. S. McDowell, J. Coburn. 

No. 250, Thistle, Embro.— L. Thomson, H. B. Atkinson, 
J. Kennedy, J. French, 0. H. Murray, N. McLeod. 

No. 253, Minden, Kingston. — J. S. Duncombe, E. V. 
Elliott, R. S. Graham. 

No. 254, Clifton, Niagara Falls. — J. C. Rowley, F. S. 
Lane, C. S. Warren, F. Want, H. A. Marquis, C. K. Pearson, 

F. W. Gregory. 

No. 255, Sydenham, Dresden. — T. Tiffin, F. Craig, S. 
Duddy, W. H. Hopper, R. R. Dusten, E. R. Paling, F. 
Abraham. 

No. 257, Gait, Gait. — A. H. Kruse, C. H. Smith, J. S. 
McGaw, R. D. Law, J. W. McKellar, W. Dryden, R. Clark, 
J. Weepers, H. A. Hannam, J. H- Cowan, J. J. McCartney, 
W. L. McGill. 

No. 258, Guelph, Guelph.— E. Denver, H. A. Hignell, W. 

G. Kitchen, C. Penfold, S. S. Royce, W. G. Tharby, F. H. 
Cooke, W. Lodge, P. D. Hill, C. Wilson, F. F. Sweetman, R. 
M. Finlay, W. A. Mahoney, W. W. P. Colwill. 

No. 259, Springfield, Springfield. — J. W. Green, J. C. 
Dance. 

No. 260, Washington, Petrolia.— G. Scott. 

No. 261, Oak Branch, Innerkip. — G. A. Smith, W. E. 
Thompson. 

No. 262, Harriston, Harriston. — R. Bradley. 

No. 263, Forest, Forest.— D. S. Whyte, W. T. Braun, C. 
M. McFarlane, E. Roberts. 

No. 264, Chaudiere, Ottawa. — J. G. Stewart, J. Mc- 
Culloch. 

No. 265, Patterson, Thornhill. — J. J. Madill, J. A. 
Thompson, P. T. Drake, S. Davis, E- Brown, A. L. Francis, 
N. McDonald, J. E. Francis, C. P. Hills, T. R. Johnston, S. 
H. R. Jarrett, S. Allsopp, H. S. Sparks, G. Robinson. 

No. 266, Northern Light, Stayner. — W. A. Blackburn, 
R, E. Ives, G. A. Clemence. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 19 

No. 267, Parthenon, Chatham.— F. Bowers, P. V. Patten, 
A. Illman, J. M. Reid, J. T. Crouch, W. R. Coltart, C. A. 
Lister, J. W, Plewes, J. W. Draper, J. A. Miller, J. G. 
Robinson. 

No. 269, Brougham Union, Claremount. — H. G. Michell, 
T. C. Brown, R. E. Forsyth, J. McGrath, H. Pugh. 

No 270, Cedar, Oshawa.— N. H. Ashley, W. Deans, E. 
F. Farrow, B. S. Edmondson, N. J. McDougall, P. H. Jobb, 
R. Meek. 

No. 272, Seymoiur, Ancaster. — R. Johnston, J. G. Coch- 
rane. 

No. 276, Teeswater, Teeswater. — G. Dickinson, R. 
Thompson, J. W. Ross, G. Melvin, R. C. Thompson, W. Barber. 
No. 277, Seymour, Port Dalhousie. — T. 0. Johnston, A R. 
McDonald, J, S. Bowman, R. H. Johnston. 

No. 283, Eureka, Belleville. — M. R. Davidson, F. D. 
Diamond, R. D. Adams. 

No. 284, St. John's Brussels.— S. Wilton, A. E. Martin, 

No. 28.5, Seven Star, Alliston. — P. N. Knight, G, F. 
Crosbie, E. Skelton, W. M. Lee, J. J. E. McCague. 

No. 286, Wingham, Wingham. — A. B. Mitchell, R. C. 
Redmond, W. H. Phair, F. W. Spry, W. J. Adams, T. W. 
Booth, A Reid, W. VanWyck, F. C. Fuller. 

No 287, Shuniah, Port Arthur.— H. J. Good, A. P. Freed, 
0. F. Young. 

No. 289, Doric, Lobo. — G. H. R. Seaman, A. C Ferguson, 
N. P. Campbell, G. E. Hicks, W. Vail- 

No. 290, Leamington, Leamington. — G. Reh, F. Moore, 
L. M. Malott, H. F. Mclntyre, J. T. Murtie, E. Russelo, L. 
V. Kennedy, B. E. Ellis, A. Bunn, L. Esson, L. Jeffrey, W. 
J. Marriott, W. Plumb, T- Maidens, C. Ferguson, W. S. Set- 
terington. 

No. 291, Dufferin, West Flamboro.— D. W. Dunkin, W. 
J. Stutt. 

No. 292, Robertson, King. — R. Hollingsworth, F. E. 
Boys. 

No. 294, Moore, Courtright. — E. G. Kremer. 

No. 295, Conestogo, Drayton. — J. W. Stewart. 

No, 296, Temple, St. Catharines. — A. L. McPhail, F. 
Parker. J. Backus, W. J. Vickers, E. MacLean, R. Aitken, 
A. C. Hoople, J. C. Laughlin, F. L. Hefler. 

No. 297, Preston, Preston. — C. Schniiedendorf , E. Tailby, 
H. L. Clare, G. V. Hilborn. 

No. 300, Mount Olivet, Thorndale.— H. Henshaw, W. J. 
Ellis. 

No. 302, St. David's, St. Thomas. — M. Penhale, G. F. 
Young, C. E. Ashbury, L. N. Lane, W. Swindells, P R. Locke, 
K. S. Woodward. 



20 GRAND L0D(;E OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

No, 304, Minerva, Stroud. — E. Carr, H. Kelcey, 0. R. 
Black, O. Todd. 

No. 305, Humber, Westion.— J. A. Russen, E. E. Watts, 
A. D. Polworth, H. J. Alexander, A. E. Scythes, J. W. Duke, 
H. G. S. Jeffrey, C. E. Webster, T. R. Simpson. 

No. 306, Durham, Durham.— C. M. Steinacher, R. W. F. 
Hughes, D. W. McClure, G. C. Webster. 

No. 307, Arkona, Arkona. — R.R. Crawford, C. McLeish, 
R. E. Wilson, R. G. Woods, G. W. Robinson. 

No. 309, Morning Star, Carlow. — F. Mcllwain, D. W. 
Green, T. Wilson, R. D. Munro, J. J. Robertson. 

No. 311, Blackwood, Woodbridge. — R. Barker, S. Mc- 
Clure, G. L. McGillivray. 

No. 312, Pnyx, Wallaceburg. — C. S. Lawrence. 

No. 313, Clementi, Lakefield. — R. Bullock, D. H. Web- 
ster, A. H. Clark. 

No. 314, Blair, Palmerston. — J. F. Edwards, W. T. 
Brown, W. Wells. 

No. 315, Clifford, Clifford.— C. Stroh. 

No. 316, Doric, Toronto.— H. C. Ness, H. J. Ragen, W. 
F. Newell, R. H. Dee, C. Allen, C. H. B. Johnson, T. G. 
Waters, G. A. Glover, F. T. Bryers. 

No. 319, Hiram, Hagersville.— N. C. Colbert, 0. C. Dell, 
C. S. Graham. 

No. 320, Chesterville, Chesterville. — A. S. Morrison. 

No. 321, Walker, Acton.— R. P. Watson, R. J. McArthur, 
J. A. Leslie, F. Mcintosh, W. H. Hortop, R. M. McDonald, 
R. A. Winton. 

No. 322, North Star, Owen Sound.— R. T. Rowe, W. M. 
Morrow, W. B. Phillips. 

No. 323, Alvinston, Alvinston. — P. A. Barber. 

No. 324, Temple, Hamilton.— A. G. McLeish, C. C. Ash- 
croft, J. W. Bell, C. L. Mills. 

No, 325, Orono, Orono.— E. J. Hamm, 0. W. Rolph, R. 
R. Waddell, E. G. Power, S. E. Allin, E. E. Patterson, N, 
Winter, C. Billings, R. E. Logan. 

No, 326, Zetland, Toronto.— R. V. Millar, H. V. Hearst, 
H. J. H. Deedman, J. C. Greig, F. S. McLean, A. Stewart, 
T. H. Riches. 

No. 327, Hammond, WardsviUe. — F. Haggitt, E. G. 
Lomas. 

No. 328, Ionic, Napier. — E. W. Denning, A. Such, S. 
Rowe, E. C. Freer, A. Richardson, L. Richardson, T. E. 
Bogue, R. Quick, A. E. Field, J. Richardson, F. Richardson. 

No, 329, King Solomon's, Jarvis, — J. B. Castles, L. L. 
McBride, A. Booth. 

No, 330, Corinthian, London, — J. R. Kilpatrick, J. Her- 
riot, E. G. Menzie, J. Ferguson, R. Warren, W. E. Bradt, 
F, G. Tulett, J. Mills. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 21 

No. 331, Fordwich, Fordwich.— R. W. N. Wade. 
No. 332, Stratford, Stratford. — A. G. Osborne, E. 
Denroche. 

No. 333, Prince Arthur, Flesherton. — H. Corbett, W. 
Walker, F. H. W. Hickling, J. E. Milne, W. G. McBride, 

No. 334, Prince Arthur, Arthur. — C. T. White, S. L. 
Small, W. C. Drury, A. L. Finder, T. Wilson, W. S. Stuckey. 

No. 336, Highgate, Highgate. — C. Teetzel, R. C. Mc- 
Cutcheon. 

No. 337, Myrtle, Port Robinson.— R. R. Camp, S. L. W. 
Harton, C. S. Ross, W. B. Biggar. 

No. 338, Duflferin, Wellandport. — C. Gilmore, W. T. 
Fralick, F. Donovan. 

No. 339, Orient, Toronto.— G. B. Craigie, M. Macfarlane, 

F. A. Gibbons, H. M. Alchin, W. J. Cordell, J. Gallaher, B. 
T. Smith, J. J. Cairns, W. 0. Matthews, H. W. Pierce, P. C. 
Werthner. 

No. 343, Georgina, Toronto. — F. E. Burroughes, A. 
Hulme, R. J. Haviland, J. H. Kent, E. H. Stanvers, R. W. 
Davies, R. B. Fowler, A. H. Downs, S. S. Crouch, J. Curtis, 
R. C. Berkinshav/, E. G. Hodgson, W. R. Madill, H. F. E. 
Kent. 

No. 344, Merrill, Dorchester Sta. — W. A. Barr, N. 
Sauter, P. V. Hale, C. Hunt, C. Shields, J. Knight, J. Morris. 

No. 345, Nilestown, Nilestown. — T. W. Dickenson, J. F. 
Johnston, W. R. Smale, M. L. Lansdale, T. Beattie, G. H. 
Martin. 

No. 346, Occident, Toronto. — W. J. McCahon, J. W. 
Laing, A. G. Greenwood, J. T. Berry, J. D. Cooke, W. Wil- 
liams, A. C. Knox, J. Howlett, A. E. Powell, J. T. Dempster, 
T. W. Horn, W. S. Leach, I. Johnson, M. F. Smeall, J. E. 
Collict, W. J. A. Lake, S. E. Solley, J. H. Murray, C. S. 
Hall, A. Mason. 

No. 347, Mercer, Fergus.— W. B. Young, W. B. Mitchell, 
W. R. Gow, L. L Smith. 

No. 348, Georgian, Penetanguishene. — W. B. Armstrong, 

G. Robinson, N. J. MacMillan, W. R. Benson, R. T. C. Dwelly, 
R. D. Keefe, G. Todd, J. J. O'Hara, B. A. Blackwell, R. R. 
Trustham, A. J. Richardson, A. J. Hurdle. 

No. 352, Granite, Parry Sound. — A. M. Brown. 

No. 354, Brock, Cannington. — F. H- Hinchley. 

No. 356, River Park, Streetsville.— A. B. Quennell, T. 
D. Jones, Russell Langmaid, A. L. Couse. 

No. 357, Waterdown, Millgrove — J. C. Sanderson, W. F. 
Douglas, J. R. Nicol. 

No. 358, Delaware Valley, Delaware. — Geo. Bancroft, 
R. A. Campbell, Geo. Hedley, H. Lipsitt, C. Hutton, W. Jones. 

No. 359, Vittoria, Vittoria. — Leslie Adams, Wm. Mitchell, 
Thos. Sinclair, T. P. Pope, R. W. McColl, J. H. Lawrence, 
H. A. Reeves. 



22 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

No. 360, Muskoka, Bracebridge. — N. E. Prouse, H. C. 
Budd, J. H. Hines. 

No. 361, Waverley, Guelph, — M. J. Rudell, E. S. Bur- 
rows, J. Naismith, Alex. Jaffray, Wm. Templeman, H. :-. 
Cosford, B. G. Gummer, G- H. Weber, J. F. Marr, R. G. 
Stephens, R. Keegan, R. S. Cull, A. M. Ogg, A. W. Baker, 
J. C. McGregor, W. D. S. Cross, J. D. McArthur. 

No. 362, Maple Leaf, Tara.— H. A. Collins Wm. Colling, 
R. M. Young, E. J. Madill, C. B. Grant, W. A. Dalgarno. 

No. 364, Dufiferin, Melbourne. — J. C. McLean, Russell 
Roemmele, Sam Acton, J. A. McGugan, N. L. Okie, J. S. 
Campbell, J. F. Cass, Chas. Adams, J. L. Stephenson, D. L. 
McGugan. 

No. 367, St. George, Toronto. — P. H. Morley, A. R. 
Carrothers, R. B. Dargavel, H. E. Richmond, A. J. Saunders, 
E. R. Shaw, J. Reid, Sr., T. A. Wilson, D. J. Dixon, J. H. 
Wilkinson, W. F. Damp, W. J. Damp, Tom Griflfiths, J. T- 
Gilchrist, J. A. Steven. 

No. 368, Salem, Brockville.— T. S. Young. 

No. 369, Mimico, Lambton Mills. — K. C. Siddall, John 
Kendall, W. P. Gray, A. B. Rice, E. D. Bull, J. A. Moran. 

No. 370, Harmony, Delta.— A. L. Campbell. 

No. 371. Prince of Wales, Ottawa.— H. J. Sykes, C. R. 
Hickman, F. H. Connett 

No. 372, Palmer, Port Erie North.— Erie Cornell, F. J. 
Conely. 

No. 373, Copestone, Welland.— C. Cohen, Boyd Daniel, 
A. Allan, F. E. Watt, J. Mcllvride, A. N. Tattersall, P. 
Carnochan, D. McGruer, C. Smith, T. W. Houtby. 

No. 375, Lome, Omemee. — L. R. McQuade, W. Greig. 

No. 376, Unity, Huntsville.— S. G. Avery, G. R. Booth, 
J. D. MacDonald. 

No. 377, Lome, Shelburne. — Sam Patterson, T. F. 
Brown, J. A. Hughes, Edgar Patterson, E. M. Wansbrough, 
J. W. Fleck, A. H. Jelly, R. A. Lavertv, T. E. Ferguson, G. 
E. Foster, J. H. Zim, J. C. Stoddart, J. R. Berwick, S. A. 
McKelvie, M. C- Crawford. 

No. 378, King Solomon's, London.— R. S. McLeod, Jas. 
White, E. Thomson, A. L. Simmie, Jos. McDougall, W. H. 
Slade. 

No. 379, Middlesex, Bryanston. — D. S. Aitken, B. 
Donaldson, E. R. O'Neil, L. Ironside, L. G. Lambourn, W. 
Pattison, G. Kinney, C. Dann, C. W. Gloyne. 

No. 380, Union, London.— C T. Bailey, A. Utting, J. W. 

Carson, A. C. Flowers, M. H. Burns, F. J. Delaney, H. Shill, 
W. E. Rider, C. J. Hill, E. T. Read, H. E. Livermore, W. M. 
Legg, A. M. Legg, W. E. Holland, R. E. Tillson. 

No. 382, Doric, Hamilton.— W- H. Wallace, A. E. Mc- 
Arthur, C. B. Webber, L. P. Robertson, E. E. Walker, J. W. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 23 

Watters, W. A. Weir, G. A. McCulloch, R. C. Mills, W. J. 
McQueen, G. Perry, G. J. McQueen, 

No. 383, Henderson, Winchester.— H. L. Flora. 

No. 384, Alpha, Toronto — Harry Burridge, H. R. Ken- 
nedy, H. A. Targis, J. Black, W. R. Ledger, J. A. Eyre, A. 
W. Ward, W. G. Salter, M. A. Searle, W. H. Price, R. N. 
McElhinney, P. W. Roger, J. Dorricott, W. Moull, F. C. 
Gullen. 

No. 385, Spry, Beeton.— W. H. D. Robinson, J. R. Croft, 
Dr. F. Spearing, S. R. McKelvey. 

No. 386, McColl, West Lome. — F. G. Balsdon, A. 
P. Petherick, A. J. DeLong, J. L. Atkinson, H. F. Ripley. 

No. 388, Henderson, Ilderton.— J. C. McNair, R. A. W. 
Carter, J. H. Whealen, B. R. Clemance, W E. Martin, J. E. 
Robson. 

No. 389, Crystal Fountain, North Augusta. — W. L. 
Beaton, M. R. Hough. 

No. 390, Florence, Florence. — Lawrence Wilcox, Stanley 
Hanks, C. J. Houston, W. D. Houston. 

No. 391, Howard, Ridgetown. — Arthur Townsend, B. B. 
Foster. 

No. 393, Forest, Chesley.— A. R. Siegrist, F. W. Fisher. 

No. 394, King Solomon's, Thamesford. — W. D. Suther- 
lan, Wm. Jamieson, R. J. Kerr, W. H. Dunlop, John Chowen, 
Calvin Sutherland, Frank Clark. 

No. 396, Cedar, Wiarton.— L L. Ingles, A. C. Campbell, 
W. M. Newman. 

No. 398, Victoria, Kirkfield. — Hector McPhail, G. V. 
Grant, J. D. McMillan, G. V. Dunn. 

No. 399, Molfatt, Harrietsville. — K- V. Rath, K. Long- 
field. 

No. 401, Craig, Deseronto. — J. C. Milligan, F. D. 
Pringle. 

No. 403, Windsor, Windsor. — M. L. Allen, A. P. Mc- 
Intyre, H. M. Edgar, S. Jewill. 

No. 405, Mattawa, Mattawa. — G. S. Davidson, A. F. 
Hurdman, W. H. Bell. 

No. 406, Spry, Fenelon Falls.— M. F. Mo>nes, J. E. Lee, 
Wm. Nesbitt, 0. Geiger, S. N. Morrison, F. M. Graham. 

No. 408, Murray, B«averton. — John McLeod. 

No. 409, Golden Rule, Gravenhurst. — G. H. Bromby. 

No. 410, Zeta, Toronto. — G. D. Lyons, Jas. Donaldson, 
E, J. Bennett, S. J. Boyde, D. W. Andrews, A. F. Hethering- 
ton, Hunter Singer, B. F. Selby, J. A. Chambers, W. T. 
Singer, Sam Alexander, W. R. Madill, C. C. Wallace, F. W. 
Davidson. 

No. 411, Rodney, Rodney.— S. F. Kennedy, A. D. Strath, 
G. C. Schweitzer. 



24 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

No. 412, Keystone, Sault Ste. Marie.— Jas. Hull. 
No. 413, Naphtali, Tilbury. — H. Hassard, Dr. E. N. 
Sparling, H. Williams, W. E. Cowley. 

No. 414, Pequonga, Kenora. — D. H. Currie, A. G. Hol- 
No. 415, Fort William, Fort William. — Robt. Jamieson. 
No. 417, Keewatin, Keewatin. — A. G. Holland. 
No. 419, Liberty, Sarnia.— W. J. Aitchison, E. L. Treitz, 
J. H. Aitchison. 

No. 420, Nipissing, North Bay. — A. W. Struthers, B. F. 
Nott, D. G. Stevens, E. L. Moore. 

No. 421, Scott, Grand Valley. — J. A. Mclntyre, G. H. 
Hardy, A. E. Smith, Wm. Buchanan, W. H. Watson, J. E. 
Mclntyre, A. Menary, M. W. Berwick, C. W. Lawson. 

No. 422, Star* of the East, Bothwell. — C. L. Beemer, 
Thos. Boon, George Winship. 

No. 423, Strong, Sundridge.— C. E. Grose. 
No. 424, Doric, Pickering.— C. E. Morley, J. S. Balsdon, 
H. W. Boyes. 

No. 426, Stanley, Toronto. — J. L. Johnson, Chas. Fraser, 
A. J. Anderson, W. J. Turk, S. A. Ash, H. W. Percy, F. D. 
Clark, Geo. Tindall, R. M. Brown, Geo. McKenzie, J. R. Cox, 
H. W. Colnett, H. B. Sommerville, J. J. Linton, R. Mitchell, 
N. S. Chisholm, J. R. Chisholm, Wm. Speers, John Marr, W. 
J. Sheppard, W. R. Saunders, H. H. Talbot. 

No. 427, Nickel, Sudbury.— J. R. Home, C. A. Eby, R. 
H. Arthur, W. E. W. Cressey, J. Fowler. 

No. 428, Fidelity, Port Perry. — L R. Bentley, L. B. 
Colbear, A. B. Cawker, G. R. Davey, G. M. Gerrow. 

No. 429, Port Elgin, Port Elgin.— Chas. Fotheringham. 

No. 430, Acacia, Toronto. — A. H. Jones, Alex Clancy, 

Chas. Ellis, Arthur Johnston, W. J. Pickard, J. S. Pickard, 

E. Balfour, H. G. French, R. W. J. Sealy, D. A. Landell, A. 

M. Heron, M. E. Steele, H. P. Phillips, A. E. Gubb. 

No. 431, Moravian, Cargill. — W. J. Loughleen, W. T. 
Baillie, W. M. Lee, P. C. Hunstein. 

No. 432, Hanover, Hanover.— J. A. Magee, F. A. Glebe, 
W. D. Staples, 0. H. Becker, A. E. Ball, L. S. Stokes, S. H. 
Zinn, John Mills. 

No. 434, Algonquin, Emsdale.— C. L. Pearce, H. R. Hav- 
ward, D. W. Campbell. 

No. 435, Havelock, Havelock. — W. J. Nobes, W. B. 
Ritchie. 

No. 436, Burns, Hepworth. — Robt. Cruickshank, W. F. 
Brown, W. P. Brooks. 

No. 437, Tuscan, Sarnia.— A. T. Earl. 

No. 438, Harmony, Toronto. — A. Carwithen, W. H S 
Robertson, E. W. Barber, A. H. Lougheed, W. R. Shaw, h! 
J. Hunt, G. H. Simmons, D. R. Leask, W. J. Robertson, W. 
H. King, R. T. Musson, R. McCann. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 25 

No. 439, Alexandria, Alexandria. — F. V. Massey. 
No. 443, Powassan, Powassan. — Roy Hobden, C. P. 
Shapter. 

No. 444, Nitetis, Creemore. — C. L. Hayward, F. B. 
Wood. 

No. 445, Lake of the Woods, Kenora.— A. G. Holland. 

No. 446, Granite, Fort Frances.— C. H. G. Mann. 

No. 447, Sturgeon Falls, Sturgeon Falls.— M. Mandell, 
H. A. Batsford, J. D. Cockburn. 

No. 448, Xenophon, Wheatley, — J. D. MacGregor, J. E. 
Dales, 

No. 449, Dundalk, Dundalk.— A. Campbell, A. E. Colgan, 
J. R. Neilson. 

No. 450, Hawkesbury, Hawkesbury. — A. C. Price. 

No. 452, Avonmore, Avonmore. — E. W. Richards. 

No. 453, Royal, Fort William.— C. E. Watkins 

No. 454, Corona, Burk's Falls. — H. H. Hunter, G. J. 
Grunig, J. M. Gerow. 

No. 455, Doric, Little Current. — J. B. Wallace. 

No. 457, Century, Merlin.— G. C. Ford, Grant D. Crewe, 
L. E. Crewe. 

No. 458, Wales, Wales.— G. Raymond. 

No. 459, Cobden, Cobden.— P. W. Collins. 

No. 460, Rideau, Seeley's Bay.— F. S. Young. 

No. 461, Ionic, Rainy River. — E. E. Jess. 

No. 462, Temiskaming, New Liskeard. — R. H. Irwin, J. 
Penman, J. S. McCullough. 

No. 463, North Entrance, Haliburton.— M. R. Archer, R. 
W. Archer. 

No. 464, King Edward, Sunderland. — R. M. Patterson, 
H. Wilson, B. Oliver, C. E. Shier, C. G. Pinkham. 

No. 466, Coronation, Elmvale. — S. Kimberley, C. W. 
Ritchie. 

No. 467, Tottenham, Tottenham.— J. A. Foucar. 

No. 468, Peel, Caledon East.— J. J. Berney, M. Nelson, 
J. O. Little, H. Spratt, J. N. Proctor, T. R. McCartney, W. B. 
Cannon. 

No. 469, Algoma, Sault Ste. Marie. — C. A. Griswold. 
No. 470, Victoria, Victoria Harbor. — F. Hodges, D. G. 
Bell, W. B. Crooke. 

No. 471, King Edward VII, Chippawa. — W. Irwin, A. 
Gray, M. C. Bacon, J. M. Rapelje, W. Johnston, W. Philp, 

No. 472, Gore Bay, Gore Bay. — R. Robinson, L. Gosselin, 
S. Clarke. 

No. 473, The Beaches, Toronto. — E. E. Ritcey, T. J. 
Mason, R. H. Nesbitt, S. J. Manchester, S. A. Griffin, L. A. 
Woolgee, A. J. Stringer. 



26 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

No. 474, Victoria, Toronto. — P, A. Jerman, G. Angus, 
W H. Searles, D. L. McPherson, A. M. Thorne, N. Henry, V. 
Hill, W. J. Sheppard, A. O. Wilson, F. D. Hopkins, A. S. 
Topping, W. J. Armstrong, C. Miller, G. A. Williams, W. J. 
Wadsworth, F. G. I. Whetter. 

No. 475, DuTidurn, Hamilton. — J. Bolingbroke, G. Walk- 
er, M. C. Thompson, G. Milne, T. R. Hawkins. 

No. 476, Corinthian, North Gower. — M. J. Haggins, H. 
L. Greer. 

No. 477, Harding, Woodville.— J. W. Dixon, J. R. Kelsey, 
F. C. T. Smith. 

No. 478, Milverton, Milverton. — F. A. Dale. 

No. 479, Russell, Russell.— D. P. Dewer, R.W.Atkinson, 
R. M. McRuer, L. W. Latimer. 

No. 480, Williamsburg, Williamsburg. — G. Hess. 

No. 481, Corinthian, Toronto. — W. E. Marshall, G. M. 
Britton, F. Geary, D. Douglas, W. N. Hannigan, F. E. Ansell, 
E. S. Brown, W. J. Forrester. 

No. 482, Bancroft, Bancroft.— J. Wiggins, W. E. Wig- 
gins. 

No. 486, Silver, Cobalt.— D. A. Crichton, H. H. Abell. 

No. 488, King Edward, Harrow. — E. Richardson, J. D. 
Wright, W. Murdock, C. J. Brush. 

No. 489, Osiris, Smith's Falls. — F. W. Oldham, D. S. 
Noad. 

No. 490, Hiram, Markdale.— C. R. King, J. H. Reburn, 
J. S. Cooper, R. Bradey, G. A. Beaton. 

No. 491, Cardinal, Cardinal.— R. S. Cuthbertson. 

No. 492, Kamak, Coldwater. — R. F. Aitcheson, A. 
Harden, T. D. Brown. 

No. 494, Riverdale, Toronto.— W. Thom, D. Walton, R. 
F. Thomas, W. R. Ward, P. Bell, E. F. Guest, G. Jones, L. 
E. Jordan, D. Bannerman, C. M. Rawson, H. M. Boddy, B. 
E. Ekblad, O. B. Stanton. 

No. 495, Electric, Hamilton.— T. H. Leaker, W. Turner, 
J. Gough, R. D. Berry. 

No. 496, University, Toronto. — M. C. Hooper, E. J. 
Walkom, C. R. Redfern, A. E. MacGregor, W. C. White, P. 
W. Rogers, H. McNairn, R. T. C. Dwelly. 

No. 497, St. Andrew's, Arden. — E. Q. Pixley. 

No. 498, King George V, Coboconk.— E. B. White, L. 
Richmond, R. C. Hanthorn, F. Rummy, J. F. Wood, J. G. 
McFarland, R. T. Robertson. 

No. 499, Port Arthur, Port Arthur.— J. McLean. 

No. 500, Rose, Windsor.— H. M. Gard, D. M. Seggie, E. 
J. Sirrs, D. W. Nichols. 

No. 501, Connaught, Mimico. — F. Shackleton, A. D. 
Norris, J. H. Wallace, T. M. Staunton, J. P. Lee. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 27 

No. 502, Coronation, Smithville. — C. Comfort, J. H. 
Patterson, S. Magder, C. Snyder, E. Merritt, W. N. Trembley, 
H. Hibbard, E. L. Snyder. 

No. 503, Inwood, Inwood.— W. J. McNally, L. Elliott, A. 
R. Chapman. 

No. 505, Lynden, Lynden.— R. Clark. 

No. 506, Porcupine, South Porcupine. — J. P. Douglas, E. 
J. Mason, W. H. Johns. 

No. 507, Elk Lake, Elk Lake.— J. M. Coghill. 

No. 508, Ozias, Brantford.— R. W. Roberts, M. M. Still- 
man. 

No. 509, Twin City, Kitchener.— B. F. Matthews, J. W. 
Stoner, G. DeKleinhans, H. L. Freeston. 

No. 510, Parkdale, Toronto.— F. McNair, E. H. Wilson, 
E. A. Peaker, A. J. Murray, C. H. Allen, E. A. Peaker Ji-., 
G. H. Wilson. 

No. 511, Connaught, W. Fort William. — R. Jamieson. 

No. 512, Malone, Sutton.— F. H. Hinchley, M. W. Tre- 
mayne, J. A. Latimer, R. E. Weir, R. H. Corner. 

No. 513, Corinthian, Hamilton.— K. J. Farthing, G. W. 
Presnell, J. R. Crocker, J. R. Croft, A. G. Elford. 

No. 514, St. Alban's, Toronto.— J. A. Northway, G. V. 
Brown, J. H. Messer, E. W. Stoddard, J. L. House, T. C. 
Kremer, G. W. McRae, W. R. Boyd, H. S. McHenry, J. S. 
Eastman, H. Williams, R. A. Woodley, R. W. Hind, J. A. 
Cooper. 

No. 515, Reba, Brantford.— A. McAllan, R. W. F. Mc- 
Fadden. 

No. 517, Hazeldean, Hazeldean. — F. J. Bradley. 

No. 518, Sioux Lookout, Sioux Lookout. — R. A. Shields. 

No. 519, Onondaga, Onondaga. — R. Jamieson, T. Gray. 

No. 520, Coronati, Toronto. — F. G. Chandler, R. F. 
Hunter, G. B. Bailey, W. T. Overend, G. H. Elson, C. Muckles- 
ton, S. Lambert, H. Lane. 

No. 521, Ontario, Windsor.— C. M. Fry, A. R. Graham, 
T. L. Mclntyre. 

No. 522, Mount Sinai, Toronto. — N. Perlmutter, B. 
Freed, L Finberg, A. Fox, A. I. Cohen, M. L. Levy, M. 
Cooper, A. L. Tinker. 

No. 523, Rojal Arthur, Peterborough. — M. G. Hardill, 
W. L. Ferguson. 

No. 524, Mississauga, Port Credit.— T. S. Bayley, W. H. 
Shaver, G. E. Williamson, C. W. Robb, S. Mcllroy, R. E. 
Malpass, J. Heywood, J. A. Smith, E. J. Madill. 

No. 525, Temple, Toronto.— W. F. Graham, J. Clelland, 
W. Agnew, W. Mck. Hamshaw, J. Hamshaw, J. Marr, P. M. 
Grant, E. G. Archbold, W. J. Sheppard, J. R. Jackson, F. G. I. 
Whetter. 



28 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

No. 526, Ionic, Westboro. — P. L. Campbell, 

No. 527, Espanola, Espanola. — W. J. Black. 

No. 528, Golden Beaver, Timmins. — D. A. Moore, G. 
Jones, G. C. Murphy, E. P. Ramsay. 

No. 529, Myra, Komoka.— M. Scott, D. Mclntyre, W. E. 
Bishop, J. F. Frank, C. B. Smith, C. McKinley, R. Pearson. 

No. 530, Cochrane, Cochrane. — L. R. Eades. 

No. 531, High Park, Toronto. — W. J. Hutchison, T. C. 
Ingram, W. J. Moore, J. C. West, G. E. B. Wheeler, A. J. 
McWatters, R. B. Magill, S'. Marshall, E. A. Blackball, W. 
R. Hayes, J. C. Doney, C. H. Lord, T. C. Ingram, A. A. Gow, 
T. W. Heron, V. R. Dale, F. C. Becker, N. J. Powell. 

No. 532, Canada, Toronto. — T, A. Johnston, J. A, Hearn, 
H, A. Miller, R. Carney, A. Kirk, J. Rogerson, J. J. Mc- 
Lennan, W. Ramsay, T. R. Hunter, A. T. Yule, A. Murdoch, 
A. Wilson, R. R. Davis, C. C. Card, F. Busteed, J. N. Mul- 
holland, E. Midgley, D. Mullen. 

No. 533, Shamrock, Toronto.— W. S. Laidley, A. Fernie, 
E. W. Leith, J. M. Burden, W. Garrett, D. E. Parker. 

No. 534, Englehart, Englehart.— C. F. Read, W. J. Hill. 

No. 535, Phoenix, Fonthill.— T. A. Barron, B. A. Patti- 
son, F. H. Clark, J. A. Christie. 

No. 536, Algonquin, Copper Cliflf. — G. H. Harry, J. 
Gribble, G. M. Ferguson. 

No. 537, Ulster, Toronto.— C. A. Rogers, J. Williamson, 
H. R. Boal, W. Bush, J. Jordan, R. S. Kerr, T. E. Foster, R. 
Aiken, D. V. R. Saunderson, D. Hanna, B. H. Brown, T. A. 
Murphy, C. A. Jones. 

No. 539, Waterloo, Waterloo.— H. G. Mistele, S. W. Otto. 

No. 540, Abitibi, Iroquois Falls.— W. Stables. 

No. 541, Tuscan, Toronto.— X W. Spence, G. A. Fry, W. 
V. Ridgeway, W. R. Scott, F. D. Robertson, S. G. Nicholls, 
J. C. Hetherington, T. H. Parliament, R. F. Hutchings, J. 
E. Carter, W. T. Elliott, A. R. Gray, R. Merkle, J. Herriot. 
J. Boyd, J. A. Burnett. 

No. 542, Metropolitan, Toronto. — N. Guthrie, J. A, Ma- 
theson, J. A. Troyer, A. L. Tinker. 

No. 543, Imperial, Toronto.— J. Ross, H. A. Miller, M. 
S. Maudsley, F. A. Gibbons, J. E. Walker, W. R. Ledger, 
E. E. Reid, A. Pollock, E. Hewett, A. E. Moss, D. S. L. Mac- 
Dougall, J. Brancier. 

No. 545, John Ross Robertson, Toronto. — J. Pezzack, T. 
E. Clegg, D. Dyer, E. Miles, J. A. Robertson, H. V. Locke, 
C. H. Cope, W. A. Howell, G. Hambly, F. W. Slade, H. B. 
Swift, A. E. Stone, W. J. S. Graham, F. G. Smith, W. T. 
Mills, E. McMoran, G. S. Henry, S. E. Madgett. 

No. 546, Talbot, St. Thomas.— W. A. D. Paterson, C. R. 
Norton, A. A. McNames, C. H. Roberts, R. B. Bowey, J. C. 
Ferguson, T. PuUen. 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1940 29 

No. 547, Victory, Toronto. — A. E. Kirkpatrick, W. T. 
Kincade, D. A. McRae, N. F. D. Kelly, F. Wells, W. D. 
Sprinks. 

No. 548, General Mercer, Toronto. — F. H. Walden, G. 
Gault, R. B. Clarke, W. J, Armstrong Jr., G. E. Rees, W. J. 
Armstrong Sr., D. C. Robertson, R. Paterson, W. Woan, F. 
W. Fisher. 

No. 549, Ionic, Hamilton. — B. Townsend, W. A. Laidlaw, 
J. Rosie, J. Forth, A. J. Lainchbury, J. M. Connor. 

No. 550, Buchanan, Hamilton. — H. Savoy, W. Davies, J. 
N. Chandler, R. Johnson, H. S. Stears, J. Forth. 

No. 551, Tuscan, Hamilton. — A. Tilbury, Wm. McCrone, 
Wm. Turner, H. M. Mclntyre, R. A. Carter,' A. L. Hardy, M. 
C. Thompson, C. L. Crompton, W. M. Brown, Jas. Baird. 

No. 552, Queen City, Toronto. — A. A. Seedhouse, Geo. 
Garnett, H. L. Rehill, T. Swan, F. A. Gibbons, S. Case, 
Walter Carey, F. H. Cooper, Geo. Spracklin, J. C. Hillman, 
Ed. Adair, H. T. Sears, B. H. McKnight, W. R. Cockburn. 

No. 553, Oakwood, Toronto. — B. S. Sheldon, F. A. 
Sceviour, R. M. Paterson, S. H. McElwain, W. Sceviour, W. 
A. Savage, A. P. Carruth, R. D. Creighton. 

No. 554, Border Cities, Windsor. — A. Haycock, C. J. 
McCallum, E. J. Morton, E. T. Howe, A. R. MacQuarrie. 

No. 555, Wardrope, Hamilton. — W. J. Smith, W. J. 
Attig, A. Lang, J. W. Nairn, M. E. Smith, B. W. Hopkins, 
J. P. Mills, J. C. Cochrane. 

No. 558, Sidney Albert Luke, Ottawa.— S. F. Smith, J. 
A. Reid, R. M. Stanton, T. H. Weatherdon, C. W. Mcintosh. 

No. 559, Palestine, Toronto. — H. H. Bocknek, B. H. 
Papernick, I. M. Ginsberg, Herman Ginsberg, A. A. Golden- 
berg, L. Blumberg, C. H. Reeve, Carl Frankel, B. Silverberg. 

No. 560, St. Andrew's, Ottawa. — Robt. Steele, J. Cal- 
laghan, A. K. Stewart. 

No. 561, Acacia, Westboro.— G. A. Wild, G. T. Wild. 

No. 562, Hamilton, Hamilton. — W. G. Smitten, E. G. 
Dixon, A. A. Patterson, A. E. Barnby, H. A. Snell, A. J. 
Johnston. 

No. 563, Victory, Chatham. — J. M. Campbell, Ross 
Doyle, C. E. Clements, G. H. Hodges, C. D. Sucee. 

No. 564, Ashlar, Ottawa.— G. W. Green, J. T. Gillespie, 

No. 565, Kilwinning, Toronto. — M. R. Thomas. Geo. 
Mitchell, Smith Shaw, A. J. Murray, J. S. Clouston, Foster 
Bray, John Hain, R. M. Penrose. W. A. Ross, B C. Mc- 
Clelland, John Hamshaw, E. L. Roxborough, M. Strachan, 
D. L. McPherson, Jas. Reidford. 

No. 566, King Hiram, Toronto.-W M \Vishart S. F. 
Albertson, E. Bailey, T. A. Howson, Archie Wright, W. Gow, 
W. Wadsworth. 



30 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

No. 567, St. Aidans, Toronto.— Paul Lange, G. A. Coales, 
S. Oliver, L. A. Murphy, H. Pike. 

No. 568, Hullett, Londesboro. — Jas. Neilans, P M. 
Townsend. 

No. 569, Doric, Lakeside. — A. J, Baker. 

No. 570, Dufferin, Toronto.— J. A. Hodgins, G. C Poole, 
S. W. Hall, J. McDonald, A. M. RoUo, H. Poison. 

No. 571, Antiquity, Toronto. — E. Bolland, H. Newton, 
Robt. Fraser, A. N. McDonald, W. Sellers, H. Cameron, E. 
J. Trist, W. J. Armstrong. 

No. 572, Mizpah, Toronto.— O. B. Hobbs, A.E.Williams, 
N. C. Stewart, F. Howell, H. F. Allen, G. G. Boyd, R. W. 
Frow, J. E. Phillips, G. R. Sheppard, E. W. Armstrong, V. 
M. Brown. 

No. 573, Adoniram, Niagara Falls.— C. G. W. Macintosh, 
G. E. French, J. T. Ruley. 

No. 574, Craig, Ailsa Craig.— G. R. McEwen, F. J. Mc- 
Leod, W. G. Smith, A. Gillies. 

No. 575, Fidelity, Toronto.— Chas. Cramond, D. Smith, 

E. F. Bevis, W. H. McNairn, W. MouU, E. A. Dolson. 

No. 576, Mimosa, Toronto. — J. Donaldson, Dr. W. R. 
Walters, F. Harvey, A. M. Heron, G. F. Empringham, R. L. 
Webster, R. H. Reynolds. 

No. 577, St. Clair, Toronto. — L. Quackenbush, C. H. 
Summefeldt, A. G. Saunders, F. A. Evans, H. L. Martyn, 
W. F. Gunning, W. R. McConnell, P. Bach, J. H. Dawe, J. 
Woodland, H. B. Lloyd, F. G. Whetter. 

No. 578, Queens, Kingston. — E. Davis, J. A. McRae, 

No. 579, Harmony, Windsor. — C. Secrest, F. Sartain, 

F. J. Hughes, W. H. Kent, J. L. Miller. 

No. 580, Acacia, London.— F. B. Schofield, A. E. Selwey, 
J. W. Bradshaw, A. G. N. Bradshaw, L. H. Lunn, J. W. 
Plewes. 

No. 581, Harcourt, Toronto.— G. T. Clark. 

No. 582, Sunnyside, Toronto.— H. Holt, .J. H. Hiscox, F. 
Power, R. H. Dee, S. D. McKechnie, R. T. Hogg, E. W. M. 
Thomson, R. E. Roome. 

No. 583, Transportation, Toronto. — G. T. Trowhill, A. 
Maynes, H. G. N. Brems, F. E. Jones, C. A. Ward, J. Boyd. 

No. 584, Kaministiqaiia, Fort William. — C. E. Watkins. 

No. 585, Royal Edward, Kingston. — W. M. Shurtleff, 
W. J. Saunders. 

No. 586, Remembrance, Toronto. — L. B. Curran, M. 
Jones, E. A. Lewis, W. S. Duck, F. J. Johnson, R. W. Smart, 
W. H. Smith, Sage Snider, W. A. Anderson, H. Radermacher, 
H. K. Lamb, H. C. Judges, C. H. Reeve, F. J. Ranee. 

No. 587, Patricia, Toronto.— Alex. Hadden, Sam Donnan, 
Chas. Jennings, H. R. Wilson, W. M. Leask, W. McMillan, 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1940 31 

S. W. Wilson, Robt. Somerville, M. F. Smeall, E. J. Reddick, 
J. R. Longstaffe. 

No, 588, National, Capreol. — E. H. Hamilton, M. Nisbet, 
J. Turner. 

No. 589, Grey, Toronto.— R. A. Gregory, W. B. Fetch, 
F. E. Sillifant, J. C. MacLatchy, R. F. H. Beard. 

No. 590, Defenders, Ottawa.— A. W. Chambers, W. C. N. 
Marriott. 

No. 591, North Gate, Toronto. — Robt. Cowling, F. C. 
Green, Jack Mein, P. G. Drake, J. M. B. Paterson, P. F. 
Drake, John Cook, F. L. Nash, F. E. Irwin. 

No. 592, Fairbank, Toronto. — J. W. Burroughs, W. 
.Sharp, S. H. B. Tonkin, F. Reynolds, F. W. Hall, F. T. Wat- 
son, Frank Elliott. 

No. 593, St. Andrew's, Hamilton. — G. V. Bryan, Jas. 
Fram. L. P. Robertson, W. H. Wallace, G. A. McCuUoch, John 
Forth, Jas. Baird, S. Davidson, F. W. Davidson. 

No. 594, Hillcrest, Hamilton.— R. A. Pilgrim, Dr. 0. J. 
Newell, W. Madill, T. Morgan, E. P. Manuel. 

No. 595, Rideau. Ottawa.— D. Pettvpiece, S. C. Bateman, 
A. E. Masterman, R. D. Whitrnore, F. W. Plet. 

No. 596, Martintown, Martintown. — D. S. Mcintosh. 

No. 597, Temple, London.— A. J. Smith, A. E. Cane, W. 
H. Rath, W. M. Me.-^ser, P. B. Fetterly. 

No. 598, Dominion, Windsor. — C. E. Milburn, W. H. 
Horton, M. Dell, T. J. Viveash, R. E. Lonnee, D. M. Hanna. 

No, 599, Mt. Dennis, Weston. — H. M. LeGard, T. L. 
Hurst, A. McLean, R. S. Blackstock, F. S. Fordham, A. F. 
Nesbit, H. F. Sproul, Geo. Hinton, F. E. Smith, W. Allaby. 

No. 600, Maple Leaf, Toronto, — A. L. Weeks, J. Craigie, 
W. J. Armstrong, Jas. Herriot, F. J. Duff, J. A. Cooper. 

No. 601, St. Paul, Sarnia.— A. E. Bowd. 

No. 602, Hugh Murray, Hamilton.— W. D. Connor, D. H. 
G. Fairclough, A. N. Arnold, J. Eaglesham, D. Turner, A. 
Lavis. 

No. 603, Campbell, Campbellville.— W. J. McLeod, E. M. 
Readhead. 

No. 604, Palace, Windsor. — A. E. Joselin, W. K. Mc- 
Keown, H. M. Smith, G. R. Jackson. 

No. 605, Melita, Toronto.— R. M. Gibson, S. B. Watson, 
S. Marshall, C. H. Lord, S. M. Black, E. W. Skirrow, D. S. 
Linden, F. C. Becker. 

No. 606, Unity, Toronto. — H. Browning, R. E. Slade, G. 
A. McCausland, G. H. McKelvie, W. J. Soanes, E. F. Trumper, 
E. Flath, J. T. Minaker, 0. E. Hodgson. 

No. 607, Golden Fleece, Toronto.— A. R. W. Dalley, H. 
J. Rigby, A. Green, W. G. Varty, M. C. Cain, T. Marshall. 



32 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

No. 608, Gothic, Lindsay.— W. D. Ecobichon, H. H. Mc- 
Fadden, B. A. Wilson, B. C. Maidens. 

No. 609, Tavistock, Tavistock.— C. J. Eifert, S. Loveys, 
S. A. Goring, G. S. Murray. 

No. 610, Ashlar, Byron.— D. R. Sanderson, W. P. Simp- 
son, R. L. Irwin, W. Bartlett, W. Tanton, F. Gilbert, F. G. 
Fuller, 

No. 611, Huron-Bruce, Toronto. — P. F. Graydon, R. 
Ellison, A. C. Dickson. 

No. 612, Birch Cliff, Birch Cliff.— E. M. Baird, E. Mc- 
Naughton, P. Henderson, W. J. Merrill. 

No. 613, Fort Erie, Fort Erie.— C. Burt, J. A. Spencer, 
A. J. Francis, H. A. Yeo. 

No. 614, Adanac, Merritton. — R. Barr, J. Rennie. 

No. 615, Dominion, Ridgcway. — K. Ellsworth, J. E. 
Laur. 

No. 616, Perfection, St. Catharines. — J. Watson, A. Gill, 
A. L. Luce. 

No. 617, North Bay, North Bay. — W. Little, H, M. 
Gregor. 

No. 618, Thunder Bay, Port Arthur.— H. Dalzell. 

No. 619, Runnymede, Toronto — C. R. Davis, G. Haynes, 
W. J. Armstrong, W. J. McDougall, S. R. Baker, C. E. Sisson, 
A. E. Craig, H. S. Parkinson, D. D. Brown, H. E. McCullagh. 
R. A. W. Stewart, W. Mck. Hamshaw, E. C. Roelofson, R. E. 
.Johnston, C. A. Gumming, F. F. Jollow. 

No. 620, Bay of Quinte, Toronto. — R. S. Welsh, J. W. 
Russell, A. L Bird, J. A. M. Taylor, W. G. Harwood, G. A. 
Kingston, A. E. Langman, C. Mikel, W. E. Leonard, N. M. 
Menzie. 

No. 621, Frontenac, Sharbot Lake. — C. T. Tripp. 

No. 622, Lome, Chapleau.— C. C. McKnight, S. W. Mc- 
Donald. 

No. 623, Doric, Kirkland Lake.— H. W. Newington. 

No. 624, Dereham, Mt. Elgin.— J. Flanders. 

No. 625, Hatherly, SauU Ste. Marie.— F. W. Collaton. 

No. 626, Stamford, Stamford Centre.— G. S. Bridge. W, 
J. Goodyear, R. Blain, A. B. Warren, R. F. Cooper, G. W 
Powell, H. D. Santer, R. W. Embleton, A. Maclntyre, A. E. 
MacKenzie. 

No. 627, Pelee, Scudder.— H. K. Quick, C. L. Mills. 
No. 628, Glenrose, Eimira— H. A. Fell, A. Brandt. R 
R. Hillis. 

No. 629, Grenville, Toronto.— H. E. Brown, R. E. Story, 
K. H. Scott, R. S. Sheldon, J. Eyre, A. L. Scace, G. W. Keevil 
0. L. Boyd. ' 

No. 630, Prince of Wales, Toronto.— W. Bailey W J R 
Kmgston, W. Speers, J. C. Thompson, J. Gillespie.' 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 33 

No. 631, Manitou, Emo.— E. E. Jess. 
No. 632, Long Branch, Mimico. — A. G. Pratt, J. B. 
Smith, R. W. Knaggs. 

No. 633, Hastings, Hastings.— W. S. Fife. 

No. 634, Delta, Toronto.— N. E. Eadford, H. Swales, A. 
Lawrence, A. W. Murdock, J. B. Holmes, H. B. Swift. 

No. 635, Wellington, Toronto. — J. H. Mitchell, G. W. 
Smith, E. E. Guthrie, W. S. Smellie, E. Flath, T. G. Haslam, 
T. Rafter, A. R. Rundle. 

No. 637, Caledonia, Toronto, — G. Duguid, L. Querie, M. 
MacGregor, R. Compton, W. G. Smith, A. Wilson, R. Davis, 
R. Kent, A. G. Marr, G. McBain, G. Mould, J. F. Gillanders, 

D. S. L. MacDougall. 

No. 638, Bedford, Toronto, — A. J. Pirie, J, Gibson, J. 
Gillies, T, A. Lamon, T. A. Domleo, R. M. Porter, J. H. L. 
Sarge, W. J. Miller, H. Smith, J. Miller, E. A. Dickinson, D. 
F. Bissonnette, J. H. Gumming. 

No. 639, Beach, Burlington Beach. — H. L. Chown, G. 
Powell, W. Turner, E. K. Buckingham, B. E. Hulford, H. S. 
Marshall, R. D. Berry. 

No. 640, Anthony Sayer, Mimico. — J. B. Thompson. 
No. 641, Garden, Windsor. — E. H. Medland, W. Spooner, 
R. J. R. Brown, J. E. Murphy. 

No. 642, St. Andrew's, Windsor.— G. Saundercock, C. R. 
Watson, A. Hodgins, D. Patterson, A. Maguire, G. E. Searle. 

No. 643, Cathedral, Toronto.— A. Irvine, W. Lov,-, J. K. 
McGuire, G. T. Henry, J. G. Jack, H. LeGard. 

No. 644, Simcoe, Toronto. — W. H. Stoddart, G. Mont- 
gomery, R. E. Moir, H. Bolton, J. Leatherdale, G. W. Rich- 
ardson, T. R. W. Black, W. F. Ronald, S. M. James, D. E. F. 
Gauley, G. M. Jebb, P. J. Spring, A. C. Agnew. 

No. 645, Lake Shore, Mimico. — H. E. Newton, E. J. 

Everett, L. K. Redman, E. C. Horwood, G. G. Gauld, R. W. 
Swanton. 

No. 646, Rowland, Mt. Albert. — E. Lepard, C. Moore- 
head, S. Oldham. 

No. 647, Todmorden, Todmorden. — N. Newton, S. Pover, 
T. Meakins, H. Bramwell, W. M. Williams, A. E. Powell, W. 
MulhoUand. 

No. 648, Spruce Falls, Kapuskasing. — D. S. Arnot, J. H. 
Atkinson, J. W. Fanning, G. R. Connor. 

No. 649, Temple, Oshawa. — M. N. Jackson, S. G. Peebles, 

E. A. Cooper, F. C. Davidson, C. F. Cannon. 

No. 651, Dentonia, Toronto. — R. J. Mawhinney, H. F. 
Taylor, H. A. Miller, E. S. Calder, W. M. Locke, A. W. Law- 
rence, J. Dawes. 



34 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

No, 652, Memorial, Toronto. — J. Jeffrey, W. T. Boxall, 
T. Beattie, W. Johnston, S. Boyd, S. Alexander, W. J. Finch, 
L. Gateley. 

No. 653, Scarboro, Agincourt. — R. 0. Burrows, R. R. 
Davis. 

No. 654, Ancient Landmarks, Hamilton. — G. G. McEwen. 
G. Walker, W. Turner, W. Connor, G. B. Clark, J. R. Crocker, 
E. Bottrill, H. J. Hazell, H. Percy, J. C. Cochrane, H. Temple. 

No. 655, Kingsway, Lambton Mills. — A. P. Reid, H. C. 
Startup, W. G. Gallow, C. M. Sinclair, A. Murdoch, S. G. 
Nicholls, R. J. Pearce. 



MINUTES 

The Grand Secretary proceeded to read the 
Minutes of the last meeting held in Toronto, in July, 
1939, when it was moved by the Deputy Grand 
Master, seconded by M.W. Bro. J. A. Rowland and 
resolved: That inasmuch as the Minutes of the last 
Annual Communication held in Toronto have been 
printed and distributed to all the constituent lodges, 
the same be now taken as read and confirmed. 



RULES OF ORDER 

The Rules of Order governing the conduct of 
the meeting were read by the Grand Secretary. 



ORDER OF BUSINESS 

It was moved by the Deputy Grand Master, 
seconded by M.W. Bro. W. H. Wardrope and una- 
nimously carried, that the Order of Business of this 
Communication be changed at the discretion of the 
Grand Master. 



THE GRAND MASTER'S ADDRESS 

M.W. Bro. J. A. Dobbie, Grand Master, then 
delivered the following Address: 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 35 



THE GRAND MASTER'S ADDRESS 

Another year has passed into the Great Beyond 
and Grand Lodge again assembles with a deep sense 
of gratitude to God that, while most of those living 
in Europe and Asia are passing through stormy 
days, we in this country are comparatively at ease, 
though torn with distressing thoughts on behalf of 
our compatriots and those that would be so if they 
could. The fears of the last twelve months have 
become an actuality and it now behooves us to be- 
seech Almighty God with contrite hearts to endue 
us with full confidence to enable us to bear v*^hatever 
may be our burdens; to grant us courage and will- 
power to carry on with such energy and determina- 
tion that Right may finally be triumphant; and to 
cause peace once again to reign throughout the 
world, that His work may be promoted and that 
man, created in his image, may rise to heights not 
yet attained. 

During the past year. Masonry throughout the 
Jurisdiction has been showing excellent progress 
toward recovering its hold upon the brethren and 
upon the world at large. To visit the different parts 
of the Jurisdiction but emphasizes the truth of this 
statement. The gatherings, both regular and special, 
are much larger, the enthusiasm of the brethren for 
the work much more striking, the outlook for the 
future much more optimistic and that necessary 
feature (if we are to be successful), the increase in 
membership, shows a wonderful improvement- every 
Summons showing a number seeking admission to 
the Order. 

Being resident in the extreme East of the 
Province, it has been impossible to accept every in- 
vitation extended to me by the various lodges, 
but, by striving to have arrangements made that 
the important events take place on successive 
nights, much has been accomplished and I have 



36 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

visited the following places during the year now 
closed: — Toronto, Bolton, Sarnia, Chatham, Guelph, 
Hamilton, Ayr, Sundridge- Fort William, Smith's 
Falls, Napanee, Oshawa, Ottawa and St. Thomas. 

One of the greatest pleasures a Grand Master 
can have is to be present on a special occasion in 
any lodge when the senior members are brought out 
to enjoy the honouring of one of the 'Old Brigade'. 
Such was my pleasure at Napanee on the 8th of 
March, 1940, when I became the fortunate one, on 
account of the misfortunes and engagements of 
three of our Past Grand Masters, and was privileged 
to present the fifty-year Veteran's Medal to three 
members of Union Lodge, No. 9, Napanee. Amongst 
these was Most W. Bro. Walter S. Herrington, K.C. 
who had completed his fifty years of membership 
on January 31st, 1940. He is with us today, having 
celebrated another anniversary, his 80th birthday 
on Sunday the 14th July, last. As I wished him at 
the time of his Masonic half-century, so now, on 
your behalf, and my own, I wish him continued 
health and length of days to enjoy the many, many 
friendships which he has so firmly made throughout 
his legal and his Masonic life. 

To the other veterans may I say that it is al- 
ways a great delight to see them at lodge wearing 
their medals and I never fail to greet my "young" 
friends and utter a prayer that they may long live 
to act as a beacon light to us who are younger in 
years but not so young in spirit and in outlook. To 
me fifty years is a period of honour and one which 
should not be lightly regarded. While others may 
have approached that period there is no good reason 
why the medal which was given for fifty years' 
service should be given for anything less. If neces- 
sary, we might have one that may be given for any 
length of service, but we should preserve those now 
in use for their specified times and purposes. 

The question of what the Masonic Order is to 
do in order to help in winning the war has been 
uppermost in the minds, not only of the ofiicers of 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1940 37 

Grand Lodge but also of the officers and members 
of the constituent lodges. Many suggestions have 
been made and considered, but the majority of these 
seemed to be along the line of contributing money 
to organizations already in possession of large sums, 
or of providing materials for soldiers, for which, if 
there be any great need, the Government is already 
in a position to supply. The Red Cross is an excel- 
lent organization doing good work; therefore, on the 
recommendation of the Grand Treasurer and some 
of the Past Grand Masters, the sum of $500.00 was 
sent to that organization on the 23rd of January, 
1940. For this subscription I request your sanction. 
It was felt that, if further contribution was con- 
sidered necessary, it could be made at a later date 
and, if other means of assisting were decided upon, 
the money could then be directed to that in order 
to enable the new plan to be carried through. Early 
last autumn, after the declaration of war, the sug- 
gestion was made to me by Most W. Bro. Frank A. 
Copus that it would be a grand thing if the Grand 
Lodge of Canada in the Province of Ontario would 
send a cable to the Grand Lodge of England inti- 
mating that we would be willing to look after the 
children of Masons from England if they were sent 
out to Canada. At that time your Grand Master 
felt that the invitation might not be received and 
acted upon, owing to the fact that parents might 
not feel the necessity or because ocean traffic was 
not safe enough to risk the lives of the children. 
Your Grand Master did not feel that the proper 
time for that effort had arrived. However, recent 
events have caused further consideration of the 
scheme and, as a result of the unanimous opinion 
of the "Grand East", it was arranged to send cables 
carrying the suggestion and the invitation to each 
of the three Grand Lodges in the British Isles 
through their Grand Secretaries. Further promotion 
of the scheme was accomplished by having a Special 
Committee wait on the Honourable the Minister of 
Immigration and his Deputy to discuss with them 
the scheme and to endeavour to ascertain whether 
or not there were any obstacles to prevent it. Such 



38 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

a conference was held and the utmost co-operation 
was received by the Committee from the Honour- 
able Mr. Crerar and his Deputy Mr. F. C. Blair. As 
a result a further cable was forwarded requesting 
that one thousand children be sent as a first con- 
tingent. In doing this, and as a result of some news- 
paper publicity, a most encouraging response has 
been received, intimating to the officers of Grand 
Lodge that their action was concurred in by the 
members of the fraternity. It was then thought 
wise to appoint a Committee consisting of M. W. 
Bro. Copus, M. W. Bro. John Rowland, M. W. Bro. 
Dargavel, M. W. Bro. Dunlop, R. W. Bro. H. G. 
French, R. W. Bro. N. F. D. Kelley, R. W. Bro. Dr. 
T. A. Carson, R. W. Bro. E. G. Dixon, W. Bro. Rus- 
sell Treleavan, W. Bro. C. H. Cunningham together 
with the Deputy Grand Master and the Grand 
Master to act as an Official Central Board on your 
behalf, which Committee will have full charge of 
receiving the children from the Children's Aid 
Society, under which Society they are admitted into 
Canada and under whose supervision they are to re- 
main. Your Grand Master respectfully solicits your 
cordial and loyal support for the scheme as a whole 
and for the Committee thus appointed. Kindly re- 
member, brethren, that the most fateful hour for 
our Grand Lodge in the work which it has under- 
taken and cherished for centuries has now arrived 
and it is incumbent upon each and every member 
to make this undertaking a matter of personal in- 
terest whether or not you can aid by taking a child 
into your own home. It is most urgent and neces- 
sary that nothing be done by any member of the 
Fraternity to cause the undertaking to be open to 
censure. We must realize, now and always, that the 
trust which becomes ours must be fulfilled, irre- 
spective of everything else, and that we, as Masons, 
are obligated to these children, to their parents and 
friends, to the British Government sending them 
out to us, and to our King and Queen, for the most 
sacred trust ever bestowed on a Masonic organiza- 
tion. Nothing must be said or done which will in 
the slightest manner betray that trust, or produce, 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 39 

in the public mind, an undesirable impression of the 
Craft. 

Your Grand Lodge Officers have full confidence 
that the Fraternity as a whole will rise to the oc- 
casion and carry through to a most satisfactory 
termination the undertaking which has been plan- 
ned out of hearts filled with brotherly love, relief, 
and truth. 

Your Grand Master could not feel satisfied, did 
he not pay the full measure of praise, honour and 
satisfaction, on behalf of the members of the Fra- 
ternity, to those brethren who have seen fit to 
forego the pleasures and comforts of their normal 
lives and those of their families, to join His Ma- 
jesty's Forces for service where'er the call may 
come. To them be all honour and glory; and our 
sincere wish is that they may be safely returned 
to their families, honoured for their efforts; that 
their future may be filled with a full share of this 
world's blessings; and that they may have their 
reward in feeling that they have been a unit of that 
body of men who have had a share in bringing back 
peace to the world at large, to be uninterrupted for 
many centuries to come. 

To those whose duty it is to keep the home fires 
burning allow me to say that it is my earnest wish 
that your endeavours may be crowned with success. 
May happiness and good fortune therein be your 
reward for many inconveniences and heartaches suf- 
fered in the doing thereof. It is for each and every 
one of us to steel ourselves for the future, as we 
shall assuredly be called upon to make greater and 
greater sacrifices and contributions ere we shall be 
able to rest in peace and comfort with the assurance 
that the forces of evil are subdued and are not likely 
to become active again. 

At our last Annual Communication it was with 
regret that we noted the absence of Most W. 
Brother Ponton and many were the expressions of 
sorrow and esteem uttered upon the completion of 



40 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

the reading- of his Report of the Board of Fraternal 
Correspondence by Rt. Rev. and R. W. Bishop 
White. To many of us these reports of the Chair- 
man were always found to be gems of thought and 
wisdom. At the close of Grand Lodge, on my return 
journey, Rt. Wor. Bro. W. C. N. Marriott of the 
Board of General Purposes and I stepped in to visit 
our worthy brother to bring to him some idea of 
what took place at Grand Lodge. He was greatly 
pleased to see us and his eyes glistened as he heard 
of one thing after another. He had a keenness of 
mind to take in and a quickness of speech and re- 
partee to reply when necessary. It was a few 
minutes well spent, though sorrowful. It was not 
many days until we heard that he had passed on 
to the Grand Lodge Above. 

The funeral, though non-masonic, was well at- 
tended by many of our Grand Lodge officers and the 
brethren of the surrounding districts, and there was 
not one but would have said: — 

And yet, Good Bye! Good Bye! thou faithful soul. 
From toil and trouble thou hast earned release. 
Thy weary feet are resting at the goal, 
The stress of living ended in God's peace. 

To his widow, daughters and sons, we, the 
members of the Grand Lodge of Canada in the 
Province of Ontario, express our deepest sympathy 
on behalf of the whole membership of our Craft, 
the members of which he knew so well and by 
whom he was most beloved. 

Another prince of Masons has passed to his 
reward in the person of R. W. Bro. Robert F. 
Richardson, than whom, when Grand Lodge was in 
session no one had a more cheery word nor a greater 
number of friends. Only a few days before his 
death he sent me a message to Sarnia that it would 
be impossible for Grand Lodge to be opened without 
his presence and I took it that he fully intended to 
be present, but such was not to be. He died on June 
9th and was buried on June llth, 1940. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1940 41 

To his sister with whom he lived, our feelings 
of deepest sympathy go out in her hour of trial and 
in the days to come when she will miss him sorely. 

Suitable tribute to both these worthy Masons 
will be found in the Report of the Committee on the 
Fraternal Dead, 

While the affairs of Masonry progress slowly 
from year to year, many of the same problems recur. 
While to many there is not much change, yet the 
hand of Death and of Misfortune of one type and 
another leave their mark upon our Order. Those 
who are left behind have not in many cases the 
wherewithal to carry on and, in other cases, have 
not the ability to do so. Old age is a handicap hard 
to overcome in the active world of today and any- 
one past middle age has a very difficult time getting 
work should he or she be so unfortunate as to lose 
the position occupied in early and middle life. In 
many cases mey appeal to their brethren for assis- 
tance and may be referred by them or by their 
lodges to our Benevolence Officer. Filling this of- 
fice, Grand Lodge is blessed with a man of sym- 
pathy, yet not without insight and decision ; a man 
who has a keen appreciation of the ways of the 
human being, who has the ability to seek and 
gather such information as is necessary to enable 
him to arrive at a fair and just estimate of the 
person's ability to help himself or herself. Thus we 
have a man whom we can feel assured that our 
needy dependents can approach and, if deserving, 
will receive assistance. His work is extensive but 
yet it is always well in hand and he seems to be 
able to bring comfort and consolation where it is 
most needed. Most W. Bro. R. B. Dargavel, our 
Benevolence Officer, seems to be the right man in 
the right place. 

It is a mark of appreciation to be requested to 
be the principal speaker at any gathering of im- 
portance, but to be so chosen to address the Annual 
Communication of the Grand Lodge of Connecticut 
is one of outstanding distinction. On February 7th 



42 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

and 8th, 1940, at the meeting of this Grand Lodge 
held at Hartford, Connecticut, Most W. Bro. W. J. 
Dunlop was so honoured and he also brought honour 
to the Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province of 
Ontario, On this occasion M. W. Bro. Dunlop was 
markedly distinguished in being presented by the 
Grand Lodge of Connecticut with the Pierpont 
Edwards Medal and also with the Sesquecentennial 
Medal. Such adornments and evidences of goodwill 
will be worn with the gracious and dignified appreci- 
ation at all times exhibited by M. W. Bro. Dunlop. 
The Craft at large appreciate the honour thus con- 
ferred on them through this especial honouring of 
one of our outstanding brethren. 

No Grand Master's address could possibly be 
complete without a most kindly reference to the 
able, co-operative and never-faihng assistance re- 
ceived by him through the Grand Secretary and his 
official staff. He is always at one's right hand to 
keep one reminded of what needs to be done and, if 
necessary, to add counsel as to what is the best line 
to take. Nothing seems to miss him and that is 
really remarkable when one thinks of the daily 
mail and the number of official letters from the 
Grand Lodges and the incumbents of office chang- 
ing from day to day. His genial countenance is a 
great introduction to the lodge members through- 
out the Jurisdiction and his presence at lodge func- 
tions is eagerly sought. His ability to be here and 
there and everywhere at the same time is marvel- 
lous and your Grand Master is fully appreciative of 
the many, many kindly courtesies extended by our 
officials to all coming in contact with the office of 
the Grand Secretary. 

The Committee on Masonic Education has been 
carrving on an excellent programme of work under 
the leadership of Rt. Wor. Bro. Charles Robb. The 
best means of observing this is by knowing what 
is being done in the individual lodge room and, while 
the Committee may have an excellent programme 
laid out, whether or not this is accomplished can 
be seen only in the lodge itself. My observation is 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 43 

that the services of many able men have been se- 
cured in the Districts and the effort they are making 
to get things done, means that the Chairman of the 
Committee must be getting his own honest efforts 
home in a convincing manner. May these men have 
more and more success and thereby place the mem- 
bership of our Craft in an intelligent position to set 
out and explain Masonry! 

From what little I can gather the library also 
is doing some good work but not nearly sufficient 
brethren utilize it as it should be used. Some really 
worthwhile books may be obtained and, by setting 
out to do a little regular and systematic reading, 
you will be surprised what you will accomplish and 
what benefit the reading will be to you. Maintain 
your courage, brethren, you will be encouraged and 
greatly surprised in time. 

On St. John's Day, 27th December, 1939, at 
Smith's Falls, St. Francis Lodge, No. 24, were hav- 
ing their officers for 1940 installed in the afternoon, 
when your Grand Master considered himself highly 
honoured in being requested to be the Installing 
Master. The ceremony was a fitting part of the 
year's proceedings w^hen they celebrated the One 
Hundredth Anniversary of the institution of their 
Lodge and in the evening the affairs of the year 
were brought to a close with a wonderful attendance 
and many historical references to the Lodge, its past 
members, its present members, and a very excellent 
historical sketch of the Lodge, read by R. W. Bro. 
Dr. Wickware but prepared by V. W. Bro. McKim. 
It was my pleasure to be able to grant St. Francis 
Lodge permission for the wearing of the gold lace, 
permitted by the Constitution as a recognition of 
one hundred years' duration of the lodge. It is my 
opinion that such historical sketches as were pre- 
sented on this occasion should be turned over to 
the Grand Secretary for preservation by Grand 
Lodge as their sources will ere long be gone, never 
to be replaced. To St. Francis Lodge, its officers and 
members, you wall join with me, I am sure, in ex- 



44 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

tending our congratulations and hearty good wishes 
for many more years of prosperity, brotherly love, 
and usefulness. 

Grand Lodge this year called an Especial Com- 
munication to meet at St. John's Anglican Church, 
Woodhouse, Sunday, 23rd June. The occasion was 
the marking of the 100th anniversary of the initi- 
ation into Masonry of Most Worshipful Brother 
William Mercer Wilson, First Grand Master of the 
Grand Lodge of Canada. Such an event is in itself 
outstanding; but when the beautiful setting of the 
church grounds is seen, it is small wonder that so 
many from far and near assemble to do honour and 
pay respect to the memory of that worthy head and 
patron of our organization. The service was held 
under the combined sponsorship of the rector of the 
church. Rev. T. B. Holland, B.Ai, B.D., R.D. and 
Norfolk Lodge No. 10, A.F. & A.M., Simcoe. 

Wor. Bro. H. P. Innes, Worshipful Master, and 
the committee, consisting of M. W. Bro. W. J. 
Dunlop, R. W. Bro. E. G. Dixon, V. W. Bro. R. B. 
Kent, W. Bro. John Anguish and W. Bro. B. M. 
Pearce arranged an excellent Anniversary Service. 
While it was intended that the ceremonies should 
take place under the trees as an open-air service, 
Jupiter Pluvius spoiled the fine day by forcing the 
gathering to seek shelter within the Church and 
Sunday School Hall. These were filled to overflowing 
and probably as many more had to be content with 
the covering of their cars. However, as the com- 
mittee had arranged a system of loud speakers, the 
service transferred to the church was heard by all. 
It was estimated, from the reports received, that a 
fine day would have seen thousands there, while 
between 600 and 700 arrived in a most torrential 
storm. The service was conducted by Rev. Mr. Hol- 
land assisted by the Rev. and V. W. Bro. D. J. 
Cornish. The Rt. Rev. and Rt. Wor. Bro. Charles 
A. Seager, Lord Bishop of Huron, delivered a very 
able sermon. The brethren then marched to the 
grave of our First Grand Master, where a magnifi- 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 45 

cent wreath was placed upon the grave and a few 
words of appreciation of the Hfe and works of our 
departed but long remembered Grand Master were 
spoken by the present incumbeift of that office. It 
was an event which will long remain in the mem- 
ories of those present. 

It has been noted with extreme satisfaction 
that the Conference of Grand Masters of Masons 
in the United States was held in February, 1940, and 
that R. W. Bro. Ewart G. Dixon, our Grand Secre- 
tary, was in attendance. It is also noted that a very 
excellent series of discussions of important subjects 
were on the programme and from what our Grand 
Secretary considers he gets out of these discussions 
and his intercourse with the Grand Masters and 
others attending, it is to be hoped that our Grand 
Lodge will always be represented. I have not been 
able to see how ii is financed but I would suggest 
that, if there be any fee payable. Grand Lodge pay 
that fee to permit our attendance at the Conference. 

It has come to the attention of the Grand 
Master that for some years past in a few districts 
(and I sincerely trust it is very few) the officers of 
a lodge are installed and that portion of the cere- 
mony where the Secretary is requested to produce 
the Auditor's Report, Section 159, is overlooked. 
This has led to a bad state of affairs in connection 
with the Secretary's and Treasurer's financial 
records. Men supposedly honest and particular have 
been found to be anything but so. The lodge is the 
consequent loser and, instead of being in good 
financial condition, it is almost bankrupt. The In- 
stalling Master, at such a time, has no legitimate 
reason for omitting this part of the ceremony. The 
lodge and its officers should be checked and the 
matter reported to the Grand Secretary in order 
that matters may be corrected. The D.D.G.M. should 
also have been aware of this state of affairs for, on 
his regular visit of inspection, he is expected to see 
that such necessary procedure in lodge finances is 
carried out. The Master, officers, and members 
should also realize that such an annual accounting 



46 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

is essential and should see that it is forthcoming. 
In fact, where such a state of affairs exists, the 
members of the Fraternity are not fulfilling their 
duties to their loflge and to themselves. It is too 
late to lock the door after the horse is stolen. It is 
the responsibility of each and every member of a 
lodge, whether officer or not, to see that this pro- 
cedure is properly carried out. To those who receive 
elevation to office is entrusted the direct super- 
vision of the lodge's affairs. It is all the more in- 
cumbent upon them to overlook no such lethargic 
state of handling matters but to draw the attention 
of the lodge thereto and insist upon the report or 
audit being satisfactorily made. It is hoped that 
this question will never have to be referred to 
again. 

There are times when the Grand Secretary or 
the Grand Master, on looking over the monthly sum- 
monses of the various lodges, notes with pleasure 
the doings of the lodges and the spirit of friendship 
which exists, resulting in sister lodges visiting one 
another, thus working for the strengthening of the 
brotherly ties existing between Masons. Such in- 
terchange of visits is greatly to be desired and your 
Grand Master would that there was much more 
thereof. Anything tending to the uplifting of the 
members is cordially welcomed by Grand Lodge. 
There is, however, another type of visiting which 
requires a little more care in its carrying out. When 
a lodge outside the Jurisdiction is about to be re- 
quested to pay a visit to an Ontario lodge, the 
Ontario lodge is required by the rules of Grand 
Lodge to write for the permission of the Grand 
Master and also for the permission of the Grand 
Master of the Jurisdiction from which the visiting 
lodge is coming. This is but an act of courtesy and, 
while your Grand Master is not objecting to the visi- 
tation and sincerely hopes that much good may 
come of every such visit, there are many little mat- 
ters to be attended to by way of courtesy which 
the Grand Master will be only too willing to lend a 
hand to aid. It is expected that the secretaries of 
such lodges will see to it that the required steps be 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 47 

taken to prevent irregularities and that permission 
be sought of the Grand Master at a time early 
enough to prevent inconvenience and worry. 

Owing to illness, W. Bro. Robert F. Cowling 
of North Gate Lodge, No. 591, Toronto, was unable 
to be installed until about three months after his 
election, I therefore recommend that a motion be 
passed by Grand Lodge granting W. Bro. Robert F. 
Cowling the rank of Past Master of North Gate 
Lodge, No. 591, notwithstanding that the provi- 
sions of the Constitution require a full year's ser- 
vice in the office of Master of the lodge to entitle 
him to past rank of the office. 

To the officers and members of Madoc Lodge, 
No. 48, Madoc, we tender our sincere sympathy in 
the loss which they suffered when their lodge room 
was destroyed by fire. Filled with optimism, they 
will, we trust, soon re-establish themselves. 

Another matter which has for years been a 
cause of worry to both lodges and the officers of 
Grand Lodge is the method of determining the dates 
of regular meetings of the lodge. That of a relation 
to the phases of the moon — a survival of the horse 
and buggy days — might very reasonably be con- 
sidered by the individual lodges concerned and a 
more up-to-date system evolved. The District De- 
puty Grand Masters have difficulty in making their 
programmes of official visits where this method is 
in vogue. I fully realize that perhaps the fact that 
it is considered a landmark prevents many lodges 
from taking action but there is nothing to prevent 
any lodge changing its night of meeting so long as 
it is done with the sanction of the Grand Master 
and the by-laws of the lodge. Such being the case, 
reference to the phase of the moon could very easily 
be done away with. To those brethren in lodges 
where such is still the practice, I would respectfully 
suggest that some thoughtful consideration be given 
to this question. 

If the brethren could only see the eagerness 
with which I open my morning mail and lay aside 



48 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

that which I am anxious to see, they would then 
realize that I am interested in what is going on in 
the different lodges throughout Ontario. I note the 
date of meeting, the trimness of the summons is- 
sued, the Masonic work on the trestle board, the 
applications and the occupation of the applicants, 
the officers and the roster of the various commit- 
tees. Having done this, I am in a position to know 
how things seem to be going. That is all fipe for 
those lodges which forward me a copy of the sum- 
mons. Last autumn I sent a letter to each secretary 
of every lodge in Ontario requesting that my name 
be placed on the mailing list of the lodge in order 
that I would be sure to receive a summons every 
month. Most of the lodges fulfilled my desire but 
there are still some lodges from which I have yet 
to receive my first summons. It merely means that 
I nave no knowledge whatever regarding that lodge 
or lodges. I therefore am forced again to request 
every secretary to see that my name and address 
are placed on his mailing list. Don't fail me this 
time. Though you mail one to the Grand Secretary, 
that is not enough. That is kept on file there and is 
not sent on to me at Ottawa. 

The unusual conditions of the world today have 
caused Masonic relationships to be somewhat strange 
also. Owing to this condition many of our Grand 
Representatives of Grand Lodges near our Grand 
Lodge have resigned their Commissions. I have 
great pleasure in naming R. W. Bro. W. H. Gregory, 
Grand Representative of Idaho, near this Grand 
Lodge. 

Holding the Commission of Grand Representa- 
tive of the Grand Lodge of North Dakota and hav- 
ing had the pleasure of visiting that Grand Lodge 
in June, 1939, and meeting the various members as 
they had assembled for their Annual Communica- 
tion from all parts of the Northern State, my recol- 
lections are still very vivid as to how the Grand 
Master of the year. Most W. Bro. R. E. Trousdale, 
was kindness itself in his welcome to me. His con- 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1940 49 

ducting- of his Grand Lodge seemed simplicity itself 
and nothing seemed to bother him. Great was my 
feeling of sadness and loss when I recently read of 
his passing from this life when he seemed to be just 
at the zenith of his manhood and usefulness. He 
will be sorely missed not only for his financial and 
executive ability but as a man and sympathetic 
friend and brother. 

I cannot complete my address without a refer- 
ence to the fact that we are this year again meeting 
in Toronto, and not in Ottawa, as had been selected 
by Grand Lodge. On going to the management of 
the Chateau Laurier Hotel on my return from Grand 
Lodge in July, 1939, in order to book the hotel for 
July 14th to 18th, 1940, I was surprised to be in- 
formed that a Youth Conference had booked the 
same time a year previously, or two years before 
needing it. After some discussion and endeavours 
to have it changed, I finally had to decide that a 
meeting in Ottawa was out of the question and so 
turned to the Past Masters' Association of Toronto 
to see whether or not they would be willing to func- 
tion for a Grand Lodge Communication in Toronto 
in July, 1940. They acquiesed immediately and said 
that they would be only too willing to act, were it 
necessary. To these faithful men. Grand Lodge 
owes a debt of gratitude and, on behalf of Grand 
Lodge, I wish to pay our fervent respects to the 
Toronto Past Masters' and Wardens' Association 
for their ready and thorough assistance and support 
given under the circumstances. Full well can I 
realize how burdensome Grand Lodge may become 
to any one city and how delightful it is for these 
men to have the opportunity of getting away for 
a short holiday and to see the other fellow doing the 
chores. Let us trust that our Toronto Brethren will 
have that opportunity in 1941. 

J. A. DOBBIE, 

Grand Master. 



50 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

At the conclusion of the Address M.W. Bro. R. 
B. Dargavel moved, seconded by M.W. Bro. A. J. 
Anderson that the Grand Master appoint a com- 
mittee to consider and report on his Address. The 
motion was carried. 

The Grand Master appointed M.W. Bro. W. S. 
Herrington, Chairman of the committee composed 
of all Past Grand Masters in attendance at Grand 
Lodge. 

APPENDIX 

Dedications 

The following lodge rooms have been dedicated : 

Silver Lodge, No. 486, Cobalt, on Friday, Sept. 22nd, 
1939, by R.W. Bro. J. A. McRae, Deputy Grand 
Master. 

Strong Lodge, No. 423, Sundridge, on Thursday, 
May 16th, 1940, by the Grand Master. 

Corner Stones 

The Corner Stone of St. Andrew's Anglican 
Church at Windsor was laid with Masonic Ceremony 
by M.W. Bro. W. J. Dunlop, on Sunday, Nov. 5th, 
1939. 

The Corner Stone of the New High School at 
Palmerston was laid with Masonic Ceremony by M. 
W. Bro. W. J. Dunlop, on Wednesday, May 29th, 
1940. 

Especial Communication 

An Especial Communication was held on Sun- 
day, June 23rd, 1940, at St. John's Anglican Church, 
Woodhouse, at 2.45 o'clock in the afternoon, to cele- 
brate the One Hundredth Anniversary of the initi- 
ation of our First Grand Master, M.W. Bro. William 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 51 

Mercer Wilson. The Grand Master presided and was 
assisted by Rt. Wor. Bro. and Rt. Rev. Charles A. 
Seager, Lord Bishop of Huron, V.W. Bro. D. J. 
Cornish and Rev. T. B, Holland, B.A., B.D., rector 
of St. John's Anglican Church. 

GRAND REPRESENTATIVES 

On the recommendation of the Grand Masters 
concerned, the Grand Master appointed the follow- 
ing brethren to act as Grand Representatives of this 
Grand Lodge near their respective Grand Lodges and 
commissions were issued to them: 

South Australia T. Phelps 

Colorado E. J. Wittelshofer 

Sweden 0, A. E. Lithander 

Under the nomination of the Grand Master of 
Canada, in the Province of Ontario, the following 
brethren accepted commissions from the respective 
Grand Masters to act in this Grand Lodge as Grand 
Representative of the Grand Lodge specified. 

Massachusetts F. A. Copus 

Idaho W. H. Gregory 

Washington N. F. D. Kelley 

Sweden C. H. Reeve 

Porto Rico K. B. Konger 

LETTERS OF REGRET 

The Grand Secretary read letters and communi- 
cations from many Grand Masters, distinguished 
brethren and Grand Lodges extending most cordial 
greetings and best wishes for a successful meeting 
and expressing sincere regret that they were unable 
to be present or represented, 

RECEPTION OF GRAND REPRESENTATIVES 

As the Grand Secretary called the roll of Grand 
Representatives of Foreign Jurisdictions those who 



52 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

were present attended at the Altar and received a 
most cordial wlcome from the Grand Master. Grand 
Honours were then given under the direction of the 
Grand Director of Ceremonies. 

GRAND TREASURER'S REPORT 

The Grand Treasurer, M.W. Bro. J. A. Rowland 
presented his report as follows: 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers 
and Members of Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of 
Canada, in the Province of Ontario. 
I hereby present my Report for the year ended 

31st May, 1940. 

The following statements, audited and duly 
certified, are attached: 

General Fund — Statement of Receipts and Dis- 
bursements, and Schedule of Investments. 

Memorial and Semi- Centennial Funds — State- 
ment of Receipts and Disbursements, and 
Schedule of Investments. 

The securities listed in the various schedules 
are deposited with The Canada Permanent Trust 
Company in Toronto, and the schedules have been 
prepared from lists furnished and signed by the 
Trust Company, and verified by the Auditor, the 
values given are the face values of the securities. 

All of which is fraternally submitted. 

JOHN A. ROWLAND, 

Grand Treasurer. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 53 

GENERAL FUND 

RECEIPTS 

Balance in Canadian Bank of Com- 
merce, 1st June, 1939 $ 13,362.22 

Petty Cash on hand 200.00 

$ 13,562.22 

Received from: — 

Grand Secretary from Lodges ...$103,691.05 

Refunds 320.87 

Interest 15,816.19 

$119,828.11 

Investments Matured or Sold: 

$15,000.00 Dominion of Canada 

Bonds 5%, 1941 $ 16,012.50 

10,000.00 National Trust Co. 4% 

Inv. Rec. Matured 10,000.00 

10,000.00 Canada Permanent 

Mtge. Co. 4% Deb. 

Matured 10,000.00 

5,121.37 City of Peterboro 41/2% 

Bonds Matured 5,121.37 

2,000.00 Township of Etobicoke 

5^/2% Bonds Matured. 2,000.00 

$ 43,133.87 

$176,524.20 
DISBURSEMENTS 



General Charges — Schedule herevi^ith.$ 40,557.72 
Benevolent Grants 78,995.00 

$119,552.72 

Invested Funds: 

$20,000.00 Dominion of Canada 

Bonds BM7c, 1952 $ 20,000.00 

11,000.00 Province of Ontario 

Bonds 3%%, 1955 .... 10,807.50 

10,000.00 Canada Permanent 

Mtge. Co. Deb. 31/2%, 

1945 10,000.00 

2,000.00 Canada Permanent 

Mtge. Co. Deb. 3^/2%, 

1945 2,000.00 

$ 42,807.50 
Accrued Interest 19.59 

$ 42,827.09 



54 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Balance in Canadian Bank of Com- 
merce, 31st May, 1940 $ 13,944.39 

Petty Cash on hand 200.00 

$ 14,144.39 



$176,524.20 



JOHN A. ROWLAND, 

Grand Treasurer. 



H. FEANK VIGEON, 

Auditor. 

Toronto, 12th June, 1940. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1940 55 

SCHEDULE OF GENERAL CHARGES 

1939 
June 15 R. B. Dargavel — Expenses to G. L. of 

England $ 750.00 

F. A. Copus— Expenses to G. L. of Eng. 750.00 

R. B. Dargavel— Travelling Expenses.. 300.00 

Grand Secretary— Salary 416.66 

30 Chief Clerk— Salary 300.00 

Clerk— Salary 150.00 

Stenographer— Salary 100.00 

Bell Telephone Co 8.75 

Supervisor Benevolence — Salary 333.33 

Miss J. Place — Retiring Allowance, June 41.66 

Mrs. W. M. Logan — Allowance, June . . 83.33 

Grand Treasurer's Clerk 100.00 

Auditor 150.00 

Hamilton Masonic Hall— Rent 250.00 

Petty Cash — Postage, Express, Long 

Distance Calls and Office Sundries 92.47 

Geo. H. Lees— 50 Year P.M. Jewels 9.11 

National Paper Goods Ltd. — Printing 

and Stationery 7.99 

Ewart G. Dixon — Expenses of G. M. 

Conference, Toronto 21.45 

Dye & Durham — Printing and Stationery 12.60 

E. B. Wilson — Printing and Stationery'. 33.75 
W. S. Herrington — G. M. Conference, 

Toronto 13.15 

Griffin & Richmond Co. — Stationery . . . 16.20 
Better Business Unlimited — Printing 

and Stationery 2.75 

H. J. Alexander — Typewriting 8.97 

July 14 Chairman Fraternal Correspondence 

(W. N. Ponton) 400.00 

Canadian Passenger Association — G. L. 

Expenses 1939 9.00 

Ambrose Kent & Sons Ltd. — Repairs to 

Regalia 30.00 

Cooper — Flowers 12.00 

W. T. Robb — Expenses re Commission. 17.68 
18 W. T. Overend — G. L. Meeting Expenses 

1939 3,343.52 

20 Royal York Hotel — G. L. Meeting Ex- 
penses 1939 495.99 

31 Grand Secretary — Salarv 416.66 

Chief Clerk— Salary . .' 300.00 

Clerk— Salary 150.00 

Stenographer — Salary 100.00 

Bell Telephone Co 8.75 

Supervisor Benevolence — Salary 333.33 

Supervisor Benevolence — Stenographer . 150.00 

G. M.— Travelling Expenses 750.00 



56 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

G. M.— Stenographer 150.00 

J. A. McRae — Travelling Expenses .... 250.00 

J. A. McRae— Postage 15.00 

Chairman Benevolence Committee — 

Postage 15.00 

Miss J. Place — Retiring Allowance, July 41.66 

Mrs. W. M. Logan — Allowance, July . . 83.33 
Petty Cash — Postage, Express, Long 

Distance Calls and Office Sundries. 83.46 
Times Job Print Co. — G. L. Expenses 

1939 144.18 

Herbert McPhie — Insurance Premium . 18.60 

Geo. H. Lees— 50 year P. M. Jewels . . . 61.38 

The T. Eaton Co. Ltd.— G. M. Regalia. 340.00 
Aug. 4 Stainton & Evis Ltd. — Printing and 

Stationery 3.00 

Victor Mann — Memorial Tribute 10.00 

Grand Treasurer's Clerk — Postage .... 10.00 
W. J. Attig — balance G. L. Expenses 

1939 15.77 

Griffin & Richmond Co. — Printing and 

Stationery 18.04 

The T. Eaton Co. Ltd. — Badges G. L. 

Meeting 1939 265.95 

31 Grand Secretary — Salary 416.66 

Chief Clerk— Salary 300.00 

Clerk— Salary 150.00 

Stenographer — Salary 100.00 

Bell Telephone Co 8.75 

Supervisor Benevolence — Salary 333.33 

Miss J. Place — Retiring Allowance, Aug. 41.66 

Mrs. W. M. Logan — Allowance, August 83.33 
Griffin & Richmond Co. — Printing and 

Stationery 25.38 

Robert Duncan & Co. Ltd. — Printing and 

Stationery 3.45 

Petty Cash — Postage, Express, Long 

Distance Calls and Office Sundries. 108.76 
Sept. 1 N. W. J. Haydon — Masonic Library 

Supplies 23.25 

30 Grand Secretary — Salary 416.66 

Chief Clerk— Salary 300.00 

Clerk— Salary 150.00 

Stenographer — Salary 100.00 

Bell Telephone Co 8.75 

Supervisor Benevolence — Salary 333.33 

Supervisor Benevolence — Travelling 

Expenses 300.00 

Miss J. Place — Retiring Allowance, Sept. 41.66 

Mrs. W. M. Logan — Allowance, Sept. . . 83.33 

Grand Treasurer's Clerk 100.00 

Auditor 150.00 

Hamilton Masonic Hall— Rent 250.00 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1940 57 

Testimonial to P. G. M 500.00 

Petty Cash — Postage, Express, Long 

Distance Calls and Office Sundries. 131.46 

Ryerse Bros. — Memorial Tributes 7.00 

The Macoomb Press — G. L. Expenses 

1939 312.83 

Griffin & Richmond Co. — Printing and 

Stationery 10.26 

International Railway Publishing Co. — 

Stationery 6.48 

Times Job Print Co. — Printing Consti- 
tutions 641.87 

Robert Duncan & Co. Ltd. — Printing and 

Stationery 3.40 

Masonic Relief Association — Canada and 

U. S. A 239.17 

T. C. Wardley — Travelling Expenses 
attending Canada & U. S. Relief 

Ass'n New York 64.25 

Oct. 12 N. W. J. Haydon — Masonic Library 

supplies 21.51 

Dorothy F. Quick— Memorial Tributes.. 20.00 

Birks Ellis Ryrie Ltd.— Jubilee Medals. 240.00 

Hugh Murray — Insurance Premium . . . 13.50 

Robert Duncan & Co. Ltd. — Printing and 

Stationery 147.15 

F. & J. McMulkin — Fidelity Bond 

Premiums 37.50 

17 E. G. Dixon — Expenses of G. M. Con- 
ference, Toronto . . , 21.20 

F. A. Copus — Expenses G. M. Confer- 
ence, Toronto 18.00 

Times Job Print Co. — Printing G. L. 

Proceedings 1939 2,474.65 

31 Grand Secretary- Salary 416.66 

Chief Clerk— Salary 300.00 

Clerk— Salary 150.00 

Stenographer — Salary 100.00 

Bell Telephone Co 8.75 

Supervisor Benevolence — Salary 333.33 

Miss J. Place — Retiring Allowance, 

October 41.66 

Mrs. W. M. Logan — Allowance, October 83.33 

W. J. Attig — Postage on Proceedings . . 185.78 

Griffin & Richmond Co. — Printing and 

Stationery 132.79 

Muir Cap & Regalia Ltd. — Repairs to 

Regalia 25.00 

Charles Reid & Co. — Mailing boxes for 

Proceedings 49.83 

John Ness — Masonic Library Supplies.. 5.00 
Joseph Fulton — Masonic Library, bind- 
ing books 40.80 



58 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

S. A. Moffat— G. L. Expenses 1939 19.92 

Petty Cash — Postage, Express, Long 

Distance Calls and Office Sundries. 91.59 

Times Job Print Co.— Printing 12.96 

Nov. 9 Addressograph Co. — New Equipment... 198.32 
N. W. J. Haydon — Masonic Library 

expenses 10.72 

The Macoomb Press — G. L. Expenses 

1939 39.59 

Remington Rand Ltd. — Office Supplies. 3.00 
W. J. Dunlop — Expenses, Corner Stone, 

Windsor 19.45 

30 Grand Secretary— Salary 416.66 

Chief Clerk— Salary 300.00 

Clerk— Salary 150.00 

Stenographer — Salary 100.00 

Bell Telephone Co 8.75 

Miss J. Place — Retiring Allowance, Nov. 41.66 

Mrs. W. M. Logan — Allowance, Nov. . . 83.33 

Supervisor Benevolence — Salary 333.33 

Petty Cash — Postage, Express, Long 

Distance Calls and Office Sundries. 109.65 
Dec. 7 Griffin & Richmond Co. — Printing and 

Stationery 26.62 

N. W. J. Haydon — Masonic Library 

Supplies 12.42 

Robert Duncan & Co. — Printing and 

Stationery 58.32 

Geo. H. Lees— 50 year P. M. Jewel 5.04 

Dictaphone Corp. Ltd. — Office Supplies 3.00 
Supervisor Benevolence — Travelling Ex- 
penses 300.00 

20 Grand Secretary — Salary 416.66 

Chief Clerk— Salarv 300.00 

Clerk— Salary 150.00 

Stenographer — Salary 100.00 

Bell Telephone Co 8.90 

Supervisor Benevolence — Salary 333.33 

Supervisor Benevolence — Stenographer . 150.00 

G. M. Allowance 750.00 

G. M. Stenographer 150.00 

D. G. M. Allowance 250.00 

D. G. M. Postage 15.00 

Grand Treasurer's Clerk 100.00 

Auditor 150.00 

Miss J. Place — Retiring Allowance, Dec. 41.66 

Mrs. W. M. Logan— Allowance, Dec. . . . 83.33 

N. W. J. Haydon — Librarian Honorarium 100.00 
30 Robert Duncan & Co. Ltd. — Printing 

and Stationery 2.00 

Hamilton Masonic" Hall— Rent 250.00 

Griffin & Richmond Co. — Printing and 

Stationery 58 32 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 59 

Thos. H. Riches — Office Furniture and 

Equipment 91.00 

Victor Smith & Co.— Office Furniture.. 16.00 
Cunningham Studio — P. G. M. Photo- 
graph 25 00 

Geo. H. Lees — 50 year P. M. Jewel .... 5.04 

Petty Cash — Postage, Express, Long 

Distance Calls and Office Sundries .... 148.69 

1940 
Jan. 12 N. W. J. Haydon — Masonic Library ex- 
penses 3.86 

Howell Lithographic Co. — Certificates . 313.84 
23 Canadian Red Cross Society — Contri- 
bution 500 00 

31 Grand Secretary — Salary 416.66 

Chief Clerk— Salary 300.00 

Clerk— Salary 150.00 

Stenographer— Salary 100.00 

Bell Telephone Co 8.90 

Supervisor Benevolence — Salary 333.33 

Miss J. Place — Retiring Allowance, Jan. 41.66 

Mrs. W. M. Logan— Allowance, Jan. . . 83.33 

Hamilton Masonic Hall— Rent 133.33 

Geo. H. Lees— 50 year P. M. Jewels . . . 10.24 
G. S. Pearcy Agency — Toronto Library 

Library Insurance Premium 12.25 

William Patterson Co. — Office Cleaning 

Supplies 17.39 

Petty Cash — Postage, Express. Long Dis- 
tance Calls and Office Sundries . . . 191.79 
Feb. 8 N. W. J. Haydon — Masonic Library ex- 
penses ". 12.77 

Robert Duncan & Co. — Printing and 

Stationery 4.25 

Victor Smith & Co.— Office Furniture . 18.00 
W. G. L. Hardie — Repairs to Office 

Furniture 26.25 

G. M. Conference, Washington, — Mem- 
bership fee and Exchange 55.50 

29 Grand Secretary — Salary 416.66 

Chief Clerk— Salary 300.00 

Clerk— Salary . . . .' 150.00 

Stenographer — Salary 100.00 

Bell Telephone Co. ' 8.90 

Supervisor Benevolence — Salary 333.33 

Miss J. Place — Retiring Allowance, Feb. 41.66 

Mrs. W. M. Logan— Allowance, Feb. . . 83.33 
Better Business Unlimited — Printing 

and Stationery 2.97 

Griffin & Richmand Co. — Printing and 

Stationery 84.78 

W. S. Herrington — Reviewer's Confer- 
ence, Toronto 4.50 



60 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

F. A. Copus — Reviewer's Conference, 

Toronto 10.00 

Hamilton Masonic Hall— Rent 133.33 

Petty Cash — Postage, Express, Long 

Distance Calls and Office Sundries. 132.49 
Griffin & Richmond Co. — Printing and 

Stationery 49.90 

E. G. Dixon — Expenses G. M. and G. S. 

Conference, Washington 74.11 

Mar. 8 Robert Duncan & Co. — Printing and 

Stationery 5.00 

N. W. J. Haydon — Masonic Library 

Toronto expenses 9.17 

Victor Smith & Co. — Office 

Furniture $ 652.00 

Inter-office communication 

system 150.00 

802.00 

E. B. Wilson — Printing and Stationery. 14.04 

A. E. McArthur— Painting Office 12.65 

15 Office Specialty Mfg. Co. — Office Fur- 
niture 66.00 

26 Victor Smith Co., Office Furniture 18.00 

Griffin & Richmond Co. — Printing & 

Stationery 10.37 

E. G. Dixon— P. G. M. & G. S. Travel- 
ling Expenses, Blenheim 33.05 

30 Grand Secretary— Salary 416.66 

Chief Clerk— Salary 300.00 

Clerk— Salary 150.00 

Stenographer — Salary 100.00 

Bell Telephone Co 10.30 

Supervisor Benevolence — Salary .... 333.33 
Miss J. Place — Retiring Allowance, 

March 41.66 

Mrs. W. M. Logan — Allowance, March. 83.33 

Grand Treasurer's Clerk 100.00 

Auditor 150.00 

Hamilton Masonic Hall— Rent 133.33 

Griffin & Richmond Co. — Printing and 

Stationery 159.73 

Petty Cash — Postage, Express, Long 

Distance Calls and Office Sundries. 61.59 
C. W. Robb — Chairman Masonic Educa- 
tion 24.38 

Apr. 1 N. W. J. Haydon — Masonic Library 

Expenses 13.14 

4 Grand Treasurer's Clerk — Postage .... 10.00 

22 Board of Education, Toronto — Rent Hall 

for G. L. Meeting 1940 50.00 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 61 

23 Canadian Passenger Association — G. L. 

Meeting 1940— Identification Certif, 9.00 

Remington Rand Ltd. — Office Supplies. 3.00 

Victor Smith & Co.— Office Furniture.. 21.95 

30 Grand Secretary— Salary 416.66 

Chief Clerk— Salary 300.00 

Clerk— Salary 150.00 

Stenographer — Salary 100.00 

Bell Telephone Co 10.30 

Supervisor Benevolence — Salary 333.33 

Miss J. Place — Retiring Allowance, Apr. 41.66 

Mrs. W. M. Logan — Allovi^ance, April . . 83.33 

Hamilton Masonic Hall— Rent 133.33 

Petty Cash — Postage, Express, Long 

Distance Calls and Office Sundries. 112.61 

E. G. Dixon — Expenses of G. M. Con- 

ference, Toronto 25.45 

F. A. Copus — Expenses G. M. Confer- 

ence, Toronto 9.75 

Griffin & Richmond Co. — Printing and 

Stationery 30.02 

E. G. Dixon— Expenses G. M. Reception, 

Ottawa 29.74 

May 4 W. S. Harrington — Expenses G. M. Con- 
ference, Toronto 12.20 

N. W. J. Kaydon — Masonic Library 

Toronto expenses 3.94 

Griffin & Richmond Co. — Printing and 

Stationery 7.57 

31 Grand Secretary — Salary 416.74 

Chief Clerk— Salary 300.00 

Clerk— Salary 150.00 

Stenographer — Salarv 100.00 

Bell Telephone Co. .' 10.30 

Supervisor Benevolence — Salary 333.37 

Miss J. Place — Retiring Allowance, May 41.74 

Mrs. W. M. Logan — Allowance, May . . 83.37 

Hamilton Masonic Hall— Rent 133.33 

N. W. J. Haydon — Librarian Honorarium 100.00 

E. T. Howe — Expenses attendance G. L. 

Michigan 24.27 

Petty Cash — Postage, Express, Long 

Distance Calls and Office Sundries 104.88 
Griffin & Richmond Co.: 

Printing and Stationery ....$ 1.89 
G. L. Meeting 1940— Printing 133.11 

135.00 

Dye & Durham — Stationery 19.50 

Supervisor Benevolence — Balance Travel- 
ling Expenses 16.74 

Robert Duncan & Co. — Stationery 4.90 

F. & J. McMulkin — Premium on Fidelity 



GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Bond 25.00 

Canada Permanent Trust 

Co. — Disbursements $ 10.44 

Administration Fee 302.00 

312.51 

$ 40,557.72 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 63 

GENERAL ACCOUNT 

Schedule of Investments, 31st May, 1940 

Face 

Due Value 

Landed Banking & Loan Co 3%% 1941 $ 5,000.00 

Township of Barton SVa % 1952 5,000.00 

City of Brandon 5% 1939 2,000.00 

Canadian National Railway 5% 1954 8,000.00 

Township of Etobicoke 51/2% 1941 3,000.00 

Township of Etobicoke 51/2% 1942 2,000.00 

Township of Etobicoke 5^/2% 1943 3,000.00 

Town of Gananoque 5% 1941 5,000.00 

City of Hamilton 6% 1953 3,000.00 

City of Hamilton 6% 1949 3,000.00 

City of Hamilton 6% 1948 4,000.00 

Province of Manitoba 6% 1947 11,000.00 

Province of Manitoba 51/2% 1955 10,000.00 

City of New Westminster 5% 1943 5,000.00 

City of Oshawa 5% 1941 10,000.00 

City of Owen Sound 5% 1945 10,000.00 

Province of New Brunswick 5% 1954 5,000.00 

Province of Prince Edward Island 6% 1947 25,000.00 

Township of Sandwich East 5V2% 1934 4,000.00 

City of Saskatoon 5% 1945 10,000.00 

City of Toronto 6% 1950 12,000.00 

City of Toronto 6% 1 949 3,000.00 

City of Woodstock 51/2 % 1950 3,000.00 

City of Woodstock 5y2% 1949 2,000.00 

Tov/nship of East York 41/^% 1952 2,000.00 

Toronto General Trusts Corp., 

Guaranteed Investment Receipt 31/2% 1943 11,000.00 
Toronto General Trusts Corp., 

Guaranteed Investment Receipt 3%% 1942 10,000.00 
Toronto General Trusts Corp., 

Guaranteed Investment Receipt 3^^% 1943 15,000.00 
The Canada Permanent Trust Co., 

Guaranteed Investment Receipt 3^/2% 1941 10,000.00 
The Canada Permanent Trust Co., 

Guaranteed Investment Receipt 3^2% 1942 10,000.00 
Canada Permanent Mortgage Corp., 

Debenture 3y2% 1942 1,500.00 

Canada Permanent Mortgage Corp., 

Debenture 3^/2% 1945 10,000.00 

Canada Permanent Mortgage Corp., 

Debenture 31/2 % 1945 2,000.00 

Dominion of Canada 41^% 1959 65,500.00 

Dominion of Canada 3^4% 1952 20,000.00 

Province of Nova Scotia 3M% 1956 12,000.00 



61 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Province of Ontario 3% % 1955 11,000.00 

City of Windsor 3% % 1975 21,000.00 

Hydro-Electric Power Commission 

of Ontario SV2% 1947 10,000.00 

Burrard Dry Dock Co., Limited . . 3% 1950 5,000.00 

Total Face Value $369,000.00 

Cash on hand, 31st May, 1940 $ 200.00 

Cash in Bank, 31st May, 1940 13,944.39 

$ 14,144.39 

$383,144.39 



JOHN A. ROWLAND, 

Grand Treasurer. 



•Verified' 

H. FRANK VIGEON, 

Auditor. 
Toronto, 12th June, 1940. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 65 



COMBINED MEMORIAL AND SEMI-CENTENNIAL 



FUNDS 



RECEIPTS 



Balance in Canadian Bank of Commerce, 1st 

June, 1939 $ 4,338.65 

Cheque issued prior to 1st June, 1939 cancelled. . 60.00 



$ 4,398.65 
Received from: — 

Grand Secretary from Lodges . . $ 57.00 

Refunds 49.02 

Interest and Exchange 19,484.52 

Investments Matured or Sold: 
$15,000.00 City of Hamilton 

Bonds 412%, 1940 .... $15,151.25 
1,000.00 City of Toronto 

Bonds 510%, Matured.. 1,000.00 
2,000.00 Province of Ont. 

5%, 1942 2,000.00 

1,400.00 National Trust 
Co, Investment Receipt 

4%, Matured 1,400.00 

1,003.07 Town of Oakville 

Bonds 5%, Matured . . . 1,003.07 
1,319.25 City of Peterboro 

Bonds 41/^%, Matured.. 1,319.25 
1,953.81 Township of Eto- 
bicoke Bonds 5V2%, Ma- 
tured 1,953.81 

13,000.00 Village of Forest 

Hill Bonds 5%, Matured 13,000.00 

$ 36,827.38 
Accrued Interest, pre- 
vious year purchases 100.27 

$ 36,927.65 

$ 56,518.19 

$ 60,916.84 



66 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



DISBURSEMENTS 

Benevolent Grants $ 20,375.00 

Canada Permanent Trust Co.: Including 
Semi-Centennial Fund: 
Administration Fee ...$ 355.90 

Disbursements 19.81 

$ 375.71 

$ 20,750.71 

Invested Funds: 

$ 3,000.00 Province of Ontario Bonds 

3%, 1949 $ 2,749.50 

3,000.00 Province of Ontario Bonds 

3%, 1950 2,730.00 

2,000.00 T. and N. 0. Rly. Bonds 

4%, 1964 2,020.00 

7,000.00 Can. National Rly. Bonds 

3%, 1950 6,580.00 

2,000.00 Province of Ontario Bonds 

51/2%, 1942 2,000.00 

2,000.00 Township of York Debs. 

3%, 1937— Extended 1,920.00 

15,000.00 Province of Quebec Bonds 

3%%, 1955 14,737.50 

4,000.00 Township of York Bonds 

41/2%, 1971 3,980.00 

36,717.00 

Accrued Interest 240.65 

$ 36,957.65 

Balance in Canadian Bank of Com- 
merce, 31st May 1940: 

Capital Account $ 262.61 

Income Account 2,945.87 

$ 3,208.48 

$ 60,916.84 



JOHN A. ROWLAND, 

Grand Treasurer. 
H. FRANK VIGEON, 

Auditor. 

Toronto, 12th June, 1940. 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1940 

COMBINED MEMORIAL AND SEMI-CENTENNIAL 
FUNDS 



Schedule of Investments, 31st May, 1940 

PART ONE— MEMORIAL FUND 

Face 

Due Value 

Township of Etobicoke 51/2% 1941 2,226.27 

Township of Etobicoke 51/2% 1942 3,000.00 

Township of Etobicoke 51/2% 1943 2,816.97 

Township of Etobicoke 5% 1945 2,993.91 

Township of Etobicoke 5% 1946 143.61 

City of London 41/2% 1944 15,000.00 

Province of Manitoba 6% 1947 10,000.00 

Province of Ontario 5I2 % 1942 27,000.00 

Province of New Brunswick 5% 1954 10,000.00 

City of Peterborough 5% 1940 13,000.00 

City of Saskatoon 5% 1961 5,000.00 

Province of Saskatchewan 6% 1952 1,000.00 

City of Toronto 51/2% 1952 5,000.00 

Dominion of Canada 41/2% 1959 30,000.00 

Canadian National Railway 5% 1954 25,000.00 

Toronto General Trusts Corp., 

Guaranteed Investment Receipt 3^/2% 1944 20,000.00 
Toronto General Trusts Corp., 

Guaranteed Investment Receipt 3y2% 1943 10,000.00 
The Canada Permanent Trust Co., 

Guaranteed Investment Receipt 3^/2% 1944 10,000.00 
The Canada Permanent Trust Co., 

Guaranteed Investment Receipt 3V2% 1944 10,000.00 
National Trust Company Limited, 

Guaranteed Investment Receipt 3% 1941 15,000.00 
Canada Permanent Mortgage Corp., 

Debenture 31/2% 1940 1,000.00 

Province of Ontario 6% 1943 21,000.00 

Province of New Brunswick 5^/2% 1950 1,000.00 

Town of Orillia 41/2% 1954 4,000.00 

Province of Nova Scotia 3%% 1956 20,000.00 

St. John Dry Dock & Ship Build- 
ing Co 3 V2 % 1952 3,500.00 

Dominion of Canada 3% Perpetual 12,000.00 

Burrard Dry Dock Co. Limited ...3% 1950 5,000.00 
Canada Permanent Mortgage Corp., 

Debenture 31/2 % 1942 1,800.00 

City of Windsor 3^4% 1975 25,051.24 

Canada Permanent Mortgage Corp., 

Debenture 31/2 % 1943 3,000.00 

Province of Nova Scotia 3% 1956 5,000.00 

Canadian National Railway 3% 1959 8,500.00 

Province of Ontario 3% 1949 3,000.00 

Province of Ontario 3% 1950 3,000.00 



68 GRAND LODGE 6f CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Temiskaming & Northern Ontario 

Ely. Co 4% 1964 2,000.00 

Canadian National Railway 3% 1950 7,000.00 

Township of York, Debenture 41/2% 1956 2,000.00 

The Canada Permanent Trust Co., 

Guaranteed Investment Receipt 31/2% 1945 15,000.00 

Province of Quebec 3%% 1955 15,000.00 

Township of York, Debentures ...6/41/2% 1971 4,000.00 

Total Face Value $379,032.00 

Cash in Bank, 31st May, 1940 3,208.48 

$382,240,48 



JOHN A. ROWLAND, 

Grand Treasurer. 



'Verified' 

H. FRANK VIGEON, 

Auditor, 
Toronto, 12th June, 1940. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 



69 



Schedule of Investments, 31st May, 1940 

PART TWO— SEMI-CENTENNIAL FUND 

Face 

Due Value 

Township of Barton 51/2 % 1952 $ 2,000.00 

City of Hamilton 5% 1949 1,000.00 

City of Hamilton 5% 1963 3,000.00 

District of North Vancouver 41/2% 1939 3,000.00 

Town of Oakville 5% 1940 1,053.22 

Province of Ontario 6% 1941 1,500.00 

Province of New Brunswick 5% 1954 5,000.00 

City of Saskatoon 5% 1945 7,000.00 

Township of York, Debenture 41/2% 1942 1,440.72 

Province of Saskatchewan 6% 1952 6,00D.00 

Toronto General Trusts Corp., 

Guaranteed Investment Receipt 3%% 1943 5,000.00 
Toronto General Trusts Corp., 

Guaranteed Investment Receipt 31/2% 1943 1,000.00 
Toronto General Tiusts Corp., 

Guaranteed Investment Receipt 31/2% 1941 6,235.00 
The Canada Permanent Trust Co., 

Guaranteed Investment Receipt 3l^% 1945 4,000.00 
The Canada Permanent Trust Co., 

Guaranteed Investment Receipt 31/2% 1942 2,500.00 
Canada Permanent Mortgage Corp., 

Debenture 31/2 % 1940 2,500.00 

Canada Permanent Mortgage Corp., 

Debenture 3^^ % 1942 2,000.00 

Dominion of Canada 41/2 % 1959 6,000.00 

City of Windsor 3^ % 1975 11,736.78 

Township of East York 41/2% 1952 4,000.00 

Township of East York 41^ % 1953 5,315.50 

Total Face Value $ 81,281.22 

Cash in Bank, 31st May, 1940 100.00 



$ 81,381.22 



'Verified' 

H. FRANK VIGEON, 

Auditor. 

Toronto, 12th June, 1940. 



JOHN A. ROWLAND, 

Grand Treasurer. 



70 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

On motion of the Deputy Grand Master, second- 
ed by M.W. Bro. J. A. Rowland, the report was 
received and referred to the Committee on Audit 
and Finance. 

GRAND SECRETARY'S REPORT 

The Grand Secretary, R.W. Bro. E. G. Dixon, 
presented his report as follows: 

To the M.W. the Grand Master, Officers and Mem- 
bers of the Grand Lodge A. F. & A. M. of 
Canada, in the Province of Ontario: 

M.W. Sir and Brethren: 

I beg leave to present my annual report, con- 
taining an account of all moneys received by me, 
and paid to the Grand Treasurer, during the year 
ending the 31st May, 1940. 

The following statements are herewith submit- 
ted viz.: 

A Summary of receipts from various sources 
on General Account; Detail of Receipts on General 
Account and Ledger Balances as at the 31st May, 
1940; a Summary of Receipts for the year; Details 
of Payments to the Grand Treasurer; a Summary 
of Expenditure; Details of the Returns of Lodges 
as at the 31st May, 1940; a Summary of the Re- 
ceipts and of Payments to the Grand Treasurer on 
account of the Semi-Centennial and Memorial 
Funds; and a Statement of the Receipts and Dis- 
bursements on the Semi-Centennial and Memorial 
Funds Revenue Account. 



Amount 


Dr. 


165.00 




521.00 




404.50 


1.00 


332.00 


1.60 


178.00 


3.00 


254.00 


.50 


265.00 


1.00 


356.00 


5.00 


146.50 


2.50 


323.00 


5.50 


452.50 


8.25 


246.05 


4.00 


277.50 


3.00 


995.90 


3.00 


62.50 




265.50 


4.00 


143.50 


3.50 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 71 

Details of Receipts of Grand Lodge on General 
Account and Ledger Balances, Year 

ending May 31st, 1940 

Balance 

No. Name of Lodge Location Amount Dr. Cr. 

2 Niagara.... Niagara 

3 Ancient St. John's-Kingston 

5 Sussex..... Brockville .. 

6 Barton Hamilton 

7 Union Grimsby 

9 Union...... Napanee 

10 Norfolk Simcoe 

11 Moira Belleville 

14 True Britons ..Perth 

15 St. George's _ ..,St. Catharines... 

16 St. Andrew's ^Toronto 

17 St. John's Cobourg 

18 Prince Edward ......Picton 

20 St. John's -London 

21a St. John's „Vankleek Hill 

22 King Solomon's .Toronto 265.50 

23 Richmond Richmond Hill. 

24 St. Francis Smith's Falls 279.50 

25 Ionic -Toronto 235.00 

26 Ontario -Port Hope 137.00 1.00 

27 Strict Observance...Hamilton _ 424.50 6.00 

28 Mount Zion Kemptville 120.50 .50 

29 United Brighton 181.00 

30 Composite .Whitby 130.75 

31 Jerusalem Bowmanville 235.50 2.00 

32 Amity ...Dunnville 194.00 

33 Maitland - Goderich 200.00 7.20 

34 Thistle _..... ...Amherstburg ... 128.50 

35 St. John's .....Cayuga 127.00 1.00 

37 King Hiram Jngersoll 161.25 

38 Trent „ Trenton 218.50 1.00 

39 Mount Zion .Brooklin 120.75 7.25 

40 St. John's Hamilton 504.70 

41 St. George's , Kingsville 343.50 7.00 

42 St. George's .London 263.00 

43 King Solomon's -.Woodstock 387.50 

44 St. Thomas St. Thomas 427.50 

45 Brant Brantford 385.00 

46 Wellington Chatham 237.25 1.50 

47 Great Western Windsor 738.10 3.00 

48 Madoc ....Madoc 131.00 

50 Consecon Consecon 83.20 3.00 

52 Dalhousie -..Ottawa 312.00 

54 Vaughan Maple 92.60 1.50 

55 Merrickville -_Merrickville 91.50 3.00 

56 Victoria Sarnia 287.00 7.00 

57 Harmony ..Binbrook 121.00 



72 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Balance 

No. Name of Lodge Location Amount Dr. Cr. 

58 Doric Ottawa 392.00 1.00 

61 Acacia .Hamilton 778.50 8.50 

62 St. Andrew's ..Caledonia 164.00 3.50 

63 St. John's Carleton Place... 195.00 1.00 

64 Kilwinning ..London 394.35 1.00 

65 Rehoboam .^Toronto 405.00 4.50 

66 Durham Newcastle 100.00 6.50 

68 St. John's ....Ingersoll 143.10 2.00 

69 Stirling Stirling 181.75 1.00 

72 Alma ,Galt 232.00 

73 St. James St. Marys 149.50 3.00 

74 St. James South Augusta 96.00 

75 St. John's ....Toronto 138.25 4.50 

76 Oxford Woodstock 293.00 3.00 

77 Faithful Brethren._Lindsay 303.00 1.50 

78 King Hiram Tillsonburg 297.50 6.00 

79 Simcoe ...Bradford 173.00 

81 St. John's Mount Brydges 100.00 

82 St. John's ,Paris 211.00 

83 Beaver Strathroy 154.00 .50 

84 Clinton Clinton 141.00 

85 Rising Sun .Athens 93.00 1.00 

86 Wilson Toronto 217.00 4.00 

87 Markham Union Markham 177.60 9.00 

88 St. George's ..Owen Sound 150.00 2.50 

90 Manito Collingwood 250.00 1.00 

91 Colborne Colborne 96.00 6.50 

92 Cataraqui ...Kingston 360.00 1.00 

93 Northern Light ...Kincardine 193.50 

94 St. Mark's ...Port Stanley 65.50 .50 

96 Corinthian , Barrie 446.00 2.00 

97 Sharon Queensville ... 

98 True Blue : Bolton 

99 Tuscan Newmarket 182.50 .50 

100 Valley Dundas 

101 Corinthian Peterborough .. 

103 Maple Leaf. St. Catharines.. 

104 St. John's Norwich 

105 St. Mark's Niagara Falls .. 

106 Burford Burford 

107 St. Paul's Lambeth 

108 Blenheim Princeton 

109 Albion ..Harrowsmith .. 

110 Central Prescott 

113 Wilson ...Waterford 

114 Hope Port Hope 

115 Ivy Beamsville 216.00 

116 Cassia Thedford 77.00 1.00 

118 Union Schomberg 67.50 

119 Maple Leaf Bath 120.00 

120 Warren..... Fingal 60.00 3.00 

121 Doric .Brantford 447.50 5.00 



89.00 


3.00 


65.50 




182.50 




250.00 


1.00 


325.00 


3.50 


365.50 


9.00 


178.00 


3.00 


285.50 




110.75 


1.00 


158.80 


4.00 


85.30 


1.50 


178.00 


1.80 


157.50 


2.00 


166.75 




193.20 





TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 73 

Balance 

No. Name of Lodge Location Amount Dr. Cr. 

122 Renfrew Renfrew 114.50 

123 Belleville Belleville 337.50 3.00 

125 Cornwall Cornwall 222.95 12.00 

126 Golden Rule Campbellford ... 200.00 1.00 

127 Franck -Frankford 269.50 4.50 

128 Pembroke Pembroke 198.50 9.00 

129 Rising Sun ......Aurora 124.00 3.00 

131 St. Lawrence ..Southampton ... 107.00 

133 Lebanon Forest Exeter 141.00 

135 St. Clair .....Milton 146.00 

136 Richardson Stouffville 103.00 4.00 

137 Pythagoras ._Meaford 123.00 1.50 

139 Lebanon. Oshawa 283.50 

140 Malahide Aylmer 139.10 

141 Tudor Mitchell 133.50 

142 Excelsior Morrisburg 121.00 

143 Friendly Brothers... Iroquois 118.00 

144 Tecumseh...... Stratford 356.00 .50 

145 J.B.Hall Millbrook 74.50 

146 Prince of Wales ..Newburgh 65.25 1.00 

147 Mississippi Almonte 136.00 2.50 

148 Civil Service „Ottawa 360.50 1.50 

149 Erie ...Port Dover 198.50 3.00 

151 Grand River Kitchener 363.25 

153 Burns Wyoming 72.50 3.00 

154 Irving ...Lucan 117.50 1.50 

155 Peterborough..... .Peterborough .. 378.75 .75 

156 York ^Toronto 336.70 2.00 

157 Simpson , Newboro 74.70 

158 Alexandra .......Oil Springs 98.50 1.50 

159 Goodwood Richmond 86.20 

161 Percy Warkv.'orth 129.50 2.50 

162 Forest ...Wroxeter 68.50 

164 Star in the East Wellington 103.50 

165 Burlington .Burlington 231.50 3.00 

166 Wentworth Stoney Creek . 232.75 1.25 

168 Merritt Welland 225.00 1.00 

169 Macnab .Port Colborne ... 232.50 

170 Britannia Seaforth 99.00 

171 Prince of Wales ...lona Sta 53.00 3.00 

172 Ayr Ayr 74.00 

174 Walsingham ...Port Rowan 124.00 1.00 

177 The Builders ..Ottawa 404.50 

178 Plattsville Plattsville 58.50 

180 Speed Guelph 352.00 8.00 

181 Oriental Port Burwell ... 64.50 

184 Old Light ....Lucknow 204.50 1.00 

185 Enniskillen York 60.50 13.00 

186 Plantagenet Riceville 54.00 

190 Belmont Belmont 110.00 

192 Orillia Orillia 373.00 1.00 

193 Scotland Scotland 110.05 1.00 



74 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Balance 
No, Name of Lodge Location Amount Dr. Cr. 

194 Petrolia - Petrolia 174.00 

195 Tuscan -London 251.00 3.00 

196 Madawaska..... .....Arnprior 127.50 6.00 

197 Saugeen -Walkerton - 132.00 6.00 

200 St. Alban's -Mount Forest 92.00 

201 Leeds -Gananoque 246.50 

203 Irvine Elora 118.60 

205 New Dominioa New Hamburg... 50.00 

207 Lancaster - Lancaster 102.50 3.00 

209a St. John's London 1,381.50 1.00 

209 Evergreen ^Lanark 74.00 

215 Lake .-Ameliasburg 82.50 

216 Harris -..Orangeville 194.00 1.50 

217 Frederick .Delhi 117.00 1.00 

218 Stevenson Toronto 296.75 1.50 

219 Credit -Georgetown 141.00 5.50 

220 Zeredatha - Uxbridge 165.80 

221 Mountain -...-Thorold 244.00 3.20 

222 Marmora -....Marmora 89.50 

223 Norwood -Norwood 92.00 

224 Huron _ Hensall 83.50 

225 Bernard -Listowel 219.50 13.00 

228 Prince Arthur Odessa 166.50 75.50 

229 Ionic - Brampton 200.50 12.50 

230 Kerr Barrie 315.00 6.00 

231 Fidelity Ottawa 355.50 1.25 

232 Cameron Dutton 264.00 3.50 

233 Doric Parkhill 116.00 

234 Beaver - -..Thornbury 104.00 

235 Aldworth -Paisley 109.50 

236 Manitoba Cookstown 146.00 

237 Vienna -Vienna 124.50 .50 

238 Havelock .'...Watford 118.00 4.00 

239 Tweed _ -Tweed 133.50 2.00 

242 Macoy -Mallorytown ... 89.25 2.00 

243 St. George St. George 91.00 

245 Tecumseh Thamesville 115.50 

247 Ashlar -Toronto 234.00 7.80 

249 Caledonian Midland 214.00 24.75 

250 Thistle Embro 126.50 

253 Minden...... -Kingston 309.30 4.00 

254 Clifton Niagara Falls... 323.00 6.00 

255 Sydenham Dresden 128.00 

256 Farran's Point -Aultsville 466.50 

257 Gait Gait 222.50 

258 Guelph Guelph 271.00 

259 Springfield -Springfield 133.50 

260 Washington Petrolia 170.00 1.00 

261 Oak Branch. Innerkip 59.00 

262 Harriston Harrison 105.50 

263 Forest _...Forest 100.50 1.00 

264 Chaudiere Ottawa 275.50 8.00 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 75 

Balance 
No. Name of Lodge Location Amount Dr. Cr. 

265 Patterson .Thornhill 167.00 2.20 

266 Northern Light ...Stayner 93.00 2.00 

267 Parthenoa...., -Chatham 277.10 1.00 

268 Verulam , Bobcaygeon 188.50 2.00 

269 Brougham UnioiL.„_Claremount 118.50 .50 

270 Cedar ...._Oshawa 260.05 5.00 

271 Wellington _ Erin 114.25 

272 Seyjnour Ancaster 222.50 1.00 

274 Kent Blenheim 190.60 

276 Teeswater Teeswater 97.00 

277 Seymour Port Dalhousie 120.00 

279 New Hope Hespeler _ 115.50 1.00 

282 Lome „.Glencoe 109.55 

283 Eureka -Belleville 292.75 

284 St. John's .Brussels 95.50 

285 Seven Star ...Alliston 186.95 8.00 

286 Wingham Wingham 167.50 .50 

287 Shuniah. ...Port Arthur 484.10 8.50 

289 Doric ....,Lobo 121.50 .50 

290 Leamington —Leamington 294.50 5.00 

291 Dufferin West Flamboro 120.60 4.00 

292 Robertson ._King 39.00 225.60 

294 Moore .._Courtright 100.00 3.00 

295 Conestogo Drayton 89.00 

296 Temple .St. Catharines... 365.00 1.00 

297 Preston Preston 226.00 .50 

299 Victoria Centreville 43.75 

300 Mount Olivet Thorndale 70.00 1.50 

302 St. David's .......St. Thomas 390.00 4.50 

303 Blyth Blyth 69.50 

304 Minerva Stroud 151.50 

305 Humber. Weston _.. 172.00 4.00 

306 Durham Durham 108.25 1.00 

307 Arkona -Arkona 60.00 1.00 

309 Morning Star Carlow 89.50 

311 Blackwood — Woodbridge 115.75 

312 Pnyx Wallaceburg 202.00 

313 Clementi Lakefield 134.50 

314 Blair -Palmerston 162.60 

315 Clifford... Clifford 86.60 

316 Doric — Toronto 227.10 5.00 

318 Wilmot..... Baden 29.50 

319 Hiram Hagersville 133.00 2.50 

320 Chesterville ..-Chesterville 104.50 1.00 

321 Walker Acton ..„ 171.50 3.00 

322 North Star Owen Sound 225.00 4.00 

323 Alvinston .Alvinston 82.50 1.00 

B24 Temple Hamilton 425.50 7.00 

325 Orono Orono 70.00 

326 Zetland .Toronto 335.80 

327 Hammond Wardsville 44.50 6.75 

328 Ionic Napier 57.00 3.50 



76 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Balance 

No. Name of Lodge Location Amount Dr. Cr. 

329 King Solomon -Jarvis 101.50 5.00 

330 Corinthian .London 286.50 6.50 

331 Fordwich...... .....Fordwich 58.00 

332 Stratford Stratford 309.50 8.00 

333 Prince Arthur ^Flesherton 130.20 1.00 

334 Prince Arthur _ Arthur 73.00 

336 Highgate -Highgate 125.30 2.25 

337 Myrtle Port Robinson... 87.00 1.00 

338 Dufferin Wellandport 46.00 44.20 

339 Orient Toronto _ 294.70 1.50 

341 Bruce .Tiverton 54.20 

343 Georgina -Toronto 370.00 2.50 

344 Merrill Dorchester Sta. 76.00 

345 Nilestown ™Nilestown 137.00 .50 

346 Occident Toronto 296.50 6.00 

347 Mercer -Fergus 137.50 

348 Georgian _ _ ..Penetanguishene 86.50 

352 Granite „...., .Parry Sound 318.50 1.50 

354 Brock -....Cannington 87.15 

356 River Park Streetsville 121.00 

357 Waterdown _..,Millgrove 203.80 1.00 

358 Delaware Valley .Delaware 85.00 

359 Vittoria Vittoria 89.50 

360 Muskoka Bracebridge 167.00 

361 Waverley. Guelph _ 336.00 

362 Maple Leaf _ Tara 61.50 

364 Dufferin Melbourne 67.00 

367 St. George Toronto 290.20 5.50 

368 Salem Brockville 349.95 

369 Mimico _ .Lambton Mills... 227.50 4.25 

370 Harmony _ Delta 105.00 

371 Prince of Wales Otawa 344.40 7.00 

372 Palmer Fort Erie North 145.00 1.00 

373 Copestone ...Welland 220.00 

374 Keene .Keene 51.50 

375 Lome Omemee 125.00 .50 

37"6 Unity „ -Huntsville 155.75 1.00 

377 Lome Shelbume 109.00 

378 King Solomon's London 435.50 1.50 

379 Middlesex Bryanston 64.00 .50 

380 Union London 388.00 6.00 

382 Doric Hamilton 397.50 3.00 

383 Henderson ..Winchester 73.00 

384 Alpha Toronto 412.50 2.00 

385 Spry. ..Beeton 104.50 

386 McCoU West Lome 98.10 

387 Lansdowne Lansdowne 97.50 1.00 

388 Henderson Ilderton 114.05 3.00 

389 Crystal Fountain North Augusta 88.00 3.00 

390 Florence :. Florence 72.50 .50 

391 Howard Ridgetown 133.75 

392 Huron Camlachie 81.50 



TORONTO. ONTARIO. 1940 77 

Balance 

No. Name of Lodge Location Amount Dr. Cr. 

393 Forest. _Chesley 106.00 

394 King Solomon. Thamesford 91.00 

395 Parvaim _...._...._Comber 63.50 3.00 

396 Cedar. -.„Wiarton 142.50 3.00 

397 Leopold _ Brigden 106.00 4.00 

398 Victoria _.... Kirkfield 93.00 .50 

399 Moffatt .Harrietsville ..... 67.50 .50 

400 Oakville _Oakville 222.00 573.50 

401 Craig .....Deseronto 82.50 4.25 

402 Central .Essex 154.50 

403 Windsor ...„Windsor 509.80 4.00 

404 Lome Tamworth 83.80 

405 Mattawa ...Mattav/a 60.50 6.00 

406 Spry Fenelon Falls ... 144.75 .50 

408 Murray .Beaverton 115.50 1.50 

409 Golden Rule _Gravenhurst 132.00 .50 

410 Zeta -Toronto 335.25 ci.OO 

411 Rodney _Rodnev 89.00 2.50 

412 Keystone Sault Ste. Marie 327.50 

413 Naphtali „Tilbury 114.00 3.50 

414 Pequonga _..Kenora 261.00 

415 Fort William .Fort William ... 408.50 1.50 

416 Lyn _Lyn 33.10 

417 Keewatin. Keewatin 99.75 

418 Maxville Maxville 82.75 

419 Liberty _Sarnia 167.00 3.00 

420 Nipissing ..-North Bay 332.50 

421 Scott __ Grand Valley ... 88.50 2.00 

422 Star of the East _Bothwell 70.00 

423 Strong „Sundridge 108.30 

424 Doric _ ......Pickering 86.00 1.00 

425 St. Clair Sombra 84.00 4.00 

426 Stanley Toronto ....;. 346.50 4.50 

427 Nickel Sudbury 386.75 

428 Fidelity Port Perry 110.00 

429 Port Elgin Port Elgin 82.50 3.50 

430 Acacia Toronto ..: 255.30 3.50 

431 Moravian Cargill .-. 58.00 

432 Hanover Hanover 112.40 

433 Bonnechere Eganville 121.50 1.00 

434 Algonquin _.Emsdale 140.50 

435 Havelock „_.Havelock 171.00 .50 

436 Bums Hepworth 74.50 4.30 

437 Tuscan „ Sarnia 373.50 6.00 

438 Harmony „Toronto 213.50 4.50 

439 Alexandria .Alexandria 187 00 185.00 

440 Arcadia Minden 98.00 

441 Westport Westport 97.50 1.00 

442 Dyment _ .Thessalon 149.00 48.00 

443 Powassan Powassan 134.50 1.00 

444 Netitis ...Creemore 85.00 1.00 

445 Lake of the Woods.Kenora 138.00 2.50 



Amount 


Dr. 


205.60 




93.25 


.70 


90.00 


1.00 


93.50 


2.40 



78 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Balance 

No. Name of Lodge Location Amount Dr, Cr. 

446 Granite .Fort Frances ... 

447 Sturgeon Falls Sturgeon Falls... 

448 Xenophon Wheatley 

449 Dundalk -Dundalk 

450 Hawkesbury Hawkesbury 179.00 

451 Somerville ..Kinmount 57.50 

452 Avonmore „Avonmore 74.50 .50 

453 Royal Fort William ... 228.00 

454 Corona Burk's Falls 124.00 2.50 

455 Doric _ Little Current... 73.50 

456 Elma Monkton 65.00 

457 Century .....Merlin 126.70 1.00 

458 Wales .....Wales 116.00 

459 Cobden Cobden 116.00 

460 Rideau Seeley's Bay 77.50 

461 Ionic Rainy River 125.00 1.00 

462 Temiskaming New Liskeard ... 137.50 

463 North Entrance Haliburton 96.00 

464 King Edward Sunderland 78.00 

465 Carleton _ Carp 67.00 1.80 

466 Coronation Elmvale 111.00 

467 Tottenham.... .Tottenham 94.30 5.00 

468 Peel Caledon East ... 103.25 .50 

469 Algoma Sault Ste. Marie 311.50 

470 Victoria .Victoria Harbor 123.60 .50 

471 King Edward Vn....Chippawa 96.00 4.00 

472 Gore Bay Gore Bay 200.65 4.50 

473 The Beaches Toronto 223.75 .50 

474 Victoria _ Toronto 270.50 1.00 

475 Dundurn Hamilton 410.00 1.50 

476 Corinthian North Gower ... 108.50 1.20 

477 Harding Woodville 84.60 

478 Milverton Milverton 99.00 

479 Russell Russell 104.00 

480 Williamsburg Williamsburg ... 77.50 6.00 

481 Corinthian Toronto 227.50 2.50 

482 Bancroft Bancroft 173.50 

483 Granton Granton 65.00 

484 Golden Star .Dryden 95.00 

485 Haileybury -Haileybury 133.00 .50 

486 Silver Cobalt 178.00 1.00 

487 Penewobikong Blind River 36.50 292.00 

488 King Edward Harrow 143.50 12.50 

489 Osiris Smith's Falls 177.00 

490 Hiram Markdale 61.50 .50 

491 Cardinal Cardinal 92.00 

492 Karnak Coldwater 92.75 

494 Riverdale Toronto 281.00 13.00 

495 Electric Hamilton 356.50 21.00 

496 University Toronto 286.00 1.00 

497 St. Andrew's .Arden 81.05 3.50 

498 King George V Coboconk 73.50 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 79 

Balance 

No. Name of Lodge Location Amount Dr. Cr, 

499 Port Arthur ....Port Arthur 338.50 8.00 

500 Rose Windsor 153.00 5.50 

501 Connau^ht ,Mimico 216.00 5.50 

502 Coronation Smithville 115.80 

503 Inwood -Inwood 68.00 1.00 

504 Otter ™Lombardy 52.00 

505 Lynden Lynden 78.00 .50 

506 Porcupine _,South Porcupine 151.50 

507 Elk Lake ..__ Elk Lake 125.00 15.50 

508 Ozias -Brantford 237.00 4.00 

509 Twin City -Kitchener 333.00 

510 Parkdale ^..Toronto 204.00 5.50 

511 Connaught W. Fort William 174.00 4.00 

512 Malone -Sutton 115.50 3.00 

513 Corinthian _ ^Hamilton 345.00 4.00 

514 St. Alban's .Toronto 241.00 

515 Reba _Brantford 300.20 3.00 

516 Enterprise _Beachburg 84.00 1.50 

517 Hazeldean Hazeldean 156.50 1.00 

518 Sioux Lookout Sioux Lookout... 179.50 2.00 

519 Onondaga...... Onondaga 82.50 .60 

520 Coronati ...Toronto 297.50 

521 Ontario Windsor 490.50 15.75 

522 Mount Sinai „Toronto 604.00 6.00 

523 Royal Arthur .^Peterborough ... 214.00 1.00 

524 Mississauga .Port Credit 172.25 .50 

525 Temple .Toronto 207.25 

526 Ionic _Westboro 550.00 

527 Espanola _.Espanola 99.00 

528 Golden Beaver Timmins 249.50 .50 

529 Myra _Komoka 65.00 

530 Cochrane „ Cochrane 155.20 .50 

531 High Park ..Toronto 381.75 

532 Canada _ .Toronto 280.20 1.00 

533 Shamrock Toronto 182.50 .50 

534 Englehart Englehart 131.00 1.00 

535 Phoenix Fonthill 107.00 1.00 

536 Algonquin Copper Cliff 173.50 1.00 

537 Ulster Toronto 468.00 2.50 

538 Earl Kitchener. Port McNichol 29.00 28.40 

539 Waterloo Waterloo 227.00 2.00 

540 Abitibi Iroquois Falls... 117.50 2.00 

541 Tuscan ..Toronto 329.70 

542 Metropolitan Toronto 151.00 

543 Imperial Toronto 202 00 1.50 

544 Lincoln .Abingdon 55.00 .50 

545 John Ross Rob'son.Toronto 320.00 4.50 

546 Talbot St. Thomas 225.00 7.00 

547 Victory .Toronto 59.50 1.00 

548 General Mercer Toronto 361.75 2.00 

549 Ionic... Hamilton 251.50 1.00 

550 Buchanan Hamilton 225.50 3.50 



80 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Balance 

No. Name of Lodge Location Amount Dr. Cr. 

551 Tuscan _ .....Hamilton 397.00 2.60 

552 Queen City ......Toronto 318.60 2.00 

553 Oakwood ...Toronto 139.50 6.00 

554 Border Cities Windsor 123.20 

555 Wardrope Hamilton 295.00 81.50 

556 Nation Spencerville 75.50 1.00 

557 Finch Finch 104.00 

558 Sidney Alb't Luke..Ottawa 225.50 1.00 

559 Palestine Toronto 240.50 7.00 

560 St. Andrew's Ottawa 223.00 

561 Acacia. ...Westboro 178.50 6.50 

562 Hamilton „ Hamilton 243.00 2.00 

563 Victory Chatham 258.10 1.00 

564 Ashlar ...Ottawa 206.20 1.00 

565 Kilwinning Toronto 356.50 9.00 

566 King Hiram Toronto 133.10 3.50 

567 St. Aidan's Toronto 75.50 1.00 

568 Hullett .Londesboro 46.50 4.00 

569 Doric -Lakeside 69.70 1.00 

570 Dufferin Toronto 275.00 3.50 

571 Antiquity Toronto 176.00 4.00 

572 Mizpah. ..Toronto 267.20 2.00 

573 Adoniram Niagara Falls.. 137.00 2.00 

574 Craig Ailsa Craig 77.00 1.00 

575 Fidelity Toronto 172.50 1.50 

576 Mimosa Toronto 183.50 2.00 

577 St. Clair Toronto 216.00 1.00 

578 Queen's Kingston 250.25 .25 

579 Harmony Windsor 134.00 10.00 

580 Acacia .London 151.00 2.50 

581 Harcourt Toronto 96.50 

582 Sunnyside Toronto 206.00 2,20 

583 Transportation Toronto 303.50 4.00 

584 Kaministiquia Fort William ... 167.00 4.00 

585 Royal Edward Kingston 148.50 

586 Remembrance Toronto 264.00 8.50 

587 Patricia Toronto 205.80 .50 

588 National Capreol 118.50 

589 Grey Toronto 171.50 3.00 

590 Defenders Ottawa 134.50 1.00 

591 North Gate Toronto : 202.80 7.00 

592 Fairbank Toronto 131.80 3.00 

593 St. Andrew's Hamilton 467.70 4.00 

594 Hillcrest Hamilton 173 50 

595 Rideau Ottawa 206.00 

596 Martintown. Martintown 39.00 

597 Temple .'. .London 178.00 

598 Dominion Windsor 94.00 3.00 

599 Mount Dennis Weston 187.00 1.00 

600 Maple Leaf Toronto 157.50 8.25 

601 St. Paul ... Sarnia 152.50 3.00 

602 Hugh Murray. ; Hamilton ?. 247.50 1.00 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 81 

Balance 

No. Name of Lodge Location Amount Dr. Cr. 

603 Campbell Campbellville ... 88.50 2.50 

604 Palace ...Windsor 128.50 1.00 

605 Melita Toronto 143.40 

606 Unity Toronto 129.20 2.00 

607 Golden Fleece Toronto 122.00 1.00 

608 Gothic Lindsay 108.50 

609 Tavistock -Tavistock 61.00 

610 Ashlar ...Byron 82.00 .50 

611 Huron-Bruce .Toronto 127.00 1.00 

612 Birch Cliff Birch Cliff 142.75 3.00 

613 Fort Erie Fort Erie 75.50 3.50 

614 Adanac _Merritton 131.00 1.00 

615 Dominion Ridgeway 76.75 1.50 

616 Perfection St. Catharines... 101.00 1.00 

617 North Bay North Bay 140.75 4.00 

618 Thunder Bay Port Arthur 227.05 

619 Runnymede Toronto 227.50 5.00 

620 BayofQuinte Toronto 183.00 1.50 

621 Frontenac Sharbot Lake ... 132.00 1.00 

622 Lome Chapleau 94.00 1.00 

623 Doric .....Kirkland Lake... 280.50 11.00 

624 Dereham Mt. Elgin 67.50 

625 Hatherly Sault Ste. Marie 46.00 

626 Stamford .....Stamf'd Centre 156.25 .50 

627 Pelee -Scudder 53.50 .50 

628 Glenrose Elmira 67.50 

629 Grenville Toronto 195.00 5.00 

630 Prince of Wales Toronto 139.50 2.00 

631 Manitou ..Emo 71.50 

632 Long Branch. ..Mimico 126.50 2.50 

633 Hastings Hastings 58.00 

634 Delta Toronto 233.05 5.50 

635 Wellington Toronto 201.50 9.50 

636 Hornepayne .Hornepayne 110.00 2.00 

637 Caledonia ....Toronto 247.00 3.00 

638 Bedford Toronto 168.50 3.65 

639 Beach ...-Burlington B'ch 183.50 4.00 

640 Anthony Sayer -Mimico 52.00 3.00 

641 Garden Windsor 94.00 1.00 

642 St. Andrew's Windsor 77.50 1.00 

643 Cathedral Toronto 130.00 

644 Simcoe Toronto 161.50 4.00 

645 Lake Shore Mimico 135.00 3.00 

646 Rowland Mt. Albert 69.00 

647 Todmorden Todmorden 130.50 1.00 

648 Spruce Falls .Kapuskasing ... 105.00 1.00 

649 Temple Oshawa 138.15 

650 Fidelity Toledo 51.00 .50 

651 Dentonia Toronto 170.50 5.00 

652 Memorial ..Toronto 146.00 4.00 

653 Scarboro Agincourt 67.70 1.00 



82 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Balance 
No. Name of Lodge Location Amount Dr. Cr. 

654 Ancient Landm'ks.. Hamilton 137.50 3.50 

655 Kingsway - Lambton Mills... 107.00 7.00 

U.D. Kenagomisis Geraldton 76.50 6.00 

$102,536.30 

Interest 15,816.19 

Debentures Matured 32,121.37 

Sundries 2,488.12 



$152,961.98 



TORONTO. ONTARIO. 1940 

GENERAL ACCOUNT 



83 



SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS 

Year ended May 31st, 1940 

Fees, Registration of Initiations 

Fees, Registration of Affiliations 

Dues 

Certificates 

Constitutions 

Ceremonies 

Dispensations 

Commutations of Dues 

Musical Rituals 

Warrants 

Sale of History 

Refunds: 

Lake Shore Lodge No. 645, Re 

Mills $ 20.77 

Keystone Lodge No. 412, Re 

Tyrrell 30.00 

Lome Lodge No. 375, Re Allan 202.18 

Toronto Banquet Committee 1939 67.92 

Miscellaneous 



Interest of Debentures and Bank Interest: 
Dominion of Canada, War Loans $ 3,163.25 
Landed Banking and Loan Co... 187.50 
Toronto General Trusts Cor- 
poration 1,260.00 

Township of Barton 275.00 

Canada Permanent Trust Com- 
pany 700.00 

Canada Permanent Mortgage 

Corp 452.50 

Canadian National Railways . . . 400.00 

Township of Etobicoke 550.00 

Town of Gananoque 250.00 

City of Hamilton 600.00 

Province of Manitoba 1,210.00 

City of New Westminster 250.00 

National Trust Company 200.00 

City of Oshawa 500.00 

City of Owen Sound 500.00 

City of Peterborough 230.46 

Prince Edward Island 1,500.00 

City of Saskatoon 500.00 

City of Toronto 900.00 

City of Woodstock 275.00 

Township of East York 86.74 



5,607.00 

263.50 

85,528.00 

57.50 

1,083.50 

315.30 

745.00 

8,868.00 

36.50 

10.00 

120.00 



320.87 
1,056.75 

$104,011.92 



84 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



Hydro Electi-ic Power Commis- 
sion of Ontario 

Province of New Brunswick .... 

Burrard Dry Dock 

Province of Nova Scotia 

City of Windsor 

Trust Company Interest 

Debentures matured: 

Dominion of Canada 

National Trust Company 

City of Peterborough 

Township of Etobicoke 

Premium on sale of Debentures. 



350.00 
250.00 
150.00 
390.00 
682.50 
3.24 



15,000.00 

10,000.00 

5,121.37 

2,000.00 



$ 15,816.19 



32,121.37 
1,012.50 

$152,961.98 



GENERAL ACCOUNT 

SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES 



Year ended May 31st, 1940 

John A. Rowland, Grand Treasurer's Clerk, 

salary to March 31st, 1940 $ 400.00 

H. F. Vigeon, Auditor, salary to March 31st, 1940 600.00 

E. G. Dixon, Grand Secretary, salary to May 

31st, 1940 5,000.00 

W. J. Attig, Assistant to Grand Secretary, salary 

to May 31st, 1940 3,600.00 

F. J. Brown, Clerk, salary to May 31st, 1940 . . 1,800.00 
H. M. Gardner, Stenographer, salary to May 

31st, 1940 1,200.00 

Retiring Allowance to Miss Place 500.00 

Incidentals Expenses, Grand Secretary's Office.. 1,369.44 

Printing, Stationery, etc 935.18 

Constitutions 641.87 

Certificates S13.84 

Proceedings 1939 and mailing boxes for same... 2,537.44 

Masonic Library, Toronto 408.42 

Telephone Services 110.10 

Insurance and Bond Premiums 94.60 

Office Rent - 1,416.65 

Postage on Proceedings 185.78 

Postage, Chairman of Committees 65.00 

Chairman on Fraternal Correspondence 400.00 

Allowance to Grand Master 1939-1940 1,500.00 

Stenographer for Grand Master 300.00 

Allowance to Deputy Grand Master 500.00 

Expenses Grand Lodge Toronto 1939, Pay Roll, 

Rent and Printing 4,650.37 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1940 

Expenses Grand Lodge Toronto, 1940, Rent and 
Printing 

Honorary Presentation Jewels 

U.S. and Canada Masonic Relief Association . . . 

Grand Master's Regalia 

Canada Permanent Trust Co., re Securities .... 

Allowance to Mrs. Logan 

Memorial Tributes 

Portrait of Past Grand Master 

Repairs to Regalia 

Expenses, F. A. Copus attending United Grand 
Lodge of England 

Expenses, R. B. Dargavel attending United Grand 
Lodge of England 

Expenses of Representative to Grand Lodge of 
Michigan 

Purchase of Addressograph, Grand Secretary's 
Office 

Purchase of New Furniture, Grand Secretary's 
Office 

Masonic Trials 

Expenses Grand Master's Conference, Toronto.. 

Expenses Grand Secretary attending Reception 
to Grand Master in Ottawa 

Repairs to Office Furniture 

Membership Fee and U.S. Exchange Grand 
Masters' Conference in Washington 

Expenses Fraternal Reviewers, Toronto 

Expenses Custodian and Grand Secretary attend- 
ing Lodge of Instruction, Chatham District. 

Expenses Grand Secretary attending Grand 
Masters' and Grand Secretaries Conference 
in Washington 

Expenses Laying Corner Stone at Windsor .... 

Expenses, T. C. Wardley attending meeting of 
the U.S. and Canada Masonic Relief Associ- 
ation, in New York 

Testimonial to Retiring Grand Master 

Masonic Education 



192.11 

330.81 

239.17 

340.00 

312.51 

1,000.00 

49.00 

25.00 

55.00 

750.00 

750.00 

24.27 

198.32 

1,032.95 

17.68 

121.20 

29.74 
59.29 

55.50 
14.50 

33.05 



74.11 
19.45 



64.25 

500.00 

24.38 



$ 34,840.98 



Supervisor of Benevolence, R. B. 

Dargavel $ 4,000.00 

Supervisor of Benevolence, Stenog- 
rapher 300.00 

Supervisor of Benevolence, Travell- 
ing Expenses 916.74 

Donation to Canadian Red Cross 



5,216.74 
500.00 



$ 40,557.72 



86 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Debentures Purchased: 

$20,000.00 Dominion of Canada. . . $ 20,000.00 
$11,000.00 Province of Ontario . . . 10,827.09 
$ 2,000.00 Canada Permanent Mort- 
gage Corporation 2,000.00 



$ 32,827.09 



$ 73,384.81 
Benevolent Grants 78,995.00 



$152,379.81 



MEMORIAL FUND 

Summary of Receipts for the year ended May 31st, 1940 

Received from Lodges $ 57.00 

Refunds 49.02 

Debentures matured: 

City of Toronto $ 1,000.00 

Province of Ontario 2,000.00 

National Trust Company 1,400.00 

Town of Oakville 1,003.07 

City of Peterborough 1,319.25 

City of Hamilton 15,000.00 

Township of Etobicoke 1,953.81 

Village of Forest Hill 13,000.00 

36,676.13 

Premium on sale 151.25 



$ 36,923.40 



SEMI-CENTENNIAL AND MEMORIAL FUND 

REVENUE ACCOUNT, YEAR ENDING MAY 31st, 1940 

Interest on Investment and on Bank Balances as 

Schedule below $ 19,484.52 

Dominion of Canada, War Loans ... $ 1,980.00 

Toronto General Trusts Corporation. 1,578.22 

Canada Permanent Trust Company.. 1,600.00 

Canada Permanent Mortgage Corp. 360.50 

National Trust Company 478.00 

Township of Barton 110.00 

Canadian National Railways 1,459.92 

Township of Etobicoke 706.73 

Village of Forest Hill 650.00 

City of Hamilton 506.37 

City of London 675.00 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 



87 



Province of Manitoba 600.00 

Province of Ontario 2,874.39 

Town of Oakville 102.80 

City of Peterborough 709.36 

City of Saskatoon 600.00 

City of Toronto 302.50 

Township of East York 404.11 

Township of York 75.94 

Province of New Brunswick 805.00 

Town of Orillia 180.00 

Burrard Dry Dock 150.00 

Province of Nova Scotia 793.02 

St. Johns Dry Dock 122.50 

Province of Saskatchewan 420.00 

City of Windsor ■ 1,195.60 

Temiskaming & Northern Ontario 

Railway 28.39 

Trust Company Interest 4.30 

U.S. Exchange 11.87 



$ 19,484.52 




Grand Secretary. 



On motion of the Deputy Grand Master, second- 
ed by R.W. Bro. E. G. Dixon, the report was received 
and referred to the Committee on Audit and 
Finance. 



88 GRAND LODGE OP CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

AUDITOR'S REPORT 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers 
and Members of Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of 
Canada, in the Province of Ontario. 



I beg to report having completed the continuous 
monthly audit of the accounts of the Grand Treasur- 
er and the Grand Secretary for the year ended 31st 
May 1940, and submit herewith the following State- 
ments for your approval: 



GENERAL FUND: 

Receipts and Disbursements, 

List of General Charges, 

Schedule of Investments, 31st May 1940. 

MEMORIAL FUND: 

Receipts and Disbursements, 

Schedule of Investments, 31st May 1940. 

SEMI-CENTENNIAL FUND : 

Schedule of Investments, 31st May 1940. 

Securities representing the Investments of the 
three Funds on 31st May 1940, as set out in the 
Schedules attached were examined by me and found 
in order. 

All of which is fraternally submitted. 

H. FRANK VIGEON, 

Chartered Accountant- 
Auditor. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1940 89 

REPORTS OF THE DISTRICT DEPUTY 
GRAND MASTERS 

The reports of the thirty-five District Deputy 
Grand Masters were presented by the Grand Sec- 
retary and on motion of the Deputy Grand Master, 
seconded by the Grand Secretary, they were received 
and referred to the Board of General Purposes. 

ALGOMA DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

In accordance with Section 77 of the Constitution, I wish 
to report hereby that, acting as your Disrict Deputy in the 
Masonic year of 1939-40 I have made an honest and con- 
scientious endeavour to carry out the several duties which 
you have thus entrusted to my care. 

I have visited each of the nine lodges in the Algoma 
District at least once in what is commonly called an official 
visit. In addition I have also visited all seven lodges of Port 
Arthur and Fort William on what might for purposes of 
distinction be described as casual visits. These have included 
installation ceremonies, church services and other special 
occasions. Kenogamisis Lodge, U.D. at Geraldton I have 
visited twice, once for institution and presentation of dis- 
pensation and again some months later on an official visit. 
I had but one opportunity to visit Hornepayne Lodge. 

You will remember. Most Worshipful Sir, that you were 
a visftor at Fort William in September last and that it was 
my great privilege to arrange for and accompany you on 
a visit to Fort William Lodge, which meeting was attended 
by officers and members of other lodges in the two cities 
in large numbers. I have noticed that members of the Craft 
here frequently recall your visit and the address which you 
gave on that occasion with much pleasure. 

Your acquaintance with previous reports from this 
Masonic District will have made you aware that Masonry 
here is in a generally flourishing condition. This assurance 
I am happy to renew. As far as I was able to observe all 
the lodges are in excellent condition, capably managed with 
respect to their business affairs and active and diligent in 
carrying out the great objectives of the fraternity. 

I have been especially interested in and have maintained 
close contact with the work and activities of Kenogamisis 
Lodge which has been operating under dispensation at 
Geraldton, having in mind the probability that it would be 



90 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

making application for a warrant. This application I have 
recently endorsed and I should like to add that I do so with 
a great deal of pleasure and satisfaction in full confidence 
that issuance of the warrant will be fully justified. I was 
much impressed with the apparent character of the charter 
members and officers and noted their obvious desire to con- 
form to all the proprieties of the fraternity. Their lodge 
quarters and furniture are everything that could be expected. 

In addition to making inquiries about the financial con- 
ditions of the various lodges and looking over their methods 
as to keeping minutes and records, I reminded each one of 
the advisability of regularity and order in the making of 
reports to Grand Lodge Officers. This I believe is being 
done. 

I have had the utmost of co-operation from Masters, 
Secretaries and other officers of lodges as well as of those 
whom I chose to assist me as Secretary and Chaplain. 

Nothing has been brought to my attention either by 
lodges or individual members that could be described as 
presenting difficulty or complication. 

The year has been a most pleasant one in every respect. 
I have obtained more of the personal benefits which accrue 
from an active participation in Masonry and have been mpst 
happy to serve as your District Deputy for Algoma District. 

Sincerely and fraternally yours, 

0. F. Young, 
D.D.G.M., Algoma District. 

BRANT DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

It is a great honor and pleasure to present the report 
on the general condition of Masonry in Brant District, and 
in so doing I wish to extend my sincere appreciation to the 
brethren of the District, for electing me to this high office, 
and for the honor conferred upon me and my Mother Lodge, 
St. John's No. 82, also to Most Worshipful Bro. J. A. Dobbie 
for confirming my election. 

My first official act was to appoint Wor. Bro. H. Frosch 
as District Secretary, and to him I am greatly indebted for 
the splendid support he has given me. He accompanied me 
on all my official visits, as well as many other visits in and 
throughout my jurisdiction and surrounding districts. 

I visited all the lodges at least once and some on more 
than one occasion. I have seen every lodge either confer 
or exemplify at least one or more of the three degrees. The 
work throughout the District is fairly good and in some 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 91 

cases it appears to be about letter perfect. Where correc- 
tions were to be made I endeavoured to do this quietly and 
more as a suggestion for the improvement of the work. 

The attendance at all of my official visits was very 
encouraging and on nearly every occasion I have spoken to 
the brethren regarding the value of fraternal visits and the 
friendships that are made in this way. 

We visited several lodges on special occasions outside 
my jurisdiction. One worthy of mention was to Ayr Lodge. 
The Most Wor. the Grand Master, Grand Secretary and 
many Grand Lodge officers attended this meeting on April 
22nd, and helped this thriving little lodge to celebrate their 
seventy-fifth anniversary. 

My official visit to my Mother Lodge was an event that 
I shall always remember. I was honored by having at least 
twenty-seven lodges represented as well as several D.D.G. 
Masters and a past D.D.G. Master from Fultonville, N.Y. in 
the person of Rt. Wor. Bro. Vedder, 

A very interesting evening was held at Burford Lodge 
No. 106, when two grandfathers initiated their grandsons. 
This made the fourth generation of the Polley family and 
the third generation of the Taylor family to be initiated 
into Masonry in Burford Lodge. 

According to the notices I have received and observa- 
tions I have made Masonry is of a very high standard in 
Brant District. The financial standing of the lodges, general- 
ly speaking is very good and showing improvement. 

In conclusion I would like to express my appreciation 
to the brethren of the District for the courtesies and sup- 
port they have given me throughout the year and would 
ask that they kindly give my successor the same considera- 
tion. 

Fraternally and affectionately submitted. 

M. C. Hawley, 
D.D.G.M. Brant District. 

BRUCE DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

In presenting my report on the condition of Masonry 
in Bruce District I shall first take the opportunity of ex- 
pressing my appreciation of the honour bestowed upon me 
by the brethren of this District in recommending me to the 
Grand Master for the important position of District Deputy 
Grand Master. It has been a distinct honour to have had 
the opportunity of representing the Most Worshipful the 
Grand Master and Grand Lodge in Bruce District. 



92 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

During my term of office, I have visited the various 
lodges, and everywhere I have received the glad hand of 
friendship. During my inspection of the different lodges I 
have been pleased to find that everywhere the various lodges 
are working with that love and harmony which should at all 
times characterize Freemasonry. 

Thanks to the Supervisorr of Masonic Education for 
Bruce District, Worshipful Bro. Harry Alton, I find a great 
interest is being taken along the lines of Masonic Education, 
and in every lodge a committee has been appointed to ar- 
range for some well skilled brother to discuss and enlighten 
the members on some topic of interest to the Craft. My 
District Chaplain, Rev. Bro. Moore, has already assisted me 
in this matter, and I am sure the brethren have all profited 
by the excellent addresses he has given to us. 

May I express my sincere thanks to Wor. Bro. Hunstein 
for his fine and untiring work as my District Secretary. 
Worshipful Bro. Hunstein has accompanied me on all my 
visits, and has ever been ready to give me his timely advice 
and assistance. 

I would like to mention our Past Masters' Association 
of Bruce District which we have formed this year. I think 
this is something we have needed for a long time. Not only 
will it be of assistance to the D.D.G.M. in the performance 
of his duties, but it will greatly assist in fraternalizing the 
different lodges and in furthering Masonic Education. In 
any business it is a good thing for us to get together and 
discuss our problems and our difficulties and to assist each 
other in straightening them out. Under the capable leader- 
ship of the fine officers you have chosen, I am sure that our 
Past Masters' Association will be a source of great help to 
all of us. 

In conclusion, may I say, brethren, that Masonry as I 
have found it in the various lodges of Bruce District is in 
excellent condition, and Masonic Education is steadily grow- 
ing. 

Fraternally submitted, 

W. T. Baillie, 
D.D.G.M., Bruce District. 

CHATHAM DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

I have the honour to submit for your consideration my 
report on the condition of Masonry in Chatham District. 

First, I wish to express my appreciation and thanks 
to all those who have helped make this year one of the 
most enjoyable of my masonic career and also have made 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 93 

it possible for me to report that Masonry in Chatham 
District is in good condition. 

Space will not permit mention of more than a few, but 
I would like especially to mention Wor. Bro. J. W. McKay, 
District Secretary, whose enthusiasm, genial temperament 
and happy faculty of making friends have gone a long way 
toward making this a successful year. 

There was a splendid attendance at all meetings. The 
officers of all the lodges have the work well in hand and 
there is nothing to suggest any lack of uniformity. The 
District Secretary made a careful inspection of the books 
and records of each lodge and his reports in most cases show 
an improvement over previous years. Most of the lodges 
have more work and more applications for membership than 
they have had for some time. The harmony and good fel- 
lowship which exists in the lodge rooms were very apparent. 

The plan of having the Masters, Wardens and Secre- 
taries together for instruction and planning of the year's 
work, before any visits of inspection were made, worked 
very well indeed. It not only helped us off to a good start, 
but saved a great deal of repetition in the fourteen visits. 
The instruction is also much more effective when given at 
such a meeting. 

The matter of Masonic Education was well taken care 
of under the capable leadership of Rt. Wor. Bro. J. A. M. 
Hay. 

There were several outstanding district meetings v.-hich 
included a Past Masters' Association meeting in Chatham 
with Most Wor. Bro. Frank Copus as guest speaker; an 
"old fashioned" Lodge of Instruction held in Blenheim at 
which we were very fortunate in having Most Wor. Bro. W. 
J. Dunlop, Custodian of the Work, accompanied by the Grand 
Secretary; a District Church service in Thamesville with Rt. 
Wor. Bro. Rev. Thos. Eakin, Grand Chaplain, in charge of 
the service; and last, but not least, a meeting in Chatham 
to extend a welcome to our Grand Master, Most Wor. Bro. 
J. A. Dobbie, on an official visit to the District. All these 
meetings were very largely attended and will be remembered 
long as having contributed greatly to the welfare of Masonry 
in Chatham District. 

During the year death again played its part and removed 
from our midst several valued member? of the Order. Three 
were Past Grand Lodge Officers — Rt. Wor. Bro. Archdeacon 
R. J. M. Perkins, Past Grand Chaplain (1927), a member of 
Victory Lodge No. 563, Chatham; Rt. Wor. Bro. R. N. Fraser, 
Past District Deputy Grand Master of Erie District No. 1 
(1907), a member of Tecumseh Lodge No. 245, Thamesville, 
and also University Lodge, Vancouver, and Very Wor. Bro. 
Arthur B. Castell, Past Grand Organist (1935), an honorary 
member and Organist of Highgate Lodge No. 336. Also I 
would like to record here the death of another rnember of 
Highgate Lodge, Pilot Officer Bro. John G. Lee who was 



94 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

accidentally killed at Trenton. Bro. Lee was the first mem- 
ber in this District to give his life in the service of his King 
and country since the beginning of the present war. 

My term of office has been a most delightful one due 
in a large measure to the kindness, courtesy and co-operation 
extended to me by every lodge in the District. I have enjoyed 
also the pleasure of exchanging fraternal visits with the 
District Deputies in several of the neighbouring districts. 

To the large number of brethren who accompanied me 
on all visits of inspection and to other meetings I wish to 
express my deep gratitude. Their presence was a real in- 
spiration and I am truly grateful for their loyal support. 

In conclusion may I say that I feel that there has been 
an advancement in Masonry in Chatham District this year. 
If my efforts have contributed in any way to that improve- 
men I shall feel well repaid. 

All of which is respectfully and fraternally submitted. 

R. C. McCutcheon, 
D.D.G.M., Chatham District. 



EASTERN DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

I have the honour to submit my report as representative 
of the Grand Master in Eastern District for the year 1939-40. 

May I take this opportunity of expressing my sincere 
appreciation of the honour conferred upon me and Martin- 
town Lodge, No. 596, by the brethren of the District in 
electing me District Deputy Grand Master, the first D.D.G.M. 
from Martintown Lodge. 

My first official duty was to appoint Worshipful Brother, 
Duncan A. Ross, as District Secretary, and the Rev. Brother 
G. W. Irvine of Lancaster, Lodge No. 207, as District 
Chaplain. To both of these officers, I wish to express my 
thanks for the support they have given me throughout the 
year. 

All the lodges were visited officially and I found 
Masonry in the District, in a vigorous and healthy condition. 
An increasing number of candidates are coming forward for 
membership in Masonry, and I was very much impressed by 
the fine type of men who are attracted to membership in the 
Order. The future for Masonry in Eastern District is bright 
indeed. The work throughout the District is uniform and of 
a very high standard. 

In closing this report may I express my thanks and ap- 
preciation to all the brethren who accompanied me on my 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 95 

visits throughout the District. I shall always look back with 
pleasure to the pleasant evenings spent with the brethren 
of the District, and I thank them all for their kindness. I 
can truthfully say this has been the best year of my life. 
All of which is fraternally submitted. 

D. S. Macintosh, 
D.D.G.M., Eastern District. 

FRONTENAC DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 

Members of the Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 

in the Province of Ontario. 
Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

My duties as District Deputy Grand Master now draw- 
ing to a close I now present the following report. 

I visited each lodge in the District and saw the First 
Degree exemplified in five lodges, the Second Degree in four, 
and the Third Degree in two. There being no degree work 
in the remaining seven lodges, they were opened and closed 
in the three degrees and the work was done in a very satis- 
factory manner. 

When I visited Westport, I invested Very Worshipful 
Bro. W. C. Taylor with Grand Lodge Regalia which had been 
presented to him by the brethren of his lodge and which he 
acknowledged in a most suitable manner. 

At Prince of Wales Lodge I was asked to present a 
Past Master's Medal to R. W. Bro. Aylesworth. As this 
brother was unable to attend lodge we gathered at his home 
and I had the honour to make the presentation of the Medal 
in commemoration of his having completed fifty years as 
a Past Master. Although the brother was at that time un- 
well he made a very happy and suitable acknowledgment and 
I appreciated the privilege accorded to me very much. Canon 
A. E. Smart of Ancient St. John's Lodge was the speaker 
of the evening and his address was interesting and in- 
structive. 

At Victoria Lodge I had the honour to present a Past 
Master's Jewel to W. Bro. Horace Clancey. Bro. Ross 
Winter, Senior Warden of Queen's Lodge, was the guest 
speaker on that occasion and gave a very interesting and 
eloquent address. This lodge has the unique distinction of 
having a member, in the person of Brother Henry Purcell, 
who celebrated his one hundredth birthday last fall. A 
large number of brethren gathered at his home to extend 
best wishes on that day. 

At Union Lodge No. 9, Napanee, I had the pleasure of 
presenting W. Bro. E. C. Hogarth with a Past Master's 
Jewel on the night of my official visit. 

This lodge also had a "Red Letter Night" on the evening 
of March 8th, when it was honoured by a visit from the 



96 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Most Worshipful Grand Master J. A. Dobbie. On that oc- 
casion three of the veteran members, M. W. Bro. W. S. 
Herrington, P.G.M., W. Bro. J. W. Robinson, P.M., W. Bro. 
Frank H. Perry, P.Mj were presented with Veteran's Jubilee 
Medals by the Grand Master, they having completed fifty 
years membership in the Craft. 

On my visit to St. Andrew's Lodge at Arden I conducted 
election of officers. The chairs in this lodge are being filled 
with Past Masters. This is a condition that should not exist. 
It is not good for the Lodge nor the Craft in general, and I 
spoke to them about this and urged them to try and remedy 
it. 

I am very grateful to R. W. Bro. Robb for supplying 
me so generously with material for Masonic Education. I 
have used this extensively on my various visits and it has 
been received and commented on very favourably. In fact, 
I had some copies made of "Questions and Answers on the 
Constitution" and distributed them to each lodge in the 
District, and I am assured they are being used considerably 
and much benefit is resulting therefrom. 

It is gratifying to me to see the subject "Masonic 
Education" mentioned on so many copies of the summons 
which I receive. It shows the matter is being followed up 
by the lodges themselves. Some of them have a regular 
program which they carry out, and I have promised them my 
assistance at any time I can be of service. 

Taking things as a whole, Masonry throughout the 
District is in a fairly good condition. Of course we have 
the matter of finances, but I understand the lodges are doing 
their best to collect outstanding dues and, I believe, are 
having fair success consistent with present day conditions. 

I have had occasion to criticize the odd summons and 
in one instance stop a lodge from balloting because there 
was not sufficient information given regarding the applicants. 

Applications for membership are not too plentiful in the 
District and, of course, when you have no candidates the 
work suffers to some extent. I have tried to impress on the 
Masters the advisability of taking up something of interest 
in the way of Masonic Education to make their meetings as 
interesting as possible. 

Fraternal visits throughout- the District still prevail, 
and the mingling together with the brethren of different 
lodges is of great benefit to all concerned. 

I must mention the passing of R. W. Bro. G. A. Ayls- 
worth on December 2nd, 1939. The funeral was held on 
Saturday, December 4th. There was a large gathering of 
Masons present and the service at the grave was conducted 
by M. W. Bro. W. S. Herrington and myself. A Mason for 
fifty-six years our late brother had been an outstanding 
citizen in the community in which he lived and his passing 
is a distinct loss. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 97 

I must also record the passing of R. W. Bro. J. G. 
Fennell of Union Lodge No. 9, Napanee. He was a Mason 
of many years' standing and a prominent citizen. He was 
also Honorary Secretary of his lodge and had taken an 
active part in its affairs. 

I also have to record the passing on December 10th, 
1939, of V. W. Bro. R. Easton Burns of The Ancient St. 
John's Lodge No. 3. He had been a Mason for fifty-two 
years, having joined the Craft in 1887 and was Master of 
his lodge in 1894. 

It has been a privilege and pleasure for me to serve 
as District Deputy Grand Master. I hope I have merited 
the confidence of the brethren and that I have been able to 
render some real service throughout the District. 

I now pledge my support to my successor. Whoever he 
may be, I know he will be received as courteously and kindly 
as I have been and I wish him every success. 

It is my earnest wish that the same spirit of friendship 
and brotherly love will continue to prevail throughout the 
District as always and may the lodges prosper as never 
before. 

Fraternally submilted. 

Wm. Chapman, 
D.D.G.M. Frontenac District. 

GEORGIAN DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: — 

As my official duties draw to a close, it is with mingled 
feelings of regret and pleasure that I make this report on 
the condition of Masonry in Georgian District. My regret 
is that my work is at an end; my pleasure is that some other 
brother may repeat the wonderful reception I have been 
given on each and every night. 

War broke out before my duties began and I feared 
that my year would not be the success the previous years 
had been. To my great satisfaction I found that the hostili- 
ties brought the brethren closer to their mother lodge. I 
was amazed at the interest shown throughout the various 
lodges and the work of the officers and brethren v/as a 
revelation to me. 

Each lodge in the District was visited at least once and 
a degree was worked in every case. The exemplification of 
the degrees was, at all times, skillfully and accurately done 
and great congratulations were in order to each and every 
Master. This good work not only shows the interest taken 
by the various lodges but proves, to my entire satisfaction, 



98 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

that Masonry, as a fraternal organization, will continue to 
be a powerful force for good in the country. 

There is a good attendance and while a few brethren 
have been suspended for non-payment of dues this loss was 
more than made up by the initiations. A great effort is 
being made in the District to prove to the brethren that it 
is most necessary for them to pay their dues promptly and 
it is having a beneficial effect on the finances of most of the 
lodges. 

Your most efficient District Secretary, Wor. Bro. 
(Doctor) S. R. McKelvey accompanied me on every occasion 
and he reports that the financial administration of the 
various lodges is of a high order. This shows that the right 
type of men are elected to fill the several responsible posi- 
tions. 

There is an Officers' and Past Masters' organization in 
the District which is doing good work. These men visited 
several lodges putting on a degree in each case. A number 
of Past District Deputy Grand Masters were invited and the 
details of the work were fully discussed and much valuable 
information was given. All this tends to better degree work 
in the lodges and is to be highly commended. 

Early in the year, Beaver Lodge, Thornbury, was re- 
opened following the disastrous fire the previous winter. A 
great deal of hard work has been done by the members of 
Beaver Lodge and they are to be highly congratulated for 
their interest and efficiency. 

On every occasion stress was made by me on the work 
that is desired and expected of the benevolent and sick com- 
mittees of each lodge and I was pleased to find it was well 
received. 

Our District Divine Service was held in Midland on 
Sunday, June 9th, at which the District Chaplain, Bro. (Rev.) 
H. D. Cleverdon of Beeton, took the service assisted by Very 
Wor. Bro. R. T. C. Dwelly of Penetanguishene and Right 
Wor. Bro. L. E. Gosselin of Victoria Harbour. A very in- 
spiring sermon by the District Chaplain was of no little help 
to the brethren in these trying times. 

The outstanding event of the year, for me, was on the 
occasion of my official visit to my home lodge, Spry No. 385, 
Beeton. One hundred and fifty-two brethren attended, rep- 
resenting 14 of the 19 lodges in the District. This was final 
proof of the excellent condition of Masonry in Georgian 
District. ' 

Much of the success of the year was due to the untiring 
work of Wor. Bro. S. R. McKelvey who, more than anyone 
else, was responsible for fostering a spirit of fraternity 
among the brethren throughout the District. 

It is with much regret that I report the death of Wor. 
Bro. R. L. Williams, Master of Corinthian Lodge, Barrie. 
When I recall the excellent work done in Corinthian Lodge 



TORONTO. ONTARIO. 1940 99 

on my official visit, I know how great a loss his death will 
be to the brethren. While it is not usual to state which lodge 
has done the best work during the year, under these circum- 
stances, I unhesitatingly state that the exemplification of the 
First Degree by Corinthian Lodge was the best and most of 
the work was done by the Master, Wor. Bro. Williams. 

In conclusion, my thanks are expressed to the brethren 
of Georgian District for making it possible for me to spend 
a year in their services as the representative of the Most 
Worshipful the Grand Master. 

Sincerely and fraternally, 

Frederick Spearing, 
D.D.G.M., Georgian District. 

GREY DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

I have the honour to submit my report on the condition 
of Masonry in Grey District during my term of office as 
D.D.G.M. 

May I take this opportunity of expressing to you. Most 
Worshipful Grand Master, and to the brethren of Grey 
District, my sincere appreciation for the honour conferred 
upon me and for the privilege of serving as D.D.G.M. I 
also wish to thank the brethren of the District for the hearty 
co-operation given me. Many accompanied me on my official 
inspection and fraternal visits and in many other ways 
assisted in making the duties of my office easier and most 
enjoyable. 

My first official act was to appoint Wor. Bro. T. S. 
Cooper of Hiram Lodge No. 490, as District Secretary, and 
I am very grateful to him for the very efficient assistance 
he has given me. He not only inspected the Secretary's book 
but always had a message of interest and encouragement for 
the brethren. 

I have officailly visited every lodge in the District and 
without exception found the work uniform and of a very 
high standard. Much credit is due the Past Masters for their 
loyal support to the presiding officers, who are giving so 
much of their time and effort to further the work. From 
my observations Masonry is improving in the District. In 
most lodges the brethren appear to be enthusiastic and a 
good attendance was in evidence at every meeting. 

The books of all the Secretaries were inspected and 
found to be in good order. Dues were fairly well collected 
and every effort made to reduce outstanding dues which, in 
general, were not of an alarming nature. 



100 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

I am happy to report a unique experience which took 
place in Durham Lodge No. 306, on June 11th. It was my 
privilege to be present and see Right Wor. Bro. Grant, Past 
D.D.G.M. of Grey District in the Chair, and with his two 
brothers in the Wardens' Chairs, initiate his son, which was 
well done and well worth placing on record. 

Our District Church Service was held on June 16th. Our 
District Chaplain, Canon Bro. West-McMaster, gave an out- 
standing address, while Rt. Wor. Bro. Zinn and Rt. Wor. 
Bro. Kress took part in the service assisted by the Rector 
Bro. C. 0. Pherrill. A fairly good crowd was in attendance. 

Our Past Masters' Association is not as active as it 
might be. But as it is not long organized it should improve 
in the future. To encourage visiting throughout the District, 
I started a travelling gavel. This gavel I hoped would make 
the rounds of the District during my term of office. I might 
mention the fact that this gavel was made by Very Wor. 
Bro. Richardson of Durham and presented to the Past 
Masters' Association for the purpose I have mentioned. 

I have visited in the neighboring districts and I find 
conditions might be improved by re-arranging the districts. 
This could be done mutually by the D.D.G.M. as some dis- 
tricts are small and others large. Some of the lodges would 
appreciate the change. 

In conclusion I would like to again express my deep 
gratitude for the assistance and loyal support accorded me 
by the Masters, Past Masters and brethren in the District 
and for the many kindnesses and courtesies extended to me. 
It has been a pleasure to serve and my greatest wish is 
that Masonry may continue to prosper and spread its benign 
influence among mankind. 

All of which is fraternally and respectfully submitted. 

T. H. Reburn, 
D.D.G.M., Grey District. 

HAMILTON DISTRICT "A" 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

I have the honour to submit my report on the condition 
of Masonry in the Hamilton District "A" during my term 
of office as D.D.G.M. 

May I at the outset express my sincere appreciation to 
the brethren of the District for unanimously selecting me 
for this high honour, and to you. Most Worshipful Sir, for 
confirming my election. In all my visits my reception as 
the representative of the Grand Master has been most 
cordial and respectful and the genuine enthusiasm and 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 101 

loyalty shown to the Grand Master and to Grand Lodge in 
general has been fully demonstrated. 

Officially I have inspected sixteen lodges, also visited 
unofficially about the same number. I have attended several 
"At-Homes", which I consider an excellent method of bind- 
ing and cementing the ties of a Mason's family with the 
lodge. 

The average attendance has been excellent, on several 
occasions more than two hundred members being present. 
And I believe that the average attendance is on the upswing. 

I have been impressed by the general increased revenue 
from dues and the small reduction in membership through 
suspension for nonpayment of same. Indeed it gives me 
pleasure to record that St. Johns No. 40 reports not one 
member in arrears of dues. This is an excellent record for 
a lodge of 520 members. 

The condition of Masonry in this District is excellent; 
the roots which were planted in the cradle of Mttsonry in 
this Province are deep, healthy and strong; and the branches 
extend to every part of our spiritual, industrial, commercial, 
cultural and administrative life, blending together our true 
citizens with loyalty, brotherly love, relief and truth. The 
work of the Ritual is uniform, dignified and in accordance 
with the Grand Master's interpretations. 

The amounts dispensed for private benevolence by the 
various lodges are very gratifying, giving practical demon- 
strations of the true principles of Masonry in bringing 
succor and relief to the distressed and less fortunate 
brethren. 

I shall be forever grateful to my predecessors who in- 
stituted the practice of inter-lodge visits between city and 
rural lodges on the occasion of the Official Visits of Inspec- 
tion by the D.D.G.M. Apart from the solid backing and 
comfort it gives the District Deputy, it opens another 
avienue of personal friendships and happy memories for the 
brethren. 

Until recently the Masters' and Wardens' Association 
has sponsored the educational programme in the Hamilton 
District. Now, through mutual agreement, it is assumed by 
the Past Masters' Association. A Chairman is appointed by 
the Association to work in conjunction with the Supervisors 
of both Districts and the instructors from the various lodges. 
Several instructional meetings have been held and valuable 
information has been received by the brethren who attended 
the meetings. Our thanks go to Wor. Bro. W. L. Somerville 
as Chairman, Wor. Bro. T. H. Riches and Very Wor. Bro. 
G. McCulloch, Supervisors of Masonic Education for Dis- 
tricts "A" and "B" respectively, Wor. Bro. Prof. W. H. 
McNairn of The Barton Lodge No. 6 and Wor. Bro. M. C. 
Cain of Golden Fleece Lodge No. 607 for their scholarly and 
interesting lectures. 



102 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

A Masonic Library has been instituted by the Past 
Masters' Association under the personal supervision of Wor. 
Bro. W. J. McGilvery. This ardent Mason is making a dream 
come true in Hamilton. 

Two District Divine Services w^ere held during my term 
and both were well attended. The first was to celebrate the 
Festival of St. John the Evangelist, on October 29th, 1939 
at Christ Church Cathedral, Hamilton, under the auspices of 
The Barton Lodge No. 6. Very Wor. Bro. the Rt. Rev. L. 
W. B. Broughall, M.A., D.D., Lord Bishop of Niagara, de- 
livered the address. It was a \Yonderful masonic service 
with such a beautiful temple setting. The other service was 
to celebrate the Festival of St. John the Baptist and was 
held in the Scottish Rite Cathedral, May 5th, 1940, under 
the auspices of the Lodge of Strict Observance No. 27. The 
Minister was Rt. Wor. Bro. the Rev. G. W. Tebbs, Rector 
of St. Luke's Church, Burlington, P.G.C. "The Fellowcraft" 
was the subject of the address which was interesting, in- 
structive and inspiring. In both services full choirs attended 
and rendered beautiful anthems. 

The Grand Master's visit to Acacia Lodge No. 61 was 
an outstanding meeting. A large number of Present and 
Past Grand Lodge Officers attended. The Most Worshipful 
Bro. Dr. J. A. Dobbie received a great ovation from that 
large loyal gathering. This happened in District "B" so I 
will leave the recording of the meeting to my brother 
D.D.G.M. The Worshipful Masters of both Districts were 
presented to the Grand Master. 

The "W. M. Logan Memorial Night", a memorial to our 
dearly beloved, the late Grand Secretary, was held, Thurs- 
day, Nov. 16th, 1939 in the Masonic Hall, Hamilton. More 
than 250 members were present of which 65 were Present 
and Past Grand Lodge Officers, and these hailed from all 
sections of Ontario and several from Buffalo, N.Y. Most 
Wor. Bro. W. H. Wardrope was given the honour of unveil- 
ing the tablet which is of bronze, now permanently located 
in the regular Blue Room. The ceremony was simple and 
sincere, the voice of Most Wor. Bro. Wardrope just seeming 
to fit the occasion adding dignity to our lasting tribute. 
He recalled many of the sterling qualities of the late Rt. 
Wor. Bro. W. M. Logan which were greatly responsible for 
the high position our Grand Lodge holds in the world today. 

In the Banquet Room Most Wor. Bro. John A. Rowland 
gave a most inspiring address, reviewing the life of our late 
Grand Secretary from the time they were both students 
attending the University of Toronto until the time of his 
death. It was a splendid meeting, well organized and a 
fitting and final tribute to a distinguished Mason. 

One of my greatest pleasures was enjoyed during my 
official visit to Oakville Lodge No. 400. It was in presenting 
Veteran's Medals for fifty years of membership to Wor. Bro. 
J. A. Riggs who was Master of the Lodge in 1904, also Wor. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 103 

Bro. Alfred Hillmer, who was Master in 1909. These splendid 
masonic gentlemen, who are still in full harness, have 
worked and lived for more than half a century using the 
principles of Masonry in their everyday lives. Their benign 
dignity is a shining example to their younger brethren. Bro. 
W. E. King, also of this lodge, being sick at the time, re- 
ceived his Medal at a later date. To all these worthy 
brethren we offer our sincere congratulations and trust they 
will be spared many years to proudly wear their distinctive 
medals. 

Although recording it last in this report, my first official 
act, in accordance with the Grand Master's views and the 
views of many distinguished Past Masters of my own lodge, 
was to appoint Wor. Bro. Thos. R. Hawkins to the office of 
District Secretary. I am delighted that I was able to make 
this choice. His business ability, masonic knowledge and 
friendly counsel have helped to make the term, to me, suc- 
cessful. 

Respectfully and fraternally submitted. 

Geo. Walker, 
D.D.G.M., Hamilton District "A". 

HAMILTON DISTRICT "B" 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

It is a delightful privilege to tender this report at the 
conclusion of a busy and happy year spent in the service of 
our beloved Order, a year that I feel has been and will 
remain the one of highest value in my masonic career. 

First, I wish to confirm what I have told the brethren 
orally at every opportunity, how grateful I am to the rep- 
resentatives of the lodges in this District for my unanimous 
election to the high office that I have held, and at the same 
time to express my thanks to the brethren of my own lodge 
for selecting me from our Past Masters. 

It was a pleasure to appoint as District Secretary, Wor. 
Bro. Harry S. Stears, who has the ability and facilities to 
properly look after the important duties of his office and 
he has been most faithful, energetic and efficient. As Dis- 
trict Chaplain, I appointed Wor. Bro. Robt. Johnston, a very 
capable Past Master, and he too has been both enthusiastic 
and reliable. I feel very fortunate in having had these two 
brethren to assist me. 

As supervisor of Masonic Education, my appointee was 
Very Wor. Bro. Gordon McCulloch of Doric Lodge, one who 
is keenly interested in this phase of Masonry, and I am very 
appreciative of his ready acceptance of the appointment. He 



104 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

and the supervisor for District "A", Wor. Bro. Thos. Riches, 
have done worth-while work in co-operation with the Past 
Masters' Association, and I am sure the brethren of the 
Hamilton Districts have derived much knowledge of things 
masonic from their efforts. 

During my term, I have visited officially each of the 
seventeen lodges and have attended most of them on other 
occasions, thereby having had opportunities to observe_ their 
work, which I have found to be very commendable in all 
the lodges. Our ritual is of such excellence that it calls for 
our best efforts toward efficiency and I believe the officers 
of our lodges realize this fact and are continually striving 
to improve the quality of their work. I have found the 
lodges to be in good financial standing, the officers keen and 
capable, and the condition of Masonry in this District to be 
very good. 

In a brief report it is not possible to review all the 
activities of the year, but some of the outstanding events 
are deserving of special mention. 

Most cordial fraternal relations have existed with the 
District Deputy Grand Masters of the adjacent districts, and 
visits have been paid with R. W. Bro. Hawley of Brant 
District, R. W. Bro. Lane of Niagara "B", R. W. Bro. Albert- 
son of Toronto "A", and R. W. Bro. Walker of Hamilton 
"A". Their kindly interest and good fellowship are much 
appreciated. 

On October 13th, 1939, Acacia Lodge held its annual 
"Grand Lodge Night", when a great many Grand Lodge 
Officers were present and the guest of honor was the Grand 
Master who also addressed the brethren in the banquet hall. 

Another memorable evening was Nov. 20th, 1939, when 
Doric Lodge celebrated its 60th Anniversary. The arrange- 
ments were excellent and the lodge is to be congratulated 
on a very fine Diamond Jubilee Celebration. 

On May 10th, 1940, Acacia Lodge held a reception for 
the Grand Junior Warden, R. W. Bro. B. C. Beasley, a Past 
Master of Acacia. A great number of Grand Lodge Officers 
were in attendance and high tribute was paid to this very 
popular officer of Grand Lodge. 

On May 16th, 1940,, at Union Lodge No. 7 Grimsby, I 
was asked to present fifty year medals to two of their 
honored veterans. This I deemed a very great privilege and 
one that I hoped I might be so fortunate as to realize some- 
where during my year. We should and do extend to these 
veteran members of the Craft our heartiest congratailations 
and best wishes. 

A very special event of the year was the visit on Satur- 
day, May 25th, 1940, of Buchanan Lodge to Western Star 
Lodge No. 21 at Youngstown Ohio, when Buchanan Lodge 
exemplified the Master Mason's Degree. This was one of 
the finest gatherings of Masons I have ever attended, with 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 105 

a total registration of 810 brethren, including a number of 
Grand Lodge Officers and representatives from 119 American 
and 7 Canadian lodges. A very fine spirit of international 
good will was in evidence throughout and, I believe, the 
bonds of masonic brotherhoad were further cemented. 

Several of the lodges have held special Divine Services, 
which I attended, as well as the annual Fall and Spring 
joint services under the auspices of the Masonic Benevolent 
Board. The attendance was fair, but there is room for im- 
provement in this respect and I would urge upon the breth- 
ren the value of taking advantage of such opportunities to 
unite in prayer and praise to the Great Architect. 

While many of our brethren have enlisted for war 
service and the lodges have been asked to furnish particulars, 
this seems to have presented some difficulties and I regret 
that the figures have not become available. 

It has been my aim to further the cause of Masonry 
and to impress upon the brethren the high standards that 
are set for their attainment, and it is my earnest hope that 
as a result this District will have in it at least a few better 
Masons and better citizens. 

In conclusion, I wish to express my sincere appreciation 
of the courteous and hearty welcome that has been accorded 
me by my brethren in all the lodges and for their very loyal 
support. 

Respectfully and fraternally submitted, 

W. Davies, 
D.D.G.M., Hamilton District "B". 

LONDON DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

In the presentation of my report of London District I 
desire to express my grateful appreciation to the brethren of 
the District for the honour bestowed upon myself and 
Belmont Lodge in electing me to the office of D.D.G.M. and 
to you, Most Worshipful Sir, for confirming the same. 

The work was made a pleasure by the whole-hearted co- 
operation of the Masters, officers and brethren of the District. 
District Deputy Grand Masters in London District are most 
fortunate in that they always have the loyal support of 
Present and Past Grand Lodge Officers, all of which is grate- 
fully acknowledged, particularly that of the immediate past 
D.D.G.M. 
(1) Appointments 

The appointment of District Secretary was accepted by 
Wor. Bro. John Ferguson. His long and varied experience, 



106 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

not only in Masonry but in other endeavours, has been most 
valuable. He has given much appreciated counsel and as- 
sistance to the D.D.G.M. and his v/ork has been most satis- 
factory to the District. 

(2) Lodge Rooms and Equipment 

There may be room for improvement in some cases but 
on the whole the lodge rooms are in good condition. Several 
lodges are contemplating improvements. It is recommended 
that more adequate facilities for the safe-keeping of records 
be provided in cases vi^here provision has not already been 
made, 

(3) Lodge Meetings 

The attendance at meetings of inspection has been ex- 
cellent. The average for the twenty-three visits being 105 
with the high, two hundred and fifty and the low forty-five. 
With few exceptions the work of the officers and assistants 
has been well done and many lodges have been outstanding 
and are a credit to the District. 

(4) Masonic Education and Instruction 

The educational branch of our masonic activities is in 
the most capable hands, in London District, of the following 
outstanding committee composed of Rt. Wor. Bro. Bimie 
Smith, Chairman, Rt. Wor. Bro. N. C. Hart, W. Bro. E. A. 
Miller and Very Wor. Bro. G. A. Wheable. This committee 
has rendered valuable service in the field of Masonic Educa- 
tion. 

At an emergent meeting of Tuscan Lodge on February 
29th, a "True and False Quizz" on the Constitution was con- 
ducted by brethren chosen by the District Educational Com- 
mittee in co-operation with the Past Masters', Masters' and 
Wardens' Associations. Added interest was created by hav- 
ing the Masters of the District Lodges answer the questions 
which were given by Rt. Wor. Bro. N. C. Hart. The good 
offices of Tuscan Lodge in arranging this emergent meeting 
have been greatly appreciated. 

London District is fortunate in having an excellent Past 
Masters', Masters' and Wardens' Association and it is diffi- 
cult to estimate its value to the District and particularly to 
the D.D.G.M. 

While some outside speakers have addressed lodge meet- 
ings, London District fortunately has many speakers of out- 
standing ability who have given addresses on Masonry and 
other interesting subjects. 

Many of the lodges conducted Annual Church Services 
and the District Divine Service was held on May 19th, at St, 
Paul's Cathedral, London. The late Very Rev. and Rt. Wor. 
Bro. C. E. Jeakins, Dean of Huron, gave a very fine address 
and little did those who were fortunate in hearing him on this 
occasion think that it would be his last sermon. Later in the 
week his sudden death came as a shock to London District 
and Western Ontario. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 107 

(5) Fraternal Visits 

Considerable fraternal visiting took place during the 
year. While the D.D.G.M. did not have the pleasure of being 
with all the lodges on the occasions of their visits, he was 
fortunate in accompanying Union Lodge to Buffalo, Acacia 
Lodge to Toronto and Temple Lodge to Strathroy. The D.D. 
G.M. accompanied a group of Past Masters to Carghill 
(South Huron District) to assist in the formation of a 
Masters', Past Masters' and Wardens' Association. Fraternal 
visiting cannot be encouraged too much. 

(6) Benevolence 

The work of benevolence has been carried on as usual 
in a satifactory manner and the work of the Committees on 
on the visitation of the Sick is one of the most important. 
In addition to ordinary benevolent work the lodges of London 
District have contributed liberally to a sister lodge which 
has had financial difficulties for some time. 

(7) Finance 

On the whole the finances of the lodges are in good 
condition and the lodges are taking a more liberal and more 
commendable attitude in cases of delincjuent members who 
may have met with unfortunate circumstances. 

(8) Obituaries 

Many of the lodges have lost a number of highly esteem- 
ed members during the year: Four Past Grand Lodge Offi- 
cers—Very Wor. Bro. f. W. Needham, Rt. Wor. Bro. T. 
Robson, Very Wor. Bro. J. H. C. Woodward and Very Rev. 
and Rt. Wor. Bro. C. E. Jeakins. The sympathies of every 
Mason in the District are extended to the families of all de- 
parted brethren. 

(9) Recommendations 

(a) During the year the advisability of having attractive 
lodge summonses has been discussed with several 
lodges. It is true that many are most interesting and 
attractive but, in view of the fact that the monthly 
notice is often the only medium of contact with many 
of the brethren, it is advisable that more thought be 
given to an endeavour to make the summonses more 
inviting and attractive. 

(b) More thought and attention should be given to mak- 
ing the lodge meetings interesting to those who are 
not officers or past officers. Lodges should not be 
unmindful of the fact that for this group of members, 
lodge attendances often become monotonous and may 
result in non-attendance. In all lodge functions, 
whether educational or otherwise, the membership 
other than present and past officers should be given 
more consideration and responsibility. 

(10) War Service 

London District is proud of the brethren v,-ho have en- 
listed in His Majesty's Forces, included in the number being 



108 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

a Worshipful Master. We earnestly hope and pray that the 
Most High will guide and protect them and that they may 
return safely to their homes and loved ones. 

Doubtless as time goes on many of the brethren will 
open their homes to the refugee children of masonic brethren 
in war areas. 

While it is true that there always has existed a wonder- 
ful spirit of friendship in the lodges of London District, it 
is most gratifying to think that at the conclusion of one's 
term of office an even more friendly fraternal spirit prevails. 
It is hoped that as each year passes the fruits of a worthy 
ambition to make the fraternity the "Friendly Fraternity" 
will be realized. 

The many kindnesses extended by the brethren of the 
District to me and the privilege of attempting to serve 
London District as D.D.G.M. have been greatly appreciated. 

Respectfully and fraternally submitted. 

D. A. Ferguson, 
D.D.G.M., London District. 

MUSKOKA DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren. 

I have the honour to submit my report on the condition 
of Masonry in Muskoka District for the year 1939-1940. 

To the brethren of the District, of which I have had the 
pleasure of serving as their District Deputy Grand Master, 
I offer my sincere thanks. 

I shall ever remember this year as one of greatest 
pleasure enriched by the many acts of kindness and support 
so willingly given to me by my kind friends throughout the 
District. Their unfailing kindness and willingness at all 
times to do anything in their power made the year an ex- 
perience I shall never forget and for which I shall ever be 
grateful. 

My first official act was to appoint as District Secretary, 
Wor. Btco. J. F. McDonald of Algonquin Lodge No. 434, 
Emsdale. He has been a tower of strength to me doing 
everything required of him in a most efficient and painstak- 
ing manner and assisting me with counsel and suggestion. 

I also appointed as District Chaplain, Bro. Rev. Canon 
C. C. Simpson of Algonquin Lodge No. 434, Emsdale. Bro. 
Simpson has been a lifelong friend of mine, and his support 
throughout the year has been of inestimable benefit to me. 
To these two brethren belong the chief credit for any success 
to which I may have attained. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 109 

During my year of office I have visited officially each 
lodge in the District once, besides which I have dropped in 
on many of the lodges now and again as an ordinary visitor 
and I have found them all doing excellent work. The books, 
records and furniture of the lodges are being well kept and 
the buildings and furniture are adequately insured. I found 
the work of the various Masters and their officers to be of 
a high order and indeed quite uniform throughout the whole 
District. I feel that the practice of visiting betv/een the 
lodges is gaining in popularity and is to be highly recom- 
mended as it tends to build up uniformity of work and 
fraternity of feeling. 

I have witnessed outstanding examples of benevolence 
in two or three of the lodges during the year and right here 
I want to pay tribute to V. W. Bro. Wm. Bailey, Secretary 
of the Toronto Masonic Board of Relief and all those who 
are associated with him in that work. I have made great 
use of them during my year, and have found them to be 
efficient and cheerful givers of their time, their talents, their 
money and their sympathy. I am sure their reward is great 
for truly, "the Lord loveth a cheerful giver". I have seen 
this spirit of benevolence being exemplified very markedly 
in the smaller centres too, several instances having come 
to my knowledge during the past year so that the heart of 
the Craft beats warm and true in our District still. 

i have tried to impress upon the brethren of my District 
the crying need for every man to recognize the responsi- 
bilities of life, that the world needs men of high ideals and 
lofty aspirations, that it is the duty of every Mason to see 
that he is truly a good citizen and that his life is such that 
all men may copy him with profit. And I have reason to 
believe that at least something may have been accomplished 
as one brother said to me after one of our meetings, "there 
was seed soM^n here tonight that may bear fruit in the days 
to come." 

I have not found as much interest in Masonic Education 
as I could wish for. But I attribute this chiefly to the de- 
mands made on our time and thoughts by the war and all 
its worries and perplexities, so that many of the brethren 
have not the time to devote to study that they had in former 
years. 

Early in my year it was my privilege to present to Wor. 
Bro. Allan Kilpatrick, the first Master of Algonquin Lodge 
No. 434, a Veteran's Medal, in recognition of his membership 
in the Craft for fifty years. Many members of the lodge, 
also many visitors were present on this occasion and showed 
to Wor. Bro. Kilpatrick, by their words and actions, the deep 
feelings of esteem and affection with which they regard him. 

On Thursday, May 16th, this District in general and 
Strong Lodge No. 423 in particular were greatly honoured 
by a visit from M. W. Bro. J. A. Dobbie, the Grand Master 
of our beloved Grand Lodge. It was the occasion of the 



110 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

dedication of the new quarters of Strong Lodge and was a 
very inspiring ceremony throughout. After the ceremony of 
dedication was completed the brethren repaired to the 
pavilion of J. P. Johnstone, on the shore of Lake Bernard 
where a particularly fine banquet had been prepared for 
their enjoyment. After which they listened with keen in- 
terest and appreciation to addresses delivered by the Grand 
Master, the Grand Secretary and many other eminent breth- 
ren. The brethren of Strong Lodge are to be heartily con- 
gratulated on the zeal and assiduity with which they have 
planned and laboured to provide themselves with the fine 
quarters which they now occupy. The dedication of this 
lodge fulfils a long cherished hope that each lodge in this 
District should have quarters suitable to the exemplification 
of the work of our beloved Craft. And that this hope should 
have seen its fulfilment during my term of office is indeed 
a very great pleasure to me. 

On Sunday, May 19th, we held our District Church 
Service under the auspices of Algonquin Lodge No. 434, at 
Emsdale. The Service was under the management of Bro. 
Rev. Canon Simpson, our District Chaplain, and the preacher 
was Wor. Bro. Rt. Rev. Geo. F. Kingston, Bishop of Algoma. 
Every lodge in the District was represented making a 
splendid gathering of Masons who, with many citizens of 
the community, filled the largest building in the village to 
the very doors. A very inspiring service was appreciated 
by all present, especially the address delivered by his Lord- 
ship, Bishop Kingston. This service will long be remembered 
I am sure, with thankfulness by the brethren of Algonquin 
Lodge and their visitors on that occasion. 

Finally, may I express the hope that, ere another year 
has passed, the great struggle in which we are now engaged, 
will be over, and that the great principles of Justice and 
Liberty, of Truth and Righteousness for which our Order 
stands may have triumphed and may stand unfettered and 
unhindered in the hearts and minds of man. 

All of which is fraternally submitted. 

H. R. Hayward, 
D.D.G.M. Muskoka District. 

NIAGARA DISTRICT "A" 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

I have the honour of presenting herewith my report of 
the condition of Masonry in Niagara "A" District for the 
masonic year now drawing to a close. 

Before proceeding with my report, I wish to express 
my sincere thanks and appreciation for the honour bestowed 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 111 

upon me and Temple Lodge No. 296, by the brethren of the 
entire District in electing me to the office of District Deputy 
Grand Master, and to the Most Worshipful the Grand Master 
for confirming my election. 

My first official act was to appoint Wor. Bro. Ed Mac- 
Lean as District Secretary, Wor. Bro. F. W. Armstrong, 
District Chaplain, and Wor. Bro. F. R. Davis as Chairman 
of Education. I am very grateful to these brethren for the 
assistance they have given me during the year. 

I visited every lodge once officially and many of them 
on more than one occasion and found the work of the various 
lodges uniform and of a good standard. The officers were 
sincere in their desire to impress the various candidates 
with the beauty of our ritual and the worth of our Order. 

The outstanding event of my visits of inspection was 
the Armistice Memorial Service at St. George's Lodge No. 
15, which was conducted in a very solemn and dignified 
manner. 

The financial condition of all lodges in the Niagara 
District "A" is very good. The matter of arrears in dues 
has been given careful consideration by the officers of all 
lodges affected, and considerable improvement has been 
made in this direction. 

Divine Service for the District was held in Knox Presby- 
terian Church, St. Catharines, April 14th, under the auspices 
of Maple Leaf Lodge No. 103. Over four hundred Masons 
attended representing nearly every lodge in the District, 
A large choir made up of brethren of the District added 
greatly to the impressiveness of the service. 

It is with deep regret that I report the passing of Rt. 
Wor. Bro. William Wheeler, P.D.D.G.M. of Niagara District 
"A". Widely known and highly esteemed by all Masons in 
the Niagara Districts, his passing is a great loss to our 
fraternity. 

It is also with deep regret that I report the sudden 
death of Worshipful Master Francis William Kennedy, of 
Adanac Lodge No. 614. Installed as Worshipful Master 
December 1939. Called to the Grand Lodge Above, February 
1940. 

An interchange of fraternal visits between Rt. Wor. Bro. 
Fred Lane, D.D.G.M. Niagara District "B" and myself, not 
only gave me g-reat pleasure but served as an inspiration 
and helpfulness to me in carrying on my work in the Dis- 
trict. The fraternal relations on these occasions were most 
cordial. 

The year has been one of pleasure and I will carry with 
me pleasant memories of the splendid support and many 
courtesies I have received. 

All of which is respectfully and fraternally submitted. 

Joseph Backus, 
D.D.G.M., Niagara District "A". 



112 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

NIAGARA DISTRICT "B" 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of Canada, in 
the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

Another Grand Lodge year is drawing to a close and 
with considerable regret I am preparing to surrender the 
office to a successor. 

May I take this opportunity to again express my sincere 
appreciation to the brethren of this District for the honour 
conferred upon Clifton Lodge No. 254, and myself, also my 
appreciation to you, Most Worshipful Sir, for confirmation 
of their choice. 

Early in the present Grand Lodge year it was my happy 
privilege to have the honour of introducing for the first time 
to an assembly of Masons in this District, our highly 
esteemed Grand Master. The occasion was the Seventy- 
fifth Anniversary of Merritt Lodge No. 168, of Welland, on 
the evening of November 20th, 1939, at which time the 
Grand Master delighted his many new friends with an in- 
teresting address. 

An event worthy of mention to the Masons of this 
province took place in LaSalle Lodge No. 1049, at Niagara 
Falls, N.Y. on the evening of December 21st, last, when Rt. 
Wor. Brothers Fred Trelford and G. E. French and I accom- 
panied by the Worshipful Master and a number of brethren 
of St. Mark's Lodge No. 105 were guests on the occasion of 
Wor. Bro. Edwin Lorraine Wallace being installed as Wor- 
shipful Master. 

Wor. Bro. Fred Want of Clifton Lodge, kindly consented 
to receive the appointment of District Secretary and proved 
a valuable and capable assistant. He found the books of 
all Secretaries generally well kept in every office, though 
in some cases he thought it advisable to suggest a more 
practical system of keeping the lodge records. I found all 
lodges carrying the necessary protective insurance. 

During the first three months of my term of office I 
visited each of the thirteen lodges with the object of be- 
coming acquainted with their problems and endeavoured to 
create a spirit of optimism. From my observations during 
these visits and the visits of inspection later, I am pleased 
to report a noticeable improvement in the condition of 
Masonry in this District. While some lodges are still suf- 
fering from the effects of the past few lean years, others 
are recovering most satisfactorily. Each, however, had 
learned that prosperity is not always permanent. 

It is gratifying to report that there has been an increase 
in the number of initiations and likewise a decrease in sus- 
pensions. The candidates initiated in the various lodges are 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1940 113 

a very fine type of young men, and as far as possible, I 
have taken a personal interest in each and endeavoured to 
impress upon them the principles and high ideals of the 
institution. And to the officers and members I have stressed 
emphatically their responsibility to the candidates by being 
living examples of the teachings of Masonry. 

The degree work in this District generally merits praise. 
However, one cannot fail to observe that fully attended 
regular rehearsals are necessary if real efficiency is to be 
maintained. 

I am further plea.sed to report an encouraging number 
of reinstatements, proving that many of the brethren who 
allowed themselves to slip out still have an interest in the 
fraternity. Most lodges have accepted the full meaning of 
Article 219-b., and made the possibility of reinstatement less 
burdensome. 

The lodges have active committees in charge of all de- 
partments. But one cannot fail to be particularly impressed 
by the activities of many committees on the care of the sick. 
It is gratifying to learn of the attention the sick breth- 
ren are receiving. 

Throughout the District everything points to the real 
spirit of Masonry, and if it existed before, I, for one, did 
not appreciate it, and am happy to have had the privilege 
of becoming acquainted with this fact. 

At the beginning of the vear, I proposed to Rt. Wor. 
Bro. C. W. Robb the name of Rt. Wor. Bro. G. E. French 
as supervisor of Masonic Education in this District and I 
leave to him the privilege of presenting his report to the 
Chairman of that Committee. Apart from the efforts of the 
District Supervisor I have endeavoured to impress upon the 
members in this District that one important branch of 
Masonic Education is that of adjusting our actions in the 
daily walk of life so that the principles practised by us may 
prove a worthy example to the rest of the world. 

An unusual international fraternal visit occurred on Satur- 
day May 11th, v/hen nearly one hundred Master Masons 
from Wheeling, W. Va. and surrounding district visited 
Clifton Lodge No. 254, to witness the exemplification of the 
Master Mason's Degree according to our Canadian ritual. 
The genuine sincerity with which these brethren from West 
Virginia expressed their appreciation for the reception and 
courtesies extended to them by the Masons in this city, 
strengthens an opinion which I have recently formed, that 
even though our country is actively engaged in the present 
war and the position of the United States is one of neutral- 
ity, a sti-onger bond of friendship between the Masons of 
these two countries now exists than ever before. 

During the past winter the Niagara Districts and 
Niagara Falls in particular, suffered the loss of two stalwart 
figures in Masonry in the persons of Rt. Wor. Bro. C. H. 
Stringer, P.D.D.G.M. of Niagara "B" and Rt. Wor. Bro. Wm. 



114 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Wheeler, P.D.D.G.M. of Niagara "A". The tragic sudden- 
ness of the death of both these widely known brethren was 
a severe shock. 

Before Grand Lodge convenes I expect to have the pri- 
vilege of presenting the Grand Lodge Veteran's Jewel to 
Wor. Bro. Alexander Fraser, a Past Master of Clifton Lodge. 

There seems so much to do for our institution and it 
requires the greater part of the year to find out what is 
most needed, so, at the end of my term there remains so 
much undone. 

Finally, may I say the year has been the most pleasant 
and profitable I have yet known. The real friendship extend- 
ed to me by the brethren in the District and beyond, the 
loyalty of Past Grand Lodge officers, Masters, Past Masters 
and others in support of my visits have been a real inspira- 
tion and will be a cherished memory, and to my successor 
I wish the same hearty co-operation and loyal support that 
has been mine. 

Now, with due regard for the critical times through 
which our Country and Empire is passing, may the Eighty- 
fifth Annual Communication of Grand Lodge be richly bless- 
ed and successful in all its deliberations. 

Respectfully and fraternally submitted. 

F. S. Lane, 
D.D.G.M., Niagara District "B". 

NIPISSING EAST DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

The enthusiasm, friendship and happiness which has 
been so much exemplified during this year have more than 
repaid me for any sacrifices of time and energy which I 
thought necessary in the fulfilment of this office of District 
Deputy Grand Master. I find there is no sacrifice, and that 
this idea has become an ideal of joy and pleasure. 

The meeting of all the brethren in each of the district 
lodges except Elk Lake during the first six months of my 
incumbency, which I did unofficially, created I believe a 
closer feeling of unity between the lodges. 

The brethren of Silver Lodge No. 436, Cobalt, have much 
to be proud of in their new lodge rooms. This lodge was 
duly dedicated on September 22nd by R. W. Bro. J. A. Mc- 
Rae, D.G.M., assisted by many Grand Lodge Officers from 
the area. The large number of Masons who gathered was 
quite enthusiastic and much appreciated the fine banquet 
and impressive ceremonies which followed. On March 4th, 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 115 

I visited this Lodge again and found the work excellent in 
the conferring of the M.M. Degree. The brethren are happy 
in their new home. 

After having been in a slump for many years, Mattawa 
Lodge No. 405 has successfully snapped out of the slough 
of despair, and has a real revival. Great credit is due to the 
brethren who held on through trying times; they are now 
well rewarded for their faithfulness. This year eleven new 
candidates have entered their portals. The officers have had 
to work real hard and are continuing to do so. And on my 
official visit on March 5th, we had a grand time. The en- 
thusiasm and cordial friendship show a glorious spirit of 
Masonry. Their hospitality is unbounded. The conferring of 
the M.M. Degree v.'as well done. 

Haileybury Lodge No. 485 has been somewhat quiet but 
now has an application which was read on my official visit 
on April 4th, and I believe there will be several to follow. 
These brethren have a most beautiful Temple and I found 
there the earnest and sincere exemplification of our fraternal 
feelings. 

April 9th, at Nipissing Lodge No. 420, North Bay was 
an innovation for district nights in this particular district. 
Supper was served at 6.30 p.m. and a fine crowd of brethren 
assembled. After supper the usual toasts were observed, 
followed by moving pictures by Bro. F. Goddard which was 
in fact, a picture lecture of nature and science. The ordinary 
lodge business was then transacted. I have seen all of the 
degrees conferred by this lodge and find the brethren expert 
workmen and well worthy of commendation. 

I visited officially my Mother Lodge, No. 447, Sturgeon 
Falls, on April 11th. This lodge has come through very 
trying times during the immediate past, but are coming 
through fine and enthusiastic. Much credit is due the few 
older members for their tenacity in hanging on and fighting 
through. The younger members are exceptionally fine and 
have caught the true teachings of the Craft. The two 
groups are combining to make this lodge a credit to our 
Grand Lodge. Degrees are well conferred and I feel that 
with a continuance of the fine spirit of friendliness and co- 
operation this lodge has nothing to fear. 

My visit to North Bay Lodge No. 617, was marked by 
the very excellent work of the officers in the conferring of 
the E. A. Degree. I do not think I have ever felt a finer 
and more sacred atmosphere anywhere or seen a candidate 
more in earnest. The leadership of W. B. Little is a great 
incentive to the brethren to do their utmost. Friendliness 
is oustanding in this lodge. This was too the first meeting 
in the Temple since it was vacated one year ago. The in- 
terior of the Temple has been re-decorated and is really 
beautiful. 

Temiskaming Lodge No. 462, at New Liskeard was in 
fine fettle on May 16th, and although there was no degree 



116 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

work on this particular evening, quite a large number was 
present and a very happy time was enjoyed by all. On this 
evening, previous to the lodge meeting, I was privileged to 
visit in the company of R.W. Bro. Dr. J. S. McCullough, our 
very good faithful R. W. Bro. Dr. G. Crann, who was un- 
fortunately confined to hospital. 

Elk Lake Lodge No. 507 was visited on June 11th, and 
the E. A. Degree was well conferred. These brethren have 
a very fine lodge room and are justly proud of this posses- 
sion. Brethren come long distances to attend the meetings 
and it was wonderful to see how the true spirit of Masonry 
permeated the whole gathering. 

The financial condition of every lodge in the District is 
good. The teachings of the Craft are being properly taught 
and the brethren are endeavouring to live out these teach- 
ings. 

Masonic education is in the hands of Bro. John Smorth- 
waite, a very capable and earnest brother and I know how- 
much good is being and will be accomplished along these 
lines. 

I must express my heartfelt thanks to all the brethren 
who have assisted me from time to time and I trust they 
v/ill be much blessed by the memories of happy times to- 
gether and duties happily performed. 

District Church Services at Elk Lake and Sturgeon Falls 
on June 23rd were well attended and were enjoyed and ap- 
preciated by all the brethren present. It has been found in 
this District that this is the most satisfactory way of hold- 
ing Divine Service and I trust it will be continued. 

Finally, I have found all lodges in good financial con- 
dition, and the Secretaries are to be congratulated for their 
work. The conferring of degrees has been well done through- 
out and great care has been taken in the acceptance of can- 
didates. Lodge rooms are well furnished and equipped. The 
brethren are earnest and sincere and are zealous and de- 
voted to the principles of the Craft. 

My sincere thanks go out to all the brethren for hav- 
ing given me this high honor and the extra opportunity for 
service. 

Fraternally submitted, 

Herbert A. Batsford, 
D.D.G.M., Nipissing East District. 

NIPISSING WEST DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

I have the honour to submit my report on the condition 

of Masonry in Nipissing West District for the past year. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 194(i 117 

It has been my privilege and pleasure to visit each of 
the twelve lodges in the District, and to receive at their 
hands a sincere fraternal welcome and many evidences of 
loyalty to the Grand Master and Grand Lodge. In each case 
I endeavoured to carry out the instructions I received and 
stressed particularly the importance of the benevolent work 
of Grand Lodge and the duty and privilege of the constituent 
lodges to do all in their power in relieving distress among 
our brethren and their families. 

Throughout my visitations I found work uniform and of 
a high order. What pleased me even more than this was the 
fact that everywhere the spirit of brotherhood was evident 
and nothing has occurred during the year to disturb the 
harmony of any lodge in the District. The officers are keen 
and the members appear deeply interested. I found the Sec- 
retaries efficient and painstaking and the records well kept. 

Although the District covers an extensive territory and 
the distances between some of the lodges and their nearest 
neighbours are very considerable I found that visits be- 
tween the lodges were fairly frequent, resulting in the 
strengthening of fraternal ties between the brethren of the 
various localities. 

Under the continued direction of Rt. Wor. Bro. H. F. 
Goodfellow, the work of Masonic Education has been carried 
on with considerable success, and in various lodges I found 
keen interest being taken in the educational programmes. 
On my visit to Dyment Lodge, No. 442, Thessalon, there 
being no degree to confer, W. Bro. J. O. Coulter gave an 
admirable explanation, point by point, of the First Degree, 
which could not help giving everyone who heard it a deeper 
appreciation of the inner meaning of this part of our ritual. 
In some lodges candidates have been few and the educational 
work has helped to keep interest alive as well as to widen 
the knowledge of the brethren. A few lodges however have 
not yet taken full advantage of the facilities offered them. 

Sault Ste. Marie is a strong Masonic centre, with a fine 
Temple; and the members of the three Lodges — Keystone, 
No. 412, Algoma, No. 469, and Hatherly, No. 625— have very 
happy associations, not only with each other, but with the 
brethren in the sister city, Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. Here, 
as in many other places, masonic fellowship is one of the 
influences making for good international feeling. 

At the other end of the District, Nickel Lodge, No. 427, 
Sudbury, Algonquin Lodge, No. 536, Copper Cliff, and 
National Lodge, No. 588, Capreol, are all active and in close 
fraternal relationship. My visit to Nickel Lodge w-as par- 
ticularly memorable to me, for it was pleasant to be wel- 
comed in my Mother Lodge by some of those who had given 
me my first lessons in Masonry thirty-five years ago. 

Lome Lodge No. 622 Chapleau is isolated from the rest 
of the District, but shows vigorous life and a splendid 
spirit. 



118 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

The two lodges on the Manitoulin Island — Doric, No. 
455, Little Current and Gore Bay, No. 472, Gore Bay, in 
spite of the forty miles which separate them, are in close 
fraternal touch with one another and are upholding the 
honour of the Craft on the Island in an admirable way. 

I was particularly impressed by the way in which certain 
lodges have been kept alive and fairly active in places where 
prosperity has waned through the cessation of industry. At 
Espanola the paper mill, the only industry, has been closed 
for a number of years and there seems no prospect of its 
reopening. Yet Espanola Lodge, No. 527, is carried on by 
a faithful few, supported by the loyalty of the members who 
have had to seek their livelihood elsewhere. Blind Eiver and 
Thessalon are much less prosperous than formerly, owing to 
the gradual disappearance of lumbering in the vicinity. Yet 
Penewobikong Lodge, No. 487, and Dyment Lodge, No. 442, 
continue to function and to exercise a beneficent influence 
on the communities. The spirit of the brethren in these 
lodges is beyond all praise. 

There are three Past Masters' Associations in the Dis- 
trict, at Sault Ste. Marie, at Sudbury and at Copper Cliff. 
All do good work, but the first named has the advantage 
of being able to draw upon three lodges for its membership. 
It is especially active in Masonic Education and contributes 
to the welfare of the Craft in the city in various ways as 
well as bringing the members together in social intercourse. 

It has not been possible as yet to secure full informa- 
tion as to enlistments for active service because many of 
the lodges in this part of the jurisdiction have a very scat- 
tered membership. As recruiting speeds up, however, it will 
be found that the Masons are not behind in their duty to 
King and Country. 

While not yet having the final statistics before me, I 
fear that lodges will show a considerable decrease in mem- 
bership. There has been a dearth of candidates in some 
lodges, partly caused by the difficult times through which 
we have been passing for some years and partly by the 
attractions of other excellent organizations whose good deeds 
are of a somewhat more spectacular nature than those of 
the Craft. There have been, unfortunately, a number of 
suspensions for non-payment of dues. I do not think this 
has been resorted to unnecessarily nor where there is a hope 
that the brother may be retained on the membership. But 
there are cases where all appeals fail and this is the only 
course. 

On Christmas Eve the brethren in Sault Ste. Marie were 
called upon to mourn the sudden passing of one of the best 
loved Masons of the city, V. W. Bro. Job Dudley, a Past 
Master and Secretary of Algoma Lodge No. 469, and a Past 
Assistant Grand Organist. He was a true Mason and his 
loss is keenly felt. 



TORONTO. ONTARIO. 1940 119 

My task was made much lighter through having a very 
efficient Secretary, W. Bro. Wilfred E. Morley, who very 
kindly undertook the responsibility and rendered me most 
valuable assistance. To him I wish to express publicly my 
sincere thanks. 

I desire also to thank the representatives of the lodges 
of the District for the honour done me a year ago in elect- 
ing me as District Deputy Grand Master. While conscious 
of many shortcomings, I have tried to be worthy of the trust. 
It has been a great privilege to serve the Craft in this capa- 
city and I deeply appreciate the opportunity given me to do 
so. 

Respectfully and fraternally submitted. 

Fred W. Colloton, 
D.D.G.M., Nipissing West District. 

NORTH HURON DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 

Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 

in the Province of Ontario. 
Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

I have the honour of presenting my report on the con- 
dition of Masonry in North Huron District for the year 
1939-40. 

I would first like to express my appreciation for the 
honour which North Huron District has conferred upon me 
in electing me as the representative of the Grand Master 
and to the Grand Master for confirming same. 

As my first official duty I appointed Wm. D. Wells as 
District Secretary and Brother Harold Snell as District 
Chaplain. During my term of office I visited all the lodges 
once and found that the Worshipful Masters and officers of 
all lodges were efficient and endeavouring to carry on their 
work to the utmost of their ability. I might also say that 
the Secretaries are very efficient and their records are well 
kept. 

An event of outstanding importance in North Huron 
was the laying of the Corner Stone of Palmerston's new 
High School on the twenty-ninth of May by Most Worship- 
ful Brother W. J. Dunlop immediate Past Grand Master of 
Toronto. We were pleased to welcome Past Grand Master 
R. B. Dargavel, Rt. Wor. Brother E. G. Dixon, Grand Sec- 
retary, Rt. Wor. Brother T. C. Wardley, Chairman of 
Benevolence and many other distinguished visitors from 
surrounding districts. The members of Blair Lodge are to 
be congratulated for the manner in which they conducted 
this affair. 

North Huron was also favored by a visit from the Grand 
Senior Warden when Rt. Wor. Bro. Frank England accom- 
panied by a number of brethren from Rehoboam Lodge of 



120 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Toronto visited Wingham Lodge and gave a very instructive 
address. 

I appreciate very much having Most Worshipful Brother 
James McEw^ing of the Grand Lodge of Manitoba visit my 
mother lodge, Hullett No. 568, when I made my official in- 
spection. He gave a very interesting address and explained 
different methods of the Grand Lodge of Manitoba. 

On my official visit to Fordwich Lodge I had the pleasure 
of presenting a fifty year jewel to Rt. Wor. Bro. A. C. 
Hutchison who has since passed to his reward. Blyth Lodge 
also sustained a great loss when the death of Rt. Wor. 
Bro. James B. Tiernay occurred. Further mention of these 
brethren will be found in Report on the Fraternal Dead. 

In submitting this report I consider Masonry in North 
Huron to be in a flourishing condition, all the lodges being 
in a good condition financially and a large number own their 
lodge rooms. The latest to acquire its own property is 
Forest Lodge, Wroxeter. All property is well covered by 
insurance but there is always the question of arrears ofi 
dues although the Secretaries are endeavouring to keep 
them down to a minimum. 

I have found as I visited several lodges that harmony 
and good feeling exists to a high degree amongst the breth- 
ren and most of the lodges are paying many fraternal visits 
which help to keep up interest in the Craft. A number of 
these lodges have admitted one or more candidates during 
the year. 

I have had the literature as supplied by Board of 
Masonic Education typed and sent to each lodge and feel 
that the brethren will in this way be able to leam more of 
the Craft Yet I would like to see some organization for 
Masonic Education which would carry on from year to year. 

I have endeavoured in all my addresses to the several 
lodges to impress upon the brethren the necessity of carry- 
ing the teachings and principles of our Order into the ac- 
tivities of our daily life and by so doing, we, as Masons, 
may be a guiding influence in the troublesome times we are" 
now passing through. I trust that in some way I have been 
able to awaken a greater interest in this matter. 

On the second of June our District Divine Service was 
held in Londesboro United Church when a large number of 
brethren of the District was present and Brother Snell gave 
a very inspiring sermon entitled "Master Builders." 

My thanks are due to the Grand Secretary for the advice 
which he so willingly gave. I also appreciate the fraternal 
visits of the D.D.G.M.'s of Bruce, South Huron and Wilson 
Districts, also the brethren of Hullett Lodge who supported 
me so well during the year. 

In. concluding I trust that I may in some way have been 
able to help Masonry in general and North Huron in par- 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 121 

ticular. My year as D.D.G.M. will be marked as one of the 
happiest of my life and I will long remember the many 
friends I have made during my year of office. And finally, 
I would bespeak for my successor the same co-operation and 
loyal support which have made my task much easier and 
more pleasant. 

Fraternally submitted, 

James Neilans, 
D.D.G.M., North Huron District. 

ONTARIO DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

I have the honor of submitting my report as the rep- 
resentative of the Most Worshipful the Grand Master in 
Ontario District for the masonic year 1939-1940. 

First, I desire to express my sincere thanks to the 
brethren of Ontario District for the honor they bestowed 
on me and my mother lodge, Ontario Lodge, No. 26, in elect- 
ing me to that high office, also to the Most Worshipful, the 
Grand Master in confirming my appointment. 

My first official duty v.-as to appoint Wor. Bro. Charles 
E. Stephenson of Port Hope as District Secretary and Bro. 
Rev. J. M. Crisall, also of Port Hope, as District Chaplain. 
I am most grateful for the support given me by these breth- 
ren, and also for the interest and painstaking manner in 
which they discharged their official duties. 

I visited all lodges in the District once officially and 
several on different occasions throughout my term. At all 
meetings it was a pleasure to witness the uniformity of the 
ritualistic work and the high standard maintained by officers 
who appear to be sincere and conscientious in the perform- 
ance of their duties. 

Attendance at all lodges was very good, due no doubt 
to the increasing number of candidates and the strong sup- 
port given to the lodges by Past Masters. 

The District Secretary reports all secretaries are doing 
excellent work and that lodge books are being kept neatly 
and records in splendid order. 

The financial condition of all lodges is improving and 
lodge property is covered by insurance. 

Owing to the outbreak of war early in the year many 
lodges thought it best that social activities should be some- 
what curtailed. However, several lodges held "Ladies Night" 
and these functions were most successful. One outstanding 
event however should have special mention. I refer to the 



122 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

"Burn The Mortgage Night" held by the Oshawa lodges. 
At this the Most Worshipful the Grand Master applied a 
torch to the mortgage thus signifying the removal of all 
debt from Oshawa's beautiful Temple. 

Masters' Night is an annual event at St. John's Lodge, 
No. 17, Cobourg. Cedar Lodge, No. 270, Oshawa holds an 
annual Senior Wardens' Night. These events prove success- 
ful in bringing together throughout the District various 
officers as well as lodge members. This greatly assists in 
establishing a truly fraternal spirit. 

The spiritual side of our Order has not been neglected. 
Nearly every lodge in the District has attended Divine 
Service. 

In conclusion may I express my gratitude to the breth- 
ren of Ontario District for the wholehearted support which 
I received during my term. Many kindnesses were shown 
and courtesies extended. This has helped to make my past 
year a pleasant and profitable one. 

All of which is fraternally and respectfully submitted. 

Yours fraternally, 

H. W. Mitchell, 

D.D.G.M., Ontario District. 

OTTAWA DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

I have the honour to submit herewith for your con- 
sideration my report of the condition of Masonry in the 
Ottawa District. 

I wish to take this occasion of expressing my appreci- 
ation of the honour which the brethren of the Ottawa Dis- 
trict conferred on me in electing me as the representative 
of the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master and also of the 
loyal support and cordial reception accorded me at all times 
by the lodges and the brethren throughout the District. 

Before entering upon the report of the operations of the 
lodges in the District I desire to express my sincere thanks 
and appreciation to the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, 
for confirming my election as D.D.G.M. 

Shortly after taking office I appointed Wor. Bro. S. B. 
Gordon, Past Master and Secretary of Goodv/ood Lodge No. 
159, Richmond, Ont. as my District Secretary. He has given 
of his time and proven his alloted task in his mother lodge 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 123 

and I was pleased to have him accept this important office 
and on many occasions his advice has been most helpful. 
Indeed, to him I owe a debt of gratitude. 

With the exception of two I have witnessed the confer- 
ring of degrees in ail lodges in the District. These two 
lodges opened and closed in the three degrees also put on 
a lecture and one of the charges. The meetings have all 
been well attended as a rule, great interest manifested and 
masonic traditions ever safeguarded, the utmost harmony 
and good feeling in evidence, while, almost without ex- 
ception, there has been steady growth and prosperity. 

I was indeed pleased to have Wor. Bro. Thomas H. 
Mansell accept the office of District Chairman of the local 
committee on Masonic Education. The progress made in 
future years will be sufficient evidence of his skill and 
ability in furthering the need of this important branch of 
Masonry throughout this District. 

It is with sincerest regret that I report the death of 
Rt. Wor. Bro. Dr. Hyndman and many other brethren of 
this District have been called to the Grand Lodge Above. 

To the Masters, Past Masters and Grand Lodge Officers 
who accompanied me on my visits and assisted me in every 
possible way I am indeed grateful. It was through their 
kind co-operation, good fellowship and showing a true spirit 
of friendship that I was able to complete and enjoy my 
year's work. 

In conclusion, Most Worshipful Sir, I can assure you 
that in general the condition of Masonry in the Ottawa 
District is most gratifying, the officers in almost every 
lodge are earnest capable men, financial standing good, the 
work being well done and with fair uniformity; and the lodge 
rooms as a whole, are comfortable, attractive and appropri- 
ately equipped, so that the spirit of zeal and optimism pre- 
vailing among officers and members generally is the result 
obtained. And my earnest endeavour has been to uphold 
the dignity of the office my brethren entrusted to me and 
to serve the District to the best of my ability in a practical 
manner. 

All of which is fraternally and respectfully submitted. 

J. Edgar Gamble, 
D.D.G.M., Otcawa District. 

PETERBOROUGH DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

I have the honour to submit for your consideration my 

report on the condition of Masonry in Peterborough District 

for the masonic year 1939-40. 



124 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Wor. Bro. A. S. Couper accepted the office of District 
Secretary and V. Wor. Bro. Albert J. Throop that of District 
Chaplain. These brethren are distinguished Masons, lovers 
of the whole Craft and capable ritualists. They have been 
invaluable to me in carrying forward my work in the District 
during the year. 

I have visited each lodge in the District officially and 
I am pleased to report that the work attempted was v/ell 
and capably presented. The officers are well skilled, good 
ritualists and zealous to attain a high standard of work- 
manship. The Past Masters continue to add grace, strength 
and dignity by their presence and by their participation in 
the work. The lodge books are well kept and reflect great 
credit on the efficiency of the work done by the Secretary 
of the Lodge. "Arrears of Dues" is not a serious problem 
in any of the lodges. 

At the conclusion of the work in the lodge room the 
brethren cease "labour" and enjoy "refreshment". The 
banquet hour reflects the true spirit of friendly and care- 
free fellowship. Good things to satisfy one's physical needs, 
entertaining music, often a sing-song, the usual toasts and 
the address of the D.D.G.M. bring to a close a really worth- 
while meeting of the Craft. Thus Masonry marches on, 
cementing and adorning. 

Wor. Bro. J. J. Lewis Hay, Campbellford, has performed 
a truly masonic service in the District during the year by 
promoting masonic visitation and good fellowship. This 
District is the custodian of a Travelling Square, the gift 
of R. Wor. Bro. W. R. Morris, which is intended to promote 
good fellowship. Wor. Bro. Hay has kept the Travelling 
Square on the move from lodge to lodge. This means that 
the lodge receiving the Travelling Square pays a fraternal 
visit to a neighbouring lodge and leaves the Travelling- 
Square to be passed on in the near future to a sister lodge. 

The work in Masonic Education merits my warmest com- 
mendation. A few years ago this phase of masonic work 
received initial emphasis. Committees are now working in 
every lodge to spread and diffuse masonic light. Bro. Leo 
Copp has acted as chairman of this work during the past 
year. 

It has been a very great pleasure and delight to have 
six worthy veteran Masons honoured by receiving jewels 
during the year. R. Wor. Bro. McRae, Deputy Grand Master, 
on his visit to Peterborough, December 27th, 1939, presented 
Wor. Bro. A. E. Peck of Corinthian Lodge with tv/o jewels — 
one for being a Mason for over 50 years, the other for being 
a Past Master for 50 years. At the same meeting the 
D.D.G M. presented Wor. Bro. Robert J. Kingan, Corinthian 
Lodge, with a jewel emblematic of his 50 years in Masonry. 
Wor. Bro. W. A. Donnelly presented a jewel on behalf of 
Peterborough Lodge to his father-in-law, Wor. Bro. Dr. J. 
H. Eastwood. The D.D.G.M. also presented jewels to the 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 125 

following worthy brethren, E. Wor. Bro. Robert J. McCamus, 
Keene Lodge, Wor. Bro. Robert A. Scott and Bro. W. A. 
Richardson, both of Norwood Lodge. The presentation of 
these jewels to these distinguished Masons was one of the 
high lights of the year. 

On May 17th, 1940, Corinthian Lodge held an unique 
meeting known as Right Worshipful Brethrens' Night. The 
chairs were filled by R. Wor. Brethren from the District and 
the M. M. Degree was exemplified. Practically all the 
P.D.D.G.M.'s were present and assisted in the work. R. Wor. 
Brethren were also present from neighbouring districts. The 
bringing together of these distinguished brethren will 
doubtless stimulate Masonry throughout this Disrict. 

Church services have been held throughout the District. 
On June 2nd, the three city lodges worshipped in St. George's 
Anglican Church, Peterborough South. Rev. Bro. T. H. 
Floyd, B.D., Rector of the Church, conducted the service and 
delivered an inspiring address. 

Excellent work is being done by the District Past 
Masters' Association which meets twice a year. R. Wor. Bro. 
John Comstock is the able and competent Secretary. The 
success of this Association is due in large measure to his 
untiring efforts. 

During the year Masonry has suffered severely in the 
passing of two of its most distinguished brethren in the 
persons of R. Wor. Bro. E. H. D. Hall, Corinthian Lodge, 
and V. Wor. Bro. W. A. Logan, Royal Arthur Lodge. 

The Masons of the city are taking steps to provide a 
more suitable and commodious home for its growing mem- 
bership. 

The D.D.G.M. of Peterborough District expresses the 
hope and the prayer that soon the ravages of this terrible 
war may cease and that peace may come to all people. In 
the meantime Masons are urged to have in mind the sick, 
the aged, the infirm, the v.'idow and the orphan. Let us all 
be calm, confident and trustful in the Great Architect of the 
Universe. Let us often visit the North East Angle of the 
Lodge for instruction and direction in charity and bene- 
volence. 

In conclusion I wish to state that, though my year has 
been strenuous and laden with masonic responsibilities, it 
has been a very enjoyable privilege to serve my brethren. 
Old friendships have been renewed and cemented and new 
ones have been made and forged. I wish to thank all the 
members of the fraternity throughout the District for their 
many acts of kindness, their readiness to assist and their 
unfaltering loyalty and fidelity. To the Past Masters' Associ- 
ation, which nominated and supported me for this high and 
responsible office, I express my sincere appreciation, and to 



126 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

the M. W. the Grand Master, for concurring in the choice 
of my brethren I also express my thanks. 
"He profits most who serves best". 
Fraternally and respectfully submitted. 

R. F. Downey, 
D.D.G.M., Peterborough District. 

PRINCE EDWARD DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 

Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 

in the Province of Ontario. 
Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

It is a pleasure and a privilege to submit for your con- 
sideration my report on the Condition of Masonry in Prince 
Edward District for the masonic year 1939-40. 

May I first of all be permitted to express my appreci- 
ation of the high honor conferred upon me and on my mother 
lodge, Star-in-the-East No. 164, by the brethren of the 
District in electing me to be the representative of the Most 
Worshipful the Grand Master in Prince Edward District. 
I am also grateful to the Grand Master for confirming that 
election. Fully appreciating the importance of the office I 
have endeavoured to discharge those duties to the best of my 
ability and to maintain if possible the high standard of 
efficiency set by my predecessors in office. 

My first official act was to appoint Worshipful Brother 
Norman A. Tice as District Secretary and Bro. (Rev.) E. N. 
Grant as District Chaplain. I am grateful to both these 
brethren for their valuable assistance. 

Accompanied by several members of my mother lodge, 
I visited every lodge in the District and have had the 
pleasure of seeing at least one degree conferred at each 
visit. The work in nearly every case was well done and 
left little room for making corrections. Whenever it was 
necessary to correct a portion of the work, I endeavoured 
to do so quietly and to offer suggestions for the improvement 
of the work. 

Attendance at all lodges was most gratifying due to the 
increasing number of candidates and also to the untiring 
efforts of the various Masters and Past Masters to provide 
some special features besides the regular lodge work. 

Masonic Education is taken care of on lodge nights 
when no degrees are conferred by lectures given by pro- 
minent Masons and also by fraternal visits between lodges 
both within and without the jurisdiction. I have also at 
nearly every meeting pointed out the advantages of Masonic 
Education to the individual members by the use of our 
Masonic Library. 

The District Secretary reports that the Secretaries are 
doing good work, that the lodge books are in good order and 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 127 

neatly kept. Lodge property in all cases is fully covered by 
insurance. 

The work of benevolence is not being neglected. The 
lodges are doing their best to render assistance where neces- 
sary. During the year I have endeavoured to keep this 
matter before the brethren. 

I am sorry to report the loss to Madoc Lodge No. 48 of 
their Masonic Temple by fire on Jan. 18th. Fortunately they 
were able to save the lodge furniture and equipment. The 
loss was fairly well covered by insurance. 

Masonry lost a great patriot when M. W. Bro. William 
Nisbet Ponton, K.C. was called to the Grand Lodge Above 
on Sept. 6th, 1939 in his 84th year. He was a member of 
Belleville Lodge No. 123 and Grand Master in 1921-22. A 
further list of his achievements is recorded in the report to 
Grand Lodge of our Fraternal Dead. 

In conclusion I wish to express my appreciation for the 
assistance given me by the present and past Grand Lodge 
Officers. This has made my term of office one of profit and 
pleasure for me. I have made many new friendships during 
the year and I hope that the fraternal feeling which exists 
among the brethren of Prince Edward District may long 
continue. I am deeply grateful to all for their support and 
co-operation during the year and I trust that the same as- 
sistance will be extended to my successor as has been given 
me. 

All of which is respectfully and fraternally submitted. 

Hilton McCartney, 
D.D.G.M., Prince Edward District. 

SARNIA DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

I am pleased to provide you with a resume of Masonic 
activities during the pasl twelve months and to report on 
the condition of Masonry in Sarnia District. 

First, however, I desire to thank this District for en- 
trusting me with the office of D.D.G.M., to express my ap- 
preciation to the brethren for their unswerving loyalty 
during my term of office, and to indicate the value that my 
District Secretary, Wor. Bro. E. L. Treitz, has been to me. 
To all I am deeply indebted. 

The financial condition of each lodge in Sarnia District 
can be stated as sound, and, of most of them as good. The 
attendance, at least on official visits, is very good, and the 
fellowship and enthusiasm, very important factors, are ex- 
cellent. Each lodge is under the supervision of a capable 
Master and under the guidance of an efficient Secretary. It 



128 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

may here be pointed out that, as a Secretary may be re- 
elected year after year and a Master may rule but one year, 
great care should be exercised in the choosing of a Secre- 
tary, as on him depends, to a large extent, the solvency of 
a lodge, its fellowship, and its loyalty to the Craft. 

The attendance at regular and emergent meetings, a 
problem not peculiar to this District, leaves much to be 
desired. Lack of interest is almost sure to develop — par- 
ticularly among the members of those lodges which have 
very little work to do. There is in this District a lodge 
which has a Side Benchers' Team that has aroused con- 
siderable interest and which does its work very well. In- 
terest among the members may be aroused if each lodge 
which has Sufficient work to do v/ould organize such a degree 
team from among willing brethren who otherwise would find 
very little opportunity to take part in the work. 

During the past ten years there has been a gradual de- 
crease in membership in the District so that this year it is 
less than 78% of what it was in 1930. This is caused almost 
entirely by suspensions due to non-payment of dues, as the 
number entering the fraternity is about equal to the number 
deceased. It is unfortunate that the Order must trim off the 
unproductive wood continually, but the tree is very likely 
in a healthier condition as a result. 

Masonic Education is under the supervision of Rt. Wor. 
Bro. E. C. Freer, who carries on in conjunction with the 
Past Masters' Association. This organization holds four 
meetings per year in different sections of the District, exem- 
plifies work and provides outstanding speakers. For one of 
these meetings v/e were fortunate in securing Most Wor. 
Bro. Frank Copus, who gave a very interesting and informa- 
tive talk on his experience in England last summer. We have 
not as yet developed sufficient interest among the Past 
Masters to boast of a large membership, but we hope that 
when the value of the Association and its worth to the Dis- 
trict are proven, membership will increase. 

On Tuesday, May 21st, Sarnia District had the pleasure 
and honour of entertaining the Most Worshipful, the Grand 
Master, Dr. J. A. Dobbie. The banquet and subsequent 
meeting were well attended, almost every lodge being rep- 
resented. The message our esteemed Grand Master left with 
us was practical and very well received by the brethren. 

The lodges in this District have not suffered severely 
due to loss of members or departure from among us for 
active service. The I. P.M. of Tuscan Lodge, No. 437, and 
the W.M. of Victoria Lodge, No. 56, are both serving their 
country overseas. Capable Past Masters are carrying on in 
their absence. 

The District feels deeply the loss, due to the departure 
to the Grand Lodge Above of Wor. Bro. Wm. Clifford, 
Worshipful Master of Washington Lodge, No. 260, and of 
Rt. Wor. Bro. R. F. Richardson of Strathroy, an honorary 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1940 129 

member of the Board of General Purposes of Grand Lodge. 
Such losses can never be replaced, but we must try to so 
regulate matters that the burdens which they carried will 
rest on the shoulders of others who are worthy of the load. 
And, finally, let me assure you that I esteem it a great 
privilege to have served you and Masonry during the past 
year. I have performed my duties to the best of my ability 
and have thoroughly enjoyed doing so. I am confident that 
my successor in office will receive the same co-operation 
from the District and from Grand Lodge that they have 
given me, and that he, also, will have a profitable year. 
Fraternally submitted, 

W. J. Aitchison, 
D.D.G.M., Sarnia District. 

SOUTH HURON DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 

Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 

in the Province of Ontario. 
Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

I submit herewith my report on the condition of Masonry 
in South Huron District. 

First, I wish to express my most sincere appreciation of 
the honor conferred on me in electing me as representative 
of the Grand Master for this splendid District and I am 
very grateful to the Masters and brethren for the many acts 
of kindness that have been shown to me during my year 
of office. 

I appointed Wor. Bro. S. A. Goring, a Past Master of 
Tavistock Lodge, as my Secretary and I wish to thank him 
for his faithful service during the year. 

With but one exception a degree was conferred on the 
occasion of my official visit and I was pleased with the 
splendid manner in which the officers of every lodge per- 
formed their work. Every officer seemed to be interested 
in Masonry and tried his best to put on his work as good 
as possible. A large percentage of the lodges have regular 
practice nights and I noticed that the work v/as particularly 
good and even the junior officers did not show the same 
strain while carrying out their duties. From results I would 
certainly recommend this practice in every lodge. I can re- 
port that the Masters and officers of every lodge have main- 
tained the high standard established by the officers of this 
District in the past. 

I was pleased to have visits from a number of District 
Deputies from surrounding districts and during the year I 
visited fourteen lodges in six surrounding districts on 
special occasions. I enjoyed these visits very much and 
regret that I was not able to accept many other invitations 
I received from other districts. 



130 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

At the beginning of the year I recommended inter-lodge 
visits and am pleased with the results. Nearly every lodge 
co-operated and a large number of splendid meetings re- 
sulted. This was particularly appreciated by some of the 
smaller lodges especially when they had a shortage of work. 

We have a splendid Past Masters' and Wardens' Associ- 
ation under the leadership of H. B. Tichborne of Goderich 
and very capably assisted by an efficient Secretary, R. D. 
Munroe of Carlow Lodge. Three well attended meetings 
were held and at each one a degree was put on by a visiting 
lodge after which an experienced Past Master took charge 
of the question drawer. At these meetings we had the privi- 
lege of hearing three outstanding speakers including two 
Past Grand Masters and at each meeting we had a large 
attendance. Everyone seemed to enjoy the meetings and I 
wish to thank the officers of the Past Masters' Association 
for their work during the year. 

A very impressive ceremony took place on the night 
of my official visit to Britannia Lodge, Seaforth. Two 
veteran Past Masters were presented with Fifty Year 
Jewels. A son of one of them, who is Master in a Toronto 
Lodge made the presentation. He was accompanied by 
twenty brethren from Toronto. These two esteemed Past 
Masters were initiated into Masonry on the same night and 
both of them have been active during all the years. 

Possibly the outstanding meeting of the year was my 
official visit to my Mother Lodge, Tavistpck. On that oc- 
casion we had over one hundred and fifty visitors from 
nearly every lodge in the District and also from surrounding 
lodges. We were honored by having five District Deputies 
and a large number of Present and Past Grand Lodge Offi- 
cers, The guest speaker, Most Wor, Bro. W. J. Dunlop, who 
spent two years in Tavistock as a teacher, gave an inspir- 
ing address which was enjoyed by everyone. 

In conclusion I wish to thank the Past District Deputies 
for attending so many of my meetings and for their helpful 
suggestions and advice during the year. It has been a very 
strenuous year for me but a very happy one and I will 
always remember the many pleasant associations with the 
brethren of this District and many courtesies shown to me. 

All of which is fraternally submitted, 

S. T. Loveys, 
D.D.G.M., South Huron District. 

ST. LAWRENCE DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A,F. & A,M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

In presenting this report it is my desire to express my 

deep appreciation of the high honour the brethren of St. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 131 

Lawrence District conferred upon me, and St. Francis Lodge 
No. 24 on the 100th Anniversary of this Lodge in selecting 
me as the representative of the Grand Master in this Dis- 
trict, also to the Grand Master in confirming the same. 

I appointed Wor. Bro. G. G. Jones, Secretary of St. 
Francis Lodge, who has served his lodge so well, as my 
Secretary; also Rev. Wor. Bro. R. H. Pettem of Central 
Lodge, Prescott as District Chaplain. 

I communicated with each lodge in the District to ascer- 
tain the dates of their regular meetings which would suit 
the lodges to receive me on official visits. On receiving 
replies I had folder cards printed giving dates of visits to 
each lodge, also inter-visits of the various lodges of the 
District. 

On my official visits I make it a point to contact the 
Masters prior to opening lodge and assure them that my 
mission is to assist, as far as I can, in developing the spirit 
of Masonry as authorized by Grand Lodge, giving instruc- 
tions in minor changes and asking them to carry on their 
usual meeting as if the D.D.G.M. were not present, also in- 
timating that Grand Lodge expects the officers to give their 
best to attain proficiency in their respective tasks The lodge 
members manifested a loyal masonic spirit in the fitting 
reception accorded me and indicated they were really in- 
terested in the work of the Craft. The Masters and Secre- 
atries, in most cases, are worthy of the offices which they 
have been called upon to fill, and other officers generally 
give adequate support in carrying on the lodge business. 
In lodges where there are few new members and degree 
work is light I have recommended the Masters and Secre- 
taries to study the Grand Master's and Grand Lodge Reports 
and Constitution and select from these sections of interest 
and have them read out in lodge for instruction, and en- 
deavour to keep up the interest of the members who faith- 
fully attend lodge. 

A considerable number of lodges in St. Lawrence District 
have succeeded in securing at moderate cost and on favour- 
able terms, buildings, in most cases, churches not required 
as such after Church Union. These properties were remodel- 
led for masonic homes, some of which are fully paid for 
while others are progressing favourably towards this ob- 
jective. 

The intervisits between the lodges of this District are 
proving successful, in urging the officers of the various 
lodges to put their best efforts into their work and lodge 
proceedings and make a creditable showing which, coupled 
with the fraternal intercourse, proves a good medium of 
Masonic Education. A committee is appointed to arrange 
sectional meetings to be addressed by prominent Masons, 
when conditions are favourable. 

St. Francis Lodge No. 24, Smiths Falls, marked in a 
fitting manner the 100th Anniversary of its founding Dec. 



132 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

27th, 1839. Some three hundred attended, including the 
Grand Master, who took a leading part in the ceremonies of 
Installation in the afternoon. A banquet at 6.30 p.m. fol- 
lowed by a very interesting entertainment in the evening 
concluded with an appropriate address by the Grand Master. 
A brief sketch of the early history of St. Francis Lodge also 
of St. Lawrence District was given. The first gavel used in 
the lodge, which had been in the care of a friend of the 
newly installed Master, was presented to the lodge by the 
Master, J. A. Moir. It has since been embellished with a gold 
band suitably engraved. 

On April 26th, a special meeting, for Masonic Education 
was held in the lodge rooms. Smiths Falls, for the members 
of Zone No. One, comprising lodges at Lanark, Perth, Lom- 
bardy, Toledo, Merrickville and the two lodges in Smiths 
Falls. Wor. Bro. F. P. Smith of Queens Lodge, Kingston 
was the special speaker and gave a very interesting address 
on the Symbolism of Masonry. 

On April 29th I had the pleasure, along with several 
P.D.D.G.M.s and brethren from St. Lawrence District and 
Smiths Falls of uniting with members of the Craft of 
Ottawa District in a reception and banquet in honour of the 
Grand Master Dr. J. A. Dobbie, held in the Chateau Laurier's 
large ball room which was filled to capacity, a fitting tribute 
to the popularity of our Grand Master. Inspiring addresses 
were delivered by the Grand Master and other prominent 
members. It was quite apparent that the Masons who were 
able to attend were well pleased with the opportunity. 

A District Church Service was held Sunday afternoon, 
May 19th at three o'clock in St. John's Church, Smiths Falls, 
attended by some 400 Masons of the District. A delightful 
service was held under the direction of the rector Rev. Bro. 
A. T. Carson, assisted by Rev. Bro. Bannell, of Perth, while 
the District Chaplain Rev. Wor. Bro. R. H. Pettem of 
Central Lodge, Prescott delivered an excellent sermon suit- 
able for the occasion. A special choir of Masons with the 
regular organist led in the musical portion of the service. 

I have endeavoured to have our brethren link up with 
the church services in increased numbers and have found our 
clergymen are willing to co-operate in conducting church 
services at which the Masons are made welcome to attend 
in body thus working in unison to influence men towards a 
higher standard of life as taught in our churches and lodges. 

A committee was appointed by the Grand Master con- 
sisting of R. W. Bro. Chris Forbes, Chairman, R. W. Bros. 
R. Hawkins, A. L. Campbell, E. A. McKimm and Wor. Bro. 
Latham to investigate and report to Grand Lodge on the 
burial place and consideration of erecting a monument to 
the memory of a noted Past Grand Master, Bro. T. D. Har- 
rington who actively co-operated with the M. W. Bro. W. 
Mercer Wilson in establishing the first Grand Lodge of 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 133 

Canada in Ontario. A report on the proposal to erect a 
suitable monument in memory of M. W. T. D. Harrington 
will probably be presented to Grand Lodge in due course. 

The St. Lawrence Past Masters' and Wardens' Associ- 
ation Meeting was held in the Masonic Hall, Spencerville, on 
Friday evening, June 21st. A large number of delegates 
from all lodges in the District, except one, were in attend- 
ance. A sumptuous banquet was served by the members of 
Nation Lodge at 6.30 p.m., after which the business of the 
meeting followed. The highlight of the meeting was the 
splendid address given by the Grand Secretary R. W. Bro. 
Dixon. This was followed by an open forum, the delegates 
propounding questions on masonic procedure and the con- 
stitution. These were answered in an instructive way by the 
Grand Secretary. 

While the duties of a D.D.G.M. demand considerable 
time and attention I feel that the kind receptions, the true 
masonic spirit and enduring friendships exemplified by the 
brethren and the satisfaction of having assisted in spreading 
the gospel of Masonry, fully compensate for any effort re- 
quired to carry on the duties of the office. 

Yours fraternally, 

Robert Hawkins, 

D.D.G.M., St. Lawrence District. 

ST. THOMAS DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

As District Deputy Grand Master of St. Thomas District 
for the year 1939-1940 it is at this time my pleasure as well 
as my duty to submit my report. I have held it as my high 
privilege to carry the responsibilities of office to the best 
of my ability. It is with deep gratitude that I acknowledge 
the honor conferred upon me by my brethren of McColl 
Lodge No. 386 in advancing my name for the office. To all 
the lodges throughout the District I desire to express my 
appreciation of the unanimous support they accorded the 
nomination. In thanking the Most Worshipful the Grand 
Master for confirming my appointment, I express appreci- 
ation for the kindly advice and help I have received from 
him. It has been one of the greatest pleasures of my life 
visiting and inspecting the lodges of the District. 

I also wish to thank the brethren of the District for the 
hearty co-operation given me. The brethren were many who 
accompanied me on my visits and they assisted in many ways 
in making the duties of my office very enjoyable indeed. 



134 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

My first official duty was the appointment of Wor, Bro. A. 
J. DeLong as District Secretary. I greatly appreciate his 
assistance and advice during the year. It was also my 
pleasure to appoint Bro. Rev. R. C. Capper as District 
Chaplain. Brother Capper has proven himself an admirable 
Mason and a splendid help to me and also to the District. 

During the year I visited every lodge in the District at 
least twice and several of them three times. In each case 
I was received very enthusiastically and with kindness far 
beyond my fondest expectation. I found Masonry in a very 
healthy condition and believe that the brethren in the Dis- 
trict are taking their work very seriously and this very 
satisfying condition, I think, is due largely because of the 
enthusiasm of the Masters and Past Masters of the District. 

Masonic Education is making splendid progress in the 
District. In each lodge a Past Master who is well skilled 
in this branch of the work, was appointed chairman of 
Masonic Education and much progress has been made. I 
noticed that younger members as well as the older ones were 
becoming more interested in this work and they have been 
acquiring additional knowledge through our Masonic Library. 
At each meeting I attended, wherever time permitted, I 
selected some subject of Masonry and gave a short address 
thereon which I trust was of benefit to the brethren. 

All lodges in the District carry insurance on their fur- 
nishings and lodge property. The Secretaries' records and 
accounts on the whole are well kept. In some lodges there 
has been a marked increase in the number of candidates and 
the type of candidate appears to be of a very high order. 
There is still the problem of arrears of dues in some lodges 
but on the whole a great improvement is to be noted in this 
respect. Masonic benevolence has received due consideration 
in all the lodges and, in some, substantial grants have been 
made from the lodge funds. 

R. W. Bro. Geo. Stewart of Malahide Lodge No. 140, 
Aylmer, is compiling a history of Malahide Lodge which, I 
am sure, will be of great interest to his brethren when com- 
pleted. 

A number of the lodges in the District have been newly 
decorated and all the lodges are to be congratulated on the 
fine appearance of their rooms. On the occasion of my 
official visit to St. Mark's Lodge No. 94, Port Stanley, I 
had the pleasure of meeting V. Wor. Bro. Polden of St. 
Johns Lodge, Norwich. V. Wor. Bro. Polden, still very 
active, is reputed to be the oldest Past Master in Ontario. 

The Pastmasters' Association of St. Thomas District is 
a very active and enthusiastic group. Four meetings are 
held each year in different lodges in the District and in 
addition to the discussion of matters of interest to the 
District, an outstanding masonic speaker is obtained for each 
meeting. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 135 

An outstanding event of the year was the annual Dis- 
trict Divine Service held at Trinity Church, St. Thomas, on 
the evening of June 2nd. We were most fortunate that the 
Most Worshipful the Grand Master was able to attend and 
read the lesson and also address the brethren in the Parish 
Hall at the close of the church service. Rev. Bro. M. B. 
Johnston, Rector of Trinity Church, delivered an inspiring 
and helpful sermon. The service was well attended. 

Finally, may I bespeak for my successor the same 
kindly consideration that has been shown to me during my 
year of office. The happy memory of the associations and 
comradeship of St. Thomas District will be the most cherish- 
ed of my recollections in years to come. 

Respectfully and fraternally submitted. 

A. Petherick, 

D.D.G.M., St. Thomas District. 

TEMISKAMING DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Ldoge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

I herewith submit my report on the condition of 
Masonry in Temiskaming District for the year now closing. 

I first wish to thank each lodge for electing me to the 
office of D.D.G.M., and the Most Worshipful, the Grand 
Master for confirming their choice. 

I am also very grateful to Wor. Bro. James Goodman 
of Golden Beaver Lodge who accepted the appointment of 
District Secretary. He performed the duties of his office in 
his usual faithful and efficient manner. 

Although this District is the smallest in this Grand 
Lodge as regards the number of lodges, it is probably the 
largest in respect to area. 

The lodges are widely scattered over an area of forty 
miles from East to West and one hundred and ninety miles 
from North to South. Three of the lodges are situated in 
mining areas, two in pulp and paper towns, one in an agri- 
cultural district and one in a railroad centre. 

I have nothing of a spectacular nature to report. We 
have endeavoured to "keep our heads cool, and our hearts 
warm," as suggested by our Grand Master. In my visits to 
the several lodges I was very cordially received and shown 
the utmost kindness. The officers in each case were active 
and efficient. Doric Lodge in Kirkland Lake has had an 
extra busy year as regards degrees. Cochrane Lodge has 
had an uphill fight for some time but is bravely carrying on. 
The other five lodges have had just average years. 



136 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Although the attendance is not what it should be, the 
faithful few still carry on, and I found that the brethren, 
on the whole, are taking a keener interest in the deeper 
meaning and teachings of Freemasonry. 

My own lodge, Golden Beaver, celebrated its Twenty- 
Fifth Anniversary on May 11th. Several of its members 
were presented with life memberships. Very Wor. Bro. 
Longmore was in charge of the proceedings in the lodge 
room, and all present went away feeling that Masonry has 
been and will continue to be an influence for good in the 
District. 

Englehart Lodge has the distinction of having for its 
Master a brother who is over eighty years of age; I was 
much pleased to sit in the East with Wor. Bro. Eead and 
of him it may truly be said "he is eighty years young." 

I am pleased to report that all the lodges in the District 
attended Divine Worship. Fraternal visits between thei dif- 
ferent lodges were also carried on quite extensively. 

As my term of office draws to a close I feel I have been 
privileged in doing my little bit. I regret that bit has been 
so little. May I thank my predecessor, Rt. Wor. Bro. Ginn 
for his assistance and kindness. I found the trail easier due 
to his having passed that way. 

Fraternally and respectfully submitted. 

C. P. Ramsay, 
D.D.G.M., Temiskaming District. 



TORONTO DISTRICT "A" 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

I have the distinct pleasure of presenting for your con- 
sideration, my report on the condition of Masonry in Toronto 
District "A" for the Masonic year 1939-40. 

I v/ish first to express my thanks and appreciation to 
the brethren of the District and to the Grand Master, for 
the opportunity they have afforded me to serve Masonry in 
this District as District Deputy Grand Master. It is a great 
privilege and it has been a great pleasure to me. 

On assuming the office, I appointed Wor. Bro. T. Albert 
Howson, a Past Master of King Hiram Lodge No. 566, to 
act as District Secretary, and his assistance and co-operation 
have been of untold value to me throughout the year, I am 
deeply grateful to him for his loyal support. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 137 

The general condition of Masonry in the thirty lodges 
of this District is very gratifying. The work is exceptionally 
well done. The interest taken by the brethren is very keen. 
The attendance is increasing and very encouraging, and the 
financial condition of all the lodges is good. 

The various lodges are receiving sufficient applications 
to maintain interest in the work and give them encourage- 
ment. It is also an incentive to the members to attend when 
they are assured of seeing good work given to new candi- 
dates. 

I believe that the improved attendance can be attributed, 
in a great measure, to the fact that the lodges in this Dis- 
trict are arranging their meetings so that the brethren may 
get home early without missing any part of the programme. 
This arrangement was very much appreciated by me on my 
visits of Inspection, when it was a very rare occasion that 
the meeting was not over by 11.30 p.m. 

The work of the Committee on Masonic Education, under 
the leadership of Wor. Bro. E. L. Roxborough, has been 
of great value and interest to the brethren, and I am con- 
fident that the instruction given this year will show results 
in the various lodges in the near future. 

The Masters' Association and the Senior Wardens' As- 
sociation are very active, and are doing gre^t work in 
promoting the study of the constitution, the principles of 
Masonry, and of the many details that make for good leader- 
ship and management in their lodges. With conditions in the 
world as they are, and with the principles of democracy, 
which are the principles of Masonry, being shaken to their 
very roots, good leadership is needed in every sphere of 
life, and where better can it be taught than in our fraternity ? 

There is a decided feeling of unity of purpose between 
the lodges in the District, and this was extended this year 
to the lodges of District "D", when the lodges of both these 
districts united to give a reception to the Most Worshipful, 
the Grand Master, which was held on April 24th, 1940, in 
Rotary Lodge, Neighborhood Workers Camp, at Bolton, 
Ontario, and was attended by more than five hundred of the 
brethren. It was an occasion that will long be remembered 
by the brethren of these districts, and we trust that it was 
a source of inspiration to Most Worshipful Brother Dobbie. 

The assistance and encouragement of my predecessors 
in office, and of all the Masters and brethren, have enabled 
me to carry on during the year, and to them I extend my 
sincere thanks and appreciation, and I bespeak for my suc- 
cessor the same wholehearted co-operation. 

Fraternally and respectfully submitted. 

S. F. Albertson, 

D.D.G.M., Toronto District "A". 



138 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

TORONTO DISTRICT "B" 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

It has been a great honor and privilege to serve the 
Craft in this the largest District in the jurisdiction. 

The honor I have always considered was to Markham 
Union Lodge No. 87, and I wish to thank that lodge and all 
the other lodges of the District, for unanimously making me 
the instrument through which that honor was bestowed on 
that old lodge and for giving me the happy privilege of 
serving my brethren. 

I have endeavoured to establish and maintain close con- 
tacts, and in most cases, intimate association with the 
Masters, officers and members of the various lodges, and 
have found them to be in all cases an earnest, thoughtful 
body of men animated by a sincere desire so far as ritualistic 
work is concerned, to do a job thoroughly, efficiently and 
with the dignity and impressiveness due to our Craft. 

I have also found them to be deeply impressed with a 
sense of the efficacy of Craft teaching to overcome not only 
the ills of the world, but also the every day problems of 
life of the average individual. The harmony and spirit of 
rear friendship that prevails are remarkable and I estimate 
are to be attributed to the need and outstanding desire for 
fellowship and friendliness caused by the present times and 
the sense of loneliness and insignificance of the individual 
in the face of the accumulating and increasing forces ab- 
solutely beyond his control and the result of which he can- 
not foresee or foretell. 

The members are also seized of their responsibilities re- 
garding the old question — "who is my neighbour?" and they 
demonstrate a most charitable attitude in that respect. They 
do not overlook the practical application of that spirit to- 
wards the unfortunate and helpless which is so necessary 
these days. Much of this is being accomplished quietly and 
unostentatiously and according to the scriptural injunction 
not to let the left hand know what the right hand does. 

One outstanding example of this is worth noting and 
worthy to be quoted: 

The Beaches Lodge No. 473 has for twenty-three con- 
secutive years annually provided a splendid supper, enter- 
tainment and Christmas tree, not for its own members' 
children, but for the children and their mothers from the 
Day Nursery in the East End of the City. The members' 
wives provide the supper, the financial end being taken care 
of by voluntary subscriptions from the members, in this 
case $180.00. This, is practical charity and it may best be 
described as Masonry in action. Beaches Lodge is composed 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1940 139 

of a group of men who love and serve their fellowmen, who 
understand human nature and who know the answers to a 
great many questions of life. 

I have found a continually growing desire to study the 
meaning of our Work. I have therefore endeavoured in my 
addresses, which I have purposely shortened, to give in each 
case an interpretation of various parts of our work, co- 
relating Masonry and life and have met with a stimulating 
and encouraging response to my efforts. 

A most praiseworthy effort is being made to handle the 
work impressively, and yet expeditiously so that the social 
hour may close between 11.30 and midnight. This could be 
further facilitated if a few suggestions made to the Masters 
and Wardens were carried out by having one reception of 
visitors instead of by groups; also by the Worshipful Master 
or a Past Master of each visiting lodge vouching for his 
own members when work is to be done in the upper brackets. 

The practice of holding some installations in December 
and some in June entails on the D.D.G.M. the overseeing of 
two sets of officers in each lodge during his term. Would 
it not make for greater uniformity and conform to the 
original practice if all installations were held in December, 
and preferably on the 27th, of December, the day set apart 
for that festival ? In certain places why could not group 
installations be held in each Temple? 

The group associations of Wardens are most desirable 
and highly to be commended as a means for cultivating 
acquaintance and forming a group spirit of friendship among 
those who will later be the Masters of their various lodges. 
Attention however has been called by some of my predeces- 
sors to the tendency to hold a S.W.'s Night in each lodge, 
thereby overdoing a good thing and making a burden out 
of what would otherwise be a pleasure. It is my considered 
opinion that, due to that alone, a great many capable and 
efficient potential officers decline to enter the procession 
leading to the Masters' chair and it is said to be the cause 
of the breakdown in health and physique of those who have 
tried to keep it up. To be constructive, and I hope helpful, 
I would offer the suggestion that these S.W. Nights or 
demonstrations of work, for that is what they are, and as 
such a good thing tending towards efficiency and uniformity, 
should be limited to one in each City Temple occupied by 
the District, each lodge annually taking it in turn. A similar 
arrangement could be made in the lodges in the rural sec- 
tions. This can only be accomplished by and with the co- 
operation of the Masters' and the Senior Wardens' Associ- 
ation being willing to forego one big night of the many pre- 
arranged. 

The direction of Masonic Education has during the year 
been in most capable and experienced hands. I was de- 
lighted when Rt. Wor. Bro. Ekblad agreed once more to 
assume those duties and they have been carried out in a 



140 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

most thorough and efficient manner. My thanks and also 
that of the whole District are due to him and his most able 
committee of V.W. Bro. Clark Rawson, Wor. Bro. Wm. 
Dickie of Coronati Lodge and Wor. Bro. James Russell of 
Bay of Quinte Lodge. Their interest has been sustained and 
their presentation and demonstration of a "Board of Trial" 
in many of the lodges has caused very much favorable com- 
ment and excited the interest and attention of their audi- 
ences. Their activities also included the presentation of 
addresses in a number of lodges. 

Many brethren availed themselves of the opportunities 
so richly provided in the Library to improve their knowledge 
and much credit is due to the Librarian for his_ kindly 
courtesy and helpful consideration shown to all enquirers at 
this source of knowledge. 

In February, Doric Lodge of Pickering observed its 
Fiftieth Anniversary with appropriate ceremony, attended 
by a large group of Grand Lodge Officers and members from 
lodges of the city and the surrounding country. A most in- 
teresting historical account of its activities since its found- 
ing was read, and seventeen Past Master's Jewels were pre- 
sented. 

At Coronati Lodge an Armistice Service was held called 
"The Journey of Remembrance", a solemn, impressive and 
appropriate service. 

The Imperial Lodge together with all lodges of the 
District deplores the loss of Wor. Bro. A. G. Corscadden, 
for whom a very touching and impressive memorial service 
was held. Suitable reference to his death is made in the 
report on Fraternal Dead. 

In view of many opinions held and also of the active 
propaganda in circulation, I have availed myself of many 
opportunities of attending Lodge Divine Services throughout 
the District. 

A reception was held for our Grand Master at Bolton 
by the rural lodges of Districts "A" and "B", and a similar 
reception by the city lodges of "C" District, at both of which 
large gatherings of the fraternity paid honor to the dis- 
tinguished head of our Craft. 

Throughout all lodges of the District, all Masters are 
receiving the sustained active interest and support of their 
Past Masters. This is reflected in the excellent standard of 
the efficiency maintained. It gave me great pleasure to wit- 
ness two Past Masters in one rural lodge actively and im- 
pressively handling sections of the Work, one at the age 
of 86, the other 84. 

The efforts of the Committee on Education is shown by 
a quickened interest and is reflected in what I venture to 
hope is an increase in attendance of our members, even 
though a good many lodges record a decrease of membership. 
In some lodges a noticeable increase for new applications is 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 141 

observed. This increase in attendance is further augmented 
by some lodges in producing what they call "the chain phone 
calls", where the members are phoned regularly and asked 
to attend the meetings. 

The work of the several degrees in all the lodges showed 
evidence of all those taking part of a real appreciation of 
the beauty, dignity and real worth of our ceremonies, a 
sincere desire and earnest endeavour to convey the lessons 
of the Craft to our new members in a dignified and impres- 
sive manner, and with that co-operation and team-work 
which is so highly desirable. 

The Musical Ritual is a large contributing factor in the 
attractive rendering of our work, and the efforts of organists 
and choirs are to be highly commended. 

The Secretaries are giving to their respective lodges a 
service which may some times be not fully appreciated, not 
only handling their allotted duties quietly and efficiently, 
thereby contributing in great measure to the smooth running 
of the machine, but also lending a helping hand in many 
other ways towards the comfort and happiness of the breth- 
ren. 

In all my visits I have emphasized correct ritualism 
and uniformity of the Work, proper expression and pronunci- 
ation and at all times impressiveness. I have also tried to 
carry the spirit of friendship and friendliness to the mem- 
bers, and also the fact that while the D.D.G.M. is present 
to ascertain the quality of the work done, he is also present 
as a brother ready and willing to help with counsel and 
advice. I have deeply appreciated the unfailing loyalty, co- 
operation and support of the Masters, officers and members 
of the whole District. 

It has been a great privilege to serve in this capacity 
and it has been my sincere desire at all times to merit the 
confidence you placed in me and to be able to render some 
real service to the Craft. Such service has been more than 
repaid by the many kindnesses received and the lasting 
friendships established. 

To Wor. Bro. Jim Smith, the friend and companion of 
my travels, the patient, prompt and punctual District Sec- 
retary who has endeared himself to the brethren of the 
District, we have spent many happy hours together and we 
will spend many more in retrospect. 

The trust given to me a year ago I shall be pleased to 
hand to my successor in the full assurance that the same 
loyal welcome awaits him in every lodge in Toronto District 
"B". 

Fraternally submitted, 

Geo. C. Murphy, 
D.D.G.M., Toronto District "B". 



142 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

TORONTO DISTRICT "C" 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

In presenting this, the annual report of the activities 
of Toronto District "C", I would first express, to the twenty- 
seven lodges of the District, my very sincere appreciation, 
not alone of the honour conferred upon me but also for the 
many favours and courtesies shown me since my elevation. 
Particular thanks are due the Masters and Wardens for their 
kind and able assistance and co-operation, culminating in 
the very splendid arrangement of the reception to Most 
Worshipful Brother Dobbie on May 20th, last. 

Shortly after assuming my duties, it was my privilege 
to present, on behalf of the District, to my predecessor, 
R. W. Bro. Harry L. Martyn, the regalia of a Past District 
Deputy Grand Master. 

During the year it has been our pleasure to visit each 
lodge at least twice, and some few more frequently. The 
memory of their cordial and dignified reception of my sec- 
retary and myself will long remain as evidences of their 
sincerity and loyalty. 

It is very gratifying to note that most of the lodges are 
receiving more applications than formerly. Nor is this the 
result of any lowering of standards but rather, we feel, 
through a wider dissemination of knowledge and more 
general understanding of the true nature of the Fraternity. 
The youthfulness and calibre of the candidates have im- 
pressed us most favourably. 

The work, almost without exception, has been most pro- 
ficient, and frequently of such a quality that the D.D.G.M. 
has been at a loss to find material for comment other than 
well deserved commendation. The officers are keen, capable 
and proficient, which being pleasingly noteworthy amongst 
those of junior rank, presages well for the future of the 
Order. Special tribute too should be paid the Past Masters 
and Secretaries. A more faithful and painstaking group 
could not be found. Their lodges and indeed Grand Lodge 
owes them sincere gratitude. The District Senior Wardens 
have been most enthusiastic and progressive and have, dur- 
ing the year, conducted seven lodge meetings at which their 
work has been not alone a benefit and credit to themselves 
but an inspiration and enjoyment to all. 

Though, in a few lodges, the financial conditions were 
not all that might have been desired, there is unmistakable 
improvement in recent years and effective action is being 
taken to keep this vexing matter well in hand. It has been 
drawn to my attention that the reluctance of some lodges 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 143 

to press for outstanding dues has been cited by members 
of sister lodges as an excuse for their own continued de- 
linquence. 

The benevolent activities of our constituent lodges are 
being well and ably directed, over sixty per cent, having ex- 
pended at least ten per cent, of their annual dues for this 
purpose. Of the remaining eleven lodges five have had no 
occasion to make grants and the remainder had calls of but 
a minor nature. 

The sincere appreciation of the District is tendered to 
R. W. Bro. H. L. Martyn and W. Bro. M. C. Cain who, as 
Supervisor and Secretary of the District Educational Com- 
mittee, so efficiently directed its work. Under their able 
direction, a Lodge of Instruction was conducted in Rising 
Sun Lodge, Aurora, and over sixty lectures on masonic 
subjects were given in various lodges. It is noted, perhaps 
with mingled feelings, that the increase in candidates has 
in several instances necessitated curtailment of educational 
activity, but it is felt, however, that to the ardent observant 
masonic student, no form of instruction can surpass that of 
conferring degrees with accompanying explanations. 

During the year the District suffered the loss of four 
valued Grand Lodge Officers, — V. W. Bro. John George Muir 
of Tuscan Lodge, No. 99, Newmarket, V. W. Bro. Wm. J. 
Hambly of King Solomon's Lodge, No. 22, V. W. Bro. Mal- 
colm Sinclair of Wilson Lodge, No. 86 and V. W. Bro. Wm. 
E. Robertson of Harcourt Lodge, No. 581 and Ashlar Lodge, 
No. 247. The District unites in mourning the passing of 
these eminent and faithful brethren. 

The acceptance of the duties of Distnct Secretary by 
W. Bro. E. Manifold was most gratifying. Though very 
busy in other branches of the Order and benevolent work he 
has performed the duties of his office with an efficiency and 
congeniality which has endeared him to us all. As Secretary 
he has ever been a most willing and able officer and as a 
travelling companion to me a constant encouragement, a 
kind counsellor and a true friend. On behalf of the District 
and myself a deep debt of gratitude is gladly acknowledged. 

Throughout the past months the chaotic European situ- 
ation, as a threat not alone to all democratic institutions, but 
to civilization itself, has caused grave concern to our mem- 
bers; and some have suggested that all Masons, regardless 
of national allegiance, in the interests of humanity, should 
exert every influence and even pressure to assure an effi- 
cient and successful prosecution of our cause. In this re- 
spect, regardless of any action that may be taken, and realiz- 
ing that each case must be judged on its individual merits, 
may we, on behalf of those newer brethren who have enlisted 
their services and perhaps their lives for the cause and so 
necessitated dispensations for the completion of their de- 
grees, bespeak a kindly and understanding consideration of 
any concessions they may ask. 



144 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

The tendency on some occasions to prolong banquet 
hours is greatly to be deplored. There is, in our opinion, no 
greater single deterrent to a fuller attendance at our meet- 
ings and we would urge the Masters to use every legitimate 
means at their command to assure that meetings open 
promptly and are not unduly prolonged. 

Much to be regretted is the fact that, owing to the dis- 
proportionate size of the Toronto Districts, it is impossible 
for a District Deputy to make the close personal contacts 
with the individual lodges which are so much to be desired. 
The difficulty, in our experience, lies not so much in the 
extent of his official duties or distances travelled as in the 
many extra kindly but perhaps unthinking calls which are 
made upon him as the Grand Master's representative. 
Whether the remedy is to be found in redistribution and 
amalgamation of smaller lodges or by some other means is 
problematical. But we are convinced that it is imperative 
that the existing situation be corrected if we are to benefit 
by the services of the many talented and able brethren who, 
through the press of an already busy life, are denied the 
privilege of serving by reason of these existing conditions. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Arthur C. Norwich, 

D.D.G.M., Toronto District "C". 

TORONTO DISTRICT "D" 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

I was very fortunate indeed in my selections of Secre- 
tary, Wor. Bro. T. C. Kremer, of St. Alban's Lodge and 
Supervisor of Masonic Education, Wor. Bro. J. E. Robertson 
of Wellington Lodge. Wor. Bro. Kremer was present at all 
scheduled visits of Inspection and I have very much appreci- 
ated the very capable manner in which he discharged his 
duties. The Secretary found the books in all lodges very 
efficiently maintained and reasonable precautions taken to 
guard against loss. The Supervisor of Masonic Education, 
Wor. Bro. Robertson and the members of his committee also 
discharged their duties in a most capable manner. Despite 
an eye ailment which later greatly interferred with his sight, 
Bro. Robertson spent many hours planning interesting short 
talks on vital masonic subjects. A most extensive and in- 
teresting report was prepared by the Supervisor which 
showed that he was able to enlist the services of no less than 
fourteen Past Masters who delivered addresses outside their 
own lodges. To these brethren and to the lodge chairmen, 
I give my sincere thanks in my belief that through their 



TORONTO. 0;NTARI0, 1940 145 

efforts Masonic Educatioji certainly continued to show pro- 
gress during the yea^. 

I should also like to pay a tribute to a brother who, 
through his zeal for Masonry, has given freely of his time 
and talents on a number of occasions during my year of 
office. Bro. W. Russell Marshall, as Organist, visited many 
rural lodges and took charge of the- musical programs. 
Masonry is thus enriched by having among its members, 
men of such sterling quality, who though they do not aspire 
to office, exert those talents wherewith God has blessed 
them in the service of the Craft. This brother surely shows 
the way to many brethren v^rho are not in office but who 
can also exert their talents within their own lodge and 
district. 

During my visits of Inspection I witnessed work of a 
very high order in practically every lodge. I am particularly 
pleased to notice that the members of rural lodges are be- 
coming better acquainted with their city brethren. I firmly 
believe that these visits between lodges' result in a better 
standard of work inasmuch as they afford the opportunity 
for an officer of a lodge to learn by observation and word- 
of-mouth rather than by mere verbal coaching in his own 
lodge. The Senior Wardens' Association' continues to fill a 
very vital need in this respect and these' Masters-to-be de- 
serve the best support possible from the Masters and Past 
Masters of the Distrct. 

The matter of outstanding dues continues to present a 
problem. Unfortunately, Worshipful Masters, upon assum- 
ing office, often find a very discouraging condition in the 
matter of outstanding dues. It should be the ambition of 
every Master of a lo'dge to so conduct the affairs of the 
lodge during his term of office, that his successor will find 
a healthy condition prevailing. I am interested in this dues 
problem-, especially as it affects attendance. I found that a 
certain lodge with only a 20% attendance experience had no 
arrears in dues, whereas other lodges vvith a much larger 
average attendance showed substantial arrears in dues. We 
have to consider whether or not an energetic lodge Secre- 
tary or an energetic so-called 'dues' committee might exer- 
cise too much pressure in the collection of dues to the 
detriment of attendance and membership. The lodge, whose 
example I have quoted, obtained this result thiough no 
drastic suspensions but by consistent but considerate methods 
of collection year after year. A definite policy should be 
instituted in every lodge and that policy followed to the 
letter year after year providing that that policy has proved 
its value in collecting the dues, but, at the same time, re- 
taining the membership. In too many cases incoming 
Masters, wishing to pioneer some new idea of their own on 
how to collect dues, adopt yearly programs which leave the 
members bewildered.. A too generous policy is usually fol- 
lowed by a too strict policy with the result that members 



146 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

are lost. Every brother should be given, as his right, the 
privilege of bringing before the Master or Secretary his par- 
ticular case but it is his duty to so consult the Master or 
Secretary as soon as he knows that he cannot pay his dues, 
for that year. 

I sincerely appreciate the support given the lodges in 
this District by the Central Masonic Bureau of Toronto 
which was established by Grand Lodge twenty-five years 
ago. I believe, however, that the Bureau should receive more 
support by the representatives wbo are elected by their 
lodges each year. Each representative, in my opinion, should 
be a Past Master, and his nomination should not be an- 
nounced until he has agreed to conscientiously fulfil the 
duties of his office. By a regular attendance at all Bureau 
meetings he would be able to answer any question any 
Tarother might wish to ask and be able to report intelligently 
on all recorded suspensions, rejections, restorations, etc., 
which may take place from time to time in the sister city 
lodges. During the year an invitation was extended to all 
Worshipful Masters to visit this Bureau, and each Worship- 
ful Master should take advantage of at least one opportunity 
to visit the Bureau with his representative. I believe that 
these lists of suspensions, rejections, restorations, etc., 
should be published by the Bureau more often so that the 
reading of these names would not consume so much time 
at any particular lodge meeting. More lists composed of 
fewer names would be more beneficial in that they could be 
released more often. 

I attended many Masonic Church Services which, in 
most cases, were well attended. This is Masonry on parade 
before the eyes of those wbo are outside our portals and 
such Masonic Church Services deserve the best in attendance 
from us all. 

Benevolence, I am convinced, is receiving due attention 
by the lodges. With dark days ahead of us we must not 
fail to give all cases due consideration before acceptance or 
rejection. 

A most important event took place during the year when 
on Wednesday evening, April 24th, a reception was tendered 
to Most Worshipful Brother Dobbie at Rotary Camp, Bolton. 
This being the year when the rural lodges of Districts "A" 
and "D" are hosts to our Grand Master, the two Districts 
combined, for the first time, to hold a joint reception. Dis- 
trict "D" was particularly honoured in holding the reception 
within its borders and True Blue Lodge, Bolton, was likewise 
honoured when it received the Grand Master, at which time 
fifty Masters were presented to him within the lodge room. 

To serve this District as the representative of the Grand 
Master is a rare privilege. To become so well acquainted 
with brethren of the District is also a rare privilege and I 
will long cherish the many evenings spent in such delightful 
company. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1540 147 

As I hand over the reins of office to my successor I 
wish to thank all those whose efforts contributed to the 
advancement of Masonry in this District; to thank my pre- 
decessors for their many kind words of encouragement and 
to the Masters and the Chairmen of the various lodge com- 
mittees for their very fine spirit of co-operation. I bespeak 
for my successor that same spirit of co-operation. 

As I write my report the war clouds are very dark in- 
deed. However, if we continue to remember that we must 
hold high the torch which has been flung to us, Masonry and 
Democracy will continue to be the beacons towards which 
those less fortunate than we can look for comfort and 
support. 

All of which is respectfully and fraternally submitted. 

E. W. Stoddard, 

D.D.G.M., Toronto District "D". 

VICTORIA DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F, & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

I have the honour to submit for your consideration the 
following report on the condition of Masonry in Victoria 
District during the past year. 

My first official act after being elected was to appoint 
W. Bro. F. S. Magee as District Secretary. He accompanied 
me on all my official visits, and I wish to express my warm- 
est appreciation for the proficient manner in which he dis- 
charged the duties of that office. 

I had the privilege of making an official visit to each 
of the lodges in the District. A most gratifying loyalty to 
the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master and to Grand Lodge 
was everywhere in evidence. I was received on every oc- 
casion with the greatest respect and cordiality. 

During these visits one lodge only exemplified the 
Sublime Degree of a Master Mason and in this case the work 
was done in a dignified and impressive manner. This re- 
vealed the splendid co-operation that existed among the 
officers in each of the lodges. The work in both the First 
and Second Degree, which I had the pleasure of seeing on 
other occasions, was also done in a very creditable manner. 

Five of the Lodges did not have a candidate on the night 
of my official visit, but in each case the officers proved 
themselves well skilled in the fundamental work of the three 
degrees. This was the more commendable because some of 
them had very little work during the year and the officers 
were not able to benefit from wide experience and much 
practice. 



148 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

It is most gratifying for me to be able to report that 
without exception the Masters are giving wise and efficient 
leadership in directing the affairs of their respective lodges. 
They are receiving the active support of a loyal group of 
Past Masters and the earnest co-operation of the junior 
officers. This is quite apparent at each of the meetings I 
attended, and reflected great credit on the judgment of the 
members in their selection of officers. 

The records of . the various lodges are well kept. In 
most cases the Secretaries have given years of service to 
this work and are among the most loyal members of the 
Craft. 

During the past few years some of the lodges in this 
District initiated very few candidates. Each lodge has a 
number of membei:s who are finding it difficult, if not im- 
possible, to meet their yearly obligations. This might easily 
create a serious financial situation in some of the weaker 
lodges if it were not handled with the greatest care. I be- 
lieve, hov/ever, that the officials are doing everything in 
their power to assist their unfortunate members and at the 
same time to keep their lodge funds in a safe condition. 
There is no evidence of neglect in this respect. 

At each official visit I arranged to have a special speaker 
give an address which added greatly to the success of the 
meetings. To these brethren I wish to express my sincere 
appreciation. My thanks are due to Rt. Wor. Bro. F. M, 
Graham, P.D.D.G.M. of Fenelon Falls for acting at the In- 
spection of my Mother Lodge, Lome Lodge, Omemee. 

Wor. Bro. Anderson, who was appointed Supervisor of 
Masonic Education, was unable to arrange for as many 
meetings as desired on account of illness but' gave a very 
splendid address at the Spring meeting of the Past Masters', 
Masters' and Wardens' Association on the branch of 
Masonry. 

On my official visit to Arcadia Lodge, No. 440, Minden, 
I had the pleasure of meeting with Wor. Bro. Graham, who 
has been a member of that lodge for forty years and never 
has missed a meeting during that time. 

Our District Divine Service, which was held in the 
United Church, Omemee, was largely attended. Service was 
conducted by Wor. Bro. Robt. Patterson, Minister of the 
Church, and Wor. Master of King Edward Lodge, Sunderland, 
The choir rendered appropriate music which added greatly 
to the meeting. 

In conclusion I wish to express my sincere appreciation 
to the brethren of Victoria District for the distinct honour 
that they conferred on me and for their loyalty and co- 
operation in carrying out the duties of my office. The associ- 
ations formed this ' year shall remain as my most pleasant 
memories and I hope to be able to renew these friendships 
from time to time in the future. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 149 

I bespeak for my successor the same kindly considera- 
tion that has been shown me. And as the years go by I 
trust there will be given abundantly to those who will be 
called upon to rule and govern, that beauty and strength 
of character that will ever hold aloft the principles and 
teachings of our great fraternity. 

Fraternally submitted, 

Wm. Greig, 

D.D.G.M., Victoria District. 

WELLINGTON DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

I have the honour to submit herewith my report as 
representative of the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master 
in Wellington District for the year 1939-1940. 

First I vfish. to express to my masonic brethren of Wel- 
lington District my sincere appreciation of the honour con- 
ferred upon me and on Walker Lodge No. 321, in selecting 
me as their representative of the Grand Master. 

My first official act was to appoint Wor. Bro. Frank 
Mcintosh of Walker Lodge as District Secretary. He was 
untiring in his efforts to assist and support me in every v,-ay 
possible during my term of office. I also appointed Bro. 
Rev. G. C. Gifford of Walker Lodge, District Chaplain. He 
also was very loyal and accompanied me on several of my 
visits. 

I have visited every lodge in the District and found 
them in a healthy condition, with their officers sincere and 
enthusiastic. I found the work exceptionally well done with 
the Past Masters taking an active interest in the same. 

The attendance on my official visits was gratifying and 
while the average in the country lodges was fair, there is 
room for improvement in most of the city lodges. The 
question of outstanding dues is still a problem for a number 
of the lodges and, while quite a number of the members are 
being suspended, most lodges are endeavouring to retain 
members who are really interested in the Craft, for which 
they are to be commended. The work of the Secretaries is 
praiseworthy, records are carefully kept and the lodge 
property properly insured. 

During the y^ar I had the pleasure of visiting v/ith and 
receiving visits from Rt. Wor. Bro. H. B. Atkinson, Wilson 
District, Rt. Woi*. Bro. M. C. Hawlev, Brant District, Rt. 
Wor. Bro. S. T. Loveys, South Huron District, and Rt. Wor. 



150 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Bro. T. H. Reburn of Grey District all of which I found 
very beneficial. 

On April 15th we were honoured with the presence of 
the Grand Master at Ayr Lodge, No. 172, on the celebration 
of its Seventy-fifth Anniversary, He delivered a very in- 
spiring address and the occasion will long be remembered 
by those present. 

On April 16th we were again honoured by a visit from 
the Grand Master to Speed Lodge, No. 180, Guelph, when 
he was accompanied by the Grand Secretary Rt. Wor. Bro. 
E. G. Dixon, Rt. Wor. Bro. F. H. England, Grand Senior 
Warden and Rt. Wor. Bro. B. C. Beasley, Grand Junior 
Warden. Speed Lodge was also celebrating its Seventy-fifth 
Anniversary. Guelph being the birth place of Most Wor. 
Bro. Dobbie, his masterly address was interspersed with 
reminiscences of his boyhood days and was greatly enjoyed 
by the great gathering of brethren which taxed the banquet 
hall to its capacity. 

The re-organized Past Masters' Association has been 
quite active during the year holding meetings and discussing 
questions of interest to the District, and making recom- 
mendations. 

The Masters' and Wardens' Association has enjoyed a 
successful season. The inter-lodge visits under its direction 
have been a great success, and the Wardens of the District 
conferred the First Degree in Alma Lodge, Gait, last Novem- 
ber in a very impressive manner. 

The annual Church Service of the District was held in 
the United Church, Acton, on June 9th. The service of song 
was led by the choir of Speed Lodge, Guelph, and Bro. G. 
C. Gifford, District Chaplain, delivered a very impressive 
sermon. About two hundred brethren attended in spite of 
inclement weather. 

I cannot close my report without mentioning my visit 
to my Mother Lodge when I was greeted by the largest 
gathering of Masons ever assembled in Acton. Between two 
hundred and fifty and three hundred sat down at the banquet 
table and the Lodge was honoured on that occasion by a 
visit from Most Worshipful Brother Dunlop. I am deeply 
grateful to him for his address of instruction which was 
enjoyed by all those who were privileged to hear him. 

My visits to all the lodges were most enjoyable and I 
thank the Masters and brethren for the kindness and cour- 
tesy shown to me and my Secretary on these occasions. 

I wish to make note of the fact that death removed one 
of the "Old Guard" from our midst, R. W. Bro. Wellington 
Keefer of Hespeler. 

May I express my appreciation for all the assistance 
and encouragement tendered to me by the Past District 
Deputies and may I ask the same support for my successor. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

J. A. LesUe, 
D.D.G.M., Wellington District. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 151 

WESTERN DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

It is a privilege and a pleasure to submit for your con- 
sideration, my report on the condition of Masonry in the 
Western District. 

May I first take this opportunity of expressing to the 
brethren of the District, my sincere thanks and appreciation 
for the honor that has been mine to enjoy while serving 
them as District Deputy Grand Master and to again tender 
my thanks for the many courtesies they have shown me 
throughout the year, 

I have had the pleasure of having several brethren ac- 
company me on my official visits to the lodges and their 
company and assistance have been a great help and enjoy- 
ment to me so, to these brethren, I feel I owe a debt of 
gratitude. 

My first official act was to appoint Worshipful Brother 
Boquist, District Secretary and Worshipful Brother Parrott, 
District Chaplain. These brethren fulfilled their respective 
offices in a manner that not only is a credit to themselves 
but to Masonry in general. 

Throughout my visits to the lodges I have found that 
the work is being carried out in a very efficient and capable 
manner and to the Worshipful Masters and Officers I have 
only the highest praise and wish to compliment them for 
the manner in which they have handled the work pertaining 
to their respective chairs. 

Each lodge is brimming with enthusiasm and I believe 
that the increased average attendance is a barometer by 
which to gauge a lodge's interest. It has been a pleasure to 
be able to see candidates in waiting for each lodge and to 
witness the outstanding interest of the candidates in the 
different degrees and to hear the proficiency of the work 
exemplified by them. If Masonry in our District continues 
to have candidates of the same calibre throughout the years 
to come, I am sure that Masonry in the Western District 
will continue to flourish. 

The Secretaries of the lodges have done a wonderful 
work in reducing outstanding dues to a minimum. The 
Worshipful Masters are high in their praise for the untiring 
efforts shown by them and are pleased that, in the very near 
future, suspension for non-payment of dues will be almost 
eliminated. 

The seeds of Masonic Education so well sown by my 
predecessors have taken a firm hold and great interest has 
been created by the brethren. The Past Masters in the 
majority of lodges have devoted considerable time and study 



152 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

for the advancement of Masonic Education and meetings 
devoted entirely for this purpose are well attended and ex- 
ceptional papers have been given. A Past Masters' Associ- 
ation has put up a beautiful shield for competition. The 
competition takes the form of a questionnaire on the. work 
and is competed for by six brethren below the rank of Junior 
Warden from each lodge. The team acquiring the highest 
number of points is entitled to hold the shield for one year. 
The annual District ■ Meeting of Western District was 
held this year at Kipling Camp on the Lake of the Woods 
on June 15th. Every lodge was represented and the brethren 
in large numbers embraced the opportunity of exchanging 
fraternal greetings and becoming more closely acquainted 
with the brethren of their sister lodges. 

" It is customary at this meeting to select a Worshipful 
Brother to attend the sessions of Grand Lodge. Worshipful 
Brother E. E. Jess of Ionic Lodge No. 461, Rainy River, 
Ontario, was unanimously- elected to attend the coming ses- 
sions in July. 

In closing I wish to express my appreciation for the 
many kindnesses received from the brethren of Western 
District during the past year and I hope that the_ same 
kindly co-operation and support that it was my privilege 
to enjoy will be shown to my successor. , . 

Respectfully and fraternally submitted. 

A. G. Holland, 
D.D.G.M., Western District. 

WILSON DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

First of all I wish to take this opportunity to thank the 
Officers and Past Masters of Thistle Lodge No. 250, Embro, 
for placing my name in nomination at Grand Lodge and also 
to thank the brethren of Wilson District for the splendid 
support given me on that occasion. And I desire to express 
my sincere appreciation at being elected to represent the 
District that supplied the first Grand Master of the Grand 
Lodge of Canada, Wilson District with its historic memories 
has always held a high reputation for excellent work and 
for the friendly relations existing between the different 
lodges. 

After my election was confirmed by the Most Worship- 
ful, the Grand Master, my first official duty was to appoint 
W. Bro. Osmond H. Murray District Secretary and W. Bro. 
M. W. Goodrich District Chaplain, both of whom I wish to 
thank for their assistance. The former was with me on 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 153 

every official visit. Also I desire to thank V. Wor. Bro. Wm. 
French and R. W. Bro. James Kennedy, both of Thistle 
Lodge, for their support throughout the year. 

Lodge Secretaries 

Wor. Bro. 0. H. Murray has proven himself to be a 
very able and efficient District Secretary and has gathered 
much information from the various Secretaries in the Dis- 
trict and passed the same on to other Secretaries with very 
favourable comments. Several of the Secretaries are P.D. 
D.G.M.'s and almost all are Past Masters and no doubt this 
plays no small part in the excellent condition of the Secre- 
taries' books. 

Oflficial Visits 

I paid an official visit to every lodge in the District and 
on every occasion a degree was exemplified in a very efficient 
manner. Wilson District is to be congratulated in having 
the lodges working with such uniformity. 

The most contentious question confronting some of the 
lodges is arrears of dues, which is largely the fault of the 
individual lodge by not enforcing its by-laws. 

Past Masters' Association 

We have a very active Association in Wilson District. 
It has a membership of 89 which is a gain of 18 during the 
past twelve months. 

Lodge Attendance 

This could be improved especially in the larger lodges, 
but I do find whenever a special speaker is to give an ad- 
dress a larger number of the members attends than when 
degree work alone is on the agenda. I also notice where 
lodges open promptly and close early their attendance is 
greater, and I would urge every Master not to put on too 
much of the work himself. Keep the Past Masters coming 
to lodge by giving them work to do and I would strongly 
recommend every lodge to have a Past Masters' Night at 
least once a year. 

Lodge of Instruction 

This was held in Masonic Temple, Woodstock, on May 
29th with approximately 250 in attendance. Most Wor, Bro. 
F. A. Copus of Stratford was the guest speaker at the 
banquet and gave a splendid address on the condition of 
Masonry in other parts of the world. He also gave an ac- 
count of his trip to England in 1939 as our representative to 
the installation of His Royal Highness, the Duke of Kent, 
as Grand Master of the United Grand Lodge of England. 

St. John's Pilgrimage 

The annual pilgrimage to the grave of our First Grand 
Master, M. W. Bro. William Mercer Wilson, at St. John's 
Church, Woodhouse on Sunday, June 23rd took the form of 
an Especial Communication of Grand Lodge by the authority 
of the Grand Master, to mark the One Hundredth Annivef- 



154 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

sary of the initiation of M. W. Bro. Wilson. The special 
speaker was Rt. Rev. and Rt. Wor. Bro. Chas. A, Seager, 
Lord Bishop of Huron. M. W. Bro. J. A. Dobbie laid a wreath 
on the grave and delivered an appropriate address. 

Upwards of one hundred and fifty Masons attended the 
District Divine Service which was held at Knox United 
Church, Embro, where the District Chaplain delivered the 
address. It is with deep regret that I record the passing to 
the Grand Lodge Above of three of our Past Grand Lodge 
Officers in the persons of R. W. Bro. Hegler and R. W. Bro. 
R. B. Hutt both of Ingersoll and V. W. Bro. Raynes of Till- 
sonburg. 

Several of my colleagues from the surrounding districts 
have visited with me on numerous occasions and have helped 
to create a close fraternal relationship between their dis- 
tricts and Wilson District. 

As my term of office draws to a close let me again thank 
Wilson District for the high honor it has conferred upon 
me, for their consistent support and co-operation. I have 
thoroughly enjoyed the year's work and I feel I have made 
many new masonic friends besides further cementing old 
friendships. If I have succeeded, even in a small way, in 
leaving with each lodge a masonic message pointing out 
the importance of applying the principles of Masonry in our 
daily lives I will feel I have been of some service to Masonry 
in this District. And may I conclude my report on the con- 
dition of Masonry in Wilson District with these words, "All 
is well". 

Fraternally submitted, 

H. B. Atkinson, 
D.D.G.M., Wilson District. 

WINDSOR DISTRICT 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

I have the honor to submit my report on the condition 
of Masonry in the Windsor District for the masonic year 
1939-40. 

May I take this opportunity to express my sincere ap- 
preciation to the District for the high honor conferred upon 
me a year ago and also for the unstinted support and co- 
operation of the brethren as a whole during my term of 
office. 

To enable me to keep an open mind for district honors 
I did not appoint a District Secretary. But I did appoint 
Wor. Bro. Duncan Paterson as District Chairman on Masonic 
Education and cannot adequately thank him for the manner 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 155 

in which he undertook the duties thereof. I also wish to 
express my appreciation to Wor. Bro. J. Leonard McMuUan 
for the capable manner in which he performed the secretarial 
duties assigned to him. 

While I attended a considerably greater number of meet- 
ings than that prescribed I enjoyed every visit to the fullest 
extent and will always maintain a debt of gratitude to the 
fraternity for my many happy associations with them. 

On October 27th, 1939, I visited St. Andrews Lodge, No. 
642, on the occasion of their Annual Military Night, when a 
Third Degree was conferred on a veteran of the last world 
conflict after which a very impressive remembrance cere- 
mony was conducted attended by some 500 Master Masons. 

I also had the pleasure of visiting Leamington Lodge 
No. 290, on October 31st, 1939, when fifty officers and mem- 
bers of Dundee Lodge, Dundee, Michigan, exemplified the 
Third Degree according to the Michigan Ritual. 

On Sunday afternoon, November 5th, 1939, I had the 
honor of assisting Most Worshipful Brother Dunlop together 
with the Grand Secretary and Grand Registrar at the laying 
of the corner stone of St. Andrews Anglican Church on which 
occasion over 200 Masons were in attendance. 

On March 19th, 1940, it was my honor and privilege to 
be requested by Thistle Lodge No. 34, Amherstburg, to 
present a Veteran's Jewel for fifty years service in the Craft, 
to Brother Frank M. Falls. I also wish to extend congratu- 
lations to Rt. Wor. Bro. Col. E. S. Wigle on being the 
recipient of a similar jewel. 

On April 10th, 1940, at the invitation of the Past 
Masters' and Officers' Association, the District was honored 
with a visit from M. W. Bro. F. A. Copus who described 
to 300 members and their ladies the Installation of H. R. H. 
the Duke of Kent, as Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of 
England. 

Thanks to the untiring efforts of my predecessors, the 
ritualistic work of the District leaves little to be desired. 
Uniformity is the keynote and a friendly rivalry prevaijs 
to excel in the work. In some instances, however, I found 
that the V.O.S.L. was not opened on the proper passage 
and I would recommend that the Ritual be amended to re- 
quire the P.M. performing this duty to state in open lodge 
on what passage the V.O.S.L. is opened in each degree and 
thus educate the members. 

Two Lodges of Instruction were held during the year, 
in Central Lodge, Essex and Ontario Lodge, Windsor, re- 
spectively, and presumably were beneficial to those present. 
Where no degree work was on the agenda at an Official 
Inspection, Masonic Education was conducted. 

Benevolence is being taken care of consistent with the 
financial condition of the lodges. I am pleased to note that 
practically all lodges in the District are now in a better 



156 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

financial condition, although greater improvement could be 
desired. 

In ,the present grave military emergency patriotism is 
rampant as quite a number of members are, veterans of the 
last world conflict. Dues of all members enlisted for overseas 
service have been remitted during the term of their service. 
The national flag is proudly displayed in the lodge rooms 
on all occasions and quite a number of the members have 
offered their services to , the Empire. 

I would suggest that Grand Lodge give consideration to 
the following:— 

1. Incorporation of a statement in the ritualistic open- 
ing ceremony from the Past Master as to the passage 
where the V.O.S.L. is opened. 

2. The issuance of a 25 year Silver Jubilee Medal, 
similar in design to the 50 year Golden Jubilee Medal, 
the cost of which to be borne by the lodge requesting 
such issuance. 

3. Incorporation of a uniform form of Audit report 
throughout the Grand Jurisdiction, to be forwarded 
to the D.D.G.M. of each district by the constituent 
lodges therein. 

Finally, in thanking the Past District Deputies and the 
Past Masters' and Officers' Association for their unselfish 
devotion to the Craft in general and to my office in par- 
ticular, may I ask them to transfer to my successor the 
same allegiance and fidelity. 

Sincerely and fraternally submitted. 

J, G. Moncrieff, 

D.D.G.M., Windsor District. 



GUEST SPEAKS AND PRESENTS MEDALS 

The Grand Master introduced M.W. Joseph E. 
Perry, Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Massa- 
chusetts. M.W. Bro. Perry stated that he came to 
this Annual Communication not alone because of 
the affection and respect he had for us but also to 
convey most cordial greetings and sincere best 
wishes from the great army of brethren to the South 
whose hearts beat with ours in these times of dis- 
tress. He said how deeply he had been impressed as 
a resident of the United States with the great 
loyalty displayed at the historic gathering at 
Olympia, London, one year ago when the Duke of 
Kent was installed Grand Master of the United 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 •. . 157 

Grand Lodge of England and how his "heart warmed 
to that modest man your King." 

M.W. Bro. Perry requested M.W. Bro. W. H. 
Wardrope, the oldest of our Past Grand jMasters, 
M.W. Bro. J. A. Dobbie, our Grand' Master and R.W. 
Bro, E. G. Dixon, our Grand Secretary, to permit 
him to address them. He then presented to M.W. 
Bro. W. H. Wardrope and to M.W. Bro. J. A. Dobbie 
the Henry Price Medal of Massachusetts and to R.W. 
Bro. E. G. Dixon, the Joseph Warren Distinguished " 
Service Medal. The presentations were^greeted with 
great applause by the brethren. 

COMMITTEE OF SCRUTINEERS -^ 

The Grand Master appointed V.W. Bro. E. B. ';" 
Thompson, Chairman of the Committee of Scrutin- 
eers to count the vote at the election of Grand Lodge 
officers with power to name the members of the 
Committee. 

GUEST SPEAKS 

The Grand Master introduced M.W. Bro. Charles 
T. Sherman, Grand Master of Michigan and re- 
quested him to address Grand Lodge. M.W. Bro. 
Sherman expressed the pleasure it gave him to 
attend for the first time the Annual Communication 
of this Grand Lodge and to sit through the instruc- 
tive deliberations of our Board of General Purposes. 
He was also deeply impressed with our activities in 
connection with the reception of child guests from 
Great Britain, and was wondering how the Grand 
Lodge of Michigan could assist us. He extended 
fraternal greetings and best wishes from his Grand 
Lodge and expressed his deep appreciation of the 
fine friendly fraternal relations existing between the 
two Grand Jurisdictions. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON WARRANTS 

The report was presented by R.W. Bro. E. T. 
Howe, Chairman, and on motion of the Deputy 



158 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Grand Master, seconded by R.W. Bro. E. T. Howe, 
it was received and adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario: 
Most Worshipful Sir: 

We your Committee on Warrants, consisting of Rt. Wor. 
Bro. E. T. Howe (Chairman), Kt. Wor. Bros. G. C. Bonny- 
castle, H. J. Alexander, F. H. England, W. T. Baillie, and 
Joseph Backus, wish to report as follows: — 

We have examined the books and records of Kenogamisis 
Lodge of Geraldton, in the Algoma District, which have been 
working under Dispensation, and we are pleased to report 
that the books and records are all in proper form, and to 
congratulate the officers of said Lodge on the clear and 
concise manner in which the minutes are recorded and the 
accounts kept, and we recommend that a Charter be granted. 
The number of Kenogamisis Lodge will be 656, G.R.C. 

We believe there is a very bright future for this Lodge, 
and it should fill a vacant niche in that part of the Province. 

May they long continue to prosper. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

E. T. HOWE, 

Chairman. 

NOMINATIONS 

The Grand Master announced that nominations 
for Grand Lodge offices could now be made in ac- 
cordance with the Constitution and that same would 
be received until 5 o'clock. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON 
CONSTITUTION AND LAWS 

The report was presented by M.W. Bro. W. H. 
Wardrope, Chairman, and on motion of the Deputy 
Grand Master, seconded by M.W. Bro. W. H. Ward- 
rope, it was received and adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 

Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 

in the Province of Ontario: 
Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

The Board of General Purposes through its Committee 
on Constitution and Laws begs to report as follows: 

There is no constitutional objection to the following 
motion of R.W. Bro. J. G. Moncrieff: 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1940 159 

1. That lines 1 and 2 of Section 103 of the Constitution 
be amended to read as follows: 

"The Board shall annually appoint an Auditor who is 
a member in good standing of a recognized Institute or 
Association of Accountants, incorporated under proper legis- 
lative authority"; 

2. That line 3 of Section 117 of the Constitution be 
amended as follows: 

"The words 'The Auditor appointed by the Board' be 
substituted for the words 'a professional accountant to be 
named by the Board'; also all the words after 'and' in line 
5 of Section 117 be deleted and the following substituted 
therefor 'printed in the Proceedings of Grand Lodge'." 
All of which is fraternally submitted, 

W. H. WARDROPE, 

Chairman. 

CALLED OFF 

Grand Lodge adjourned at twelve o'clock noon. 

CALLED ON 

Grand Lodge assembled again at two-forty 
o'clock in the afternoon, the Grand Master on the 
Throne. 

REPORT ON THE CONDITION OF MASONRY 

The report was presented by R.W. Bro. W. C. 
N. Marriott, Chairman, and on motion of the Deputy 
Grand Master, seconded by R.W. Bro. W. C. N. 
Marriott, it was received and adopted. 

"To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario: 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

As nothing is laid down regarding the scope of the 
report on the condition of Masonry, your Committee has 
taken the liberty of covering the situation under the three 
headings, as follows: 

(a) The challenge to civilization, giving the background 
of the position in which Masonry stands. 

(b) The condition of Masonry in general. 

(c) The condition of Masonry in our own jurisdiction. 



160 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

(a) In the history of this Grand Lodge no Committee 
on the Condition of Masonry ever had a report to prepare 
under such circumstances of world bewilderment. Confronted 
with a challenge to everything that our civilization has stood 
for, our Empire, our Democracy, our Faith, our Homes and 
our Masonry. 

OUR EMPIRE. — Enemies from v.'ithout and within seek 
to destroy and break up and submerge all that has been 
accomplished in a thousand years of effort to ennoble man- 
kind by making the ideals of truth, liberty and justice, 
integral elements in the life of. the Commonwealth of the 
British Nations. 

Disaster bom of treachery has dogged its footsteps 
during the past few months, but the true patriot will not 
flinch, but fight on till the victory is won. Seeking to destroy 
the British Empire is a monster to whom the sanctity of a 
treaty, the laws of decency and a code of honour mean noth- 
ing. He uses only the native tribal instincts for his weapons 
— fire, pillage, murder, a vehement desire for destruction, 
and to this he adds a passion for lying propaganda. Each 
day he increases the earth's desolation and sorrow. 

DEMOCRACY. — Democracy is challenged. The procedure 
in a Democracy is slower, and perhaps more cumbersome be- 
cause it uses the method of co-operation and moves along 
orderly lines to reach its objective. That objective has been 
the attainment of dignity and happiness for the individual 
in peace, in freedom of life, and thought and worship. Hence 
democracy and civilization are synonymous terms. 

It has been called upon to face tests for v/hich it was 
never intended. It detests war, ruthlessness, violence and 
brute force. This tank-driven tyranny it must conquer. De- 
mocracy is in jeopardy until it has accomplished this end. 
To continue we must believe in it with a passionate faith. 
To have it survive we must marshal all the strength possible 
and support it with a determination greater than that of 
its enemies. The future of humanity must not be left in the 
hands of those who would imprison and enslave it. 

Democracy is made up of the individuals, and the in- 
dividual must be a free man, because he is the better man. 
Freemasons as free men must, with courage and a clear 
vision, stand ready to suffer and sacrifice in the path of 
duty. Their prayer should be: 

In Thought— Faith. 
In Word — Wisdom. 
In Deed — Courage. 
In Life — Service. 

FAITH. — Democracy and Christian Faith go hand in 
hand, because in the human spirit there is something that 
does cling to spiritual values. Man has the right to still 
think, to live his life and to worship as he desires. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 161 

Our Faith is challenged. Ours is a Brotherhood of 
British Nations. We, therefore, are a living exponent of the 
brotherhood of man. During the time our Empire was being 
built up by discovery and colonization, there followed im- 
mediately the Volume of the Sacred Law, and those who 
taught from it. Everyv/here there has been a recognition 
of the Fatherhood of God. 

There are those who deny that there is a God and would 
supplant the teachings of The Book with a Nordic myth. 

Our foes place the rights of the country or state above 
the individual. The individual must serve the state as the 
state decrees. The individual is not "Captain of his soul" 
in the Totalitarian country because the state wills it. Any 
country that does not permit of Christian teaching and de- 
nies to man the right to worship cannot survive. 

THE HOME. — The sanctity of the home is challenged. 
We have seen recently the awful spectacle of defenceless 
women and children becoming refugees, mangled by tanks, 
shot from aircraft by machine guns, myriads of homes de- 
stroyed, never to be reunited. 

There has been a lowering of moral standards, and the 
ushering in to this world of untold numbers of children, 
motherless and fatherless — the attempt to hasten the pro- 
duction of a race of super men for cannon fodder. 

There is an atmosphere of suspicion in the homes, so 
that parents are unable to discuss any topic without the 
fear that their sons will betray them to the authorities, and 
they will be taken to the internment camp or liquidated. 
Homes where the youth are all compelled to surrender to 
the will and service of the state. 

Then there are homes where to-day religion is mocked, 
where the old fashioned conventions are derided, where youth 
is not attempting to solve his problems, and other homes 
perhaps where youth is finding it difficult to keep his feet 
firmly planted on the eternal verities in a world gone mad. 

Yet youth must answer the tormenting questions of life 
as his father did before bim. Underneath all this turmoil of 
youth and the home, the old law of the decalogue still exists, 
and the old penalties still stand. Courage, strength and 
righteousness will still win out. 

MASONRY. — Masonry is challenged. In the last year's 
Proceedings you will find the names of four distinguished 
members of this Grand Lodge representing the Grand Lodges 
of the Netherlands, Denmark, Norway and France Nationale. 
One wonders where the records of these Grand Lodges are, 
but no information is available. If these countries remain 
under the iron heel of the oppressor, crushed by the tank- 
driven treachery of the Totalitarian, we may well believe 
that for them there will be no resurrection of Masonry. 
Would the fate of Masonry in the Democracies be any bet- 
ter if "all this should happen here" ? No, because our Order 



162 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

would be one of the first objects of the wrath of these dic- 
tatorships. 

Is it too much to ask the question — "Has Masonry been 
preserved and handed down through the ages to serve 
humanity at such a time as this" ? 

Yes, Masonry has withstood wars, slander, ridicule, 
panic and opposition in the past. To-day it can give direction 
to efforts to succour the orphan and homeless. It still stands 
the same strong silent influence for the doing of good, the 
building of character, the holding on high of lofty ideals 
as it has done for hundreds of years. There is a dignity, 
a universality in Masonry, because men from all walks of 
life are admitted, if they possess good character, good repu- 
tation and believe in a Supreme Being. Masonry seeks to 
point out to men the way of life, it teaches the spirit of 
brotherhood in its truest sense; the practice of charity in 
its profoundest form, and the recognition of truth in all its 
beauty. 

From these teachings man should be so developed that 
he can face with courage every challenge, whether it be that 
of the Craft, the Home, the Faith, Democracy or the Empire. 

(b) A rapid survey of Masonry throughout the world 
indicates that Masonry, as we know it, exists only in the 
Democracies. 

In the British Isles, the Grand Lodges of England, 
Scotland and Ireland continue to work in a most cordial and 
harmonious manner. In England it continues to advance, 
both as to number of lodges and membership. 

The outstanding event of Masonry in England during 
the past year occurred when His Majesty King George VI, 
Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of England, installed 
his brother, His Royal Highness the Duke of Kent, as Grand 
Master in July, 1939. The proceedings of this event are 
given in an Appendix in the annual report. Some lodges 
have closed down during the war, others are carrying on. 
As an example, one recent event was the entertainment of 
160 Masons from the Canadian Active Service Force by 
Canada Lodge, London, England. The Duke of Kent, Grand 
Master of the Grand Lodge of England, attended and spent 
two and a half hours with the brethren from Canada, much 
to the delight of all present. 

In the United States of America progress and advance- 
ment have been made. The Annual Conference of Grand 
Masters of Masons from the different States of the Union 
provides one of the best clearing houses for the exchange 
of Masonic ideas. This Graiid Lodge was invited to become 
a member of the Conference, and did so as the first Grand 
Lodge of Canada to belong to it. Our Grand Secretary was 
our Representative "at the 1940 session. 

This conference has no legislative powers. It can decide 
nothing, but with Grand Masters present, problems can be 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 163 

discussed that have a common appeal in all jurisdictions. 
The Grand Masters can take home the opinions of others 
on the subjects discussed, and bring them before their own 
Grand Lodge if any action is desired. It must be remembered 
that each is a sovereign body and must legislate independent- 
ly if there is a desire to support any national movement. 

The Agenda at the last such conference contained, 
among others, the following topics: 

(a) The latest developments in Masonry in foreign 
lands. 

(b) Can we create a National Masonic Statesmanship? 

(c) Physical qualifications. 

(d) Youth and Organizations of Youth. 

In New Zealand and Australia, Masonry continues to 
thrive and progresses satisfactorily. This is testified to by 
the increase in membership and the increase in contributions 
to the Widows', Orphans' and Aged Masons' Fund, as well 
as to the General Benevolent Fund. Under the Southern 
Cross, they believe in tolerance and goodwill in human af- 
fairs, and in the practise of the virtue of charity. 

In Canada, it is regretted, all Grand Lodges show a loss 
in membership except one. This cannot be readily explained. 
Ordinarily the membership must lose because of deaths, 
demits and suspensions. Why are there not others coming- 
forward in sufficient numbers to fill the broken ranks ? Has 
Masonry lost its drawing power? This is one of the condi- 
tions over which all officers and members must ponder 
deeply. 

(c) In this jurisdiction the supervision of Masonry is 
in the hands of Inspectors denominated District Deputy 
Grand Masters. As the Grand Master's personal representa- 
tives, they have certain duties to perform, as laid down in 
the "Constitution". One of these is to submit an annual 
report of the activities in the District which he represents. 

These reports have been reviewed, and they reveal that 
the ritualistic work has been of a high and uniform standard. 
The finances of the lodges have improved and may be con- 
sidered as in good condition. 

In general terms there are two problems that are com- 
mon to many lodges. 

First the question of unpaid dues. In many instances 
the difficulty has been overcome by the indefatigable work 
of the Master and the Secretary. The Master often inherits 
this condition from his predecessor, and makes desperate 
efforts to have the situation altered before his term expires. 
The Secretary, through the summons and by personal con- 
tact, loyally assists the Master. One lodge, with a mem- 
bership of over five hundred, has not a single member in 
arrears. If the members in their everyday lives were keen 
and enthusiastic Masons, such an item as suspension for 
non-payment of dues would be eliminated. 



164 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

The second problem is in regard to lodge attendance, 
Our modern life is so highly organized' that ;^men must select 
one or two activities if they are to "give ^luch time and 
energy to them. We find that many good men. in Masonry 
are the leaders in other organizations. We wonder if these 
men would devote an equal attention to Maso.hry if it would 
not advance and reach a new high' in devotion, enthusiasm 
and accomplishment. 

In other organizations the leaders obtain *to themselves 
a certain amount of notoriety — advertising that may be 
helpful to their personal business as their reward. In 
Masonry no such recompense can be secured. .Our Order, 
because of its nature, can furnish no such, incentive, but the 
fact that a brother does work for the improyement of 
human relationships by upholding the principles of b'rother- 
hood and friendships should bring to him an inner satisfac- 
tion of having accomplished something worthwhile. 

A member's interest in Masonry is indicated by his 
lodge attendance. 

Men never, need urging to do the things they find en- . 
joyable, or from which they may, expect to derive some 
benefit. Must we deduce this lesson from modern attendance 
that men do not find attending lodge either pleasurable or 
profitable ? Poor attendance is due to lack of interest and 
a low appreciation of what Masonry is trying to do. 

Up to a comparatively short time ago, lodge attendance 
was satisfactory because it had little competition. There 
were no sound pictures, no radios, no autos. But now there 
is a vast array of attractions, and unless the lodge meeting 
is to be interesting and inspiring, the beauty of the ritual 
and its lessons alone will hot hold the attendance. 

Men are hungry for Masonic light, and should be given 
in the lodge, information and instruction not readily avail- 
able elsewhere. This is where our Masonic Educational Work 
comes in, and to the Lodge Committee on Education, and to 
the Master we must look for a considerable share of the 
responsibility for building up the attendance. 

Addresses, debates and discussions on topics of interest, 
having direct and peculiar appeal to Masons, will result in 
well attended meetings, with this proviso that such coming 
events are well advertised through the summons and by 
word of mouth. Carefully planned and well presented pro- 
grammes of an instructive nature always have good "draw- 
ing" power. 

Masons should be proud of their membership, and en- 
thusiastic about the Craft. 

It is suggested that the late hours to which Masters 
allow their programmes to extend is detrimental to good 
attendance. When any programme is out of the ordinary, 
a prodigious amount of time is wasted and the brethren leave 
before the meeting is concluded. Can the Masters of each 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 165 

District not get together and arrange that no meeting shall 
go beyond 11.30 p.m., including the banquet and programme? 
This is a matter demanding the serious attention of Masters 
and Wardens. 

The good accomplished in those Districts where there 
are Past Masters', Masters' and Wardens' Associations cannot 
be estimated. It should be possible for such organizations — 

(a) to give leadership, 

(b) to give guidance so that a unity of purpose can be 
obtained, 

(c) to study problems and difficulties, and find the 
proper solutions. 

Lodges of Instruction under the guidance of the District 
Deputy Grand Master, supported by these Associations, can 
do much to improve the quality and uniformity of the work. 
With a beautiful ritual, nothing short of perfection should 
satisfy a Worshipful Master. 

In this jurisdiction many special exercises have been 
conducted. Some to unveil a memorial in tribute to the illus- 
trious dead, or lay a wreath at the tomb of the first Grand 
Master. Others to do honour to the Grand Old Men of 
Masonry who, for over fifty years, carried the torch of Ma- 
sonry. Still others where our Grand Master graced the 
occasion and brought a message of goodwill, hope and en- 
couragement to the faithful. Again to celebrate some an- 
niversary and mark the occasion by a special and substantial 
contribution for local benevolent purposes. In some instances 
amounts varying from $500.00 to $1,000.00 have been placed 
in the Master's keeping for benevolence. Others to say fare- 
well to Masons proceeding on Active Service, and lastly 
those occasions when the brethren muster to attend Divine 
Service. These events, because of the parade, bring the 
members of the Craft into the view of non-Masons and the 
public. The attendance is frequently not impressive, and does 
not do justice to the Society they represent. 

During the war there appears to have been a curtailment 
of the usual social activities. Many members have enlisted 
in the Canadian Active Service Force. The numbers are not 
known, but many lodges have recognized the patriotic ges- 
ture of such enlistments from Masonic ranks by remitting 
the dues of such members during their term of service. 

From time to time some lodge celebrates an important 
anniversary, and some brother delves into past history for 
the lore of the lodge. Much research work and countless 
hours of labour are necessary to obtain the history of the 
lodge concerned. The history is read once at the annivers- 
ary and is apparently forgotten. Such a record is too im- 
portant to be lightly laid aside. Copies should be made and 
deposited with — 

(a) the Grand Secretary, 

(b) the Historian of this Grand Lodge. 



166 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

In this way, these records may be of priceless value in the 
days to come. 

The utmost harmony prevails within our boundaries. 
Everywhere testimony is given to the spirit of co-operation, 
goodwill and friendship that permeates our Masonry. Men 
are ready and eager to set their hands to any task that will 
support the Masonic Pillars. 

In the summer of 1914, Lord Grey standing at the 
window in the Foreign Office spoke the following words — 

"The Lamps are going out all over Europe." 

With deepening anxiety we have seen the growing darkness. 
Brethren, that darkness can be described as a "darkness 
visible" because it has the promise of the returning Light. 
May I quote the poet's prayer — 

GOD GIVE us MEN! 
"God give us men ! A time like this demands 
Strong minds, great hearts, true faith and ready hands ; 
Men whom the lust of office does not kill ; 

Men whom the spoils of office cannot buy ; 
Men who possess an opinion and a will ; 

Men who have honor, men who will not lie ; 
Men who can stand before a demagogue. 

And damn his treacherous flatteries without winking ; 
Tall men, sun-crowned, who live above the fog 

In public duty and in private thinking." 

In concluding this survey, your committee is of the 
opinion that Masonry in this jurisdiction (considering it is 
a year of momentous happenings) has more reason than 
ever to be proud of the eighty-five year old record behind 
it. While appreciating its present satisfactory condition, 
it can be anticipated that excellent progress will be made 
in the future. 

Grand Lodge finances are in a sound condition due to 
good administration, according to modern business methods. 
It has disbursed benevolence wisely and sympathetically, and 
thereby brought solace and happiness where it was sorely 
needed. Through its educational efforts, it has maintained 
the tenets and teachings of old, and held aloft the same 
high ideals of Brotherly Love, Relief and Truth, as guiding 
lights towering over a storm-tossed world. The ancient 
usages, customs and landmarks have been zealously guarded 
and maintained. This report closes with the words of our 
Royal Past Grand Master of the Mother Grand Lodge of 
the World, when the King broadcast to the Empire last 
Christmas a message of hope. 

"I said to a man who stood at the gate of the year, 'Give me a 
light that I may tread safely into the unknown', and he replied. 'Go 
out into the darkness and put your hand into the hand of God. 
That shall be to you better than light and safer than the known 
way'." 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

W. C. N. MARRIOTT, 

Chairman. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 167 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON 
BENEVOLENCE 

The report of this Committee was presented by 
R.W. Bro. T. C. Wardley, and on motion of the 
Deputy Grand Master, seconded by R.W. Bro. T. C. 
Wardley, it was received and adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario: 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

The Board of General Purposes, through the Committee 
on Benevolence, has the honour to report that during the 
year ending May 31st, 1940, there were disbursed in *our 
benevolent work the following amounts: — 
Grants from the General Fund, authorized at the 

last Annual Communication of Grand Lodge $ 75,205.00 

Interim Grants from the General Fund, by the 
Chairman of the Committee on Benevolence, 
with the approval of the President of the 

Board of General Purposes 3,790.00 

Grants from the Interest of the Augmentation 
Fifnd, (Memorial and Semi-Centennial com- 
bined) _ 20,395.00 

Total expended from Grand Lodge Funds $ 99,390.00 

Estimated grants made by Lodges as shown by the 

reports of the D.D.G.M.'s 100,000.00 

Grand total expended for Benevolent Purposes $199,390.00 



At this Annual Communication, your Committee has 
considered a total of 676 applications, of which 105 are new. 
Owing to subsequent changes in the circumstances of the ap- 
plicants 10 are not now necessary. It is recommended that 
22 be declined and that grants be made subject to the in- 
spection of the Supervisor as follows: 

300 Granted through the Local 

Boards amounting to $35,600.00 

344 Granted through the Lodges, 

amounting to 41,200.00 

$76,800.00 
Less estimated reduction by inspection 

and deaths 5,300.00 

$71,500.00 
Interim Gi'ants from the General Fund 

(estimated) 4,500.00 

Total from General Fund $ 76,000.00 



168 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Grants recommended from the Augmen- 
tation Fund at this Communication. $21,100.00 

Less estimated reduction by inspection 

and deaths 1,100.00 

$20,000.00 
Interim grants from the Augmentation 

Fund (estimated) _ 1,000.00 

Total from Augmentation Fund 21,000.00 

Grand Total to be expended from Grand Lodge 

Funds $ 97,000.00 

Your Committee recommends that the subscription to 
the Masonic Relief Association of the United States and 
Canada be continued. The statement of disbursements from 
the Special Emergency Fund, authorized at the last Annual 
Conimunication has been examined. We concur in these dis- 
bursements and recommend that a similar amount of $500.00 
be again authorized. 

In view of the fact that the figures now submitted in- 
dicate that Grand Lodge expenditures on Benevolence show 
a reduction for the fifth consecutive year, we believe that 
the time is opportune to review the activities of your Com- 
mittee over the last ten year period, keeping in mind the 
expansion of the interpretation of the Benevolent Activities 
as expressed and desired by this Grand Lodge. 

In his report to Grand Lodge in 1929, at which time 
our Membership was increasing rapidly and Revenues were 
much more buoyant, M.W. Bro. Harcourt expressed the hope 
that in the future we might be able to do more "in easing 
the last years of older brethren, in lightening the burdens 
laid upon many a widow's heart and in giving orphaned 
children a better opportunity to become useful and self- 
respecting members of Society". Again in 1930, M.W. Bro. 
Copus, as Chairman, reported that it was the duty of the 
Committee to reflect the increasing interest of the Craft, 
"By whatever enlargements are required to speed the day 
when our dependants will find in Masonry, not only an 
Almoner with a generous purse, but also a warm-hearted, 
sympathetic and personal touch". Both of these reports 
were accepted and approved by Grand Lodge and your Com- 
mittee, during these last ten years, without doubt, the most 
difficult from a financial standpoint, have endeavoured 
to carry out and interpret your conception of Masonic 
Benevolence. 

In 1930, we spent from Grand Lodge Funds. $115,000.00 
and until 1934 there was an annual increase, until we reached 
a peak of $122,000.00. From then on there has been a de- 
crease each year until we report this year an outlay of 
$99,400.00. The Funds at our disposal come chiefly from 
Grand Lodge annual revenues and this Grand Lodge has 
never curtailed the expenditures of the Committee on Be- 
nevolence nor has it even suggested that there should be 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 169 

a reduction or revision in our estimates. This should be 
emphasized so that all may readily understand that the 
reduction in Grand Lodge Benevolent expenditures has not 
been at the expense of those who are "in our care and keep- 
ing". 

There are good and sufficient reasons for the reduction 
in our Benevolent Budget. In 1931, a radical change was 
instituted in our Supervision and Inspection. It was recog- 
nized that the hopes and aims, yes, the definite' instructions 
to the Committee from Grand Lodge could not be otherwise 
realized. A careful and thorough survey of all applications 
was made, new plans were laid for more adequate inspection, 
and it was decided that our dependants must take advantage 
of all other possible sources of income. 

As a result of that Inspection, Supervision and Guidance) 
we have aided dependants to avail themselves to the 
proper degree of assistance to which they were entitled, not 
only from Social Legislation but from other sources. Govern- 
mental and Domestic' ■ This has meant an increase of at 
least $20,000.00 in the Annual Income of our dependants. 
Your' Committee, of course, can take no credit for this, other 
than the fact that these sources of income v/hich had been 
previously available were not utilized until the survey made 
by our Supervisor. ■ lii.. 

In recent years, we have indicated in our report a 
marked extension in "Constructive Benevolence", in the 
outlay for the Education of our dependant children. This 
investment in these children has given a profitable return 
to the finances of Grand Lodge, as the improved Educational 
standing, has increased their earning power and relieved 
Grand Lodge, in many cases, of further grants to other 
members of their families. We have also learned that Advice 
and Counsel to many widows and orphans have assisted in 
conserving Financial resources, not only for the present, but 
also for the future. It is difficult to estimate the actual 
reductions by these extensive activities but we are satisfied 
that Grand Lodge funds are now being conserved to the 
extent of several thousand dollars and with the continuance 
of this form of Benevolence we anticipate even greater 
success in the future. In concluding this reference to our 
financial operations, we desire to emphasize that, never in 
our history were our dependants receiving more generous 
and constructive assistance. Ten years ago, no funds were 
available for the education of our children. To-day, v.-e are 
furnishing to a greater extent, expert and specialist medical 
attention and, as never before, a personal guidance, the 
value of which cannot be assessed in cash. 

While it may seem like reiteration, your Committee 
again emphasizes the necessity of there being established in 
each Lodge a permanent Benevolent Fund and, we again 
point out that it is only by such a Fund that a full measure 
of co-operation can be given to the Committee bv th6 



170 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Constituent Lodges, Your Committee regrets that reports 
presented to Grand Lodge and distributed to all of the 
Lodges, are apparently read by very few and that informa- 
tion instructive to the Membership is not made available 
to all in the Jurisdiction. 

During the difficult financial period from 1931 to 1935, 
some Lodges were actually unable to make adequate grants 
to dependants for whom they were requesting Grand Lodge 
help, and with the approval of Grand Lodge, your Committee 
took a sympathetic attitude to such Lodges. Since that time 
most of the Lodges involved have shown a splendid improve- 
ment but, we regret to report that there are a number where 
the grants are entirely inadequate to meet the responsibility 
of the constituent Lodge. This is a problem difficult to solve 
by rule or regulation, which in its application might seriously 
impair essential Benevolence. 

Your Committee has never, during the last few years 
had any doubts or fears about obtaining all the financial 
support required from the Masons of this Jurisdiction but, 
again, we appeal for a fuller understanding from the Mem- 
bership of what has been done in the past and of our hopes 
and expectations for the future. We know that the heart of 
Masonry is sound in this Jurisdiction, but it is the responsi- 
bility of the Constituent Lodges to give the members a 
greater opportunity for Service in this great Masonic Enter- 
prise. 

Fraternally submitted, 

T. C. WARDLEY, 

Chairman. 



REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON 
PETITION OF WELLINGTON LODGE No. 271 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario: 

Most Worshipful Sir: 

Your Committee composed of R.W. Bro. T. H. Reburn 
and R.W. Bro. J. A. Leslie wishes to report on the petition 
of Wellington Lodge No. 271, Erin, to be transferred from 
Grey District to Wellington District. 

Your Committee met at Erin on the 16th of May, 1940, 
and after considering the petition of Wellington Lodge and 
hearing the representations made in support of such petition, 
is of the opinion that it would be in the best interests of 
Wellington Lodge on account of its geographical location 
to grant the prayer. Your Committee therefore recommends 
that the prayer of Wellington Lodge be granted and that 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1940 171 

Wellington Lodge be transferred from Grey District to 
Wellington District. 

Fraternally submitted, 
J. A. LESLIE, 

D.D.G.M. Wellington District, 

T. H. REBURN, 

D.D.G.M. Grey District. 

On motion of the Deputy Grand Master, second- 
ed by R.W. Bro. J. A. Leslie, the report was received 
and adopted. 

GUEST SPEAKS 

The Grand Master introduced M.W. Bro. William 
E. Hanmer, Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of 
Connecticut who said that he brought most cordial 
greetings from a jurisdiction having 128 lodges with 
a total membership of 34,550 which tried to make 
up for numbers with Masonic friendly greetings 
within its borders. He was received with much 
applause. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE 
FRATERNAL DEAD 

This report was presented by R.W. Bro. Smith 
Shaw, Chairman, and on motion of the Deputy 
Grand Master, seconded by R.W. Bro. Smith Shaw, 
it was received and adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario: 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

To-day it is our duty to pay our tribute of respect to 
our brethren who have faithfully served this Grand Lodge, 
and have passed to the undiscovered country that lies beyond 
the hills of death. 

The disappointments of life are very hard to bear. As 
for its losses, its bereavements, its sorrows, they belong 
to the privacies of the heart, that secret battlefield where 
the fight must be fought out alone. 



172 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

How commonplace a reflection, that to be in the midst 
of life is to be in the midst of danger. Yet we need to come 
back to these stern commonplaces now and then. 

We can indulge our partiality for errant speculations 
and newly-coined philosophies when we are in the best of 
health and spirits; but when the day of trouble comes, and 
we begin to feel how tragic life is, and the wind that blows 
from the Valley of Shadow has made us catch our breath, 
we come back to realities, we seek the Solid Rock on which 
to stand. 

The day of trouble is a day we all dread. It is one thing 
to look at it .from the outside, to be a spectator and say 
how other people should behave themselves under its pres- 
sure; it is another thing altogether to come through its 
heavy hours on one's own account. 

We see another man's trouble, and we think that we 
can explain it; we have our pet interpretation ready, we 
produce our little cut-and-dried philosophy, and offer him 
our "Vacant Chaff, well-meant for grain." 

It is all but impossible for some people to remain silent; 
for them, that is the final miracle. They were born with a 
distracting eloquence; they think they can cure a wound by 
talking about it; they have not the healing gift of silence. 

The last thing a man wants in his day of trouble is a 
flood of talk. You cannot do anything for him with your 
fluent orthodoxy; you may do everything for him by your 
silent sympathy. 

What he wants for the present is the kindly glance, 
the Masonic grip, the sympathetic presence. 

We dread the day of trouble, and yet who would be 
without it ? This is the other side of the Shield. It is iron on 
the one side; it is silver on the other. The lives all sunshine 
and blue sky are not the greatest, deepest, most impressive 
lives. Climates all tropical glory and luxuriance do not 
produce the noblest, hardiest characters. It is the northern 
countries, where the grey mist comes down, and the sea 
fogs rise, and the skies are often black with cloud, that 
create the characters v/ho move the world and lead mankind. 
Men who have to wage a constant warfare with the elements 
come to have some of Nature's own strength and grandeur 
and independence added to their own. 

It is precisely so with moral and spiritual experience. 

Whose hand writes the greatest book in the world? 
The hand of Sorrow. If you could take out of the world 
all the pages that Sorrow has written, you would impoverish . 
the human heart to an incredible degree. 

It is not for us to say what form the Divine answer 
to human woe will take. It may come in a form we little 
suspect — in the drawing together of hearts estranged; in the 
deepening of sympathy; in the quickening of thought, in the 
setting free of nobler impulses; in the creation of a wider 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 173 

'' outlook; in making the invisible world more home-like 
through the passing of those we love into it. 

Death is often pictured in a stern repulsive form. It 
comes, of course, in a commanding manner. We have all 

■ to face death, but it wears a dignified and peaceful aspect. 

My favourite thought recognizes Death as the kind 
nurse who says, now then, you must sleep, and wake up in 

■ the morning. 

Christianity transforms and transfigures Death from an 
enemy into a visored friend. 

We look out upon the red plains of Europe to-day, 
trembling v/ith the tramp of armed millions; shaking with 
the shock of battle. We see the black war-clouds rolling up 
the sky, and we say, "Watchman, what of the night?" Can 
the sentinel say, "All's Well." We may hear him say it, but 
another generation must interpret the full meaning of the 
verdict. Meanwhile, our Kith and Kin are too near the strife; 
too deafened by the tumult; too stunned and dismayed with 
suspense and sorrow, to be able to endorse the Watchman's 
"All's Well" with an emphatic endorsement. 

Nothing but a strong trust in God will enable us to say 
of this tremendous conflict, "I know that this will turn to 
our deliverance." It will "turn." It will cost us much, but 
it will "turn." We are fighting for the future, and our 
children will reap the benefit of a Europe delivered from 
the dominion of brute force, saved from the curse of Hitler- 
ism, and free to pursue the arts of a peace which flow from 
goodwill amongst men. The darkest day this world has ever 
seen; "The darkest cloud earth ever stretched," shall break 
in blessing when the Most High has pierced it with the sun- 
shine of His Love, 

Then perhaps we shall see that. 

"Out of the Shadow of Nisrht 
The World rolls into Light. 

It is daybreak every where." 

The following list contains the names of those Past and 
Present Grand Lodge Officers whose deaths are noted on 
our records as having occurred during the past year: 



174 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



QIlirBr OJablrt ^ag^B 

are inBrribrd vmh fraterttallii liedtrateli 
in mpmory of 

(iur SFparlri Irrtlir^n 



M.W. BRO. W. N. PONTON, P.G.M., Belleville Lodge, No. 
123, Belleville. Died September 6th, 1939. 

R.W. BRO. J. W. J. ANDREW. P.G. Chap., St. Thomas 
Lodge, No. 44, St. Thoma. Died September 19th' 1939. 

R.W. BRO. G. A. AYLSWORTH P.D.D.G.M., Prince of 
Wales Lodge, No. 146, Newburg. Died November 30th, 
1939. 

R.W. BRO. W. F. BILGER, P.D.D.G.M.. Doric Lodge, No. 
316, Toronto. Died August 9th, 1939. 

R.W. BRO. A. L. BURCH, P.G. Chap., Kilwinning Lodge, 
No. 565, Toronto. Died November 23rd, 1939. 

R.W. BRO. R. J. CAMPBELL, P.D.D.G.M.. Northern Light 
Lodge. No 266, Stayner. Died July 5th, 1940 

R.W. BRO. D. B. DEWAR, P.D.D.G.M., Temple Lodge, No. 
324, Hamilton. Died October 29th, 1939. 

R.W. BRO. J. G. FENNELL, P.D.D.G.M,, Union Lodge, 
No 9, Napanee. Died January 4th, 1940. 

R.W. BRO. R. N. ERASER. P.D.D.G.M., Tecumseh Lodge, 
No. 245, Thamesville. Died March 4th. 1940. 

R.W. BRO. HOWARD GOVER, P.D.D.G.M., Karnak Lodge, 
No. 492, Coldwater. Died July 12th, 1940. 

R.W. BRO. E. H. D. HALL. P.D.D.G.M.. Corinthian Lodge, 
No. 101. Peterborough. Died September 28th, 1939. 

R.W. BRO. J. C. HEGLER, P.D.D.G.M.. St. John's Lodge, 
No. 68, Ingersoll. Died June 14th, 1940. 

R.W. BRO. F. E. HOWITT, P.G. Chap.. Temple Lodge. 
No. 324, Hamilton. Died August 25th. 1939. 

R.W. BRO. A. C. HUTCHINSON. P.D.D.G.M., Fordwich 
Lodge. No. 331. Fordwich. Died April 29th, 1940. 

R.W. BRO. R. B. HUTT. P.D.D.G.M.. King Hiram Lodge. 
No. 37, Ingersoll. Died November 16th, 1939. 

R.W. BRO. A. B. HYNDMAN, P.D.D.G.M., Carleton Lodge. 
No. 465, Carp. Died April 9th, 1940. 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1940 176 



R.W, BRO. C. E. JEAKINS, P.G. Chap., Tuscan Lodge. 
No. 195, London. Died May 22nd, 1940. 

R.W. BRO. SIDNEY JOHNSTON, P.D.D.G.M., Faithful 
Brethren Lodge, No. 77, Lindsay. Died March 23rd. 
1940. 

R.W. BRO. T. E. KAISER, P.D.D.G.M.. Cedar Lodge, No. 
270, Oshawa Died February 29th, 1940. 

R.W. BRO. WELLINGTON KEFFER, P.D.D.G.M., New 
Hope Lodge, No. 379, Hespeler. Died March 14th, 1940. 

R.W. BRO. D. McCAUGHRIN. P.G. Registrar, Peel Lodge, 
No. 468, Caledon East. Died June 12th, 1940. 

R.W. BRO. J. J. Mcknight, P.D.D.G.M.. Tottenham Lodge, 
No. 467, Tottenham. Died December 22nd, 1939. 

R.W. BRO. J. W. MERRICK P.D.D.G.M., Kerr Lodge, No. 
230, Barrie. Died February 22nd, 1940. 

R.W. BRO. R. J. M. PERKINS, P.G. Chap., Victory Lodge, 
No. 563, Chatham. Died May 2nd, 1940. 

R.W. BRO. R. H. REVELL, P.D.D.G.M., Windsor Lodge, 
No. 403, Windsor. Died February 24th, 1940. 

R.W. BRO. R. F. RICHARDSON. P.G. Registrar, Beaver 
Lodge, No. 83, Strathroy. Died June 9th, 1940. 

R.W. BRO. T. E. ROBSON, P.D.D.G.M.. Henderson Lodge, 
No 388, Ilderton. Died February 17th, 1940. 

R.W. BRO. J. A. RYCKMAN, P.D.D.G.M.. Talbot Lodge. 
No. 546, St. Thomas. Died November 30th. 1939. 

R.W. BRO. R. A. STEPHENS, P.D.D.G.M., Kerr Lodge. 
No. 230, Barrie. Died February 26th, 1940. 

R.W. BRO. C. H. STRINGER, P.D.D.G.M.. Adoniram Lodge, 
No. 573, Niagara Falls. Died March 7th. 1940. 

R.W. BRO. A. M. TAYLOR, P.D.D.G.M.. Golden Star Lodge. 
No. 484, Dryden. Died September 14th. 1939. 

R.W. BRO. J. B. TIERNAY, Blyth Lodge, No. 303, Blyth. 
Died January 31st, 1940. 

R.W. BRO. WILLIAM WHEELER, P.D.D.G.M., Mountain 
Lodge, No. 221, Thorold. Died April 6th, 1940. 

» 

R.W. BRO. H. R. YOUNG, P.G. Chap., Fairbank Lodge, No. 
592, Toronto. Died June 10th, 1940. 

V.W. BRO. JAMES ALLEN, P.G.S., Doric Lodge, No. 121, 
Brantford. Died December 30th, 1939. 

V.W. BRO. D. S. BALE, P.G.S.B., Wilson Lodge, No. 113, 
Waterford. Died April 8th, 1940. 



176 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



V.W. BRO. R. E. BURNS, P.G.S., Anciant St. Johns 
Lodge, No. 3, Kingston. Di-ed October 1st, 1939. 

V.W:. BRO. A. G. CORSCADDEN, P.G.S.B.. Imperial Lodge, 
No. 543, Toronto. Died February 16th, 1940. 

V.W. BRO. A. B. CASTELL, P.G.O., Cedar Lodge, No. 
396, Wiarton. Died May 18th, 1940.- 

V.W. BRO. J. T. CHITTICK, P.G.S.B., Wentworth Lodge, 
No. 166, Stoney Creek. Died September 2nd, 1939. 

V.W. BRO. V. B. COLEMAN, P.G.S.B., Hope Lodge, No. 
114, Port Hope. Died April 14th, 1940. 

V.W. BRO. VICTOR BE CARLE, P.G.S., Sussex Lodge, 
No. 5, Brockville. Died July 13th, 1939. 

V.W. BRO. JOB DUDLEY, P.A.G.O., Algoma Lodge. No. 
469, Saulte Ste. Marie. Died December 24th, 1939. 

V.W. BRO. W. M. GEMMEL, P.A.G. Sec, Humber Lodge, 
No. 305, Weston. Died March 28th, 1940. 

V.W. BRO. W. J. HAMBLY, P.G.D. of C, King Solomon's 
Lodge, No. 22, Toronto. Died November 25th, 1939. 

V.W. BRO. E. T. HUSTON, P.G.S., Lome Lodge, No. 292. 
Glencoe. Died June 29th, 1939. 

V.W. BRO. W. A. LOGAN, P.G.S., Royal Arthur Lodge, 
No. 523, Peterborough. Died March 1st, 1940. 

V.W. BRO. J. G. MUIR, P.G.O., Tuscan Lodge, No. 99, 
Newmarket. Died August 19th, 1939, 

V.W. BRO. T. W. NEEDHAM, P.G.S.B., Middlesex Lodge, 
No. 379, Bryanston. Died July 28th, 1939. 

V.W. BRO. A. E. RAYNES, P.A.G.D. of C, King Hiram 
Lodge, No. 78, Tillsonburg . Died April 9th, 1940. 

V.W. BRO. W. E. ROBERTSON, P.G.J.D.. Ashlar Lodge, 
No. 247, Toronto. Died August 6th. 1939. 

V.W. BRO. MALCOLM SINCLAIR, P.G.T., Melita Lodge. 
No. 605, Toronto. Died July 24th, 1939. 

V.W. BRO. JOHN THOMSON, P.G.S., Transportation Lodge, 
No. 583, Toronto. Died September 18th, 1939. 

V.W. BRO. J. M. WALLACE, P.G.S., Tuscan Lodge. No. 
551, Hamilton. Died February 22nd, 1940. 

V.W. BRO. C. L, WILSON, P.G.J.D.. Metropolitan Lodge, 
No. 542, Toronto. Died April 24th, 1940. 

V.W. BRO. J. H. C. WOODWARD, P.G.S., Acacia Lodge, 
No. 580, London. Died February 1st, 1940. 



Most Worshipful Brother 
William Nisbet Ponton, Past Grand Master 

At Sidney Cottage, the more than century old ancestral 
Ponton homestead on the shores of the Bay of Quinte, 
Masonry lost a great patriot who stooped beneath the arch 
of years and was exalted by the Great Jehovah unto ever- 
lasting life on September 6th, 1939. William Nisbet Ponton 
passed away in his 85th year. He was a spirit always benign, 
a nobleman who possessed an insight always discerning, and 
a philosophy of his duties ever wholesome. He served Grand 
Lodge well and long, and, while his body has been committed 
to the earth, we will keep ever green his sainted memory 
in our hearts. 

He was probably the most enthusiastic Mason of our 
day and generation; inspiring, convincing, iluent, and was 
able to lift his hearers to a high plane of thought as his 
mind was stored with the best utterances of the greatest 
writers of all time and which he was a peer in reproducing 
without effort. A fervent patriot, loyalist and imperialist, 
his addresses teemed with references to our duty to King 
and Empire, which he identified with the duties of a Mason. 

In Masonry he had many affiliations and affections: — 
Initiated in Belleville Lodge, No. 123; exalted in Moira 
Chapter, No. 7; installed a Knight Templar in King Baldwin 
Preceptory and elected an Honorary Member of many 
Ontario Lodges and Chapters because of his popularity. In 
1919 and 1920 he was Grand Z. of the Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada, which office he filled with distinction and was 
Grand Representative of the State of Georgia. Immediately 
following, he served as Grand Master of the Grand Lodge 
of Canada in 1921 and 1922. He represented the State of 
Massachusetts in the Grand Body. Possibly his greatest 
achievement was his Reviews of Sister and Foreign Juris- 
dictions, both in Grand Chapter and in Grand Lodge, which 
duty he performed for many years, a work most favorably 
received throughout the Masonic world. Although unable 
to hold a pen, he produced, during the last year of his life, 
a volume of 300 pages. 

He was born in Thurlow Township, adjoining the then 
town of Belleville on the 22nd of January, 1855, and while 
still a young man the family moved to the western outskirts 
of the town to the old residence which had the historical dis- 
tinction of having housed for one night Sir Isaac Brock while 
on his way to Queenston heights in 1812. This circumstance, 
slight in itself, was yet far-reaching, and of great signi- 
ficance in awakening in young Ponton's mind an imperialistic 
trend which grew in intensity, as he advanced in years, as 
loyalty to the Motherland was his favourite theme through- 
out his entire life. 

His early education commenced in his native city, Belle- 
ville, and continued with many honours in Upper Canada 

gutted as a public speaker and exceVtronaliy wel, Te^rseT"! 



Co ege, University of Toronto, The Law School and Military 
College. A member of the Senate of the University of 
Toronto, a Governor of Upper Canada College, a Bencher 
ot the Law Society of Upper Canada and a retired honorarv 
colonel of the old 15th Regiment, Colonel Ponton was most 
widely known not only in his native province but also in 
the adjoining Eepublic and the British Isles through his 
connection with the Masonic Order. 

He was a staunch Presbyterian and took an important 
part m all the activities of St. Andrew's Church, Belleville. 
,. .A^, we recall his diversified activities and the un- 
diminished vigor with which he pursued them even after 
passing his four score years, we are reminded of a favorite 
Si "°" "^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^"^^^ winter, frosty but 

The following is a partial list of his civil achieve- 
ments: — 

In 1873, at the age of eighteen years, he edited the 
Upper Canada College Times and later was an Associate 
Hiditor of Varsity as well as being a constant contributor 
and writer to the pages of many weekly and monthly publi- 
cstions. 

In 1877 and 1878 he received the B.A. and M.A. degrees ' 
at Toronto University. 

In 1880 he was called to the Bar; in 1908 he was made a 
King s Counsel and was at one time First Vice-President of 
the Ontario Bar Association. 

In 1906 and again 1912 he was delegate to the Empire 
meetings of the Chambers of Commerce and spoke at Guild 
Mali, London, Edinburgh, and other places. 

He served four years as alderman and thirty-five years 
as member of the Board of Education, two years of which 
he was Chairman, and also a member of the executive of 
the Board of Trade. 

Right Worshipful Brother J. W. J. Andrew 

St. Thomas lost one of its most revered citizens and 
Masonry an honoured member in the death of R W Bro 
J. W. J. Andrew on September 19th, 1939. Rector of Trinity 
Anglican Church for nearly a quarter of a century, the Veii. 
Archdeacon Andrew was an outstanding cleric in the Diocese 
of Huron, and his tolerance and forebearance and deep sense 
of humanity made him beloved and respected by the people 
of all creeds. He was undenominational in his kindliness and 
his interest m human-kind. His field of endeavour was very 
wide and included service in the St. Thomas Board of Edu- 
cation and m the St. Thomas and Elgin Children's Aid 
Society. 

T ^^^.T7M^. ^i^^ston about 75 years ago, he was christened 
James William John. After graduating from Wycliffe Col- 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 179 

lege, Toronto, he served in the mission fields of the Rainy 
River District in the days when the north country was a 
virgin wilderness and carried the message of Christianity to 
the pioneer settlers and the aborigines. His first charge 
was in Hamilton as rector of St. George's church. From 
there he went to Trinity Church in Aylmer where he was 
married. Then he was Rector of St. John's Church in 
Kitchener for 15 years before entering upon his 24 years of 
ministry in St. Thomas. 

R.W. Bro. Andrew had a notable career in Masonry for 
many years. A Past Master of Grand River Lodge, No. 151, 
Kitchener, he affiliated with St. Thomas Lodge, No. 44, in 
February, 1917. In 1918 he was elected Grand Chaplain. 
He had taken a keen interest in capitular Masonry and was 
a 32nd degree Scottish Riter. He was also one of the 
founders of the St. Thomas District Past Masters' Associ- 
ation. 

Right Worshipful Brother George Anson Aylsworth 

A sincere tribute to the memory of George Anson Ayls- 
worth, one of Newburg's oldest and most highly esteemed 
residents, who passed away in the Kingston General Hos- 
pital, Thursday, November 30, 1939, was paid, Saturday 
afternoon, when the funeral service was held from his late 
residence, Newburg. The Masonic Fraternity, of which he 
had been a member since 1884, was largely represented, and 
in addition to the presence of W. S. Herrington, K.C., Past 
Grand Master, there were present William Chapman, Kings- 
ton, District Deputy Grand Master and nine Past District 
Deputy Grand Masters. 

The Masonic brethren gathered at the lodge room and 
with W. Bro. Joseph Lewis, Marshal, and W. Bro. Fred 
Shortts, Director of Ceremonies, proceeded to the residence 
which was filled with relatives and friends. The services at 
the house and at the cemetery were conducted by Rev. E. 
F. Swayne of the United Church, of which Bro. Aylsworth 
had been a life-long member, assisted by Rev. Canon R. 
W. Spencer, Rector of St. John's Church. Following the 
regular service the Masons held their service conducted by 
M.W. Bro. W. S. Herrington and R.W. Bro. William Chap- 
man. There was a wealth of floral tributes. 

A Mason for nearly 56 years, Bro. Aylsworth, a few 
years after becoming a member, was elected to the highest 
office in the gift of his mother lodge. Prince of Wales, New- 
burg, by being chosen Worshipful Master. A few years later 
he was honored by Frontenac District by being elected 
District Deputy Grand Master. He was Secretary of 
Prince of Wales Lodge for some years and since 1926 
had been Treasurer. Until recent years he was a frequent 
visitor to various lodges in Frontenac District and being 
gifted as a public speaker and exceptionally well versed in 



180 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Masonry his addresses were always heard with much interest 
by the brethren in the District lodges. 

Bro. Aylsworth had one of the finest libraries in the 
County. He was born on a farm north of Newburg and prac- 
tically his entire life had been spent in and around Newburg. 
For five years he was Reeve of Newburg and represented 
his village in the County Council. He was offered the War- 
denship but declined. A man of intellectual attainments and 
well like by a large circle of friends, he will be greatly 
missed and Newburg, by his passing, has lost one of its 
outstanding citizens. 



Right Worshipful Brother W. F. Bilger 

R.W. Bro. William F. Bilger affiliated with Doric Lodge 
from St. Andrews Lodge, No. 16, on July 20th, 1899. He 
was installed Worshipful Master of Doric Lodge in 1908. 

He was elected D.D.G.M. of Toronto District 11 in 1912 
at which time Toronto consisted of two districts. No. 11 and 
No. IIA. 

R.W. Bro. Bilger was associated here in Toronto with 
the Montreal Star, and in 1916 moved to Montreal to assume 
the position of Advertising Manager for the Dominion 
Rubber Co. He died in Dunnville, Ont., on August 9th, 1939. 

He endeared himself to all who came in contact with 
him. 

Right Worshipful Brother A. L. Burch 

A life of devoted Christian service was closed with the 
passing of R.W. Bro. Arthur L. Burch at St. Andrew's 
Manse, Scarboro, in his 72nd year, on Nov. 23rd, 1939. Of 
mingled French and Scottish ancestry, he was born on a 
farm near the village of St. Ann's in the Niagara District. 
After obtaining the B.A. Degree at the University of 
Toronto, and subsequently studying Theology at Knox Col- 
lege, he accepted a call to the ministry of the Orangeville 
Presbyterian Church. Later he became associated with the 
work of theological colleges in both Eastern and Western 
Canada, and for a time resided in Vancouver, B.C. When 
the Great War broke out in 1914, with the rank of Major, 
he went to the front as a senior Chaplain and up to the time 
of the signing of the armistice, rendered heroic service in 
France. He was a brave patriot and a member of a patri- 
otic family as attested by the fact that his farmer father 
was a Major in the Canadian Militia, and his brother, also 
a Major, made the supreme sacrifice in the South African 
War. After the war, R.W. Bro. Burch accepted a call to the 
pulpit of the century-old St. Andrew's Church in Scarboro, 
and continued to minister to its congregation up to the time 
of his fatal, illness. It was during this ministry that Knox 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 181 

College conferred upon him the degree of D.D. (honoris 
causa). 

At the age of 21, when he was a school teacher, R.W. 
Bro. Burch was initiated in Ivy Lodge, No. 115, Beamsville, 
in 1889. He affiliated with St. John's Lodge, No. 209A, 
London, in 1892. In 1903 he affiliated with Harris Lodge, 
No. 216, Orangeville. In Vancouver he affiliated with Mount 
Hermon Lodge, No. 7, G.E.B.C, and after his return from 
overseas he affiliated with General Mercer Lodge, No. 548, 
Toronto and became a charter member and first Junior 
Warden of Kilwinning Lodge, No. 565, Toronto. In 1926 he 
was elected Grand Chaplain. His efficient service, his de- 
votion to duty while filling the Warden's chairs and sub- 
sequently that of Worshipful Master, and his pleasing per- 
sonality endeared him to the brethren of Kilwinning, and 
it was an inspiration to them that even after his removal 
from the city, to the scene of his ministerial duties in Scar- 
boro, he continued to be a fairly regular attendant at lodge 
meetings although the round trip was about forty miles. 

Once each year, he set apart a Sunday in June to preach 
a special sermon to his Masonic brethren. To this annual 
service the members of Kilwinning in large numbers motored 
to St. Andrew's, donned their regalia in the beautiful grounds 
which surround the historic Church and Manse, and enjoyed 
an eloquent discourse from the lips of their gifted Past 
Master who chose his last resting place in the cemetery 
beside the Church in which he had finished his career as a 
Minister. 

Present at the funeral were a large number of Masons, 
including four of the surviving Past Grand Masters — M.W. 
Bros. John A. Rowland, R. B. Dargavel, A. J. Anderson, and 
W. J. Dunlop. 

Right Worshipful Brother Robert John Campbell 

R.W. Bro. Robert John Campbell, Past District Deputy 
Grand Master of Georgian District, Grand Representative 
near our Grand Lodge of the Grand Lodge of Nebraska, 
passed to the Grand Lodge Above on July 5th, 1940, at the 
age of sixty-five. He was a member of Northern Light 
Lodge, No. 266, Stayner, and was Worshipful Master of his 
Mother Lodge for three successive years, 1915, 1916 and 
1917. 

R.W. Bro. Campbell was the proprietor of the general 
store in the little village of Duntroon. He knew everyone 
and was known by everyone. He was of the most kindly 
disposition and most obliging in all his dealings. "A man 
he was to all the country dear", as was amply demonstrated 
by the numbers who came on Sunday, July 6th, to pay a 
last sad tribute of respect to his memory. 

The funeral service was held in St. Paul's Presbyterian 
Church, Duntroon, and was conducted by the three clergy- 



182 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

men of the village. From the Minister of Education to the 
humblest inhabitant, all seemed to feel that R.W. Bro. Camp- 
bell was the one who had done most to maintain the life 
of the community at a high standard. Northern Light Lodge 
conducted the Masonic Funeral Ceremony. 



Right Worshipful Brother David Burton Dewar 

Hamilton lost on October 29th, 1939 one of its oldest 
Masons. Death removed to the Grand Lodge Above a highly 
respected and revered brother in the person of R.W. Bro. 
David B, Dewar at the age of 92 years. 

He was initiated in Temple Lodge, No. 324, Hamilton 
on Oct. 23rd, 1876. He moved from Hamilton and took up 
residence at Kitchener, joined and became quite active in 
Grand River Lodge, No. 151, having filled the oflFice of Wor- 
shipful Master in the year 1883. He was honoured by being 
elected D.D.G.M. for the Wellington District in 1884. 

In business he was a bank manager and held many high 
and varied positions. And on retirement he came back to 
Hamilton where for the last twenty years he lived a quiet 
and retiring life after a life well spent. 

Our worthy brother received the Veteran's Jewel some 
years ago. At the time of his death he was the oldest mem- 
ber of Hiram Chapter No. 2, R.A.M. He was advanced April 
16th, 1877 and was made a Life Member Nov. 8th, 1905. 
The funeral was largely attended by his former associates 
by whom he was held in the highest esteem. 



Right Worshipful Brother John G. Fennell 

For many years, R.W. Bro. John G. Fennel, P.D.D.G.M. 
conducted a hardware business in the town of Napanee, the 
place of his birth, afterwards filling the offices of Tax Col- 
lector and Secretary of the Board of Education until 1934 
when he retired to live with his son at Mount Clemens, 
Mich., U.S.A., where he died on Jan. 4th, 1940, age 86 years. 

He took a very active part in Masonry, having been 
initiated in Union Lodge, No. 9, Napanee, on Aug. 5th, 1881, 
served as Worshipful Master in 1895, as Secretary 1922-1935, 
and D.D.G.M. of Frontenac District in 1923. 

He was a member of Mount Sinai Chapter No. 44, 
R.A.M. and served as First Principal in 1896, and Grand 
Superintendent Prince Edward District No. 11 in 1903. He 
was a member of King Baldwin Preceptory, Knights Templar 
No. 6, Belleville, and served as Preceptor in 1926-27. He 
was also a member of Rameses Temple, Toronto, Kingston 
District Shrine Club, and the Ancient and Accepted Scottish 
Rite, Hamilton. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 183 

Right Worshipful Brother R. N. Fraser 

R.W. Bro. R. N. Fraser died in Vancouver, March 4th, 
1940. He was initiated in Tecumseh Lodge, Thamesville, in 
1889, was Worshipful Master in 1893 and District Deputy 
Grand Master of Erie District, No. 1, in 1907. He retired 
in 1933. 

In Vancouver, Dr. Fraser took a prominent part in 
municipal affairs, having represented Point Gray in the 
Council. He affiliated with the University Lodge, Vancouver, 
but never severed his connection with his Mother Lodge in 
Thamesville. In January, 1939, R.W. Bro. Fraser was pre- 
sented with a fifty year Veteran's Jewel. He was an out- 
standing Mason and was one of the few who in the early 
days helped lay the foundation of Masonry in Kent and 
Essex Counties. 

Right Worshipful Brother Howard Govcr 

R.W. Bro. Howard Gover passed to the Grand Lodge 
Above July 12th, 1940. He was a Past Master of Karnak 
Lodge No. 492, Coldwater, and was District Deputy Grand 
Master of the Georgian District in 1932-33. His funeral in 
St. Mathias Church, Coldwater, under Masonic auspices, was 
largely attended, demonstrating the high regard in which 
R.W. Bro. Gover was held by all who knew him. He was 
an ardent churchman, a lay delegate to the Synod of the 
Diocese of Toronto, and a pillar of his church in Coldwater. 
For many years he was a Magistrate for the district in 
which he lived and performed the duties of his office in an 
impartial and thoroughly upright manner. He was a citizen 
highly esteemed in his own community. 

As a Mason, R.W. Bro. Gover showed a deep interest 
in the affairs of his lodge and of his district; he was an 
enthusiastic promoter of Masonic Education. As District 
Deputy Grand Master of one of the large Districts in the 
Jurisdiction, he earned the applause and won the affection 
of his brethren. The Craft has sustained a great loss in the 
passing of this loyal, faithful, and energetic Mason. 

Right Worshipful Brother E. H. D. Hall 

Edward Harry Douglas Hall, K.C., of Peterborough, the 
oldest practising barrister in Canada, died in the City of 
Peterborough on the 28th of September, 1939, in his eighty- 
ninth year and in the sixty-fourth year of his Masonic life. 

R.W. Bro. Hall was a son of James Hall, at one time 
member of the Dominion Parliament, and subsequently 
Sheriff of the United Counties of Peterborough and Victoria. 
With the exception of two or three years in Western Canada, 
his whole life was spent in the City of Peterborough. He, 
at all times, evidenced the keenest interest in that city, and 



184 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

was a great factor in its industrial development. He was, in a 
very large degree, responsible for the establishment of the 
numerous beautiful parks to be found in the city. 

During the whole of his professional life, he enjoyed 
a very extensive practice and the confidence and goodwill of 
a widespread clientel. He was City Solicitor for many years, 
retiring from that office in 1914, but retaining, at the re- 
quest of the Mayor and Aldermen, his position as solicitor 
for the City Trust and Utilities Commission. 

R.W. Bro. Hall's career in Masonry was very outstand- 
ing. He was elected Master of Corinthian Lodge No. 101, 
Peterborough, three years after his entry into Masonry and 
for sixty years he was a Past Master of his Mother Lodge. 
Until two years previous to his death, he was found fre- 
quently taking part in the work of the Lodge. 

He was elected District Deputy Grand Master of Ontario 
District. He entered with energy and devotion into the work 
of Corinthian Chapter, No. 36, R.A.M., and the work of 
Moore Preceptory No. 13, attaining the office of Prior and 
Knight Templar, and during the reign of the late King 
Edward VII, he was appointed by that Sovereign, a Knight 
Commander. He was also an Honorary Member of Peter- 
borough Lodge, No. 155 and Royal Arthur Lodge, No. 523. 

In 1925 at a meeting of Corinthian Lodge, No. 101, 
which was attended by a very large gathering of Past 
Masters, members of the Lodge and visiting brethren, he 
was presented with a Jewel in recognition of his fiftieth 
year in Masonry. 

In the death of R.W. Bro. Hall, Peterborough lost a very 
outstanding citizen, his clients lost a wise counsellor and 
friend, and Masonry lost one who had promoted the best 
interests of Masonry for a period of time almost corres- 
ponding to the Psalmist's "three score years and ten". 

The funeral service at St. Andrew's Church, attended by 
the members of all the civic bodies of the City, by the 
officers and members of all the Masonic Lodges of Peter- 
borough and by the citizens generally, testified to the high 
esteem in which he was held. 



Right Worshipful Brother James C. Hegler 

With the death on June 14th, 1940, of R.W. Bro. James 
C. Hegler, Wilson District lost its Senior Past District 
Deputy Grand Master. He lived to a splendid old age, being 
in his eighty-ninth year, and during this long life he was 
prominent in many walks of life, legal, military and 
fraternal. 

He was initiated into Masonry in 1878, was Master of 
his lodge in 1882 and served as District Deputy Grand 
Master in 1885. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1940 185 

Of late years, owing to failing health, he had to curtail 
his activities in lodge work, but older Masons throughout 
the District will remember his splendid work of earlier days. 

R.W. Bro. Hegler will be sorely missed in his home town 
of Ingersoll and throughout the District. 



Right Worshipful Brother A. C. Hutchinson 

On the 29th of April, 1940, death removed from North 
Huron District a respected and highly esteemed Mason in 
the person of R.W. Bro. A. C. Hutchinson. He was born at 
Inovar, in the County of Fife, Scotland, on February 24th, 
1858, and came to Canada in the year 1863 with his parents 
who settled one mile west of Fordwich. 

When a young man, he learned the trade of blacksmith, 
which he followed until 1918 at which time he retired from 
active business. Bro. Hutchinson attended the Presbyterian 
Church and later the United Church of Canada. He was 
initiated in Fordwich Lodge in 1884 and served as Secretary 
for 38 years. 

In the passing of R.W. Bro. Hutchinson, North Huron 
District sustains the loss of a loving father, a good citizen 
and a faithful Mason. 



Right Worshipful Brother Raymond Beamer Hutt 

In the death of R.W. Bro. Raymond Beamer Hutt on 
Nov. 16th, 1939, not only did Wilson District lose one of its 
most outstanding Masons, but the Town of Ingersoll lost one 
of its best and public spirited citizens. 

R.W. Bro. Hutt v/as initiated into Masonry in King 
Hiram Lodge, No. 37, on July 7th, 1911, passed Sept. 1st, 
1911 and raised Oct. 6th, 1911. He was elected to the high 
office of D.D.G.M. in 1921. 

R.W. Bro. Hutt believed in the broad principles of Free- 
masonry and exemplified its teachings in every walk of life. 
He came to Ingersoll as a boy, passed through its primary 
and secondary schools and as a young man entered the 
employ of the Borden Mill Co. His ability and strict atten- 
tion to duty soon marked him as a man for advancement. 
It was not long before he became manager of the local plant 
and filled some of the highest offices in the gift of that huge 
company. 

He gave much of his time in the interests of his com- 
munity serving several years on the Board of Education, the 
Library Board and on the Board of Management of his 
church. He gave freely of his time and earnings to support 
every good cause in his community. Raymond Beamer Hutt 
lived respected, and died very much regretted by the whole 
community. 



186 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

« 

Right Worshipful Brother A. B. Hyndman 

Stricken with an acute heart attack at his home at Carp, 
Ont., Dr. A. B. Hyndman, Member of Parliament for Carleton 
since 1935 and a man who was as widely known for his many 
fine traits of character as for his outstanding record in 
public and professional life, passed away in his fiftieth year. 

Born on July 28th, 1890, at Mountain, Ont., he was a 
member of a family that had migrated from Ireland and 
settled in the County of Dundas. His first schooling was 
obtained in South Mountain and then he went to Kemptville 
High School and Smith Falls Collegiate Institute. He gradu- 
ated from McGill University in 1915 with the degree of M.D., 
CM. 

He was a member of St. Pauls United Church, and for 
some years had occupied the position of Chairman of the 
Board of Stewards and Secretary-Treasurer of the Trustee 
Board. He was president of the Carleton County Athletic 
Association. 

One of the most likeable members of the House of 
Commons where he had made friends on all sides since his 
first election in 1935, Dr. Hyndman's first interest was his 
practice as a country doctor. 

Bro. Hyndman was initiated in Merrickville Lodge, No. 
55, in Oct. 1911, was Worshipful Master of Carleton Lodge 
in 1923, and was elected D.D.G.M. in July, 1937. His father^ 
James C. Hyndman was a Past Master of Merrickville Lodge. 

The funeral was from St. Pauls United Church where 
his many friends gathered to pay their last tribute of respect 
to one who had endeared himself by his genial kindly dis- 
position to the whole community. He was buried in the 
United Cemetery, Huntley, with full Masonic Honors. 

Right Worshipful Brother Charles E. Jeakins 

Masons of London District particularly were shocked at 
the sudden death of R.W. Bro. and Very Rev. Charles E. 
Jeakins on May 22nd, 1940. On the Sunday previous he had 
preached a stirring message in St. Paul's Cathedral on the 
occasion of the Annual Church Service of London Masonic 
District. 

"The Dean", as he was known to the fraternity, was 
Dean of Huron and Rector of St. Paul's Cathedral. Active 
in all branches of Masonry, he gave unstintingly of his time, 
ability and inspiration to the Craft at all times. He was a 
former Grand Chaplain of the Grand Lodge of Quebec. 

Dean Jeakins was a great lover of his country and had 
served in militia units for many years as well as being 
Chaplain of the 58th Battalion during the War of 1914-1918. 
Associated with the Kiwanis Club, he was an international 
vice-president of the organization. 



TORONTO. ONTARIO. 1940 187 

Born in Dewsbury, England, 63 years of age, he is sur- 
vived by his widow, a son, his father and sister. In London, 
he was a member of the Tuscan Lodge. 

R.W. Bro. Jeakins was one of the "strong men of the 
Church" one of the "strong men of the Craft". He will be 
missed; his place will certainly be difficult to fill. 

Right Worshipful Brother Sidney Johnston 

R.W. Bro. Sidney Johnston passed away suddenly at his 
home in Lindsay on March 23rd, 1940. Bro. Johnston was 
made a Mason in North Entrance Lodge, No. 463, Haliburton 
and became Master of his Lodge. 

He affiliated with Faithful Brethren Lodge No. 77, 
Lindsay, April 1st, 1910 and was elected District Deputy 
Grand Master for Victoria District in 1926 which office he 
filled with distinction. He passed away at the age of sixty- 
six years, a faithful member of St. Andrew's Presbyterian 
Church, and was laid to rest in Riverdale Cemetery with full 
Masonic Honors. 

Right Worshipful Brother 
Dr. Thomas Erlin Kaiser 

■ Ontario District and the City of Oshawa suffered a 
severe loss in the death of Dr. Thomas Erlin Kaiser which 
occurred on February 29th, 1940. He was of United Empire 
Loyalist stock and was born at Edgley, York County, on 
February 16th, 1863. 

He received his early education in the public school in 
the Township of York and Western High School. In 1882 
he secured his matriculation and taught school for four 
years in the Township of Etobicoke from 1883 to 1886 in- 
clusive, graduating from the University of Toronto with the 
degree of M.D. in 1890. 

He began the practise of Medicine and Surgery in 
Oshawa in the summer of 1890 and continued in active 
practice until the fall previous to his death. He served the 
City as Councillor and was a moving spirit in improving the 
waterworks system, erection of the Oshawa General Hospital 
and City Parks system. In more recent years he conceived 
and fostered the erection of Oshawa's War Memorial in its 
present state as the Garden of the Unforgotten. In 1907-8 
he served the City as Mayor and represented his constituency 
in the House of Commons from 1924 to 1930. 

Dr. Kaiser was widely known throughout the District 
for his many Masonic activities. He was a life member of 
Cedar Lodge, being initiated June 23rd, 1891, Master from 
1895 to 1897, and District Deputy Grand Master of Ontario 
District in 1918. The funeral service was held in Simcoe 
Street United Church under Masonic auspices. 



188 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Right Worshipful Brother Wellington Keffer 

On Thursday, March 14th, 1940, there passed away at 
Hespeler, Ontario, a distinguished Mason in the person of 
Rt. W. Bro. Wellington Keffer. Born in the Township of 
Puslinch adjacent to Hespeler he spent most of his life in 
this vicinity. Though his school days were brief he managed 
by reading on his own account and by conversation with 
others to improve his mind and to enlarge his knowledge. 
Early in life he was apprenticed in the woolen industry and 
in this trade he soon became known as a master. For many- 
years prior to his retirement from business he was foreman 
and head designer in the weaving department of Messrs 
Forbes, Woolen Manufacturers of Hespeler. 

Rt. W. Bro. Keffer also occupied himself with public 
affairs in the village. He was a prominent member of the 
local United Church of Canada, serving on many of their 
leading boards. As a member of the High School Board of 
Hespeler for nineteen years, he made his quiet influence felt 
in the training of the youth of the community. 

Initiated in New Hope Lodge No. 379, Hespeler, in 1892, 
Bro. Keffer immediately evinced the greatest interest in the 
work of the Craft. Advancing step by step through the 
various chairs, his assiduity was rewarded when he was 
elected to fill the chair of King Solomon and became the 
Worshipful Master of his Mother Lodge. Then in 1928, after 
he had given up his foremanship in the mills and had leisure 
for more extensive service to the Craft, the brethren of 
Wellington District elected him to their highest office and 
the Grand Master confirmed W. Bro. Keffer as his District 
Deputy. To this important post he brought thirty-six years 
of masonic experience and many of those who listened to 
him on his various visits to the lodges of the District still 
recall the kindly and understanding words which he uttered 
to the younger men. The final honour of his long masonic 
career came in 1932 when the members of New Hope Lodge 
recognized his personal worth and his long services to the 
Craft by conferring upon him the rank of Honourary Member 
of their lodge. Thus as one who by his own trustworthiness 
had well earned this mark of appreciation his last days were 
spent in the knowledge that he had not laboured in vain. 

A kindly gentleman, an amiable and tolerant friend, a 
good citizen, a grand old man among Masons, R. W. Bro. 
Keffer lived his seventy-eight years, forty-eight of them as 
a Mason, and so living them in the fear of God and in 
charity with all men, he enjoyed in an increasing degree 
the respect and affection of his many friends. 

Right Worshipful Brother D. McCaughrin 

Captain Dan McCaughrin, a veteran of the Great War, 
died June 12th, 1940, in his 77th year after being in ill 
health for more than a year. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 189 

He was C.P.R. Agent at Orillia for several years. Re- 
signing this position, he was appointed Police Magistrate, a 
position he held until his retirement about six years ago. 

Bro. McCaughrin was born in Peel County and received 
his education at Brampton, graduating from Brampton High 
School, 

He Vv'as a member of the United Church and a very 
enthusiastic Mason, and attained the rank of Grand Registrar. 
He was a member of the Scottish Rite. He was held in high 
esteem by a very large circle of friends. 



Right Worshipful Brother James J. McKnight 

The Village of Tottenham lost one of its foremost citi- 
zens when James J. McKnight passed to his reward on 
December 22nd, 1939. 

Bro. McKnight was a public spirited citizen and took 
an active interest in municipal affairs. He was the first Chair- 
man of the Old Age Pensions Board of Simcoe County and 
a loyal worker in the United Church, serving faithfully on 
the Board and in other capacities. 

He was very prominent in Masonic circles, being a Past 
Master of Tottenham Lodge and Secretary for nearly twenty 
years. For the 1931-32 term he was the D.D.G.M. of Georgian 
District and was a member of the Scottish Rite. 

The funeral was attended by a large number of brethren 
from other districts and was under Masonic auspices. The 
many beautiful floral tributes from the various organizations 
with which he was connected were testimony to the universal 
respect in which he was held. 



Right Worshipful Brother J. W. Merrick 

The death of John Wardman Merrick, on Feb. 22nd, 
1940, well-known Barrie merchant and one of the most pro- 
minent members of the Order in Simcoe County, came as 
a shock to his many friends in town and county. 

Bro. Merrick possessed a distinguished record in Masonry 
over a period of nearly forty years. He entered the Craft 
on December 17th, 1900, as a member of Kerr Lodge, No. 
230, became Master in 1922, was elected D.D.G.M. of the 
Georgian District for 1936-37 and as such became well known 
to Masons throughout the District. He was Grand Superin- 
tendent, R.A.M., of Georgian District No. 9, in 1922 and was 
very active in the Knights Templar and Scottish Rite. 

He was a devout churchman and was a member of 
Collier Street United Church. 



190 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Right Worshipful Brother R. J. M. Perkins 

R.W. Bro. R. J. M. Perkins, Past Grand Chaplain, died 
in Sarnia Hospital May 2nd, 1940, in his 64th year. 

He was a Past Master of King Hiram Lodge, No. 37, 
Ingersoll, and an affiliated member of Victory Lodge No. 
563, which he joined shortly after its formation in 1920 at 
which time he came to Chatham as Rector of Christ Church. 
He was elected Grand Chaplain in 1927. And just recently, 
in November 1939, he assisted in the laying of the corner 
stone of the new St. Andrew's Church in Windsor, the rector 
of which is his own son. Rev. Hanley Perkins. 

He was a member of the Old Age Pensions and Mothers 
Allowance Board. He is survived by two sons. Rev. Hanley 
Perkins of Windsor, and Russell Perkins of Sarnia. 

Right Worshipful Brother R. H. Revell 

R.W. Bro. Revell affiliated with Windsor Lodge No. 403, 
on May 3rd, 1895 from King Hiram Lodge, No. 37, Ingersoll, 
Ont., where he was a Past Master since 1902 and a life mem- 
ber. He was also a Past District Deputy Grand Master of 
old Erie District No. 1, since 1907. He belonged to Ark 
Chapter, No. 80, R.A.M. and was a Past Grand Superin- 
tendent of Windsor Preceptory No. 26, Knights Templar and 
Past Provincial Grand Prior. He passed to the Grand Lodge 
Above on Feb. 24th, 1940. 

He was well known in Windsor and in old Walkerville 
where he took an active part in civic affairs. He was born 
in the Ingersoll district and lived in Windsor and Walkerville 
most of his life, A veteran employee of the Parke Davis 
Company he was, at the time of his retirement twenty years 
ago, superintendent of the laboratories. When he retired he 
moved to Goderich where he farmed. He returned to Walker- 
ville later and lived there several years before moving to 
Columbus where he passed away at the ripe age of 84 years. 

Bro. Revell was one of old Walkerviile's most prominent 
citizens. He served on the Library Board there and on the 
Town Council and was mayor in 1913. 

He was a Presbyterian by faith but after church union 
he joined the United Church. He is survived by one daughter 
and one son. He was buried with Masonic honours at 
Ingersoll. 

Right Worshipful Brother 
Robert Frederick Richardson 

Robert Frederick Richardson, one of Strathroy's most 
highly regarded citizens, died shortly after noon on Sunday, 
June 9th, 1940. at his home on Albert Street. He had been 
in failing health for some time, but until about two weeks 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 191 

previous to his death appeared to be making very good 
progress toward recovery. 

Bro. Richardson was born in Strathroy, a son of George 
Richardson and Fanny Harris, who moved to Strathroy from 
Metcalfe Township. He was unmarried and is survived by 
a sister, Miss Fanny Richardson with whom he lived and 
who is the last surviving member of a family of six children. 
He received his education in Strathroy schools, and entered 
the printing business as a young man, an occupation which 
he followed practically all his life. 

In 1887 he and his brother, the late George Richardson, 
became joint owners of The Strathroy Dispatch, taking over 
the business from W. S. and L. H. Dingman. They conducted 
the business until 1921, when The Dispatch was amalgamated 
with The Strathroy Age. Mr. Richardson continued on with 
the new firm until about two years ago when he retired 
from active work. 

Bro. Richardson's chief interest outside his work was 
the Masonic Order, of which he had been a member for rnany 
years, and in which he had held some of the highest offices. 
He was an honorary member and the oldest member of the 
Board of General Purposes of the Grand Lodge of Canada 
in the Province of Ontario of which he had been a member 
for twenty years. During most of that period he had been 
Chairman of the important Printing Committee. He was a 
member of Beaver Lodge, No. 83, Strathroy, of which he 
was secretary continuously for twenty-four years until his 
retirement a number of years ago. He was also a member 
of Beaver Chapter No. 74, Royal Arch Masons. 

He was a member of St. John's Anglican Church and 
a former member of the Strathroy Library Board. 

In his earlier days, Bro. Richardson was keenly interested 
in sports of all kinds, and that he had not lost this interest 
was shown in his enthusiastic support of the Strathroy 
Royals baseball team last season in their fight for the 
championship of the Michigan-Ontario League. 

The funeral was held on Tuesday afternoon from his 
late residence to Strathroy cemetery, with Rev. J. H. 
Geoghegan, rector of St. John's Church officiating. The pro- 
fusion of floral tributes was some indication of the high 
esteem in which he was held. The active pall-bearers, all 
old friends of the deceased were: T. E. Bogue, Dr. R. A. 
Willmot, A. W. Bixel, D. A. Crawford, E. D. Evans and J. G. 
Mills. The honorary pall-bearers, all members of the Grand 
Lodge of Canada in the Province of Ontario, were: M.W. 
Bro. R. B. Dargavel, of Toronto; M.W. Bro. Frank Copus, 
of Stratford; R.W. Bro. E. G. Dixon, of Hamilton, Grand 
Secretary; R.W. Bros. W. D. Love and J. Birnie Smith, of 
London, and V.W. Bro. William Attig, of Hamilton, Assistant 
Grand Secretary. There were also many former members 
of Grand Lodge present. 



192 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Right Worshipful Brother T. E. Robson 

R.W. Bro. Thomas E. Robson of London, Ontario, former 
County Treasurer and ex-M.L.A. for East Middlesex, died 
on February 27th, 1940, in his 89th year. Bro. Robson came 
from a family which has been prominent in the London Dis- 
trict for nearly a century. In addition to his public and 
military service, Bro. Robson, as an international authority 
on cattle breeding, probably did more than any other man 
of his time to improve the quality of livestock bred in 
Ontario. 

He was born in London Township, July 15th, 1851, and 
had been a member of the militia for many years. Begin- 
ning with the rank of Lieutenant, he was promoted to Cap- 
tain of No. 8 Company, 261st Battalion in 1882. He served 
as a member of the London Township Council from 1883 to 
1893 and was Warden of the county in 1891. In 1892 he was 
appointed County Clerk and served until his appointment 
as County Treasurer in 1916, from which office he retired 
in 1933. He was a member of the Legislature from 1901 
to 1905. 

Bro. Robson was for some years a Director of the 
London Mutual Fire Insurance Company and was a member 
of the Board of Directors of the Western Fair. He was a 
Past Master of Henderson Lodge, No. 388 of Ilderton, and 
was a Past District Deputy Grand Master of London Dis- 
trict. He was a member of St. George's Chapter No. 5 Royal 
Arch Masons, and a member of St. George's Anglican Church, 
Ilderton. 



Right Worshipful Brother James A. Ryckman 

James A. Ryckman, former Chairman of the St. Thomas 
Board of Education, and veteran railway dispatcher of the 
Canadian Pacific Railway, died at his residence, 177 Welling- 
ton St., St. Thomas on Thursday, November 30th, 1939 and 
was buried on Saturday afternoon with full Masonic honors. 
Members of fraternal organizations, civic and educational 
leaders of the City and citizens paid their last respects to 
a leading citizen of St. Thomas for many years, a man who 
did so much for the educational advancement of that City. 
Rev. Kenneth E. Taylor of St. John's Anglican Church paid 
tribute to Bro. Ryckman as a man who had led a useful and 
unselfish life. 

Bro. Ryckman was widely known through his Masonic 
affiliations and other fraternal associations. His mother 
lodge was St. Thomas, No. 44, of which he was a Past Master 
and life member. In 1919 he inaugurated and organized 
Talbot Lodge, No. 546, being its first Master. Two years 
later he was elected D.D.G.M. of St. Thomas District, 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 193 

The service at the graveside was in charge of Lome 
Hartsell, W.M. of St. Thomas Lodge, No. 44, and C. H. 
Roberts, W.M. of Talbot Lodge, No. 546. Burial was made 
in the family plot at Elmdale Memorial Cemetery. 



Right Worshipful Brother R. A. Stephens 

R. A. Stephens, one of Barrie's more prominent citizens, 
passed away on Feb. 26th, 1940. Robt. Albert Stephens was 
in the Town Council for four years and was Chairman of 
the Board of Works when the first permanent road was laid 
in 1897. He was on the Board of Education for seven years 
and was Chairman of the Building Committee during the 
construction of the present collegiate. 

He was a Past President of the Barrie Thistle Curling 
Club, and Past President of the Barrie Lawn Bowling Club. 

He was a member of Collier Street United Church, 
active in its affairs, and on the Official Board for years. 

He was a Past Master of Kerr Lodge, No. 230 and was 
a member of the Order for 57 years, for which splendid 
service he received the Fifty Year Medal. He was P.D.D. 
G.M. of the Georgian District. 

The funeral was held under Masonic auspices with 
service at the cemetery chapel. 



Right Worshipful Brother Charles H. Stringer 

Masonry suffered a severe loss in the sudden passing 
of R.W. Bro. Charles H. Stringer from a heart attack on 
March 7th, 1940. Born in Port Dover, Ont., April 21st, 1875, 
educated in the public schools and business college, he fitted 
himself for accountancy, his life work. 

Aside from his vocation, his greatest interest, which was 
almost a passion, was in Masonry. He was made a Mason 
in St. Mark's Lodge, No. 105, Niagara Falls, of which Lodge 
he was Master in 1917. He was a Charter Member and 
first Master of Adoniram Lodge, No. 573, Niagara Falls, 
and served as Master from November 1920 to December 1922. 
He was Secretary of Adoniram Lodge from 1927 until his 
death, his work being outstanding. He joined Jacques de 
Molai Preceptory K.T. No. 42, in 1922. He entered Mount 
Nebo Chapter No. 76, R.A.M. in 1915, was First Principal 
in 1921 and was honoured as Grand Superintendent of 
Niagara District in 1928. In 1933 he served Niagara District 
B. as D.D.G.M. 

Bro. Stringer's career was marked by his excellent, 
faithful and efficient work. It may be truly said of him 
that he lived respected and died regretted. 



194 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Right Worshipful Brother Adam MacDonald Taylor 

Golden Star Lodge No. 484, suffered a grievous loss on 
Sept. 14th, 1939, when E.W. Bro. Adam MacDonald Taylor 
was called to Grand Lodge Above following injuries received 
in a motor accident near IngersoU, Ont. 

R.W. Bro. Taylor was made a Mason in Doric Lodge, 
No. 455, at Little Current, and affiliated with Golden Star 
Lodge, No. 484, in June 1912. He served Golden Star Lodge 
as Worshipful Master in 1916, and in 1924 was chosen Dis- 
trict Deputy Grand Master of Algoma District, administering 
each office with great benefit to the Craft and credit to 
himself. 

Full Masonic burial rites were accorded at Dryden, with 
R.W. Bro. H. Humphreys conducting. The service was par- 
ticipated in by one of the largest Masonic gatherings ever 
assembled there, a last tribute to the esteem in which the 
late R.W. Brother was held. "He was a true and faithful 
Craftsman". 

Right Worshipful Brother James B. Tiernay 

After a short illness, R.W. Bro. James B. Tiernay passed 
away on the thirty-first of January, 1940, in his 81st year. 
His occupation was that of farming at which he was very 
successful, and he was a devoted member of Blyth Anglican 
Church. 

R.W. Bro. Tiernay was initiated into Blyth Lodge in 
May, 1889, and served it as Treasurer a great number of 
years, always taking a great interest in all Craft functions. 
Last year he was presented with the Fifty Year Jev.^el. 

Full Masonic honors were accorded R.W. Bro. Tiernay 
when he was laid to rest in Blyth Cemetery. He will be 
remembered by those who knew him well as a good friend, 
counsellor and a true and faithful Mason. 

Right Worshipful Brother Wm. Wheeler 

With startling suddenness, a month after the equally 
sudden death of his close Masonic associate, R.W. Bro. C. 
H. Stringer, and under most tragic circumstances, the breth- 
ren of Niagara Falls learned of the fatal accident which 
befell R.W. Bro. Wm. Wheeler while engaged in his duties 
as Shipping Foreman at the North American Cyanamid 
Company. The accident occurred on Monday, April 1st, 1940, 
and death relieved Bro. Wheeler of his sufferings on Satur- 
day, April 6th, 1940. Under the auspices of Mountain 
Lodge, No. 221, Thorold, assisted by distinguished Masons 
of neighboring lodges, civic officers and company officials 
and representatives, burial services were held on Tuesday, 
April 9th. 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1940 195 

Bro. Wheeler was born in Merritton, on Feb. 25th, 1892. 
He was initiated into Mountain Lodge, April 16th, 1913, 
served as Master in 1922, and was elected District Deputy 
Grand Master in 1935-36. He was one of the most efficient 
and active Grand Lodge Officers the Niagara Districts have 
known. Typical of his ability is the fact that he was usually 
Master when a Lodge of Instruction was held, and his de- 
cisions were invariably correct. Unselfishness was very 
characteristic of him and his willingness and cheerfulness 
in performing any duty requested of him endeared him to 
his brethren. But while we, as Masons, mourn his loss, our 
sympathy is extended particularly to his family, for "Bill's" 
constant thoughts were of his home, his wife and his two 
fine boys. 

Right Worshipful Brother Henry Richardson Young 

Fairbank Lodge lost one of its Charter Members in the 
passing of R.W. Bro. Young, who, by his sincerity and de- 
votion to duty, held a high place in the affections of his 
.brethren. 

He was initiated Aug. 3rd, 1906, Coronation Lodge No. 
466, Elmvale. Affiliated with Zeredetha Lodge No. 220, 
Uxbridge. He was a Past Grand Chaplain. 

He was rector of St. John's Church, Uxbridge, and for 
over twenty years had served as rector of St. Hilda's Church, 
Fairbank. 

He died June 10th, 1940, and was buried at Uxbridge 
under Masonic auspices. 



Very Worshipful Brother James Allen 

V.W. Bro. James Allen was initiated in Doric Lodge, 
No. 121, Brantford, December 28th, 1916, and was elected 
Master in December 1935. He was appointed District Secre- 
tary for R.W. Bro. McDonald in 1938 and received Grand 
Lodge honours this same year when in recognition of his 
splendid services he was appointed Grand Steward. 

He was a life member of Murton Lodge of Perfection, 
Hamilton Scottish Rite. 

He served overseas during the great War and on his 
return was appointed to the office staff of the Brantford 
Utilities Commission, where he remained until his death on 
December 30th, 1939. 

Very Worshipful Brother D. S. Bale 

Citizens of Waterford learned with regret on Monday 
afternoon, April 8th, 1940, of the death of Daniel Sinclair 
Bale in the Brantford Genera! Hospital after a short illness. 



196 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Born at St. Thomas seventy-one years ago, he attended 
Frome Public School and St. Thomas Collegiate Institute. 
He was a member of Waterford United Church and gave 
generously of his time to further its interests. For nearly 
forty years Bro. Bale was a familiar figure to everyone who 
had occasion to use the transportation facilities in Waterford 
and his unfailing courtesy and genial personality were out- 
standing characteristics of his career. 

In 1893 he became a member of Wilson Lodge No. 113, 
and served as Worshipful Master in 1899. He was District 
Secretary to R.W. Bro. James Ross, and for over twenty 
years was Treasurer of the Lodge at Waterford. He was 
appointed Grand Standard Bearer in 1903. 

Very Worshipful Brother R. Easton Burns 

V.W. Bro. R. Easton Burns was a member of the 
Ancient St. John Lodge, Kingston. He was initiated January 
6th, 1887, was Worshipful Master in 1894. He died October 
1st, 1939. 

V.W. Bro. Burns was a Chartered Accountant, having 
the degree of F.C.A., and a devoted member of St. George's 
Cathedral. He was also Secretary-Treasurer of Queen's 
Theological College and a most respected citizen of Kingston. 

Very Worshipful Brother Arthur B. Castell 

V.W. Bro. Arthur B. Castell, Past Grand Organist, pass- 
ed away at his home in Highgate on May 18th, 1940 after 
a brief illness. He was in his 83rd year. 

V.W. Bro. Castell was born in Northamptonshire, Eng- 
land, in September, 1857, and came to Canada sixty-four 
years ago. He was initiated in Cedar Lodge, No. 396, 
Wiarton, on Jan. 1st, 1901, and was a Past Master of Credit 
Lodge, No. 219, Georgetown. He affiliated with Highgate 
Lodge, No. 336 on Oct. 31st, 1930, where he introduced the 
Musical Ritual and served as organist until the time of his 
death. In 1938 he was appointed Grand Organist. 

Always an enthusiastic Mason, the principles of which 
he practiced well in his private life. His place will be hard 
to fill in his lodge and in the community in which he lived. 

Very Worshipful Brother V. B. Coleman 

The passing of V.W. Bro. Coleman, a Past Master of 
Hope Lodge, No. 114, Port Hope, on April 14th, 1940, was 
a distinct loss both to his lodge and the community as well. 

Born in Seymour Township, Northumberland County, on 
April 9th, 1869, he moved, at an early age, with his parents 
to Port Hope. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1940 197 

He was an ardent member of St. Paul's Presbyterian 
Church, serving in the various capacities of Trustee, Member 
of the Board of Managers and an Elder, conducting the 
w^eekly Prayer Meeting in the absence of the Minister. 

Bro. Coleman had a wide affiliation in fraternal circles, 
being a Past Master of Hope Lodge, No. 114, in which he 
was initiated on Nov. 3rd, 1899, a Companion of Victoria 
Chapter No. 37, R.A.M., and a Past Preceptor in Palestine 
Preceptory No. 18, K.T. as well as a Charter Member of 
the Rotary Club. He was appointed Grand Standard Bearer 
in 1913. 

A Masonic service was held in St. Paul's Presbyterian 
Church under the auspices of Hope Lodge attended by many 
brethren from the surrounding district. 

Very Worshipful Brother 
Arthur George Corscadden 

V.W. Bro. A. G. Corscadden passed away suddenly on 
February 16th, 1940, in his sixty-sixth year. 

He was very prominent in fraternal organizations, a 
devout member of the United Church and was for thirty- 
seven years with the Toronto Board of Education. 

He was a charter member of Imperial Lodge, No. 543, 
was Worshipful Master in 1922 and Secretary for sixteen 
years prior to his death. He was initiated into Masonry in 
Stevenson Lodge, No. 218, in 1907 and was also a charter 
member of Caledonia Lodge No. 637. In 1933 he was ap- 
pointed to the office of Grand Sword Bearer and was also 
a member of Orient Chapter, No. 79, R.A.M. 

He was internationally known as an excellent after- 
dinner speaker. For several years lawn bowling was one of 
his hobbies, he being a member of Withrow Park Lawn 
Bowling Club from its inception. 

Very Worshipful Brother Victor De Carle 

Victor de Carle passed away on Thursday evening, July 
13th, 1939, when making last minute preparations for the 
Shriners' Street Fair, of which he was one of the originators 
a few years ago and to which he annually gave his un- 
bounded effort to better the lot of crippled children. Per- 
haps no resident of Brockville District was better known 
than he. In many forms of endeavour he was a leading 
spirit; his jovial good nature and general cheerful disposi- 
tion made him a citizen of outstanding worth and as such 
he was regarded by all. 

Bro. de Carle was a member of Sussex Lodge No. 5, of 
Sussex Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, and of the Preceptory, 
Knights Templar and Karnak Temple of the Mystic Shrine, 



198 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Montreal. He was appointed a Grand Steward of this Grand 
Lodge in 1927. 

Interment took place in Oakland Cemetery under Masonic 
auspices. 

Very Worshipful Brother Job Dudley 

Masonry in Sault Ste. Marie suffered a severe loss in 
the sudden death on the 24th of December, 1939, of V.W. 
Bro. Job Dudley, one of the best known and most highly 
respected members of the Craft in the City. 

V.W. Bro. Dudley was bom on the 23rd of September, 
1886, and was initiated in Keystone Lodge, No. 412, Sault 
Ste. Marie, on the 20th of August, 1907. In 1918 he affiliated 
with Algoma Lodge, No. 469, Sault Ste. Marie, and in 1922 
became its Worshipful Master. From 1928 until the time of 
his death he acted as Secretary of Algoma Lodge and car- 
ried out his duties with efficiency and devotion. In 1931 he 
was President of the Sault ,Ste. Marie Past Masters' Associ- 
ation. At Grand Lodge in 1935 he was appointed Assistant 
Grand Organist. 

He was a faithful churchman as a member of St. Luke's 
Pro-Cathedral. He had several times served as Church 
Warden, occupying the position of Rector's Warden at the 
time of his death. He was beloved by all who knew hirti, 
and will be greatly missed in many departments of life in 
the city where for many years he had made his home. 

Very Worshipful Brother Walter M. Gemmel 

Masonry in Toronto District "A" lost a faithful brother 
in the sudden death of V.W. Bro. W. M. Gemmel who passed 
away on March 28th, 1940, at the age of 76 years. He was 
initiated in Humber Lodge, No. 305, Weston in 1901 and 
installed as Worshipful Master in 1906. Moving to the Port 
Credit District in 1918 he affiliated with Mississauga Lodge 
and was elected Secretary in 1920, which office he faithfully 
and zealously filled to the time of his death. He held Honor- 
ary Life Membership in both Humber and Mississauga Lodges 
and was honoured by Grand Lodge with the appointment of 
Assistant Grand Secretary. 

V.W. Bro. Gemmel was active in all community activities, 
especially interested in church work, being a member of St. 
Andrew's Presbyterian Church. He was an enthusiastic 
curler and lawn bowler. 

He was born in Toronto and served as Auditor and Ac- 
countant with many prominent Toronto firms until the time 
of his retirement in 1932. The large gathering of friends 
and brethren which crowded the auditorium of St. Andrew's 
Church for the funeral services was a fitting tribute to a 
faithful brother and friend. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 199 

Very Worshipful Brother William James Hambly 

With the passing of V.W. Bro. W. J. Hambly at Hamilton 
on November 25th, 1939, the Craft in Ontario lost its oldest 
in years and senior in service Grand Lodge Officer. 

V.W. Bro. Hambly was born in Toronto on November 
12th, 1845. He became a Mason in King Solomon's Lodge, 
No. 22, G.R.C. on May 14th, 1868, and served as its Master 
in 1876. In the same year he received the appointment of 
Grand Director of Ceremonies and the following year was 
again returned to the Chair of King Solomon in his Mother 
Lodge. Ten years later, in 1887, in an hour of adversity and 
dissention, the brethren again, for his third term, turned to 
him for guidance. At the time of his death he was not only 
a Past Master of 64 years standing, but had survived thirty- 
one of the Masters whom he preceded. 

As a native of Toronto, he received his early education 
in this City and at Bowmanville, and joined the staff of the 
Globe under the late George Brown in 1862. Four years 
later he associated himself with the late M.W. Bro. John 
Ross Robertson, also a Past Master of King Solomon's Lodge, 
at the inception of the Evening Telegraph, later The Even- 
ing Telegram. In 1872 he was largely responsible for the 
first issue of The Mail and remained in association with that 
paper until 1898 when he resigned to turn his whole atten- 
tion as a Director of the Canadian Savings Loan and Build- 
ing Association, He retired from active business in 1918. 

He represented old St. David's Ward on the Toronto 
School Board of which he was one time chairman and also 
held a similar post on the High School Committee. Later 
he became the Aldermanic Representative of Ward Two. He 
was a member and active worker in old Berkley Street 
Methodist Church. 

His passing is greatly lamented by a large circle of 
business and civic associates and his many church and 
Masonic friends. 

Very Worshipful Brother Edmund Thomas Huston 

V.W. Bro. E. T. Huston, who died June 29th, 1939, was 
one of Glencoe's outstanding citizens. A member of one of 
the pioneer families of the community, he was born here in 
1861 and resided here all his life. 

He served on the Village Council, High School Board, 
and on various boards of the Presbyterian and United 
Churches, and was for many years Treasurer of the Village. 

In 1910 he was appointed District Secretary under Hon. 
J. C. Elliott, D.D.G.M. for Erie District, and was later 
honoured by Grand Lodge and given the rank of Grand 
Steward. He also served as Treasurer of Lome Lodge for 
some years. 



200 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

He died at the age of 78 years and his funeral, held 
July 1st, was under the auspices of Lome Lodge, No. 282, 
Glencoe, of which he was a life member. 



Very Worshipful Brother W. A. Logan 

V.W, Bro. W. A. Logan was a charter and life member 
of Eoyal Arthur Lodge, and held the office of Chaplain at 
the time of his death. He passed away at his home on 
March 1st, 1940, and was in his 89th year. 

He was very highly esteemed by all members of the 
Masonic Craft in Peterborough and in 1933 was appointed 
to the office of Grand Steward in recognition of his services 
to the Craft. 

He was a staunch Presbyterian, being an Elder in St. 
Paul's Presbyterian Church, Peterborough, and also held the 
office of Secretary for a number of years. 

By profession he was a Civil Engineer and was on the 
staff of the Trent Canal up to a number of years ago when 
he retired. 



Very Worshipful Brother John George Muir 

In the tragic death, on August 19th, 1939, of V.W. Bro. 
John George Muir, the result of an accident, Tuscan Lodge 
No. 99, of Newmarket and Toronto District "C" sustained 
the loss of a true and valued friend. 

V.W. Bro. Muir, born in 1859, was initiated into Tuscan 
Lodge on June 8th, 1910, and a few years later became its 
Worshipful Master. In recognition of his many services to 
the Craft, he was appointed Grand Organist at Kingston in 
1932. 

Whilst never currying wide-spread popularity, he, dur- 
ing his eighty years, ploughed a long straight furrow and 
rendered services to the Craft and humanity which will long 
remain to us a cherished .memory. 



Very Worshipful Brother Thomas William Needham 

Thomas William Needham, well-known London Township 
farmer and prominent in London District Masonic circles, 
died suddenly on Friday, July 28th, 1939, at his home, in 
that township. He was in his 73rd year. 

Bro. Needham had farmed in the Bryanston District 
much of his life. He was a member of London Lodge of 
Perfection, Scottish Rite, a Past Master of Middlesex Lodge 
No. 379, Bryanston, and a Past Grand Standard Bearer. 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1940 201 

Very Worshipful Brother Alfred E. Raynes 

The passing of V.W. Bro. Alfred E. Eaynes of King 
Hiram Lodge, No. 78, Tillsonburg, on April 9th, 1940, in 
his 78th year was a distinct loss to his lodge and to the 
community. Born in Derbyshire, England, he left the Old 
Country as a young man and settled in Tillsonburg where 
he was a teacher in Art in the High School for some time. 

He was appointed Town Clerk, which office he held with dis- 
tinction for 43 years, being appointed Clerk Emeritus in 
December, 1933. The late V.W. Bro. Raynes was an out- 
standing citizen all through his career. He was known 
throughout the District for his paintings and his ability as 
an elocutionist. 

He became a member of King Hiram Lodge, No. 78, on 
March 1st, 1893, and was Master of the Lodge in 1896. He 
was Chaplain of the Lodge a great many yearo, and his 
outstanding services were sought all over the District to 
conduct the Masonic Burial Service. In 1916 he was appoint- 
ed Assistant Grand Director of Ceremonies of this Grand 
Lodge. V.W. Bro. Raynes was a member of St. John's 
Anglican Church. He was Tillsonburg's first Scoutmaster, 
and was actively interested in many of the community 
organizations. 



Very Worshipful Brother Malcolm Sinclair 



On July 24th, 1939, death removed to the Grand Lodge 
Above a highly respected, revered and beloved Mason of 
Toronto, V.W. Bro. Malcolm Sinclair. 

He was born in Markham, Ontario, where he received 
his early education. In 1925 he became President and owner 
of the company which was known later as The Malcolm 
Sinclair Paint Co. 

He was initiated in Wilson Lodge No. 86 on May 20th, 
1906, affiliating with High Park Lodge No. 531, on October 
20th, 1916. On April 22nd, 1922 when Melita Lodge No. 605 
was formed, he became a charter member and served as 
Worshipful Master in 1929. He was made a Life Member 
of all three lodges. 

On May 19th, 1919 he was exalted in Toronto Chapter 
No. 185 and installed in Cyrene Preceptory No. 29, on May 
17th, 1920, being elected Presiding Preceptor in 1925. On 
December 15th, 1920 he was admitted a member of Rameses 
Temple and joined Perfection Lodge, Scottish Rite, January 
13th, 1930. At the Annual Communication of Grand Lodge 
in July, 1937, V.W. Bro. Sinclair received the appointment 
of Grand Tyler. 



202 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

He was buried with Masonic Honours by the brethren 
of Melita Lodge, assisted by the brethren of High Park and 
Wilson Lodges. 

By his death there was removed a beloved father and 
husband, a good citizen and a faithful Mason. 

Very Worshipful Brother John Thomson 

V.W. Bro. John Thomson, who died on September 13th, 
1939, in his 80th year, was initiated into the Craft in Par- 
thenon Lodge No. 267 on July 4th, 1888, affiliated with 
Windsor Lodge No. 403 on Oct. 4th, 1889, Mount Morish 
Lodge No. 38, G.R.Q., Oct. 1st, 1897, St. George's Lodge No. 
367, Oct. 4th, 1901, and Transportation Lodge No. 583, as 
a charter member on May 31st, 1921. He became Worshipful 
Master for the year 1924, served as District Secretary, 
Toronto District "A" 1931-1932, and in 1932 was appointed 
a Grand Steward of Grand Lodge. 

He served as Manager of the Canadian Transfer Co., 
Toronto, for thirty-seven years, and retired in 1936. Born 
in Scotland, he came to Canada as a young man. He was 
an enthusiastic Mason, a member of High Park United 
Church and a Past President of the Dumfries and Galloway 
Association. He was buried with Masonic Honors. 

Veiy Worshipful Brother Joseph McLean Wallace 

Tuscan Lodge, No. 551, lost one of its best known and 
most beloved members in the death of V.W. Bro. Joseph M. 
Wallace on Feb. 22nd, 1940. Our brother first saw the light 
of Masonry in Scotland, where he was born fifty-eight years 
ago. He was one of the charter members of Tuscan Lodge. 

He served as Worshipful Master of the lodge in 1924 
and received honours from Grand Lodge by his appointment 
to the office of Grand Steward. He also took an active part 
in Hiram Chapter No. 2, R.A.M. He was a member at the 
time of his passing of Knights Templar Preceptory and the 
Scottish Rite bodies. 

He was buried with Masonic Honors, the funeral being 
attended by men from all walks of life by whom he was 
held in the highest esteem. 

Very Worshipful Brother Charles L. Wilson 

The Metropolitan Lodge, No. 542, lost one of its best 
known and most beloved members in the passing of V.W. 
Bro. Charles Lewis Wilson on April 24th, 1940. He was 
initiated in St. Andrews Lodge, No. 16, in 1905 and from 
that time until he passed to the Grand Lodge Above he 
gave unstintingly of his time and talent to every lodge 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 203 

activity. He was instrumental in the formation of the Metro- 
politan Lodge, being one of its Charter Members and its 
first Senior Warden. He was also a life member of the 
lodge. 

He served as Worshipful Master in 1921. He was 
honored by appointment to Grand Lodge office in 1922 as 
Grand Junior Deacon. He represented Metropolitan Lodge 
on the York Masonic Temple Hall Board from its inception 
and was a Past President of that body. He became an 
honorary member of Rising Sun Lodge, No. 129, Aurora, in 
1922 and was made a life member in 1936. He also was a 
member of the Rose Croix Chapter of the Ancient and Ac- 
cepted Scottish Rite. His memory will ever be cherished by 
those who knew him. 

Very Worshipful Brother J. H. C. Woodward 

V.W. Bro. J. H. C. Woodward, a prominent citizen of 
London, Ont., died on February 1st, 1940, at the age of 
sixty-one years. His Masonic career was a most notable one 
and few Masons have given more time and energy to the 
work of the Order. 

He was one of the prime movers in the establishment of 
Acacia Lodge No. 580, London, a Past Master of the Lodge 
and its representative on the Board of Masonic Hall, London, 
Limited at the time of his death. In 1938 he was appointed 
Grand Steward. He was active and prominently associated 
with other branches of Masonry. 

He served as an Adjutant of the 135th Battalion C.E.F. 
during the War of 1914-1918. He was later employed as 
assessor in the London District Income Tax Office. He was 
gifted with considerable musical ability serving as organist 
in several city churches and was a member of St. James 
Church, Westminster. 

Fraternally submitted, 

SMITH SHAW, 

Chairman. 

PRESENTATION OF MEDALS 

After the Grand Secretary had read out the 
names of the veteran members, the Grand Master 
requested all those who were present to come up on 
the dais. In kindly words he conveyed to them the 
congratulations and best wishes of all fellow mem- 
bers and presented medals as follows: 
To W. Bro. W. E. Brown — Fifty years a Mason. 
To W. Bro. C. L. Mills— Fifty years a Mason. 



204 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

To W. Bro. James Naismith — Fifty years a Mason. 
To R.W. Bro. J. A. V. Preston — Fifty years a 
Mason. 
These Veterans were greeted with loud applause 
as the Grand Master pinned the medals on them. 

GUEST SPEAKS 

The Grand Master, in introducing M.W. Bro. 0. 
Frank Hart, Past Grand Master and the Grand Sec- 
retary of South Carolina, advised the brethren that 
just two years ago we had the pleasure of receiving 
M.W. Bro. Walter Going, who was then Grand 
Master of South Carolina. and now we were honoured 
by the presence of the Grand Secretary of this 
Southern Grand Lodge. M.W. Bro. Hart replied that 
he brought greetings from his Grand Master, M.W. 
Bro. S. Maner Martin and as he looked in the faces 
of the brethren present they compared favourably 
with the Masons of South Carolina. He said that 
the conditions of today were a challenge to us to do 
real thinking and acting in these times; that Ma- 
sonry meant so much to him he was proud that as 
the Representative of the Grand Lodge of Denmark 
he could wear the jewel of that Grand Lodge today 
as a mark of respect and admiration for the Grand 
Master of Denmark, King Christian. 

REPORT OF THE WAR SERVICE 
COMMITTEE 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, in 
the Province of Ontario: 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

At the present time a report as to the results of the 
activities of the War Service Committee must necessarily 
be worded in general terms, for the few weeks that have 
elapsed since the Committee was appointed have been spent 
in organizing and setting up the machinery whereby the 
Craft in Ontario may most efficiently meet the challenge 
that has come to us. The co-ordinating of our efforts into 
sympathetic co-operation with those of the Federal and 
Provincial Governments is at this moment little more than 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 205 

completed. Our own organization for the listing of the avail- 
able private homes is now in full operation, thanks to the 
generous interest of the majority of our lodges. But it 
should be understood that some further organization remains 
to be dealt with at once, for it has become necessary to set 
up strong representation of this committee at every point 
where the government, through the Children's Aid Society's 
local organization, is sending the children for final distri- 
bution. 

Though it is impossible at this stage to give any definite 
statistics, this much may well be said, that the fraternity 
from one end of the jurisdiction to the other has responded 
splendidly to the appeal of the Most Worshipful the Grand 
Master. Those of us who have been in the past few weeks 
in direct contact with the course of events have been thrilled 
to note how widespread, sympathetic and generous has been 
the answer of the Masons of this province. Less than three 
weeks ago — and basing our promise on our faith in the 
warm hearts of the members of the Craft — we cabled 
overseas an initial offer of one thousand Masonic homes. 
Today — and this time basing the statement on our infor- 
mation as to the actual response to the Grand Master's ap- 
peal — we are quite sure we would be safe in promising 
that five thousand homes of Free Masons are available here 
in Ontario for the reception of our child guests. Indeed we 
feel that in this matter there is practically no limit either 
to the number of homes that would welcome these children 
or to the money that can be raised for this purpose should 
the need arise. Such is Free Masonry and such its present 
mission here in Ontario. 

We trust that the letter sent out by this Committee 
under date of July 5th has been brought to the attention 
of the officers of all our lodges and by them passed on as 
fully as possible to the membership in general. At this time 
little needs to be added to the information therein contained; 
but we do wish to again emphasize the fact that we are 
working in the closest harmony with the officials of the 
Children's Aid Society. The task that they have assumed 
is so tremendous that they will need the help of all good 
citizens. We ask all members of the Masonic fraternity to 
extend to them every possible assistance. 

Perhaps a word should be said as to reports that the 
scheme of child evacuation has been abandoned by the 
British government. Obviously we are unable to definitely 
confirm or deny these statements; but we have the best of 
reasons for assuring Grand Lodge that in all probability 
nothing more than a temporary postponement is involved. 
Further, even if the Government scheme were abondoned, 
we are assured that many children of overseas Masons will 
still be coming to this country and will require the shelter 
of Canadian homes and the loving care of Canadian foster 
parents. Under the circumstances, therefore, there must be 
no slackening in our efforts. The thing to do is to proceed 



206 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

to complete our organization as rapidly as possible so that 
we may be in a position to function with the greatest effi- 
ciency when we are called upon. We therefore ask the 
brethren to proceed with undiminished ardor and to see that 
every member of the fraternity who is in a position to do 
so is given an opportunity to have a share in the most 
wonderful and most appealing privilege that has come to 
the Masons of the Grand Lodge of Canada in Ontario. 

Fraternally submitted, 

FRANK A. COPUS, 

Chairman. 



RESOLUTION 

M.W. Bro, John A. Rowland, Grand Treasurer, 
presented the following- resolution to Grand Lodge: 

RESOLVED THAT Grand Lodge approve of 
the action of the Grand Master in the appointment 
of a Special War Service Committee, and that the 
Board of General Purposes be and they are hereby 
authorized to make such expenditures out of the 
General Funds of Grand Lodge as they may deem 
necessary and advisable to enable the said Commit- 
tee to carry out most effectively and in accordance 
with the spirit and intention of Grand Lodge the 
duties assigned to it. 

On motion of M.W. Bro. J. A. Rowland, seconded 
by M.W. Bro. F. A. Copus, the resolution was car- 
ried unanimously. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON 
GRIEVACES AND APPEALS 

The report was presented by R.W. Bro. T. H. 
Simpson, Chairman, and on motion of the Deputy 
Grand Master, seconded by R.W. Bro. T. H. Simpson, 
it was received and adopted. 

It was further moved by the Deputy Grand 
Master, seconded by R.W. Bro. T. H. Simpson and 
carried, that Clause 6 only of this report be printed 
in the Annual Proceedings. 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1940 207 

Clause 6 Re Lome Lodge, No. 282 G.R.C. Glencoe 

This is an application to be relieved from the pay- 
ment of Forty Dollars to legalize the advancement of 
two brethren to the Master Mason Degree on May 22nd, 
1939, within the prescribed time, they having received 
their Fellow Craft Degree on April 25th, 1939. 

Your Committee sympathize with the members of 
the lodge but the Constitution makes no exception 
whereby the provisions of Section 204 can be evaded. 
Under the circumstances, however, the Committee feel 
that justice would be done if the violation be treated 
as one offence, and recommend that the sum of Twenty 
Dollars be accepted. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON 
PRINTING AND SUPPLIES 

The report was presented by R.W. Bro. W. D. 
Love, Chairman, and on motion of the Deputy Grand 
Master, seconded by R.W. Bro. W. D. Love, it was 
received and adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario: 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

The Committee on Printing and Supplies for the year 
just closed, composed of Rt. Wor. Bros. J. B. Smith, 0. F. 
Young, F. S. Lane, Wm. Greig and W. D. Love, Chairman, 
wishes to present for your consideration its report giving 
detailed analysis of the expenditure for printing and supplies 
for the year ending May 31st, 1940, as follows: 

Master Mason Certificates ....$ 313.84 

Constitutions _ 641.87 

Proceedings and Mailing Boxes 2,537.44 

Printing Forms and Circulars 185.41 

Christmas Cards 58.32 

Office Stationery and Supplies 220.19 

Stationery: — 

Grand Lodge Officers and Past Grand Masters 237.01 
Ceremonies: — 

Installation, Funeral and Memorial 234.25 

$4,428.33 



We wish to express sincere thanks to the several Chair- 
men of Committees of the Board of General Purposes for 
their splendid support and co-operation in making it possible 
for us to carry out our work in the alloted time, iand to Rt. 



208 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Wor. Bro. J, B. Smith, former chairman, I wish to tender 
my personal appreciation for his valuable assistance. 

In conclusion, Most Wor. Sir and Brethren, your Com- 
mittee wishes to express its great loss and sorrow in the 
passing during the past month of its oldest and most be- 
loved member, Rt. Wor. Bro. Robert F. Richardson. For 
twenty consecutive years Bro. Richardson served this Grand 
Lodge as Chairman of this Committee and for the succeeding 
seven years as a valuable member. He was a zealous, un- 
tiring and conscientious worker in the interest of this Grand 
Lodge. To-day, while we miss his kindly word and genial 
smile we pay tribute to his worth, to his work and to his 
cherished memory. 

Respectfully and fraternally submitted, 

W. D. LOVE, 

Chairman. 

REPORT OF THE BOARD ON FRATERNAL 
CORRESPONDENCE 

M.W. Bro. W. S. Herrington advised that owing 
to the death of M.W. Bro. W. N. Ponton, our Re- 
viewer, since the last meeting of Grand Lodge, it 
had been decided to distribute the work of reviewing 
the Proceedings of the Grand Lodges among several 
of our members. He then presented the report, 
as Chairman of the Committee, by reading the 
Foreword to the Reviews. On motion of the Deputy 
Grand Master, seconded by M.W. Bro. W. S. Her- 
rington the report and the reviews were received 
and adopted to be printed as an appendix to the 
Proceedings. 

CALLED OFF 

At 4.50 o'clock in the afternoon the Grand 
Master declared Grand Lodge adjourned until 9 
o'clock on the following morning. 



CALLED ON 

Grand Lodge resumed labor at 9,30 o'clock in 
the forenoon, Thursday, July 18th, 1940, the Grand 
Master on the Throne. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1940 209 

HONORARY RANK 

M.W. Bro. R. B. Dargavel spoke of the great 
work that V.W. Bro. E. H. Cooper, Secretary of 
Canada Lodge, No. 3527 on the register of the 
United Grand Lodge of England, had done and was 
doing towards making a home overseas for all 
brethren from Canada. He then moved, seconded by 
M.W. Bro. J. A. Rowland, that in recognition of such 
services this Grand Lodge confer upon V.W. Bro. 
E. H. Cooper, honorary rank of Past Grand Regis- 
trar. The motion was carried unanimously with 
great applause. 

REPORT OF THE LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

This report was presented by R.W. Bro. John 
Ness, Chairman and on motion of the Deputy Grand 
Master, seconded by R.W. Bro. John Ness, it was 
received and adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario: 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

Whilst one would feel perfectly safe in declaring that, 
since last we met as a Grand body, the Canadian people as 
a whole have applied themselves to reading with a new 
avidity, one would also be justified in assuming that the 
general public has not shown any tendency to augment its 
consumption of contemplative or philosophical literature. 

Neither can we be surprised if, 

"When Europe's eye is fixed on mighty things 
The fate of Empires and the fall of Kings," 

the newspapers with their scare head-lines, the fulminations 
of the armchair strategists, or even the clap-trap of the 
self-appointed experts in total warfare, command an in- 
finitely larger following than the erudite exponents of the 
hidden mysteries of Nature and Science. 

Accepting this situation as a natural consequence of the 
times in which we live and of a people's anxiety, it is all 
the more gratifying to be able to report that Masonic read- 
ing is on the upgrade and that, in the number of readers, 
the volumes issued and the use of our reference facilities, 
we can show an increase over last year. 



210 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Our librarian, to whose efforts this state of affairs is 
largely due, has gently insinuated that the function of a 
report is to inform the brethren and not merely to provide 
a medium by which the chairman of a committee can add 
to, or detract from, whatever reputation he may enjoy as 
a "mute, inglorious Milton". As a glance through previous 
issues of the "Proceedings" gives some justification for this 
criticism, we accept the admonition in a truly Masonic spirit 
and foreswear gr^ammar and rhetoric for the less speculative, 
but much more operative, logic and arithmetic. 

Expenditures by the committee included: — Honorarium 
to the Librarian, $200.00; (and it should be noted that this 
is merely a "honorarium" and is in no sense a salary com- 
mensurate with the services rendered) postages, $52.17; 
binding and repairs, $42.30; purchase of new and second- 
hand books, $57.57; printing, $39.59. Allowing for incidentals 
we have still kept within our allocation from Grand Lodge. 

The shelves of our lending library now contain 146 works 
of a purely Masonic character, many of which comprise 
several volumes. Additional shelf-space is urgently needed 
and has been requested in our budget for this year. 

An additional "Travelling Library" was acquired and 
these libraries were taken advantage of by seven lodges. 
In every case the brethren expressed their appreciation of 
the facilities afforded. 

A new catalogue of books was prepared and 800 copies 
sent to lodges and individuals. We communicated with all 
the District Deputies offering advice and assistance in the 
selection of reading matter and we co-operated with the 
Committee on Masonic Education to the utmost extent. Re- 
quests for specific information resulted in 338 letters being 
written, some of considerable length, and patrons of our 
reference section received advice on many and varied subjects. 

Making liberal use of the material we placed at their 
disposal, brethren of a city lodge prepared lantern slides to 
illustrate a historical address, which our Past Masters' 
Association received with acclaim. A junior officer of a 
local lodge read all of the twenty volumes of the British 
Masonic Miscellany in preparation for his future occupancy 
of the Masters' Chair; emulating his example another con- 
scientious aspirant for Masonic honours has already digested 
the first five volumes. Such instances give one renewed con- 
fidence in the future leadership of the Craft. 

Books borrowed numbered 693, an increase of 7% over 
the previous year. The fact that only 140 went to local 
brethren is no reflection on their desire for knowledge, as 
we had a total attendance of 274 during library hours, many 
of whom contented themselves by studying works of refer- 
ence. Keen interest is taken in the magazines and publi- 
cations from foreign jurisdictions; a brother from New 
Zealand and another from the Philippines renewed home ties 
through this medium. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1940 211 

The more pretentious additions to our shelves included 
a set of "The British Masonic Miscellany" and fifteen volumes 
of "The Builder". A unique and valuable acquisition was a 
ritual of The Second Provincial Grand Lodge of Upper 
Canada, dated 1813. The opinion of experts leads to the 
belief that it is authentic. 

As in previous years we have to acknowledge numerous 
donations suitable for both the lending and reference sections 
of the library, our Scottish Rite, Knight Templar and Royal 
Arch works being extensively augmented by such gifts. 

From other jurisdictions we welcome the contributions 
of Bro. A. E. Tatton of Manila; Bro. Peterson of Philadel- 
phia; Bro. F. B. Strickland of Kansas; Bro. F. H. Snyder 
of Ohio; the Grand Secretary of Michigan; Bro. Knoop of 
Manchester, England, and Bro. R. J. Meekren of Quebec. 

Amongst Ontario donors were the Misses MacMurtry; 
the widow of the late R.W. Bro. E. A. James; the executor 
of the late Dr. A. Webster; Geoffrey de St. Aldemar Pre- 
ceptory; Grand Chapter of R.A.M.; M.W. Bro. Herrington 
and Bros. B. E. Ekblad, Wm. MouU, D. S. L. MacDougall, 
T. V. B. Pingay and W. M. Sivers. 

It would be ungracious to omit mention of the privileges 
and courtesies extended to us by the Masonic Temple Cor- 
poration, its Chairman and employees, who so v/illingly cater 
to our needs and comfort. 

To the Worshipful Masters and Secretaries of the vast 
majority of our lodges, we extend our thanks and appreci- 
ation for the manner in which the facilities of the Library 
have been brought to the attention of the brethren. Con- 
stant dripping wears away a stone and reiteration may 
eventually bring the fact of our existence to the notice of 
the most casual and indifferent. When this is accomplished 
we may find the lodges prepared to submit to a modest 
assessment, which would relieve Grand Lodge of the expense 
of library upkeep. 

It is not vain repetition to again mention the debt of 
gratitude we owe to the Librarian, Bro. X. W. J. Haydon. 
His is a labour of love and his greatest reward is the op- 
portunity afforded him of meeting the Mason with an en- 
quiring and receptive mind, into which he can instil some 
of his own enthusiasm for Masonic research. 

There is a Book which we would all do well to read, 
for it leads us to all truth, directs our steps in the paths 
of happiness and points out to us the whole duty of man. 
On the shelves of our library are other books which, taking 
their inspiration from that great source, seek to provide for 
us a philosophy of living; trace for us the unending search 
for man's lost spark of divinity and expound for us the 
fundamental principles of the Masonic creed. 

These are thoughful days and perhaps in the reading 
of The Book and the books lies our greatest hope of becom- 



212 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

ing worthy custodians of our great Masonic, democratic and 

humanitarian heritage. 

All of which is respectfully and fraternally submitted, 
S. F. ALBERTSON, 
G. C. MURPHY, 
A. C. NORWICH, 
E. W. STODDARD, 
J. NESS, Chairman. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON 
CREDENTIALS 

The report was presented by V.W. Bro. J. W. 
Hamilton, Chairman, and on motion of the Deputy 
Grand Master, seconded by V.W. Bro. J. W. Hamil- 
ton, it was received and adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario: 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: — 

Your Committee on Credentials begs to report: 
There are on the Register of Grand Lodge 569 Warranted 
Lodges. 

Represented at the Communication: 

By Regular Officers 362 

By Proxies 108 

By Past Masters 43 

Total Lodges Represented 513 

Total number of Delegates Registered 2,524 

With a total vote of 3,310 

All of which is fraternally submitted. 

J. W. HAMILTON, 

Chairman. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON AUDIT 
AND FINANCE 

This report was presented by R.W. Bro. C. S. 
Hamilton, Chairman, and on motion of the Deputy 
Grand Master, seconded by R.W. Bro. C. S. Hamilton, 
it was received and adopted. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1S40 213 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

The reports of the Grand Treasurer and Grand Secre- 
tary, which have been presented to you, are in the form 
with which you are all familiar. Having been received with 
general satisfaction and containing complete details of Re- 
ceipts and Disbursements, together with schedules of invest- 
ments for all accounts, little more than a passing comment 
is required from your Committee on Audit and Finance. 

We have examined the books of the Grand Treasurer 
and the Grand Secretary, and the Annual Statement for the 
year ended the 31st of May, 1940, has been verified. The 
Auditor's report certifies the financial transactions and 
records of the past year and inspection and examination of 
securities to the satisfaction of your Committee. 

A comparative statement of Assets shows an increase 
in General Account of $1,460.80, and in Memorial and Semi- 
centennial Fund of $193.70, representing a total increase of 
$1,654.50, as follows: 
General Account: 

31st May, 1939 31st May, 1940 

Balance in Bank...$ 13,362.22 $ 13,944.39 

Investments (face 

value) 368,121.37 369,000.00 

Petty Cash on 200.00 200.00 



$381,683.59 $383,144.39 

Semi-Centennial 
Fund: 

Balance in Bank... 100.00 100.00 

Combined Semi-Cen- 
tennial and Me- 
morial Fund: 

Balance in Bank .$ 4,338.65 3,208.48 

Investments (face 

value) 458,989.35 460,313.22 



$463,328.00 $463,521.70 



$845,111.59 $846,766.09 



Authorized trustee investments carried at their face 
value in General Account amount to $369,000,00, and in 
Memorial and Semi-Centennial Fund $460,313.22, a total of 
$829,313.22. This represents an increase over last year of 
$2,202.50. 

All securities, together with Fidelity Bonds on the 
Grand Treasurer, Grand Secretary, and Assistant to the 
Grand Secretary and combined messenger and interior rob- 



214 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

bery policy, are deposited with the Canada Permanent Trust 
Company. 

During the year, $78,797.50 face value of securities sold 
or matured, produced $79,961.25. New high grade securities 
of the face value of $81,000.00 were purchased for $79,524.50. 
Despite the fact that the investor of to-day has a real war- 
time job, these operations resulted in a capital betterment 
of $2,639.25. The coupon rate on the securities so disposed 
of averaged 4.76% as compared with an average of 3.5% on 
securities purchased. While the reduction in the coupon rate 
was inevitable on maturities in the existing market, the yield 
on sales was improved upwards of %%. 

Out of the total income from all sources of $139,312.63, 
approximately 71% was expended for benevolence, 9% for 
special grants, annual communication and proceedings ex- 
pense and non-recurring items, and 20% for general and 
benevolence administration. By the practice of economy and 
efficiency. General Account shows a credit balance, the first 
in seven years, of $275.39. 

While our financial position is satisfactory, we cannot 
overlook a decline of over $35,000.00 in this year's gross 
revenue from the high over the past ten years recorded in 
1931. The principal items affected are Dues, Registrations 
and Interest. The first two items are directly affected by 
reduced numbers in membership and of applicants. In the 
year under review. Life Members' Commutation Fees reached 
an all time high of $8,868.00, thereby effecting a reduction 
of 739 in the membership on dues. We recommend that con- 
sideration be given to the revision of Life Membership Com- 
mutation fees and the fees payable to Grand Lodge on 
Initiations and Affiliations. 

Interest returns can only be governed by the money 
market. The comparatively mild reaction of the Bond Market 
last September presented a striking contrast to the con- 
fusion in 1914. The level of Government interest rates has 
recovered to the level which existed before the War and the 
stability of rates is due in no small measure to the Bank 
of Canada and the Foreign Exchange Control Board, who 
have at their command more power than has yet been used 
to prevent a decline in the Government Bond Market. The 
belief of many authorities that this will be a "three per 
cent. War" is supported by the very much stronger economic 
position of Canada to-day. We hold $303,500.00 of securities 
with 5% or better coupons, of which $135,500.00 mature 
within five years. 

The preparation of estimates made it quite apparent 
that we will be faced with a further reduction in Income for 
the now current year. With increasing activity, unemploy- 
ment lessened, new money more freely circulated and with 
the able assistance of your Supervisor of Benevolence, it is 
anticipated that there will be fewer applications for bene- 
volence. We are thereby enabled to submit the following 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 215 

balanced Budget for the fiscal year ending the 31st of May, 
1941: 

Estimated Income Available 

Initiations $ 5,600.00 

Affiliations 250.00 

Dues 83,000.00 

Certificates 100.00 

Constitutions 1,000.00 

Dispensations 600.00 

Commutations 6,000.00 

Miscellaneous 1,500.00 

Interest 15,000.00 

Ceremonies 250.00 

$113,300.00 



Recommended Appropriations 

Grand Treasurer's Clerk $ 400.00 

Salary— Grand Secretary 5,000.00 

Salary — Assistant Grand Secretary 3,600.00 

Salary— Clerk 1,800.00 

Salary- Stenographer 1,200.00 

Gratuity— Miss P 500.00 

Auditor 600.00 

Incidentals 1,350.00 

Proceedings, 1940 2,200.00 

Mailing Proceedings 150.00 

Printing and Stationery 900.00 

Constitutions 600.00 

Telephone 125.00 

Insurance 200.00 

Office Rent 1,600.00 

Canada Permanent Trust Co. (Fees) 325.00 

Postage, Chairmen of Committees 75.00 

Masonic Education 100.00 

Library 450.00 

Grand Master's Allowance 1,500.00 

Grand Master's Stenographer 300.00 

Deputy Grand Master's Allowance 500.00 

Commissions on Trials 100.00 

U.S. and Canada Relief Association 240.00 

Grand Lodge Expenses, 1940, Toronto 4,300.00 

Miscellaneous 2,500.00 

Salary — Supervisor Benevolence 4,000.00 

Stenographer for Supervisor 300.00 

Travelling Expenses, Supervisor 900.00 

Grants, Mrs. L 1,000.00 

M.M. Certificates 400.00 

S 37,215.00 

Benevolent Grants 76,000.00 



$113,215.00 



216 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

We are deeply indebted to your Grand Treasurer and 
Grand Secretary, and on your behalf extend sincere ap- 
preciation for the care and efficiency with which the affairs 
of Grand Lodge pertaining to their respective offices have 
been conducted as evidenced by their respective reports. We 
recommend to Grand Lodge that their reports be adopted. 

Fraternally and respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES S. HAMILTON, 

Chairman. 



REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON THE 
GRAVE OF M.W. BRO. T. D. HARINGTON 

The report of this Special Committee was pre- 
sented by R.W, Bro. C. M. Forbes, Chairman, and 
on motion of the Deputy Grand Master, seconded by 
R.W. Bro. C. M. Forbes, it was received and adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario: 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

This is the report of a Special Committee appointed by 
the Most Worshipful The Grand Master in January of the 
present year. 

Assigned to this Committee were the duties of investi- 
gating the matter of a monument to mark the grave of our 
Past Grand Master Most Worshipful Brother T. D. Harington; 
to enquire into the circumstances and collect the facts of his 
burial; location of the grave, and whether or not Grand 
Lodge ought to do anything. 

Information from all available sources coming within 
our reach has been diligently sought, and where obtained 
from private individuals it has been cheerfully and cour- 
teously given. First of all we made a study of the masonic 
career of Most Worshipful Brother Harington; then by cor- 
respondence with persons reputed to know certain facts 
relating thereto; by personal interviews with others; by visits 
to the grave where the body lies, and by photographs of the 
cemetery and plot — all these have enabled us to present 
the following authentic data. 

Masonic Career 

Most Worshipful Brother T. D. Harington was Grand 
Master of this Grand Body in the years 1860-1861-1862 and 
1863. Previous to those years he was Provincial Grand 
Master of the Province of Quebec and Three Rivers. He was 
a member of Central Lodge No. 110, Prescott, and a member 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 217 

of St. Andrews Lodge No. 16, Toronto, as well as being 
associated with other branches of masonic identity. 

From 1855 until 1858 when certain views of this Grand 
Body and those of the Provincial Grand Lodge of Canada 
kept them for the time being apart. Brother Harington by 
his tact and sound judgment was able, as intermediary, to 
assist, and did assist very successfully the efforts of that 
other noble Mason our late Grand Master Most Worshipful 
Brother William Mercer Wilson by cementing the fraternal 
bond which finally resulted in the union that now forms the 
Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province of Ontario, a full 
account of these events is penned into "The History of the 
Grand Lodge of Canada, in the Province of Ontario" a fa- 
scinating book written by Most Worshipful Brother W. S. 
Harrington. 

Death of Most Worshipful Brother T. D. Harington 

Most Worshipful Brother T. D. Harington died on 
January 13th, 1882 at Prescott, Ontario. The funeral service 
was held at St. Johns Anglican Church on January 17th 
under masonic auspices, the service was conducted by Rev. 
William Lewin. The cortege proceeded from the Church to 
Prescott wharf, the remains were taken on board the 
steamer "Transit" and conveyed to Blakey's Point, thence 
to Blue Church Cemetery where interment took place. The 
funeral service was attended by Most Worshipful Brother 
Colonel J. Moffat, Grand Master; Right Worshipful Brother 
J. J. Mason, Grand Secretary; Brother Colonel J. Moore, 
Grand Prior of the Grand Priory of Canada and many other 
prominent Masons. 

Burial Place 

The remains of Most Worshipful Brother T. D. Haring- 
ton are buried in consecrated ground known as The Blue 
Church Cemetery. It is part of Lot numbered Fourteen in 
the First Concession of the Township of Augusta, in the 
County of Grenville. Blue Church Cemetery is famous in 
the religious world as the last resting place of Barbara Heck 
who assisted in the establishing of Methodism in Canada 
and the United States. It is a picturesque Cemetery about 
three miles West of Prescott, encircled by a fringe of pine 
trees, cedar and maple. It lies on a breast of land that bends 
to the waters of the St. Lawrence River. Provincial High- 
way Number Two passes in front of the Cemetery, between 
it and the river. A few yards to the rear of the imposing 
monument raised to the memory of Barbara Heck lies the 
bare burial plot of our Grand Master save for a crude two 
inch iron piping there around. 

Identification of Burial Plot 

At the time of burial of our Grand Master no plan of 
the cemetery was in existence but we have secured the 
sworn testimony of Miss Constance Skinner of Maitland, 
which is hereto annexed, that she was present at the cere- 



218 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

mony and saw the remains lowered into the grave in the 
plot heretofore mentioned. We also have the verbal testi- 
mony of Mrs. Catherine Bates that she saw the remains of 
Mrs. Harington, wife of our Grand Master deposited above 
those of her husband and witnessed the removal of stones 
and pieces of headstones which had been placed there as 
precaution against body snatching which was prevalent at 
the time of our Grand Master's death. 

Condition of Plot 

Save for the iron railing before mentioned and a small 
slab over the grave next adjoining, the plot is unmarked. 
The grass that grows over it from year to year has been 
kept cut by the kindness of a branch of Womens Institute 
in the vicinity. 

Cost 

Perpetual care of the plot will cost one hundred dollars. 
This expenditure has been guaranteed by resolution passed 
at the semi-annual meeting of The Past Masters' and 
Wardens' Association of St. Lawrence District held at 
Spencerville, June 21st, 1940 upon the decision of this Grand 
Lodge to erect a memorial, a fitting and appropriate me- 
morial, suitably inscribed will cost three hundred dollars. 

Recommendation 

It is the fully considered opinion of this committee that 
a long deferred duty lies in the heart of every member of 
the Craft in the Province of Ontario and in order that this 
duty be honorably exercised and discharged we recommend 
that this Grand Lodge authorize the erection of a fitting 
memorial to departed merit by which the name of our former 
Grand Master, Brother T. D. Harington will stand out in 
loving memory before this and succeeding generations. Such 
a memorial would have a high moral value inasmuch as it 
would serve to point out to all thoughtful minds that sacri- 
fice invariably precedes achievement, and that we are build- 
ing upon foundations others have laid. 

The Committee places on record its sincere thanks for 
information supplied by Right Worshipful Brother E. A. 
McKim, Right Worshipful Brother Harold Kidd, Right Wor- 
shipful Brother E. Hicks, Very Worshipful Brother Thomas 
Guest, Brother Charles H. Ranson, Very Worshipful Rev. H. 
R. Pettem, Very Worshipful T. H. H. Hall, Miss Constance 
Skinner, Mrs. Catherine Bates, and many others who helped 
in various ways. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

(sgd) ROBERT HAWKINS, 

(sgd) A. L. CAMPBELL, 

(sgd) E. A. McKIM, 

(sgd) F. J. LATHAM, 

(sgd) CHRISTOPHER M. FORBES, 

Chairman. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 219 

OBLIGATION OF SCRUTINEERS 

The Scrutineers and their Chairman, V.W. Bro. 
E. B. Thompson, were admitted to Grand Lodge and 
were obligated by the Grand Secretary. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE 
GRAND MASTER'S ADDRESS 

The report on the Grand Master's Address was 
presented by M.W. Bro. W. S. Herrington, Chair- 
man, and on his motion, seconded by M.W. Bro. J. 
A. Rowland, it was received and adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario: 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

After a careful perusal of the address of the Grand 
Master your Committee experienced no difficulty in reading 
between the lines that the dominating thoughts in his mind 
were closely associated with the responsibilities of the office 
and how he could best discharge them. 

It is heartening to receive from him the assurance that 
Masonry throughout the jurisdiction is showing excellent 
progress and that there is a marked increase in the number 
of applications for membership. 

Your Committee endorses the recommendation of the 
Grand Master that the rank of Past Master be granted to 
Bro. Robert F. Cowling of North Gate Lodge No. 591 who, 
through illness, was unable to be installed until three months 
after his election as Master of his lodge. 

Your Committee is fully cognizant of the excellent ser- 
vice rendered to Grand Lodge and its dependents by M.W. 
Bro. Dargavel, the Supervisor of Benevolence and also of 
the efficient manner in which the Grand Secretary fulfills 
the duties of his office. The high tribute paid to these 
officers of Grand Lodge by the Grand Master is well merited. 

The Grand Master has not over-looked the need of fur- 
ther expansion of our system of Masonic Education. It is 
to be hoped that those charged with this branch of Masonic 
endeavor in the several districts will co-operate with and 
take full advantage of the able leadership of the chairman, 
R.W. Bro. Charles Robb. 

Your Committee joins with the Grand Master in paying 
honor to the many members of the Craft who have joined 
His Majesty's Forces in the defence of the Empire. The 
sacrifices that they are prepared to make in the righteous 



220 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

cause of justice and freedom are in full accord with the 
sacred principles of our Order. 

The Grand Master administers a deserved rebuke to the 
officers of those lodges which omit to produce the auditor's 
report before proceeding with the installation of the Master- 
elect. The neglect to observe this provision of the Consti- 
tution is inexcusable and lends itself to loose methods of 
financing which in the end may lead to disaster. 

Your Committee shares the views of the Grand Master 
as to the wisdom of a strict adherence to the courtesy due 
to a foreign jurisdiction about to be visited by a lodge from 
our jurisdiction. The permission of the Grand Masters of 
both jurisdictions should invariably be obtained before com- 
pleting any such arrangement. 

Your Committee recommends that Grand Lodge ratify 
and confirm the action of the Grand Master in donating from 
the funds of Grand Lodge the sum of $500.00 to the Cana- 
dian Red Cross Society to aid that worthy organization in 
its work of mercy. At no time in the history of our Grand 
Lodge has there been such an opportunity to practice that 
virtue which we profess to admire by relieving the necessi- 
ties of our brethren in distress. Every Grand Master has 
been confronted with problems that severely taxed his in- 
itiative and energy in the regular routine work of the office 
but never before has any Grand Master been brought face 
to face with a problem of such magnitude as the duty cast 
upon us to respond to the distressful cry from our kinsmen 
in the Motherland that we provide a haven for their little 
ones who are threatened with the bombs and machine guns 
of a merciless monster who revels in the murder of the 
innocent and helpless. 

Your Committee commends the prompt action taken by 
the Grand Master in his pathetic appeal through the circular 
letter sent by him to every lodge in the jurisdiction calling 
upon the brethren to cheerfully open their homes and volun- 
tarily express their willingness to care for the children of 
such of our over-seas brethren as desire to send them to 
Canada, to escape the horrors of the impending invasion of 
England by the gangster armies of her enemies. From re- 
ports already received there is every indication that the 
Freemasons of Ontario, true to their obligations, will rise 
to the occasion and demonstrate that the Grand Master's 
faith in their whole-hearted response to his appeal is well 
founded. The Committee appointed by the Grand Master 
to supervise this benevolent undertaking was well selected 
and we have every confidence that they will wisely and faith- 
fully discharge the arduous duties assumed by them. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

W. S. HERRINGTON, 

Chairman. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 221 

DISPOSAL OF MOTIONS 

In the absence of R.W. Bro. J. G. Moncrieff who 
had given proper notice, R. W. Bro. E, Tailby moved, 
seconded by W. Bro. J, W. Stoner, 

1. That lines 1 and 2 of Section 103 of the Constitution 
be amended to read as follows: 

"The Board shall annually appoint an Auditor, who 
is a member in good standing of a recognized Insti- 
tute or Association of Accountants, incorporated 
under proper legislative authority"; 

2. That line 3 of Section 117 of the Constitution be 
amended as follows: 

The words 'The Auditor appointed by the Board' be 
substituted for the words 'a professional accountant 
to be named by the Board'; also all the words after 
'and' in line 5 of Section 117 be deleted and the fol- 
lowing substituted therefor 'printed in the Proceed- 
ings of Grand Lodge'." 

R.W. Bro. Tailby explained that there was no 
thought or suggestion behind these amendments 
that any change should be made in the present 
Auditor whose ability and qualifications were recog- 
nized. Without further discussion the motion was 
put and the Grand Master declared both amend- 
ments carried. 

BALLOTING 

At 10.15 a.m. the Grand Master declared the 
next order of business to be the balloting for the 
election of Grand Lodge Officers. 

BALLOTING CLOSED 

At 11.20 a.m. the Grand Master declared the 
balloting closed. 

GUESTS SPEAK 

In the following order the Grand Master intro- 
duced M. Ex. Comp. L. F. Stephens, Grand First 
Principal of the Royal Arch Masons of Canada, M.W. 
Bro. Albert Knight, Past Grand Master of the Grand 



222 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Lodge of Rhode Island and M.W. Bro. J. N. Nichol- 
son, Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of 
Prince Edward Island. 

M. Ex. Comp. L. F. Stephens brought greetings 
from all Royal Arch Masons and reminded the 
brethren that our first Grand Master, M.W. Bro. 
William Mercer Wilson, was also the first Grand 
First Principal of the Royal Arch Masons of Canada. 

M.W. Bro. Albert Knight said he brought greet- 
ings of his Grand Master, M.W. Bro. George F. 
Ward and through him of 14,505 Freemasons in the 
smallest state in the Union. In 1934 before he was 
elected Grand Master he had hoped to get a vision 
of Freemasonry outside of the State. And so he had 
started on its great journey the "Sacred Book of 
Law" which was lying on our Altar and which 
would, with fitting ceremony, be rededicated this 
morning. This will make the fiftieth Grand Lodge 
in the United States and Canada where this beauti- 
ful Book has been rededicated since May, 1936. 
When all these Grand Lodges have enjoyed this 
unique privilege and distinction, and this Book of 
the Law shall have been returned to the final keep- 
ing of the Grand Lodge of Rhode Island, each time 
thereafter, when it shall be used in its proper place, 
it shall have become a constant reminder and also 
a Masonic memorial to generations yet unborn, of 
the universality of Freemasonry as well as an out- 
standing evidence of what may be accomplished by 
co-operative action. 

M.W. Bro. J. N. Nicholson in a few well chosen 
words brought greetings from his Grand Master 
and the smallest Grand Jurisdiction in Canada. 

Each guest was received with much applause 
by the brethren. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE MASONIC 
EDUCATION 

This report was presented by R.W. Bro. C. W, 
Robb, and on motion of the Deputy Grand Master, 
seconded by R.W. Bro. C. W. Robb, it was received 
and adopted. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 223 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario: 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

Your Committee on Masonic Education, composed of 
R.W. Bro. C. W. Robb (Chairman); M.W. Bros. W. S. Her- 
rington, W. J. Dunlop; R.W. Bros. E. G. Dixon, W. H. 
Gregory, N. C. Hart, R. F. Downey, Thos. Eakin, John Ness, 
A. C. Norwich, C. E. Clements, F. W. Colloton, Wm. Davies, 
report as follows: 

The year now drawing to its conclusion has been marked 
by some considerable measure of progress. The good seed 
sown by our predecessors continues to bear a gratifying 
harvest of re-awakened interest in matters Masonic and 
evidence is not lacking that nearly all the lodges are con- 
scious of the desirability of a regular course of in.«truction 
to supplement the ritualistic part of the ceremonies. 

In accordance with the procedure of previous years, 
supervisors were appointed in all the Masonic districts ex- 
cept in those where the District Deputy Grand Masters • 
deemed it inadvisable because of geographic difficulties. In 
such cases, these representatives of the Grand Master cheer- 
fully assumed the additional responsibilities of superintend- 
ing the dissemination of appropriate instruction among the 
various lodges which came under their jurisdiction. 

The thanks of this Committee is extended to those 
zealous and well-skilled brethren who were good enough to 
furnish the material for the bulletins which were sent forth 
from month to month. These represented the result? of much 
reading and research, but were they able to peruse the 
many letters of appreciation which have reached us from 
all parts of the Province, they would feel amply repaid for 
their efforts. We reserve a special word of gratitude for our 
brethren from Saskatchewan, whose articles we freely ap- 
propriated with suitable acknowledgements. 

In conclusion, we should like to reiterate the advice 
contained in the 1938 report, and in particular that part of 
it which relates to the importance of giving special instruc- 
tion to the candidates. We feel convinced that if steps are 
taken to enable them to make a daily advancement in Ma- 
sonic knowledge, we shall no longer have to fret ourselves 
because of the irregularity of attendance at our lodge meet- 
ings. Let us see to it that the first fine enthusiasm of the 
quest for knowledge is not permitted to wane. 

All of which is most respectfully and fraternally sub- 
mitted, 

C. W. ROBB, 

Chairman. 



224 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

SERVICE OF RE-DEDICATION 

At the request of the Grand Master, R.W. Bro. 
and Rt. Rev. Bishop W. C. Wliite, Past Grand Chap- 
lain, attended at the Altar and conducted the service 
of re-dedication of the "Sacred Book of the Law" of 
the Grand Lodge of Rhode Island. The brethren 
stood at the Sign of Fidelity. 

Prayer, 

"Prevent us, O Lord, in all our doings with Thy most 
gracious favour, and further us with Thy continual help; 
that in all our works, begun, continued, and ended in Thee, 
we may glorify Thy holy Name, and finally by Thy mercy 
obtain everlasting life." 

"So mote it be." 
Dedication. 

"On this Altar of the Most Worshipful the Grand Lodge 
of Canada, of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons, in the 
Province of Ontario, by command of the Most Worshipful 
the Grand Master, I re-dedicate this "Sacred Book of the 
Law", to the high cause of the unity of Freemasonry on this 
continent; in the Name of the Most High, to Whom be glory 
for evermore." 

"So mote it be." 

Led by W. Bro. D. S. Linden the brethren sang 
one verse of the hymn "Unto the Hills". 

Benediction. 

"May the Blessing of the Most High rest upon us and 
upon all our work and worship done in His Name. May He 
give us Light to guide us. Courage to support us, and Love 
to unite us, now and for evermore." 

"So mote it be." 

CALLED OFF 

The labors of Grand Lodge were suspended at 
11.45 a.m. and again resumed at 2 p.m. the Grand 
Master on the Throne. 

REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF SCRUTINEERS 

V.W. Bro. E. B. Thompson, Chairm.an, presented 
the report of the Committee of Scrutineers and on 
motion of the Deputy Grand Master, seconded by 



TORONTO. ONTARIO. 1940 225 

V.W. Bro. E. B. Thompson, it was received and 
adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario: 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

Your Committee of Scrutineers begs to report the result 
of the Elections as follows: 

Grand Senior Warden M. J. Kinnee 

Grand Junior Warden Geo. Hinton 

Grand Chaplain Bishop Geo. F. Kingston 

Grand Registrar G. S. Warren 

BOARD OF GENERAL PURPOSES 

B. F. Nott „ North Bay 

W. D. Love - London 

T. H. Simpson Hamilton 

C. W. Robb - - Toronto 

John Ness Toronto 

NEXT PLACE OF MEETING— OTTAWA 

All of which is fraternally submitted, 

E. B. THOMPSON, 

Chairman. 

The Grand Master then declared the above 
brethren to be duly elected. 

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS 

The Grand Secretary read the list of names of 
the brethren selected in the various districts to 
serve as District Deputy Grand Masters. The Grand 
Master confirmed their election and requested M.W. 
Bro. F. A, Copus to install and invest them. After 
M.W. Bro. Copus had addressed them he installed 
the following brethren as District Deputy Grand 
Masters : 

District D.D.G.M. P.O. ADDRESS 

Algoma C. E. Watkins Fort William 

Brant H. S. Liittich Brantf ord 

Bruce James D. Potts Dobbinton 



226 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

District D.D.G.M. P.O. Address 

Chatham .John M. Coutts Thamesville 

Eastern Wm. R. Hall Vankleek Hill 

Frontenac Jas. W. Simmons Chaff ey's Locks 

Georgian N. Ray Doolittle Orillia 

Grey M. G. Fitzgerald Orangeville 

Hamilton "A" Dr. A. E. Barnby Hamilton 

Hamilton "B" A. E. McArthur Hamilton 

London Jos. W. Carson London 

Muskoka John M. Gerow Burks Falls 

Niagara "A" W. D. Fairbrother Beamsville 

Niagara "B" W. J. Goodyear Stamford Centre 

Nipissing East Dr. H. H. Abell Cobalt 

Nipissing West ...Matthew Nisbet Capreol 

North Huron Dr. R. C. Redmond Wingham 

Ontario O. W. Rolph Orono 

Ottawa -..C. M. Pitts Ottawa 

Peterborough D. H. Webster. Lakefield 

Prince Edward Arthur L, Hill Belleville 

Sarnia Andrew Flynn Thedford 

South Huron H. B. M. Tichbome Goderich 

St. Lawrence M. R. Hough North Augusta 

St. Thomas Ross Tufford St. Thomas 

Temiskaming John W. Fanning Kapuskasing 

Toronto "A" Albion Maynes Toronto 

Toronto "B" Dr. S. S. Crouch Toronto 

Toronto "C" N. G. McDonald Willowdale 

Toronto "D" T. R. W. Black Toronto 

Victoria R. T. Robertson Coboconk 

Wellington H. E. Cosford Guelph 

Western E. E. Jess Rainy River 

Wilson B. M. Pearce Simcoe 

Windsor L. N. Malott Leamington 

INSTALLATION 

The other officers-elect of Grand Lodge were 
installed and invested by M.W. Bro. R. B. Dargavel. 
The Grand Master then directed the Director of 
Ceremonies to give Grand Honours. 

APPOINTED MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

The Grand Master appointed the following 
brethren members of the Board of General Pur- 
poses. 

R.W. Bro. R. A. Stewart Toronto 

R.W. Bro. C. M. Forbes Perth 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 227 

R.W. Bro. G. H. Jefferson Clinton 

R.W. Bro. C. E. Clements Chatham 

and for one year, 
R.W. Bro. N. C. Hart London 

APPOINTMENTS TO OFFICE 

Grand Senior Deacon, V.W. Bro. E. MacLean, St. Catharines 
Grand Junior Deacon, V.W. Bro. F. Haffner, Kingston. 
Grand Supt. of Works, V.W. Bro. H. S. Stears, Hamilton 
Grand Dir. of Ceremonies, V.W. Bro. H. J. Sykes, Ottawa 
Assistant Grand Chaplain V.W. Bro. P. H. Streeter, Aylmer 
Assistant Grand Chaplain, V.W. Bro. M. Sellars, Toronto 
Assistant Grand Chaplain, V.W. Bro. H. R. Pettem, Prescott 
Assistant Grand Chaplain, V.W. Bro. T. S. Watson, Port 

Arthur 
Assistant Grand Secretary, V.W. Bro. J. A. Wilson, Port 

Arthur 
-Assistant Gr. Dir. of Ceremonies, V.W. Bro. P. E. Baker, 

Keewatin 
Grand Sword Bearer, V.W. Bro. J. Ferguson, Belmont 
Grand Organist, V.W. Bro. E. L. Treitz, Sarnia 
Assistant Grand Organist, V.W. Bro. J. F. McDonald, Emsdale 
Grand Pursuivant, V.W. Bro. T. S. Cooper, Markdale 

GRAND STEWARDS 

V.W. Bro. Wm. Anderson Havelock 

" " W. H. Armitage Sturgeon Falls 

" " J. Armstrong Wroxeter 

" " J. P. Ballantyne Kapuskasing 

" " Wm. Boquist Kenora 

" " John Bristow Plattsville 

" " T. C. Brown Claremont 

" R. A. Carter Hamilton 

" J. O. Coulter Thessalon 

" " A. S. Couper Peterborough 

" G. Davis St. Catharines 

" " A. J. DeLong West Lome 

" " W. H. Drummond Brockville 

" H. Frosch Paris 

" Robt. Galbraith Mount Forest 

" " Jas. Goodman Timmins 

" S. B. Gordon Richmond 

" S. A. Goring Tavistock 

" T. R. Hawkins Hamilton 

" T. A. Howson Toronto 

" P. C. Hunstein Cargill 

" C. A. Hunt Dorchester 

" T. G. Idle Thornbury 

" " Robt. Johnston Ancaster 

" " J. Kenney Acton 



228 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

GRAND STEWARDS 

V.W. Bro. T. C. Kremer. Toronto 

" J. J. Linton _ Toronto 

" Wm. MacBeth Toronto 

" F. S. Magee Omemee 

" R. E. Malpass Port Credit 

" E. Manifold Toronto 

" T. H. Mansell Ottawa 

" John Marr Toronto 

" F. Mcintosh Acton 

" J. H. Mclntyre „Wardsville 

" J. W. McKay Muirkirk 

" S. R. McKelvey Beeton 

" J. F. McLean Alliston 

" J. L. McMullan Windsor 

" S. R. Mitchell South River 

" N. F. Moore Cornwall 

" W. F. Morley Sault Ste. Marie 

" 0. H. Murray Embro 

" C. W. Newell Paris 

" J. H. Page Toronto 

" V. Pow Fingal 

" A. Reid Niagara Falls 

" J. E. Robertson Toronto 

" Wm. Robertson Elora 

" D. A. Ross Martintown 

" R. F. Rourke Port Arthur 

" Robt. Scarlett Seaforth 

" F. Scott Toronto 

" Herbert Smith Sharbot Lake 

" J. R. Smith Gormley 

" C. E. Stephenson Port Hope 

" W. J. Stoddart Woodville 

" A. Storie Oshawa 

" N. A. Tice Wellington 

" F. Want Niagara Falls 

" W. D. Wells Londesboro 

" B. Whetstone Gaelph 

" C. V. Wilkins Trenton 

" H. F. Winter Petrolia 

GRAND STANDARD BEARERS 

V.W. Bro. C. G. Jones _ Smith's Falls 

V.W. Bro. R. E. Lonnee Windsor 

GRAND TYLER 

W. Bro. G. T. Wild Westboro 

NEXT PLACE OF MEETING 
The City of Ottawa. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 229 

VOTE OF THANKS 

On motion of M.W. Bro. W. S. Herrington, 
seconded by M.W. Bro. F. A. Copus it was unani- 
mously resolved: THAT this Grand Lodge extend 
its sincere thanks to the Mayor and citizens of 
Toronto, to the Toronto Board of Education, to the 
Police Department, to the lodges of the four Toronto 
Districts, to the Local Committee on Arrangements 
and to all other officials for the kindness shown to 
the officers and delegates; and that a copy of this 
resolution be sent to the several committees and 
officials. 

GRAND LODGE CLOSED 

The Grand Master having announced that the 
labors of Grand Lodge were concluded, called on the 
Grand Chaplain to invoke the blessing of the Most 
High upon the Craft. 

Grand Lodge was declared closed in Ample 
Form at 3.15 o'clock in the afternoon of Thursday, 
July 18th, 1940. 




Grand Secretary. 




230 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

RETURNS OF LODGES AS 

For Secretary's Address look first at list of Special Addresses, pages 250 to 254. 
Lodges marked (a) hold their Installation of Officers on or near the Festival 

The names of the W. M. and Secretary 



oS 


Lodge 


Where held 


W. Master 


^2 








OloMIacroi-o 


Niagara — 

Kingston 




3 


aAnc. St John's 


W. E. Kidd. 


5 


a Sussex 


Brockville 


W. C. Singleton 


6 




Hamilton 


Chilvers Gooch 
G. B. Lipsitt 


7 


Union 


Grimsby 


9|aUnion 


Napanee 


J. D. Mayhew 


lOlaNnrfnlk 




H. P. Innes 


11 

14 




Belleville 


J. E. Bateman 
J. S. Gird wood 


aTrue Bi itons 


Perth.... . 


151 St. Geoige's 


St. Catharines 


C. A. Brown 


16 aSt. Andiew's 


Toronto 


G. W. McGill 


17 St. John's 


Cobourg 


L. E. Taylor 


18|aPrince Edwaid 


Picton.. 


Gerald Allison 


20|aSt. John's 


London 


Fred Muir.... 


21a|aSt. John's - 


Vankleek Hill 


G. E. Elvidge 


22]aKing Solomon's 


Toronto 


F. M. Byam 


23|Richmond 


Richmond Hill 


A. R. Hill.... 


24 aSt. Francis 


Smith's Falls 


J. A. Moir. 


25 alonic 


Toronto 


G. N. Hargraft 


26 aOntario.. 


Port Hope 


W. A. Highfield 


27 aStrict Obseivance 


Hamilton 


R. G. Truscott 


28|aMt. Zion 


Kemptville 


Frank Latourel 


29laUnited 


Brighton 


G. F. Wright 


30|aComposite 
31|aJerusalem 


Whitby 


H. W. Jermyn 


Bowmanville 


P. R. Cowling 


32|aAmity 


Dunnville 


Jas. Sebben. 


33|aMaitland 


Goderich 


F. R. Darrow 


34|aThistIe.... 


Amherstburg 


Geo. Somerton 


35 

37 

38 


aSt. John's - 


Cayuga 


H. A. Meadows 
H. S. Wright 
E. A. Blakely 


aKing Hiram 


IngersoU -. 


aTrent 


Trenton — 


39 
40 
41 




Brooklin _ 


John Lambert 
C. E. Heal... 
C. E. Fox 




Hamilton 


aSt. George's 


Kingsville.... 


42|aSt. George's - 


London 


H. F. Hill... 


43| King Solomon's 


Woodstock 


B. R. Thom-son 


44|aSt. Thomas 


St. Thomas _ 


J C. Smith 


45|aBrant ♦ 


Brantford 


W. E. Davies 


46|aWelling1on 


Chatham 


H. D. Palucci 


471aGreat Western . 


Windsor 


H. H. Amsden 


48laMarlof 


Madoc 


E. T. Nayler 
Ray Jack.son 
J. W. Tuck 
A. R. Bigford 


50 
52 
54 




Consecon 

Ottawa 

Maple 




aVaughan 


55 
56 




Merrickville 

Sarnia 


F. W. C. Jackson 
J A. McDonald 


aVictoria. 


57|aHarmony 


Binbrook 


Orval Bell... 


58 
61 
62 
63 




Ottawa 

Hamilton 


F. B. Dunn. 
V. N. Ameb 
W. H. Clark 

G. J. Patterson 






Caledonia 

Carleton Place _ — 


aSt. John's _ 


64 

65 




London 

Toronto 


D. H. Finlayson 
F. R. Workman 


aReh oboam 


66 

68 




Newcastle 

IngersoU 


C. M. Jones . 
T W. Dean. 


aSt. John's 


69 
72 


Stirling 


Stirling 

Gait 


H. R. Tompkins . 

T. L. Dick 




73 


a St. James 


St. Mary's 


D. C. White 



Secretary 



T. W. Bishop 

A. W. Cathcart _... 

T. H. Guest — 

B. E. James. — 

C. W. Lewis....-.- 

G. T. Walters 

D. G. Campbell 

J. W. Cook 

P. O. McLaren 

C .H. Hesburn - 

Wm. Lawrence - 

Thos. Hardcastle 

W. E. Scott - 

R. Booth -.. 

Ken. MacKenzie 

R. A. Woodley 

J. E. Smith....- 

C. G. Jones 

R. M. Willes-Chitty.. 

F. H. Batty 

R. M. AUworth 

H. D. Hyndman 

I. B. Solomon 

J. W. Bateman — 

E. H. Brown 

S. W. Lymburner 

Wm. Bisset 

L. J. Pettypiece 

R. H. Davey 

H. T. Bower _ 

W. J. Potts —. 

R. V. Mowbray 

C. F. Marshall 

E. L. Frost 

C. M. Linnell 

A. W. Massie 

F. R. Palmer 

Geo. Whitwill 

W. J. McCall 

A. M. Wright 

A. S. Cochran 

W. W. Locie 

H. W. Jackson 

E. A. Carson 

M. G. Corbett 

H. W. Unsworth 

J. D. Rose 

J. A. Ross _. 

C. E. Kelly -... 

T. J. Hicks 

H. E. Menzies 

W. Lancaster 

G.' W. Slack 

J. W. Bradley _, 

F. G. Rich 

V. Richardson 

A. G. Malcolm _ 

J. W. Durr 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 

AT DECEMBER 31, 1939. 

If not there, then Secretary's Address is where lodge is held- 

of St. John the Evangelist, all others on or near that of St. John the Baptist 

are corrected up to July 31, 1940. 



231 



OS 


Night of Meeting 


O 


1 

s 


O 

'5 


C 

'3 

1-9 


rs 

0) 

u 

to 







c 

§ 
M 


00 

u : 




2\\!<I^A «n r.^ Kof Tf "M 


4 

13 
13 
6 
2 
7 
10 
2 
1 
3 
3 
3 
10 
7 
1 
5 
3 
5 
3 
4 
8 


9 
12 
13 
6 
1 
4 
12 
4 
1 
2 
2 
2 
14 
7 
1 
4 
5 
4 
3 
3 
9 


7 
10 
11 

4 

10 

7 
1 
1 
3 
3 
12 
7 


1 

5 
2 
2 

7 

1 
4 
1 
1 


2 
1 

1 

1 

..„ 

1 
2 

1 

1 
1 


__„ 

2 
1 
6 

1 
4 
1 
2 

"IT 
2 
4 
2 

1 

7 

1 

„- 

4 

1 
1 
2 

1 


4 
8 
7 
9 
4 
1 
5 
6 
6 
6 

12 
4 
5 
9 
1 
8 
5 
4 

10 
2 

14 
1 
1 
5 
1 
2 
5 
3 
1 
5 
.1 




146 
360 
353 
423 
177 
216 
204 
380 
150 
318 
499 
247 
245 
434 
67 
301 
130 
253 
293 
167 
449 
111 
152 
124 
219 
195 
199 
118 
119 
160 
231 
102 
528 
211 
268 
361 
353 
380 
262 
515 
142 
82 
409 
70 
90 
286 
119 
370 
773 
130 
194 
400 
486 
89 
1 139 
1 120 
1 215 
1 178 


148 


3 
5 
6 


1st Th'irsday 




362 




8 
2 


351 




422 


TV,.,,.„ ,^r. r.- Ko* V M 


171 


9 2nd Friday -.. .. 

10 2nd Tuesday -. ._ . 

11 1st Wednesday 

J4!1ot TlJlr^r^Aa,, 




223 


* 3 
6 


209 
370 
143 


15 
16 

17 
18 
20 
21a 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 


2nd Tuesday 


12 

8 

10 


304 


•?,rM\ Tuesday 


482 


2nd Tuesday 

let Thiiredny 


236 

248 


2nd Tuesday 

Tues. on or bef. F.M 

9nd T>ii1'-sHay 


8 
3 
8 

7 
5 
3 

.„... 

1 


424 
61 


\ 

3 
4 
3 
9 


1 

2 

1 
1 
1 
3 

2 
1 
2 
3 

1 
1 

~Z~~ 
3 

1 
2 


283 


3rd Wednesday _. .. 


129 
256 




279 


3rd Friday 


154 


3rd Friday _.. 

Fri. on or bef. F.M.. 


435 
107 


1st Tuesday „ 

Last Monday _ 

2nd Wednesday — — -.. 

2nd Wednesday 


8 
2 
3 

1 
1 
2 
4 
4 
1 
5 
8 
5 
1 
9 


3 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
3 
4 
1 
7 
9 
5 
1 
10 


3 

2 
3 

1 
2 
2 
2 
4 
2 
7 
9 
6 
1 
7 


159 
119 
221 
195 
196 


34|Tues. on or bef. F.M...... 

35|Thurs. on or aft. F.M 

37 list Friday 

38|2nd Tuesday 




120 


3 
6 

7 


118 
154 
224 
107 


40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
50 
52 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
68 
69 
72 
73 


3rd Thurs -._ _ 

Thurs. on or bef. F.M 

1st Thursday _. .. 

1st Tuesday 

1st TVi'ireday 


1 
1 

2 

1 
5 
1 
2 
1 

2 

1 
1 
1 

2 
1 
2 

1 


1 
4 
2 
3 

6 
6 
5 

2 

3 


17 
5 
3 

4 
8 
3 

7 
8 

1 
5 
1 
5 
2 


7 

5 
4 
1 
9 
10 
34 
8 
3 
3 


515 
210 
261 
361 
348 


2nd Tuesday .. .. 


3 
3 

12 
5 
3 
2 
2 
2 
3 


3 
3 
13 
3 
3 
2 
3 
1 
2 


1 
3 
12 
4 
3 
2 
2 
1 
3 


2 

2""' 

1 

1 
1 
5 
3 


369 




244 


let- Thnrsdfiy 


487 




140 


Fri. on or bef. F.M 

1st Tuesday . _ 

2nd Tuesday 

Mon. on or bef. F.M. 
1st Tuesday 


83 

402 

73 


6 
6 


83 
280 
121 


3rd Thursday 


6 

8 
5 
3 
11 
4 
3 
3 
6 
3 
1 1 


4 
12 
4 
2 
11 
4 
2 
3 
3 




4 
12 

4 

2 
11 

3 

2 

3 

1 

3 

2 


1 
12 

1 
10 

1 
2 


5 

10 

2 

3 

6 

H 

1 1 

1 2 

1 6 
1 2 


2 
15 

12 
10 
3 
2 
2 
2 

LI 


370 


2nd Friday - 


750 


3rd Thursday 

2nd Wednesday - . 

i3rd Friday 

jlst Thursday 


136 
183 


2 

1 
3 


395 
468 


list Tuesday _. . 


90 


|3rd Friday 

3rd Thursday _ .. 


1 139 
125 
208 


|3rd Monday _ 


1 1 3 


174 



2 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

RETURNS OF LODGES AS 

For Secretary's Address look, first at list of Special Addresses, pages 250 to 254. 
Lodges marked (a) hold their Installation of Officers on or near the Festival 

The names of the W. M. and Secretary 



4^ 



Lodge 



74|aSt. James 

75| St. John's 

76jaOxford _... 

77|aFaithful Brethren.. 

7 8 1 aKingHiram 

79|aSimcoe .«. 

81|aSt. John's 



82|aSt. John's _ 

83|aBeaver 

84 1 Clinton 

85|aRising Sun 

86|aWilson._ 

87 1 Markham Union.. 

881 St. George's 

90|aManito _. 

91 1 Colborne 

92|aCataiaqui.. 

93 

94 

96 

97 

98 



aNorthern Light 

aSt. Mark's 

aCorinthian 

aSharon 

True Blue 

99| Tuscan 

1001 Valley 

101 1 aCorinthian 

lOSJaMaple Leaf 

1041 St. John's 

lOSlaSt. Mark's 

1 06 laBurf ord 

1071 St. Paul's 

1081 Blenheim 

109|aAlbion 

llOlaCentral 

113|aWilson 

IHIaHope 

1 1 5|alvy 

1 1 6 1 a Cassia 

1181 Union 

U 9 1 aMaple Leaf 

1201 Warren 

121|aDoric 

122|aRenfrew 

123laRellcvill e 

125|aCornwall 

126|aGoldenRule _ 

127iaFranck 

1281 Pembroke 

1291 Rising Sun 

lailaSt. Lawrence 

133|aLebanon Forest 

135laSt. Clair 

1361 Ri ch ardson..... 

1 3 7 1 a Py th a gor as 

1391 Lebanon 

1 4 1 a Ma I abide 

141 laTudor 

142|aExcelsior 

143|aFriendly Brothers.. 



Where held 




Mount Brydges.. 

Paris 

Strathroy 

Clinton 

Athens 

Toronto 

Markham 

Owen Sound 

Collingwood 

Colborne - 

Kingston 

Kincardine 

Port Stanley 

Barrie — 

Queensville 

Bolton 

Newmarket 

Dundas 

Peterborough 

St. Catharines 

Norwich 

Niagara Falls 

Burford 

Lambeth 

Princeton 

Harrowsmith 

Prescott - 

Waterford 

Port Hope 

Beamsville 

Thedford 

Schomberg 

Bath 

Fingal 

Brantford 

Renfrew 

Belleville 

Cornwall 

Campbellford 

Frankford 

Pembroke 

Aurora _ 

Southampton 

Exeter 

Milton 

Stouffville 

Meaford 

Oshawa 

Aylmer 

Mitchell 

Morrisburg 

Iroquois 



W. Master 



Secretary 



L. J. Chase 

G. S. Jackman 

H. J. Shantz 

D. McQuarrie 

W. D. Agur 

Max Bemrose 

L. M. Brown 

H. K. Wheeler 

J. T. Crawford 

F. Fingland 

W. A. Reid 

W. D. Proctor 

Milton Russell 

H. W. Dane 

T. J. Simpson _ _ 

W. R. Baxter 

R. J. Pindred 

J. A. Reynolds 

A. W. Ney 

J. L. Williams 

T. C. Cameron 

J. C. Goodfellow 

Chas. Bovair 

J. H. MacKay 

C. H. Crowe 

James Thomson 

Cameron Culver 

Duncan Keppy 

R. O. Lowden 

Orley Dale 

\. E. Evans 

A. Goslin 

W. G. Webb 

G. A. Allan 

L. Watson 

Jas. Mowat 

Gordon Hamilton 

H. N. Wauchope 

John Craven 

E. S. Down 

Walter McCutcheon.. 

Paul Loken 

E. S. Fairman 

H. G. Williams 

S. W. Clegg 

K. A. Fall 

E. A. Hunt 

Herbert Stocks 

A. M. C. Wells 

Cyril Tanton 

P. R. Harvey 

H. F. Sanders 

C. E. Brown 

G. H. Lauder 

E. Clarke 

W. F. Elliott 

C. R. Hunter 

Irvine Payne 



H. H. Throop 

C. F. Boddy 

E. E. Dougall 

C. L. Davidson 

R. A. McQueen 

J. F. CuUingham 

G. E. Longfield _ 

H. Frosch 

S. Swales 

H. E. Rorke 

A. E. Watt 

W. L. Lawer 

J. W. Warriner 

C. T. Waugh 

D. M. Hughes 

A. G. Cracknell 

T. N. Clarke 

J. R. McKay 

H. G. Goodhue 

A. H. Felt 

R. G. Strasler 

B. R. Leavens _ 

R. L. Pritchard 

W. J. Mulligan 

R. F. Downey 

A. E. Coombs _. 

N. C. Macwhirter... 

F. Trelford 

A. H. Beven 

R. McDougall 

S. C. Robson 

C. A. Copp 

C. H. Ransom 

R. H. Robinson 

A. Mark 

W. D. Fairbrother... 

R. P. Bass 

R. W. Stewart 

D. F. Ayls worth 

C. P. Silcox 

J. P. Temple 

J. P. Morrison 

C. D. Crosby 

A. W. Gammon _. 

F. C. Bonny castle... 

G. D. Wright 

C. W. Eraser 

N. F. Johnson 

H. R. MacNeill - 

R. N. Creech 

R. M. Clements 

K. R. Davis 

\V. G. Bright _ 

W. A. Hare. 

Geo. Stewart 

J. A. Myers 

W. C. Davy 

H. Hamilton 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1940 233 

AT DECEMBER 31, 1939. 

If not there, then Secretary's Address is where lodge is held. 

of St. John the Evangelist, all others on or near that of St. John the Baptist. 

are corrected up to July 31, 1940. 



V. 0) 
O u 


Night of Meeting 


2 


Oi 


-9 

.2 
'3 




o 

1 


a 

P5 


(V 


T3 
S 
o 
p. 




00 . 

a; « — 


1 


3 


4 


4 






1 


2 




85 


85 




9 


3 


2 


_.. 




2 


8 


3 


263 


252 


76|2nd Monday 


4 


1 


1 





1 


3 


5 


4 


295 


288 


77 1st Friday 


7 


7 


7 


5 




2 


6 


7 


297 


294 


78 2nd Wednesday _... 


12 


12 


8 


3 




5 


3 




270 


277 


79|2nd Monday 


1 


2 


4 


1 




1 




1 


121 


121 


81 1 2nd Tuesday 


2 
2 


1 

1 


1 

1 


1 

1 










93 
191 


96 


82 


2nd Tuesday -.... 




1 


3 


6 


184 


83 


3rd Friday 


2 


1 


1 


1 






•> 


5 


149 


145 


84 


Fri. on or aft. F.M 


2 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


5 


138 


135 


85 


Thurs. on or bef. F.M 


3 


3 


3 


1 




1 


1 





82 


84 


86l3rd Tuesday 


3 


3 


1 




\ 


5 


11 


4 


339 


323 


87|Fri. on or bef. F.M 


2 


3 


3 








1 




159 


160 


88 2nd Wednesday 


1 


1 




) 


1 




3 




186 


188 


90|2nd Tuesday _... 


9 


6 


5 






2 


5 


7 


231 


226 


91 1 3rd Friday .._ 


3 


6 


3 







2 


2 


5 


108 


102 


92 1 2nd Friday _.. 


8 


7 


7 


1 





1 


8 


2 


342 


340 


93 list Wednesday ...., 


2 


2 


1 






2 


1 




181 


180 


94 1 2nd Tuesday 


3 


4 


4 




2 


1 


3 




63 


64 


9611st Thursday 


8 


7 


7 


3 




3 


5 





394 


397 


97|2nd Tuesday — 


3 


4 


4 


1 


1 


1 


5 


4 


81 


76 


98 
99 


1st Friday 






1 
7 




1 


1 
4 


1 
4 


2 
4 


66 
146 


63 


2nd Thursday _ 


7 


7 


2 


143 


100 2nd Monday 


2 


3 


3 


3 


4 


2 


4 


8 


236 


231 


101 3rd Friday 


15 


16 


16 






7 


6 





246 


248 


1031 Last Thursday 


10 


11 


10 


2 


5 


3 


2 


7 


322 


327 


104]Tues. on or aft. F.M 


6 


4 


5 


4 


2 




2 




153 


163 


10512nd Tuesday 


3 


-: ■ 


5 


2 


2 


1 


2 





251 


255 


106|3rd Wednesday 


5 
8 


3 
6 


3 
6 


3 










89 
120 


97 


107; Wed. on or bef. F.M 




2 


2 




124 


10812nd Friday I 


2 

7 








1 





"T 


3 


77 
155 


77 


109|Fri. on or bef. F.M 


6 


7 1 




159 


110 1st Tuesday 


3 


3 


3 






3 


2 


19 


170 


149 


113 2nd Wednesday 


6 


4 


3 1 


1 


1 


3 


3 


3 


157 


156 


114 1st Friday _ 


8 


6 


6 


1 


?. 


1 


4 




173 


179 


115|Tues. on or bet. F.M 


6 


5 


6 


2 


2 




6 





190 


194 


116|Mon. on or bef. F.M 


3 1 


4 1 

1 1 


4 1 
2 


1 


r" 


1 
1 






63 

79 


66 


118|Mon. on or bef. F.M .1 


1 


8 


70 


11912nd Monday 


4 


5 


2 


2 




1 


3 




104 


106 


12011st Tuesday I 


I 1 


1 


1 1 












2 


51 


50 


121|3rd Friday _ . 1 


2 1 


3 


6 


3 


2 


3 


12 


5 


524 


513 


122|lst Tuesday 


1 1 
6 








1 

1 


2 1 
3 


2 
9 


4 
7 


131 
324 


124 


12311st Thursday 


4 1 


4 1 


J 


313 


125|lst Wednesday _ 


5 


6 1 


7 1 


1 





2 


3 


.. 


238 


238 


12612nd Monday 


9 


3 1 


3 1 


3 




3 


1 


7 


202 


196 


127|3rd Monday 


7 


5 1 


6 I 






: 


2 




148 


153 


128Ust Thursday 


1 


1 1 


4 1 






3 


.■> 




171 


164 


12911st Friday 


1 


2 1 
9 1 


2 i 
9 1 




1 
1 


2 


4 1 
2 1 


2 


143 
81 


136 


131|2nd Tuesday 


8 1 




88 


133|2nd Monday 


5 1 
2 1 


4 1 
2 1 


5 1 
1 1 







2 1 
5 1 


1 1 

2 1 


2 
5 


121 
140 


121 


13511st Thursday 


1 


131 


1361 3rd Friday 1 


2 1 


2 1 


3 1 


2 
2 

1 


1 


1 1 
1 1 
9 1 


1 




93 
107 
269 1 


96 


137 1 
1391 


1st Tuesday _ . _. | 


3 1 
3 1 


1 
3 


104 


2nd Tuesday 1 


4 1 


4 1 


2 1 


259 


140|3rd Wednesday 


2 1 


1 1 


1 1 


1 




1 1 


3 1 


1 


133 1 


131 


14112nd Tuesday 


7 1 


3 1 


2 i 


3 




1 1 


2 1 


3 


. 104 1 


108 


142|lst Friday 


7 1 
1 


3 1 
1 1 


3 1 
1 


1 





2 1 
1 


1 




103 1 
109 1 


109 


1431 Wed. on or bef. F.M 1 


3 1 


1 


107 



234 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

RETURNS OF LODGES AS 

For Secretary's Address look first at list of Special Addresses, pages 250 to 254. 
Lodges marked (a) hold their Installation of Officers on or near the Festival 

The names of the W. M. and Secretary 



1^3 



144 
145 
146 
147 
148 
149 
151 
153 
154 
155 
156 
157 
158 
159 
161 
162 
164 
1651 
166 
168 
169 
170 
171 
172 
174 
177 
178 
180 
181 
184 
185 
186 
1901 
192 
193 
194 
195 
196 
197 
200 
201 
203 
205 
207 
209 
209a 
215 
216! 
217 
218 
219 
2201 
221 
222 
223 
224 
225 
228 



Lodge 



aTecumseh 

aJ. B. Hall 

aPrince of Wales... 

Mississippi 

aCivil Service 

aErie 

aGrand River 

aBurns 

alrving 

aPeterborough 

aYork 

aSimpson 

a Alexandra 

aGoodwood 

aPercy 

Forest _ 

aStar in the East.. 

a B ur li n gton _ 

aWentworth 

aMerritt 

aMacnab 

aBritannia 

aPrince of Wales.... 
aAyr 

Walsingham 

The Builders 

Plattsville 

aSpeed 

aOri?ntal 

aOld Light 

a En n isls i lien 

a P I a n t aganet 

Belmont 

aOrillia 

aScotland 

aPetiolia 

aTuscan „ 

Madawaska 

aSaugeen 

St. Alban's 

a Leeds 

Irvine 

New Dominion 

Lancaster 

Evergreen 

I aSt. John's 

Lake 

aHarris 

a Fred er i ck 

a Stevenson 

aCx-edit 

Zeredatha 

aMountain 

aMarmora 

aNorwood 

Huron 

aBernard 

aPrince Arthur 



Where held 



Stratford 

Millbrook 

New burgh 

Almonte _, 

Ottawa 

Port Dover 

Kitchener 

Wyoming _... 

Lucan 

Peterborough 

Toronto 

Newboro 

Oil Springs 

Richmond 

Wark worth 

Wroxeter 

Wellington 

Burlington 

Stoney Ci-eek 

Welland 

Port Colborne 

Seatorth 

lona Stn. 

Ayr 

Port Rowan 

Ottawa - 



Plattsville 

Guelph 

Port Burwell 

Lucknow 

York 

Riceville _ 

Bel mont 

Orillia 

Scotland 

Petrolia 

London 

Arnprior 

Walkerton 

Mt. Forest 

G a n an oque 

Elora 

New Hamburg... 

Lancaster 

Lanark 

London 

Ameliasburg 

Orangeville 

Delhi 

Toronto 

Georgetown 

fJxbridge 

Thorold 

Marmora 

Norwood 

Hensall 

Listowel 

Odessa 



W. Master 



G. S. Todd 

A. J. Dawson 

S. E. Gandin 

J. L. Joss 

J. C. Browne 

P. M. Brock 

E. J. Carse 

M. R. Mills 

E. J. Dundas 

C. H. Elliott 

Chas. Scott 

Fred. Simmons 

Wm. Jones 

L. H. Brown 

C. Churchley 

Ewart Whitfield 

D. H. Macdonald 

Frank Virtue 

I. A. Lee 

J. Watson 

J. L. Stokes 

W. A. Wright 

C. T. Reicheld 

J. D. Patterson 

H. C. Unger ._ 

A. Pepper 

Wilson Bennett 

J. T. Heap 

R. W. James 

O. W. E. Crawford 

Wm. Moore 

M. G. Scott 

C. A. Cousins 

F. F. Eddington 

W. R. Anderson 

Chas. Goldsmith 

J. H. Gillies 

R. A. Sereney 

E. H. Truax 
A. W. Perry 

J. D. Carmichael 
J. L. Cameron 

E. E. Katzen meier 
A. P. McGrogor 
J. W. CRnv^b"ll 

J. G. Copeland 
Victor Bongmd 

F. A. King,shott 
T. W. Barnaid 
N. Sandham. 

O. T. McKa> 
H. V. Watson 

Robt. Nicol 

W. L. Rundle 

G. R. Baker 

A. C. Robertson 

M H. C. Hemsworth.. 

V. R. Reid 



Secretary 



S. W. Rust 

Chas. Thorndykc 
Delbert Sexsmith 
S. Bradley 
A. M. Hill 
J. C. King 
P. Fisher.. 
R. H. Louch 
C. J. Murdy 
J. H. Valleiy 
W. E. Hofland 
C. P. Bass 
N. D. Munio 
S. B. Gordon 

A. M. Smale 
J. H. Wylie 
N. A. Tice . 
H. A. Graham 
J .H. Lee 

L. R. Brennan 

M. J. Burdon 

K. M. McLean 

J. C. Dundas 
W. H. Shaw 
J. E. Biddle 
J. J. McGill 
John Bristow 

B. Whetstone 
R. C. Spragge 
T. J. Salkeld 
R. L. Murdoch 
G. A. Ryan 
John Ferguson 
W. J. Boyle 

E. E. Messecar 

Floyd Stevenson 

W. D. Jackson 

E. J. Davies 

F. B. James 

G. F. S. LeWarne.. 

A. L. Knight 

E. H. Brown 

V. T. Cavanaugh 

J. R. Harkness 

Robt. Wilson 

C. J. Atkins 

J. A. Weese 

W. J. Price 

T. E. Gingell 

A. Robertson 

W. T. Evans 

V. M. Hare 

W. J. Mable 

C. H. Buskard 

L. E. Nelson 

W. O. Goodwin 

J. H. Blackmore 

E. S. Parrott _ 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 

AT DECEMBER 31, 1939. 

If not there, then Secretary's Address is where lodge is held. 

of St. John the Evangelist, all others on or near that of St. John the Baptist. 

are corrected up to July 31, 1940. 



12 



Night of Meeting 






E°2 



144|3rd Friday ...- 

145 1 2nd Thursday .. 
146|Wed. bef. F.M. 

14711st Friday _.... 

148i2nd Tuesday 



149|Mon. on or bef. F.M 

15112nd Tuesday __. 

153|2nd Thursday 

154i2nd Thursday 

15511st Friday 

15613rd Friday 



1571Tues. on or bef. F.M.. 
158|Thurs. on or bef. F.M 
1591Tues. on or bef. F.M.. 

161 1 1st Wednesday | 

162|Mon. on or bef. F.M I 

164|lst Tuesday 1 

165 j 1st Wednesday 

166 

168 

169 

170 

171 



1st Tuesday 

2nd Monday 

2nd Tuesday 

1st Monday „.... 

Fri. on or bef. F.M 

17212nd Monday 

174|3rd Thursday 

17712nd Friday 

178|Fri. on or bef. F.M 

180|lst Tuesday _..., 

18112nd Tuesday 

184|Thurs. on or bef. F.M. 
185|Mon. on or bef. F.M., 
186|Mon. on or bef. F.M... 

190|Fri. on or bef. F.M 

1 92 1 1 St Friday 

1931 1st Monday 

194|2nd Wednesday 

195|lst Monday 

19612nd Monday 

197i2nd Tuesday 

200|Fri. on or bef. F.M 

201|2nd Tuesday 

203 

205 

207 



F.M. 



3rd Friday 

2nd Monday 

Tues. on or bef. 
209a|lst Friday 

20912nd Thursday 

215|lst Monday 

216 2nd Tuesday 

217|Mon. on or bef. F.M., 

218|2nd Monday 

21912nd Friday 

2201 3rd Monday 

22112nd Thursday 

22213rd Monday 

223 1 2nd Monday 

2241Mon. on or bef. F.M.. 

225 1 3rd Tuesday 

22812nd Monday 



12 


13 


2 


2 


3 


4 


4 


3 


2 


2 


3 


3 


4 


9 


1 


1 


1 


1 


6 


6 



4 


5 


2 


1 


4 




2 


4 


4 


._ 


1 


1 


6 




2 


2 


4 




13 




6 


5 


1 


1 





2 



2 I 

12 I 

2 I 

2 I 

I 



16 I 

1 1 I 

3 I 2 I 

2 13 1 



5 I 
5 

1 I 

2 I 



16 



I 
346 1 

78 I 

57 1 
134 I 
308 
188 
358 

75 
116 
336 
361 

74 

64 

80 
118 

66 
106 
228 
215 
226 
181 
119 

47 

78 
114 
343 

56 
310 

59 
160 

55 

52 

93 
375 
110 
180 
270 
147 
135 

92 
219 

90 

49 

93 
525 

76 

83 
194 



1 1 




102 1 


1 6 


3 


283 1 


1 6 




130 1 


1 4 




170 1 


1 5 


9 


254 1 


1 




109 1 


1 

1 
2 




68 1 
- 83 1 
194 1 





3 


I 


1 1 


94 1 



342 

78 

53 

132 

306 

191 

351 

70 

115 

335 

353 

72 

64 

81 

119 

67 

108 

227 

214 

223 

182 

115 

49 

76 

110 

331 

55 

306 

57 

160 

58 

50 

95 

367 

105 

162 

273 

143 

130 

91 

218 

91 

50 

94 

507 

71 

79 

191 

106 

262 

127 

170 

249 

110 

71 

82 

191 

93 



236 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

RETURNS OF LODGES AS 

For Secretary's Address look first at list of Special Addresses, pages 250 to 254. 
Lodges marked (a) hold their Installation of Officers on or near the Festival 

The names of the W. M. and Secretary 





Lodge 


Where held 


2291 
2301 
2311 
2321 
2331 
2341 
2351 


alonic 




Kerr „ 




Lodge of Fidelity 

a Cameron 




Dutton 


Dnrir , 


Parkhill 




Thornbur 
Paisley 




aAldworth 




236 1 aManitoba 


Cookstow 




2371 
2381 
2391 
2421 
2431 
2451 


Vienna 




Havelock 


Watford 


Tweed 


Tweed 




Malloryto 
St. Geori 
Thamesv: 
Toronto- 








aTecumseh 


lie 


247|aAshlar 




2491 
2501 
2531 


aCalclonia 




aThistle _. 




aMinden 




254|aClift:on 


Niagara 


Falls 


255| 
2561 
257 
258 
2591 
2601 
2611 
2621 
263! 
2641 
2651 
2661 
2671 
2681 
2691 


aSydonham 




aFarran 's Point 




aGalt 


Gait 


aGuelplh 


Guelph 


Springfield 




aWai^hington 








aHarriston.... 


Harriston 




Forest 


aChaudiere 

Patterson 


Ottawa 

Thornhill 


aNorthern Light 


Stayner 


Parthenon 






Bobcayge 
Claremon 






t... 


270|aC=dar 




2711 
272| 
2741 
2761 
2771 
2791 




Erin 


Seymour 

aKent 


Ancaster. 






aTeeriwater 


Teeswate 
Port Dal 










2821 LornP 




283 

2841 
2851 




Belleville 








AHiston 


2861 Wingham. . 


Wingham 
Port Art 
Lobo 




287|aShiininli 


hur 


2891 
2901 
2911 
2921 
2941 
2951 
2961 
2971 
2991 
3001 






iLeamington 


Leamingt 
W. Flam 

King 

Courtrigh 
Drayton... 




boro 


aRobertson 


t 


aConestoga 




a Temple 


!=!t. Catharines 


aPreston 

Victoria 


Preston... 
Centrevil 
Thorndal 


e'"IZI...IZ 






3021 St. David's 


St. Thomas 



W. Master 


Secretary 


T. J. HoUey 


H. A. Wilson _. 


M. A. Adamson 


V. E. Knight 


J. E. Eraser 


Robt. Wilson . 






A. P. Nichols 




A. A. Ramage 


T. G. Idle 


J. H. Grove 


G. B. Claike 


T. H. Banting 




Lyle Walsh 


R. McLean 


Wm. Miller 


Jas. Menzir<5 


G. H. Cotton 


G. D. C. Moiton 




H. L. Scott 


W. D. Taylor 


B. Stobbs 


M. F. Gillespie 


A. Graham 


A. J. Algate 


H. C. Ddvies 






Hugh McLeod 


D. J. McLeod 


J. S. Duncombe 


G. H. Veale 


J. C. Rowley 


J. D. Muir 


T. Tiffen 


M. S. Blackburn 


Chas. McConnell — 


G. E. Hagerman 


A. H. Kruse 


W. L. McGill 


Edward Denver 


F. F. Sweetman 


J. W. Green 


J. F. Lamb 




H. F. Winter 


E. W. Walton 


J. S. Hislop 




J. H. Fawt-tt 


D. S. Whyte 


W. F. Braun 


J. G. Stewart 


G. C. Bennett 


J. J. Madill 




A. Blackburn 


E. Robinson 


W. C. Lewies 


I. N. Eddington 


G. W. R. Bick 




M. B. Burk... 


J. F. Dopking 


N. H. Ashley 


N. J. IMcDougall 


R, C. Tinney 


Geo. T. Lacey 


Alex. Hendry 


E. McMullen 


G. H. Linley 


C. H. Mooney 


Gordon Dickison 


G. S. Fowlor 


W. L. Graham 


T. O. John- ton 


K. W. MacDonald 


E. Eltherington 


W. D. J. Mos-^ 


R. Singleton 


M. R. Davidson 


R. D. Adams 


H. J. Mahonoy 


Wm. Gille.'^pie 


W. D. Thompson 


G. F. Crosbie 


A. B. Mitchell 


H. L. Sherbondy 


H. J. Good 


A. P. Freed 


G. H. Seaman 


John McGugan 


G. H. Reh 


G. A. Campbell 


D. W. Dunkin 


C. O. Green 


R. Hollingsworth 


F. E. Boys 


Wm. Smith 


F. W. Burton 


Earl Newstead 


C. Scarr 


A. L. McPhail 


C. O. "•— -..n 


Chas. Schiemendorf 


J. A. King 


Harold Cook 


H. A. Car.scallen 


H. G. Henshaw 


J. A. Elgie 


Mahlon Penhade 


W. H. Stapleton 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1940 

AT DECEMBER 31, 1939. 

If not there, then Secretary's Address is where lodgre is held. 

of St. John the Evangelist, all others on or near that of St. John the Baptist. 

are corrected up to July 31, 1940. 



237 



i3 



229 
230 
231 
232 
233 
234 
235 
236 
237 
238 
239 
242 
243 
245 
247 



Night of Meeting 



3rd Tuesday 

3rd Thursday . 
3rd Tuesday ... 
1st Wednesday 
2nd Tuesday 
3rd Tuesday 
Fri. on or bef 
2nd Tuesday 
Fri. on or bef 
3rd Tuesday 
2nd Friday - 
Mon. on or bef 
1st Tuesday 
2nd Monday 
4th Tuesday 



FM 
FM 



F.M. 



249|lst Monday 
250|Thurs. on or bef FM 
2531 1st Tuesday 
254|lst Thursday 
255|2nd Wedncd ly 
256|Wed. on oi bef F M 
257 list Tuesday 



258 
259 
260 
261 
262 
263 
264 



2nd Tuesday 
1st Monday 
1st Wednesday 
2nd Thursday 
2nd Monday 
Wed. on or bef 
4th Tuesday 
265|3rd Thursday 
266|Tues. on oi bef 
267 1 1st Wednesday 
268|Fri. on or bef 
269|Wed. on or bef 
270|4th Tuesday 
271 Thurs. on oi bef 
272l2nd Tuesday 
274|2nd Monday 
276|4th Thursday 
27712nd Wednesday 
279|2nd Monday 
282|2nd Tuesday 
283|2nd Wednesday 
284|Tues. on oi bef 
285|2nd Monday 
286|lst Tuesday 
287 1 1st Tuesday 
289|3rd Wednesda\ 
290|3rd Tuesday 
291|3rd Thursday 
292 1 3rd Monday 
294|2nd Thursday 
295|Tues. on ot bef 
296|3rd Wednesday 
297 1 3rd Friday 
299|Thurs. on oi bef 
300|3rd Thursday 
302|3rd Thursday 



FM 

FM 



FM 



FM 



1 I 
I ^ I 



10 



3 |.. 

10 I 

1 I- 

1 I 

5 I.. 

5 |.. 

6 |.. 

7 I 
1 I.. 

3 I.. 

4 I.. 
1 |.. 
3 |.. 
7 I 



■o 








a 




tc 


Si 




c« 


<Si 




« 


Q 



n 0) 






1 
10 

..I 2 



4 
4 
2 

2 I 

1 I 

2 I 

I 

1 

2 I 
1 I 



1 I 
1 1 



1 I I 

1 I 3 I 

1 I I- 



3 I 
1 

7 I 
3 

1 I 
6 I 

2 I. 

4 I 
2 I 

1 I 

2 I 
1111. 
4 I 5 I 
15 

I 3 I 

I 3 I 

3 I I 

I 10 I 

I 3 I 

3 I 2 
I 4 

3 
1 
1 
1 
4 



i 201 

5 I 318 

1 1 351 

I 97 

........ 107 

89 

I 96 

1 126 

3 I 96 

96 

I 132 

1 I 83 

86 

3 I 122 

8 I 291 
I 229 

2 i 121 
5 I 285 

I 315 

127 

26 I 108 

4 I 244 
I 285 

2 I 115 

.._ I 162 

- I 58 

1 I 82 

5 I 109 
.._....! 360 

5 I 152 

2 I 96 

9 I 279 

5 94 
2 I 97 

1 I 251 
1 99 

4' I 168 

I 175 

I 95 

I 114 

I 116 

I 100 

13 I 302 
1 87 

6 I 176 

2 1 158 
I 488 

3 I 115 

I 270 

I 86 

I 64 

,...-... 81 

1 I 93 

4 I 337 
3 I 195 

3 I 45 
1 I 69 

4 I 369 



195 

314 

352 

101 

110 

90 

95 

126 

94 

101 

134 

79 

86 

115 

277 

231 

120 

279 

316 

126 

84 

240 

281 

116 

158 

59 

87 

103 

354 

151 

92 

265 

88 

97 

253 

101 

166 

176 

95 

114 

114 

95 

291 

86 

171 

156 

485 

110 

279 

87 

64 

83 

92 

338 

194 

43 

68 

368 



238 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

RETURNS OF LODGES AS 

For Secretary's Address look first at list of Special Addresses, pages 250 to 254. 
Lodges marked (a) hold their Installation of Officers on or near the Festival 

The names of the W. M. and Secretary 



J?^ 



Lodge 



303|aBlyth - 

304|aMinerva _.. 

305 1 Humber 

3061 Durham 

3071aArkona 

309|aMorning Star.. 

SlljaBlackwood 

3121aPnyx 

313|aClementi 

314|aBlair 

3151 Clifford „- . 

316|aDoric 

318|aWilmot 

319|aHiram 

320|aChesterville 

321laWalker 

322|aNorth Star 

323 aAlvinston 

324|aTemple 

325 1 Orono 

326|aZetland 

327|aHammond 

3281 Ionic 



329|aKing Solomon 

330laCorinthlan 

3311 Ford wich 

3321 Stratford | Stratford 



Where held 



Blyth_ _ 

Stroud 

Weston 

Durham 

Arkona 

Carlow 

Woodbridge..-. 
Wallaceburg... 

Lakefield 

Palmerston 

Clifford 

Toronto 

Baden 



Hagersville. 

Chesterville 

Acton 

Owen Sound... 

Alvinston...„ 

Hamilton 

Orono 

Toronto 

Wardsville 

Napier 

Jarvis 

London 

Fordwich 



3331 Prince Arthur.. 
334|aPrince Arthur.. 

336|aHighgate 

337|aMyrtle 

3381 Dufferin _.... 

339iaOrient 

341|aBruce 

343 Georgina.. 



344|aMerrill 

3451 Nilestown 

346|aOccident .«. 

347 1 aMercer 

348 1 Georgian 

352|aGranite 

3541 Brock 



356|aRiver Park 

3571 Waterdo wn 

358|aDelaware Valley.. 

359 1 a Vittoria _ 

3601 a Muskoka _ 

36 1 1 aWaverley 

362|aMaple Leaf 

364|aDufferin 

367|aSt. George „.. 

368|aSalem 

369|aMimico 

3701 Harmony.. 



371|aPrince of Wales.. 

372|aPalmer 

373|aCopestone 

374|aKeene _.... 



Flesherton _ 

Arthur 

Highgate 

Port Robinson 

Wei I an dport 

Toronto 

Tiverton 

Toronto 

Dorchester 

Nilestown _. 

Toronto 

Fergus 

Penetanguishene... 

Parry Sound 

Cannington 

Streetsville 

Millgrove 

Delaware 

Vittoria 

Bracebridge 

Guelph ._ 

Tara 

Melbourne 

Toronto 

Brockville 

Lambton Mills 

Delta 

Ottawa _ 

Fort Erie North.. 

Welland 

Keene 



W. Master 



J. T. Elliott 

Ed. Carr 

J. A. Russen 

C. M. Steinacher.. 
R .R. Crawford.. 

Elmer Graham 

Roy Barker 

C. S. Lawrence 

Roy Bullock 

T. W. Oldfield 

C. Kaebfleisch _. 

H. C. Ness 

L. R. Eastman 

N. C. Colbert 

Beattie 

Salt 

Rowe 

Barber. 

McLeish 

Hamm 

Millar 



H. 
J. 

F. 
A. 
G. 
J. 

V. 



Fred. Haggett 

E. W. Denning 

J. B. Castles 

J. R. Kilpatrick.. 

John Rae 

A. G. Osborne 

Herb. Corbett 

C. T. White 

C. Teetzel 

J. I. Whitehead.. 

W. H. Lucken 

G. B. Craigie 

W. Campbell 

F. E. Burroughs... 

W. A. Barr 

T. W. Dickenson... 

W. J. McCahon 

W. B. Young 

W. H. Morrison... 

J. H. Farr 

F. H. Hinchley 

A. B. Quennell 

W. R. Nicol 

Geo. Bancroft 

Leslie Adams 

A. Stephen 

H. Edwards 

A. Collins 

C. McLean 

H. Morley 

S. Young 

C. Siddall 

A. Campbell 
H. Connett 
Erie Cornell... 
Daniel Boyd ... 

D. R. Comrie 



Secretary 



Robt. Newcombe - 

A. L. Webb 

A. E. Scythes _. 

C. H. Moffat 

R. E. Wilson - 

R. D. Munro 

A. E. Kearney „ 

D. F. Johnson _ 

W. W. Yale - 

W. T. Brown 

E. Eckenswiller _.. 

R. H. Dee 

I. C. Laschinger 

C. S. Graham 

A. O. Robertson 

R. M. McDonald _.- 

E. L. Vanstone 

James Holme - 

Jas. Wilkinson 

Neil Colville _ 

Jacob Bennett 

J. H. Mclntyre 

Fred. Richardson _ 

R. E. Miller _ 

W. E. Bradt - 

W. E. Montgomery.. 

E. Denroche 

C. J. Belamy 

J. A. Hardman 

R. C. McCutcheon 

R. R. Camp — 

John Lampman 

W. J. Cordell - 

E. A. Taylor 

P. W. Davies 

C. E. Barr 

J. F. Johnson 

A. G. Greenwood 

J. C. Macdonald...... 

W. R. Benson _.. 

J. W. Gillies 

T. J. Purvis - 

W. F. B. Switzer 

J. R. Nicol - 

S. Merrill _ 

R. G. Wyckoff 

W. G. Gerhart - 

A. Jaffray _ 

R. I. Shannon 

J. A. McGugan 

A. B. Hutchcroft _ 

W. H. Drummond 

W. A. Beecroft _ 

C. G. Morris 

H. J. Sykes _.. 

W. W. Wallace _ 

Alf. Tattersall _. 

D. D. Brown... _ 



TORONTO. ONTARIO. 1940 239 

AT DECEMBER 31, 1939. 

If not there, then Secretary's Address is where lodge is held. 

of St. John the Evangelist, all others on or near that of St. John the Baptist. 

are corrected up to July 31, 1940. 





Night of Meeting 


•a 

01 

'c 


PL, 




73 
4) 
S 

'3 

•-s 




1 


a 


Q 


T3 

c 
2; 

3 
CO 


gOo> 


gOS 


303 


Men on or aft. F.M 

Tues. on or bef. F.M 

4th Friday _ 


1 

5 








3 

1 


2 
2 
5 


1 
3 
2 
4 

1 


3 


71 
122 
175 
122 

55 

90 

91 
196 
125 
182 

76 
352 

33 
126 

90 
145 
199 

75 
481 

76 
444 

45 

52 

93 
316 

58 
317 
129 

75 
119 

69 

78 
355 

57 
319 

67 
120 
404 
121 

90 
284 

82 
106 
197 

79 

82 
148 
314 

67 

66 
373 
324 
231 
107 
346 
- 164 
227 

47 


66 


304 


6 

1 
1 


5 
3 
1 


1 

2 
2 


126 


305 




1 
3 


170 


306 
307 
309 


2nd Tuesday - 

Thurs. on or bef. F.M 

Wed. on or bef. F.M 

1st Tuesday - 

3rd Monday — _ 

1st Tuesday _ — 

2nd Friday _.... 


1 

1 
1 
7 
1 
2 
3 
4 
1 


118 
55 
91 


311 

312 
313 


8 
2 
2 
1 
5 
2 


8 
1 
2 
1 
4 
6 


2 
3 


2" 

1 


1 
7 
1 
5 
2 


2 

i 

3 
4 

8 
1 
2 
3 
1 
5 
1 
12 

'14" 


1 
4 


97 
196 
126 


314 




"""ii" 

2 
2 

3 

4 

10 

1 

s" 


179 


315 


1 


76 


316 


3rd Thursday 


327 


318 


Fri. on or bef. F.M 


31 


319 
320 


2nd Thur.sday 


4 
4 
6 


2 
3 


2 
1 
4 
9 
2 
5 


4 
2 
2 
4 
2 
4 


...._....„..... 

"2" 

1 

1 
1 


123 

88 


321 


Mon. on or bef. F.M 


151 


^99 


2" 

1 
1 


1 

3 

3 

7 


199 


323 


Wed on or bef. F.M. 


75 


3?4 


2nd Tuesday _. 


459 


^9^ 


2nd Thursday 


74 


326 


4th Friday 


1 
1 
2 
3 
4 
1 
5 


2 
2 
2 
3 

4 
1 
6 


2 
3 
2 
2 
4 
1 
5 
2 


425 


327 


3rd Monday 

3rd Thursday 

2nd Friday 

1st Tuesday - ._ 

Thurs. on or bef. F.M...... 


1 


37 


'^'>H 




54 


329 




2 
4 
2 
2 

"""2"" 


1 
3 
1 
3 
1 

3" 

1 

6 

2 
5 


1 
3 


94 


330 


1 

"4 


314 


331 


2 

' r 
i 

"T" 
1 

3 

'""l " 

4 


58 


33? 


7 


312 


333 


2nd Friday 


127 


334 


Tues. on or bef. F.M..... 

2nd Friday 

4th Tuesday _ 

Tues. on or bef. F.M 

1st Tuesday - 

Tues. on or bef. F.M 


2 
1 

4 
2 
3 


"" "i 

4 

3 
3 




1 


74 


336 


1 
4 
3 
2 




117 


337 
338 
339 
341 


2" 

3 
5 


71 

80 

349 

53 


343 


4th Friday 

1st Thursday 


4 
3 
6 

5 
4 


6 
3 

9 
3 
4 
2 
11 
4 
3 
4 
5 
2 
7 
5 
1 
3 
6 
4 
2 


7 
3 
8 
2 
4 
2 
4 
4 
2 
6 
5 
3 
7 
4 
3 
3 
5 
3 
5 
3 
10 
7 
2 
5 


5 
1 
1 
2 
1 
3 
1 
2 

4 
3 
1 

3 

3 


311 


344 




69 


345 


Tues. on or bef. F.M 

3rd Wednesday 

1st Friday 




2 
8 
2 
2 
4 
2 

"3 

i 

1 

2 

2' 

6 
10 
1 
2 
5 

4" 

1 


6 
5 
3 


118 


346 




398 


,347 




119 


348 


1st Thursday 




1 

i" 

1 

...._.„... 
1 


86 


352 
354 
356 
357 


3rd Wednesday 

2nd Wednesday _. 


10 
2 
3 
3 
3 
2 
5 
8 
1 
3 
5 
6 
4 
1 

10 
5 
2 
2 


2 
1 
1 
1 


8 
1 


283 

79 

110 


3rH T.iPsHnv 


197 


358 2nd Thursdav 


1 
1 



81 


359 
360 
361 
362 
364 
367 


Fri. on or bef. F.M 




82 




2 
2 


154 


4th Monday 

Mon. on or bef. F.M 

Wed. on or bef. F.M._ 

1st Fridav 


6 
3 
8 
5 


313 

62 

58 

370 


368 2nd Mondnv 


1 
3 
1 
2 


319 


369 

370 


2nd Tuesday 


6 
5 


229 


Wed. on or hpf. F.M. 




102 


371 4th Fridnv 


9 
5 
2 
3 


1 


14 

i 
2 


340 


372 
373 
374 




17 
6 




152 


1st Thursday 

3rd Thursday 


218 
46 



240 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

RETURNS OF LODGES AS 

For Secretary's Address look first at list of Special Addresses, pages 250 to 254. 
Lodges marked (a) hold their Installation of Officers on or near the Festival 

•■ The names of the W. M. and Secretary 



^Jj 



Lodge 



375 1 aLorne 

3761 Unity 

37 7 1 Lome 

378|aKing Solomon's..... 

379|aMiddlesex 

3801aUnion 

382|aDoric 

3S3I Henderson 

384 1 a Alpha 

3851aSpry 

386|aMcCoIl 

387|aLansdowne. 

3881aHenderson _. 

389laCrystal Fountain. 

390|aFlorence 

391|aHoward 

392|aHuron 

3931 Forest. 



Where held 



394|aKing Solomon's. 

3951 Parvaim 

396]aCedar 

397|aLeopold 

3981 Victoria 

3991 Moffat 

400|aOakvilIe 

401|aCraig 

402|aCentral 

403|aWindsor „ 

404|aLorne 

4051 Mattawa 

406|aSpry 

408|aMurray 

409laGoIden Rule 

410IaZeta 

411 laRodney _ 

412iaKevstone 

413[aNaphtali 

4141 Pequonga 

4151aFort William 

4161 Lyn „._., 

4171 aKeewatin 

418 1 aMaxville 

419!aLiberty _.. 

4201 Nipissing 

421|aSeott 

4221 Star of the East... 

4231 Strong 

424|aDoric 

425|aSt. Clair 

426|aStanley 

427laNickpl 

4281 Fidelity 

429|aPort Elgin 

430 la Acacia 

431 1 Moravian... 

432|aHanover 

433|aBennechere _ 

434| Algonquin 



Omemee 

Huntsville 

Shelburne 

London 

Bryanston 

London 

Hamilton 

Winchester 

Toronto 

Beeton _. 



W. Master 



West Lome 

Lansdowne 

Ilderton 

N. Augusta 

Florence 

Ridgetown 

Camlachie 

Chesley 

Thamesford 

Comber 

Wiarton 

Brigden 

Kirkfield 



Harrietsville 

Oakville 

Deseronto 

Essex 

Windsor „. 

Tamworth 

Mattawa 

Fenelon Falls 

Beaverton 

Gravenhurst 

Toronto 

Rodney 

Sault Ste. Marie.. 

Tilbury 

Kenora 

Fort William 

Lyn 

'^eewatin 

Maxville _. 

Sarnia 

North Bay 

Grand Valley 

Bothwell 

Sundridge ;._ 

Pickering 

Sombra _. 

Toronto 

Sudbury 

Port Perry _ 

Port Elgin 

Toronto 

Cargill 

Hanovpr 

Ega n vi 1 le 

Emsdale 



R. R. McQuade 

S. G. Avery 
V. G. H. Phillips 
R. S. McLeod 
D. J. Aiken. 
C. T. Bailey. 

F. E. Coleman 
W. F. Workman 
Harry Burridge 

W. H. D. Robinson 
Harold Thomson 
J. E. McNeil 
J. C. McNaii 
W. O. Williams 

L. Wilson 

Arthur Townsend 

Geo. Wilson. 

A. R. Siegrst 

W. D. Sutheiland 

C. H. Thornton 

I. L. Inglis... 

Jas. Miller ... 

Hector McPhail 

K. V. Rath 

W. J. Chambeilain 

W. C. Blackwell 

C. M. Snydei 

M. L. Allen 

W. M. Carney 

Herman Ma>:well 

M. F. Moynps 

Donald Munro 

A. W. Berry. 

G. D. Lyons. 
C. M. Walkpi 

Jas. Hull - 

W. R. Cranston 
'"'.Imer Holmi i 
Robt. Jamieson 

R. Foster 

W. T. Moore 
J. W. Smith.. 

J. C. Steele 

A. W. Strutheis 

0. G. Hardy 
Gpo. Winship 
W. J. Beavis 
C. E. Morlej 
Glenn Payne.. 
T. L. Johnson 
J. R. Home.. 

1. R. Bentle:v 
Chas Fotheringham 
A. H. Jones.. 

W. J. Loughleen 
W E. Allen 
Stanley Leech 
Jno. Summervill 



Secretary 



W. J. Thorn 

G. R. Booth 
S. Paterson 
Jas. White 
Chas. Gloyne 
R. E. Tillson 
'L. P. Robertson 
W. A. Row at 
Wm. MouU 
W. S. Robinson 

A. Pethenck 
Thos. Isbistei 

B. R. Clemance 
M. R. Hough 
Stanley Hanks 
T. A. Routledge 
J. W. Lowrie 
Harry Stevens 
Jack MacKay 
L. Dean... 

W. M. NeNvman 
J. D. Bidnei 
G. V. Grant 
Gordon Mai sh 

E. O. Tayloi 

C. G. Thompson 
H. W. McGill 
H. Beardmoie 
Andrew Stinson 
A. I. Tongue 

A. W. Robson 
G. A. Smith 

H. H. Nicholson 
S. J. Boyde 
G. S. Stinson 
N. Grant... 

F. J. Sawyei 
H. S. Cade 
W. T. Biggar 

F. Spafford 

C. C. Galloway 
E. A. Cameion 
W. J. Aitchison 

B. F. Nott 
Alfred Menaiy 

B. H. Hankinson 
M. J. Gulley 
J. C. Stork 
H. M. Stover 
P. A. Holbrow 
Jos. Fowler 

G. R. Davey 
J. A. Geoi ge 
M. E. Steele 
P. C. Hunstein 
J. A. Magee 

James Reeves 

H. R. Hayward 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1940 

AT DECEMBER 31, 1939. 

If not there, then Secretary's Address is where lodge is held. 

of St. John the Evangelist, all others on or near that of St. John the Baptist. 

are corrected up to July 31, 1940. 



13 


Night of Meeting 


'S 


73 

tn 


1 
'3 


.s 

'3 

1-5 


■a 

ai 
u 


s 


T3 


to 

x: 

Q 


•6 

% 
a 

3 
w 


Members 

31 Deo., 

1938 




375 
376 












1 

2 

1 

2 1 2 


1 

1 

13 

1 
8 
5 
1 
12 

i 

2 

1 
2 
1 
7 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 




105 

163 

112 

477 

58 

369 

417 

82 

447 

91 

97 

74 

99 

75 

70 

133 

83 

97 

95 

65 

138 

98 

98 

63 

170 

94 

131 

393 

56 

81 

118 

108 

111 

355 

88 

372 

112 

252 

351 

29 

86 

92 

164 

307 

69 

82 

105 

81 

75 

399 

307 

118 

72 

276 

57 

95 

93 

115 


103 




1 


2 


5 


2 


3 
3 

8 


160 


377 




108 


378 


2nd Thursday 


6 

2 
13 

4 


6 

2 
9 
8 
2 
10 
3 


5 
2 
5 
7 
1 
10 
1 




462 


379 


Tues. on or bef. F.M 




59 


380 
382 
383 
384 
385 
386 
387 
388 
389 
390 
391 
392 
393 
394 
395 
396 
397 
398 
399 
400 
401 
402 
403 
404 




1 


1 
1 


1 
5 
1 


13 

13 

1 

9 

1 

' e" 


362 




398 






80 


1st Thursday 


8 
4 


1 


1 5 

1 

1 1 
3 1 

IZ'I """2" 

1 

1 1 ^ 


431 
94 




96 


Thurs. on or bef. F.M 


5 
1 

1 


3 

2 

1 


4 
1 

1 




77 


2 


101 


Wed. on or bef. F.M 

Fri. on or bef. F.M. 


74 




69 




1 


1 
1 
3 
2 
1 
8 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
4 
10 
1 
1 
4 
3 
1 
2 


2 
1 

2 
3 

1 
5 


1 


127 


Wed. on or bef. F.M 


82 


3rd Friday 


3 

i' 

3 

4 
1 
1 
5 
1 
5 
8 
1 
1 
5 
3 
1 
4 




90 


Wed. on or bef. F.M 

Fri. on or bef. F.M 




1 


2 
1 


92 


1 
3 




3 
4 


63 


1st Tuesday 

Wed. on or bef. F.M 


137 
102 


1 
1 
3 
2 
9 
9 
1 
1 
3 
3 
1 
2 




1 

............ 

3 

4 

4" 

4" 

i' " 


1 
2 
3 
3 
1 
4 

1 
3 
3 
6 

4" 

1 

2" 

1 

i" 

2 


1 




90 




1 

1 
1 




1 63 


1st Tuesday 

1st Tuesday 


1 
1 


4 
5 


168 

87 

135 


1st Friday 

Fri. on or bef. F.M 


1 


5 

5" 

4 
2 
2 
12 
2 
8 
4 
6 
6 


21 
4 


1 375 
1 53 


405|1st- TiiPsHnw 


1 


82 


406 
408 
409 
410 




1 
4 

ie" 

1 
2 

8 

4 

12 


119 


1st Tuesday _ 

2nd Monday , 


1 
1 


103 

108 

I 326 


411 






89 


41? 




4 
1 

4 
4 
1 
4 


4 
1 
3 
2 
1 
4 


3 

1 
4 
2 
1 
3 
1 
3 
2 
5 
2 


4 


1 366 


413 


1st Tuesday _.... 


100 


414 


1 
3 


247 


415 
416 


2nd Wednesday 

Tues. on or bef. F.M 


1 342 
1 29 


417 


2 


5 
2 

1 
5 




1 87 


418 


2nd Friday 


4 

1 


1 87 


419 




1 
4 
3 
2 


3 

1 
3 
2 


1 


163 


420 


5>nH TnooHaw 


1 306 


421 1st Mondnv 




1 70 


4'>? 


Last Wednesday 

3rd Monday _ 




2 
3 

2 
3 
9 

5 

1 




1 82 


4?3 


3 




1 105 


424 
4? 5 


3rd Thursday 

Tues. on or bef. F.M 

1st Tuesday 

1st Wednesday _.... 

2nd Tuesday _ 

3rd Thursday 


2 
4 
3 
17 
2 
2 
6 
1 
1 
3 
1 


3 
4 
3 
12 
3 
1 
6 
1 


2 
3 
3 
13 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
2 
2 




3 


r 
9 


1 78 
1 75 


426 
4?7 


1 
2 
1 
1 
2 


1 


1 


1 385 
1 321 


428 
4?9 


1 


i 

1 


3 


1 118 
1 68 


430 
431 
432 
433 


3rd Monday _ 

3rd Monday 


6 


4 
1 


1 273 
57 







1 
1 
1 




95 


2nd Mondav 


4 
2 


1 






96 


434|Tues. on or aft. F.M 










2 


113 



242 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

RETURNS OF LODGES AS 

For Secretary's Address look first at list of Special Addresses, pages 250 to 254. 
Lodges marked (a) hold their Installation of Officers on or near the Festiyal 

The names of the W. M. and Secretary 



i.1 


Lodge 


Where held 


W. Master 


Secretary 


48R 


aHavelock. 

aBurns 

aTuscan 

aHarmony 

Alexandria _ 


Havelock — 

Hepworth 

Sarnia _ _ 

Toronto ...._ 

Alexandria 


W J. Nobes 


A. C. Denike 


436 
437 


Robt. Cruickshank 

A T. Earl 


W. F. Brown _ 

W J. Barrie. - - 


-i-^s 






439 




G A Bradley- - 


440 


Earl Hewitt 


T L. Prentice - 


441 


aWestport 

Dyment _ 

Powassan _ 

aNitetis 

aLake of the Woods 

aGranite....- 

aSturgeon Falls 

aXenophon _ 

Dundalk _ 




J. A. Lee 


S. G. Crawford - 


442 


Thessalon 

Powassan 


J A FuUerton 


E G Hagan - 


443 
444 


Roy Hobden 

F. E. Gray 


L. A. Purdon — 


445 


Kenora 

Fort Frances 




W. M. Benidickson 


446 


W D Galbraith 




447 


L J Gilliland 


G W. Holder 


448 


Wheatley 


W C Mills 


W M. Chute - 


44<< 


S. H. Porter 




450 




W. T. R. Hay 


Alex. Seay- -. 


451 








C. W. Wellstood 


45? 


aAvonmore 

Royal 

Corona _. 

Doric _ 

aElma 


Avonmore _ 

Fort William 


D J Robillard 




453 


J C Perry 


R. J. Aldrich 


454 


Burk's Falls 

Little Current 


H H Hunter 


Ed. Doherty — - 


455 


F. B. Lehman - 


M. L. Bock 


45fi 




J. W. Adair 


K. E. Staff en 


457 


aCentury 




G. C. Ford 


G. E. Johnston _.... 


458 


aWales _ 

aCobden 

aRideau _ 


Wales 

Cobden 

Seeley's Bay 




G. D. Colquhoun - 


45f> 


F C. Marshall 


F. W. Truelove- 


460 






461 


F. T. Barrett 

R. H. Irwin 


J A Crackel 


46?, 




New Liskeaid 

Haliburton 

Sunderland 

Carp 

Elmvale 
Tottenham 
Caledon East 
Sault Ste. Marie 
Victoria Harbor 
Ohippawa _ _.... 




463 






W. C. Kellett 


464 


King Edward 


R. M. Patterson 


L. M. Pinkham- 


465 


Carleton 

aCoronation _ 

aTottenham _ 

aPppI 


Guy Styles 




466 






467 


L W Ward 


Harry Rinn - 


468 




G A. Evans 


46<» 


aAlgoma _ 


C A Griswold 


M J. Campbell...- 


470 




G. W. Allison 


471 
47? 


aKing Edward 

aGore Bay _ 


Wm. Irwin 

Robt. Robinson 


E. G. McKenzie— ...- — 

F. W. Clarke - 


473 


Toronto 

Toronto 

Hamilton 

North Gower 

Woodville 

Milverton 


E. E. Ritcey 


S. A. Griffin 


474 


aVictoria. 




D L McPherson -. 


475 




Geo. Milne 


476 






F. L. Brownlee - 


477 


aHarding 


J W Dixon 


W J. Stoddart 


478 


Boyd Hammond 


E. Siegner — 


479 
480 
481 
48? 


Russell... 
aWilliamsiburg 
aCorinthian 
aBancroft 


Russell 
Williamsburg 
Toronto 
Bancroft 


D. P. Dewar 

Geo. Hess 

W. E. Marshall 
John Wiggins 
G. H. Jose.. 


R. W. Atkinson -. 

A. M. Qassplman _ 

F. E. Ansell — -. 

J. L. Churcher — 


48^1 


aGranton 

Golden Star 
aHaileybury 


Granton . - 

Dryden 

Haileybury 


Robt. Rainey 


484 
485 


J. G. Marks 

D. A. Crichton 
J. E. Dunn. 

J. H. McDonald 

E. Richardson 

F. W. Oldham 
E. D. Gilpin 

R. S. Cuthbertson 

T. D. Park 


C. Holland -.,...- - 

J. T. Leishman.. — 


486 
487 
488 
489 
4<»0 


aSilver 

aPenewobikong 
aKing Edward 

Osiris - 

aHiram 


Cobalt.. 
Blind River 
Harrow 
Smith's Falls 
Markdale 


W. K. Rorke 

G. J. McArthur-.... -.-.. 

A. C. Quick ..-..- 

D. S. Noad .- 

A. E. Colgan — - — 


4<)1 


aCardinal 


Cardinal 


J. E. Schliohter — 


492 


aKarnak 


Coldwater 


F. W. Brown — 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 

AT DECEMBER 31, 1939. 

If not there, then Secretary's Address is where lodge is held. 

of St. John the Evangelist, all others on or near that of St. John the Baptist. 

are corrected up to July 31, 1940. 



243 



l3 


Night of Meeting 


X! 

.2 
'c 


•0 




■0 

R 
"0 
1-5 


0) 




J3 


a 

3 
w 




5 ^"^ 


435 
436 

437 
438 
439 
440 




7 
1 
4 
4 
7 
1 
2 
2 
2 
3 
3 
4 
3 
2 
4 
7 


6 
2 
2 
2 
7 
1 
2 
2 
2 
3 
2 
6 
2 
1 
1 
3 


6 

2 
2 
1 
6 
2 
2 
3 
3 




1 




1 


3 
1 
9 
9 

1 

"9 

1 
5 


128 

76 
366 
332 

69 

99 

90 
103 
128 

83 
125 
174 

59 

87 

79 
104 

59 

76 
211 
101 

79 

56 
112 
116 
117 

67 
120 
159 

93 

84 

56 
115 

80 

91 
269 
121 

86 
116 
217 
296 
456 

85 

84 

89 
111 

73 
267 
162 

61 
100 
119 
194 

75 
131 
165 

63 

87 

95 1 


132 




"2 

2 


.... 


76 


3rd Wednesday 
4th Monday 
1st Tuesday 


1 

i" 




5 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 


7 
5 
2 
4 
3 

2 

2" 

5 
1 

1 

i 

2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 

1 

i' 

1 
1 
1 
4 
2 
4 
3 
3 
4 

6 

7 


357 

319 

66 

94 


441|lst Friday 
442|2nd Thursday 
443i2nd Friday 
444|SrH MnnHav 


1 
1 


88 

97 

125 




79 


445 


2nd Wednesday 

1st Tuesdaj 

2nd Thursday 

3rd Thursday 

3rd Monday 

3rd Thursday 

Thurs. on oi bef F M 

Tues. on oi btf F M 


2 

8 
2 

1 
2 

1 




125 


446 


5 
2 




177 


447 




62 


448 




1 
1 

1 


3 

1 
2 


84 


449 




81 


450 




107 


451 




57 


45'' 






1 

2 






4 

17 


72 


453 
454 


1st Wednesday 

2nd Monday 

2nd Tuesday 

1st Thursday 

3rd Tuesday 

Mon. on or bef F M 

2nd Tuesday 

Thurs. on oi bef F M 

1st Thursday 

3rd Thursday 

3i-d Wednesday 

2nd Friday 

Fri. on or bef F.M 


5 
1 
2 
2 
3 
1 
1 
3 
2 

1 
2 
1 

1 


5 
1 
2 
3 
2 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
3 


7 
2 


2 




201 
101 


455 




3"" 


3 
1 




77 


4 5fi 


3 

2 
2 
2 
2 

1 
1 
2 


1 
1 
1 




57 


457 
458 


5 


113 
116 


459 
460 




1 


3 


114 
69 


461 
462 
463 


1 
3 


1 

2" 

1 


1 

1" 

3 
1 
1 
4 
1 
3 
1 


6 

2" 

7 


117 

163 

92 


464 




74 


465 


3 


2 


55 


466 




115 


467 


1st Monday 
2nd Friday 
1st Monday 
3rd Wednesday 


3 
4 
3 
1 


4 
3 
3 
2 


4 
3 
3 
2 


7 


73 


468 




90 


469 

470 


1 


4 

1 


264 
117 


471 


1 


84 


479 


1st Wednesday 

2nd Friday 

3rd Tuesday 

3rd Saturday 

Fri. on or bef F M 

Mon. on or bef F M 

Mon. on or bef F M 


2 

2 
5 

1 
5 

2 


2 
4 
5 
1 
4 
2 
2 


2 
4 
3 
3 
4 
6 
1 
1 


1 

2 


3 
6 

7 
2 


7 

4 

10 

10 

2 


105 


473 




205 


474 
475 
476 


2 
1 


281 

441 

88 


477 




2 


1 
1 


4 
2 


81 


478 




4 
6 


86 


479 




103 


480 


Thurs. on oi bef F M 
4th Thursday . _ 
2nd Monday 
Mon. on or bef F M 
2nd Tuesday 


1 

1 
7 
1 






74 


481 
48? 


1 
7 

1 


1 
7 
1 









4 


4 

1 


18 
18 


242 
150 


483 






62 


484 


3 

1 
1 


i" 

4 
1 
1 




4 
1 

2" 

2 

1 


3 

2 
5 
3 
1 
3 
2 
2 
3 1 


2 
3 

2 


96 


485 
486 

487 


1st Thursday . _ 

1st Monday 

2nd Monday 

2nd Tuesday 

2nd Friday 

2nd Thursday 


1 
3 
1 
5 
5 


1 
4 
2 
4 
3 


1 
7 
1 
1 
1 


119 

195 

68 


488 
489 
490 


1 


136 

157 

60 


491 


2nd Friday . 
list Thursday 


1 
1 1 


1 

1 1 


2 

1 2 




86 


492 




1 


1 1 


92 



244 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

RETURNS OF LODGES AS 

For Secretary's Address look first at list of Special Addresses, pages 250 to 254. 
Lodgres marked (a) hold their Installation of Officers on or near the Festiral 

The names of the W. M. and Secretary 



:^3 



Lodse 



aRiverdale- 
aElectric. 



494 
495 
496 
497 
498 
499 
500 

501 aConnaug-ht. 

502 aCoronation 

503 ainwood 
5041 Otter 
505|aLynden 



aUniversity 

S.t Andrew's 

aKing George V... 

aPort Arthur 

aRose. 



506 

507 
508 
509 
510 
511 
512 
513 
514 



aPorcupine 

aElk Lake..-. 

aOzias 

aTwin City- 

aParkdale 

aConnaught.. 
Malone 



aCorinthlan 

aSt. Alban's.. 

5 1 5 j aReba _ 

5 16 aEnterprise 



517 
518 
519 
520 
521 
522 



aHazeldean.. 
Sioux Lookout. 

aOnondaga 

aCoronati ._ 

aOntario __ 

aMount Sinai 



523iaRoyal Arthur... 
524|aMississauga 



525 
526 
527 
528 



530 
531 
532 



aTemple 

alonic... 
Espanola... 



Golden Beaver... 



529 aMyra.. 



Cochrane.. 



aHigh Park 

aCanada .... 

533|aShamrock 

534iaEngl6hart 

535 1 aPIhoenix. 

536 1 a Algonquin 

537|aUlster- 



538 laEarl Kitchener 

5391 Waterloo....... 

540|aAbitibi-.. 

54 1 laTuscan 

542 1 aMetropolitan-..- 

543lalmperial - 

544|aLincoln 

545|aJohn Ross Robertson.. 

546|aTalbot 

547|aVictory - _ 

548|aGeneral Mercer 

549iaIonic _ 

550iaBuchanan._______ 

551 jaTuscan 



Where held 



Toronto 

Hamilton - 

Toronto 

Arden 

Coboconk 

Port Arthur 

Windsor 

M i m i CO 

Smithvilla 

Inwood 

Lombardy 

Lynden 

S. Porcupine 

Elk Lake 

Brantford 

Kitchener 

Toronto _ — . 

Fort William 

Sutton W 

Hamilton 

Toronto , 

Brantford 

Beachburg _ 

Hazeldean 

Sioux Lookout.. 

Onondaga 

Toronto 

Windsor — .. 

Toronto 

Peterborough 

Port Credit 

Toronto 

Westboro. 

Espanola 

Timmins 

Komoka 

Cochrane - 

Toronto — 

Toronto 

Toronto 

En gleh art 

Fonthill 

Copper Cliff 

Toronto 

Port McNicoIl... 

Waterloo 

Iroquois Falls.. 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Abingdon 

Toronto 

St. Thomas 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Hamilton 

Hamilton 

Hamilton 



W. Master 



Wm. Thorn 

T. H. Leaker - 
M. C. Hooper 
K. A. Alexander 
E. B. White.. 
John MacLean 
H. M. Card.., 
Fred. Shackleton 

Clifford Comfort 

W. J. McNally 

G. W. Smith 

H. B. Dayman 

J. P. Douglas 

E. J. James 

R. W. Roberts 

B. F. Matthews 

R. A. R. McNair... 

P. V. Holgate 

A. H. Walinck 

K. J. Farthing 

J. A. Northway 

F. G. Peddin 

W. R. Reynolds 

A. W. Grant 

W. A. Hibbert 

Walter Davis 

F. G. Chandler 

S. M. Currie 

N. Perlmutter 

M. G. Hardill 

T. S. Bayley 

W. F. Graham 

P. L. Campbell 

Wm. Black 

Morris Scott 

D. A. Moore 

M. D. Dubin 

W. J. Hutchison 

T. A. Johnston 

W. S. Laidley 

C. R. Read. 

R. M. Barron 

G. H. Harry 

C. A. Rogers 

W. A. Courtney 

E. J. Weber 

Wilfrid Stables 

J. W. Spence 

N. Guthrie 

T. R. Hughes 

Robt. Lampman 

John Pezzack 

W. A. D. Paterson 

A. E. Kirkpatrick... 

F. H. Walden 

B. S. Townsend- 

H. Savory 

A. V. Tilbury 



Secretary 



R. F. Thomas _ 

Bert Culm ._ — 

Wm. Dowds — 

E. I. Pixley _. 

J. G. McFarland 

S. H. Green 

D. W. F. Nichols....- 

J. T. Lee 

C. A. Merritt _ 

J. R. Graham 

E. W. Joynt _ 

W. L. Taylor 

W. H. Johns 

W. J. Mills 

E. W. Lavery 

Geo. DeKleinhans 

J. H. Mills 

E. C. Schoales 

0. J. Silver 

J. R. Croft 

G. F. Frankland 

S. W. Seago....- 

A. R. Singleton 

J. H. Nesbitt- 

A. E. Hainsworth— 

A. A. Barton 

H. Spencer-. 

A. R. Graham 

Max Cooper _ 

G. W. Haley 

W. M. Gemmell 

F. R. Fleet 

P. E. Watters 

J. F. Freure _... 

1. T. Brill 

W. Arrand 

A. T. King _ 

R. B. Magill 

Alex. Wilson 

E. W. Leitih _.- 

E. A. Smith 

F. H. Clark _ 

C. O. Maddock 

Geo. Chambers 

B. J. Brownell 

C. O. Hemphill 

F. K. Ebbitt 

Jas. Herriot 

J. A. Troyer 

A. E. Reid 



A. E. Pyett 

W. J. S. Graham.- 
W. A. McPherson- 

J. N. Pike 

J. P. Simpson 

W. H. Quinn 

A. N. Moore -..._ 

R. A. Carter 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 

AT DECEMBER 31, 1939. 

If not there, then Secretary's Address is where lodge is held. 

of St. John the Evangelist, all others on or near that of St. John the Baptist. 

are corrected up to July 31, 1940. 



245 



li 



Night of Meeting 



TS 




■v 








c 


1^" 

go 05 


to 


^ 


a 








0) 




3 



4th Friday _ 

3rd Wednesday 

2nd Wednesday 

Tues. on or bef. F.M.. 

1st Monday 

2nd Monday 

2nd Tuesday _ 

2nd Thursday 

Men. on or bef. F.M.. 

1st Monday 

2nd Tuesday 

2nd Wednesday 

1st Thursday 

2nd Tuesday 

3rd Tuesday 

2nd Friday 

2nd Friday 

3rd Monday _ 

1st Wednesday 

4th Thursday 

3rd Monday 

2nd Friday 

1st Monday 

Wed. on or bef. F.M.. 

1st Monday 

4th Tuesday 

2nd Tuesday 

1st Monday 

2nd Tuesday 

1st Monday 

2nd Thursday 

4th Tuesday _ 

2nd Wednesday 

1st Wednesday 



494 
495 
496 
497 
498 
499 
500 
501 
502 
503 
504 
505 
506 
507 
508 
509 
510 
511 
512 
513 
514 
515 
516 
517 
518 
519 
520 
521 
522 
523 
524 
525 
526 
527 
528 1 2nd Wednesday 

529 3rd Saturday 

530 2nd Friday 

531 3rd Thursday 

532 1st Friday 

533 3rd Tuesday 

534 2nd Monday 

535 3rd Monday 

536 3rd Tuesday 

537 1st Monday 

538 2nd Tuesday 

539 1st Wednesday . 

540 3rd Friday .._ 

541 3rd Friday _ 

542 2nd Wednesday 

543i2nd Monday 

544|Fri. on or bef. F.M.. 

54513rd Tuesday 

546|4th Thursday 

54714th Wednesday 

548 1 2nd Friday 

549 1 1st Wednesday 

550 1 1st Thursday 

551 1 1st Thursday 



•I 5 I 



2 
3 
5 
5 
4 
4 
4 

13 
1 

11 
1 
2 
1 
3 
1 
4 
3 
3 
2 
1 
4 
6 
5 
6 
3 



5 
7 
3 
14 
8 
6 
7 



2 
3 
1 


12 
3 
6 


2 
8 
2 
1 
1 
3 
4 
1 
1 


3 

7 

1 




7" 

1 

1" 

1 
1 
1. 

3 

1 
5 


1 
3 


3 


1 


2 




7 


2 

1 


2 

1 
3 
5 
2 
2 
2 
2 
6 
3 
4 
1 
2 


21 
4 

4 
5 
3 

"'3 ' 

26 

23 

4 


i" 

1 
2 


2 
4 

1 














1 
1 
6 
3 
5 
5 
4 
2 
1 

.......... 

4 
3 

4 

1 


1 
6 
3 
2 

4 

2 

3 

i" 

1 
1 
7 
5 
3 

1 



5 
2 
7 




1 
1 
1 


8 

4 

16 


1 


"4" 





1 
4 






2 

1 
2 


11 
9 






3 


2" 


1 
8 
1 
3 
1 
2 
6 
2 

1 
2 
2 
1 
6 
3 
4 



5 

10 1 
1 




2 1 


1 
"1 


6 


5 
1 
6 


2 


4 
6 
2 
2 

1"" 

4 


i 

12 






1" 


5 
6 
6 

14 1 



286 
365 
330 

59 

74 
274 
116 
208 
106 

94 

45 

85 
143 

91 
226 
299 
190 
131 
113 
444 
252 
245 

78 

58 
135 

64 
292 
264 
392 
185 
166 
204 
294 

98 
205 

50 
144 
393 
263 
193 
113 

98 
138 
464 

53 
218 
120 
325 
137 
197 

54 
292 
220 
128 
294 
242 
190 
383 



6 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

RETURNS OF LODGES AS 

For Secretary's Address look first at list of Special Addresses, pages 250 to 254. 
Lodges marked (a) hold their Installation of Officers on or near the Festival 

The names of the W. M. and Secretary 



^^ 



Lodge 



552 
553 
554 
555 
556 
557 
558 
559 
560 
561 
562 
563 
564 
565 
566 
567 
568 
569 
570 
571 
572 
573 
574 
575 
576 
577 
578' 
5791 
580 
581 
582 
583 
584 
585 
586 
587 
588 
589 
590 
591 
592 
593 
594 
595 
596 
597 
598 
599 
600 
601 
602 
6031 
604 
605 
606 
607 
fiORI 
6091 



aQueen City 

aOakwood -.. 

aBorder Cities... 

aWardrope — 

aNation 

aFinch _ 

aS. A. Luke 

aPalestine - 

St. Andrew's... 

a A ca ci a 

aHamilton 

aVictory 

Ashlar. 



aKilwinning 

aKing Hiram 

aSt. Aidan's -.... 

aHullett 

aDoric 

aDufferin 

a Antiquity -. 

aM i zpah 

aAdoniram _. 

aCraig 

aFidelity _. 

aMimosa. - 

aSt. Clair 

aQueen 's — 

aHarmony 

a Acacia 

aHarcourt 

aSunnyside 

aTransportation.. 

aKaministiquia 

aRoyal Edward... 

aRemembrance 

aPatrlcia 

aNational. 

aGrey 

aDefenders 

aNorth Gate 

aFairbanks 

aSt. Andrew's 

aHillcrest 

aRideau _.... 

aMartintown _. 

aTemple 

aDominion 

aMount Dennis.. 

aMaple Leaf 

aSt. Paul 

aHujrh Murray... 

aCampbell 

aPalace 

aMelita 

aUnity 

aGolden Fleece... 

p Gothic 

Tavistock 



Where held 



Toronto 

Toronto. 

Windsor 



Hamilton __ 

Spencerville 

Finch 

Ottawa 

Toronto - 

Ottawa ~ 

Westboro. 

Hamilton 

Chatham 

iPttawa 

Toronto - - 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Londesboro' 

Lakeside 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Niagara Falls.... 

Ailsa Craig 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Kingston 

Windsor 

London 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 



Fort William 

K i n gston 

Toronto 

Toronto - 

Capreol 

Toronto 

Ottawa 

Toronto 

Tor on to 

Hamilton 

Hamilton 

Ottawa _ _... 

Martintown - 

London 

Windsor 

Weston 

Toronto 

Sarnia 

Hamilton 

Campbellville 

Windsor 

Toronto 

Toronto 
Toronto 
Lindsay 
Tavistock 



W. Master 



A. A. Seedhouse 

A. P. Carruth 

Arthur Haycock 

W. J. Smith 

Chas. Brown 

E. C. Gourlay 

C. G. Cobourn 

H. H. Bocknek 

Robt. Steele 

G. A. Wild 

L. A. Lothian 

J. M. Campbell 

G. W. Green 

M. R. Thomas 

W. M. Wishart 

F. H. Wood 
Wm. Leipei, Jr. 

G. L. Gregory 
A. I. Aiken.. _ 

E. Holland 

O. B. Hobbs 

C. G. W. Macintosh 
G. R. McEwen 
G. W. Holdsworth 
John Donaldson 
L. Quackenbush 
Elmer Davis 
L. A. Findlay 

F. B. Schofield 
A. G. Poupoie 
Harold Holt 

G. T. Trowhill 
H. E. Johnson 
W. M. Shurtleff 
L. B. Curran 
Alex. Hadden 

H. S. Pettibone 
R. A. Gregory 
A. W. Chambers 

C. K. F. West 

J. W. Burroughs 

G. V. Bryan 

R. A. Pilgrim 
A. E. Masterman 
C. R. Mclntyre 
R. A. Knighton 
C. E. Milburn 
H. M. LeGard - 
A. L. Weeks 
Stanley McNeil 
E. Simpson. 
W. J. McLeod 
A. E. Joselin 
R.. M. Gibson 
Harry Browning 
A. R. W. Dalley 
W. D. Ecobichon 
C. J. Eifert. 



Secretary 



W. Carey - 

S. H. McElwain 

E. T. Howe 

M. E. Smith 
G. R. Drummond 
A. McMillan 
R. M. Stanton 
H. Melvin 
J. N. Salter 
W. A. Dier 

E. L. Kerr 

C. E. Clements - 
Geo. Powers 
M. Strachan 
C. V. Tottle 
W. R. Taylor - 
R. M. Townsend 

F. W. Seaton 
J. A. Hodgins 
W. P. Bums 

F. Howell 

G E. Pedlar 
W. G. Smith 
Wm. MouU 

G. F. Empringham 

Philip Bach - — 

L. T. Rutledge - 

W. H. Kent 

J. W. Bradshaw _ 

7 S. P. Armstrong. 

K. N. Carrie — 

J. G. Dunn 

N. B. Darrell 

S. A. Hitsman 

C. H. Ward 

Robt. Somerville 

M. Nisbet 

E. G. Armstrong..- 

J. D. Gardner 

A. G. Roberts - 

T. G. Taylor 

F. W. Davidson 

G. A. Sweatman _ 

G. Chequer — 

D. A. Ross 

W. G. Stewart 

J. A. Wickens — -. 

F. Thain — 

A. R. Howlett 

J. T. Elliott........ 

J. Eaglesham 

T. H. Snyder -.i 

J. O. Moncrieff 

E. W. Skirrow _.. 

E. F. Trumper 

Robt. Macfarlane — - 
W. R. Allely 

G. F. Holley .;.._ 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 

AT DECEMBER 31, 1939. 

If not there, then Secretary's Address is where lodge is held. 

of St. John the Evangelist, all others on or near that of St. John the Baptist. 

are corrected up to July 31, 1940. 



247 







T3 








•v 


•o 




73 




a . 


°s 


Night of Meeting 


.2 


01 


0) 


0) 

s 


o 


c 


X 


a 

01 

0. 


c 2 




^3 




c 






o 

1-5 


(S 


0) 


01 


3 


S" 


S" 


552 


1st Wednesday . _. 


4 


4 


5 




3 


5 


5 


5 


320 


312 


558 


2nd Monday 




2 
2 


2 
3 


1 


1 


7 
3 


1 

1 


-..-.„._ 


154 
118 


147 


554 


1st Wednesday _.. . 


2 


113 


555|4th Monday 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


4 


5 


2 


298 


282 


556 
557 


1st Friday _ ._ 








1 





1 
3 






75 
101 
170 


75 


1st Thursday 


1 
2 






1 
3 


_.... 


101 


558|2nd Wednesday _ . _ 


3 


3 


3 


168 


559|4th Wednesday . 


11 


9 


7 










5 


4 


277 


279 


560 list Thursday 


5 


5 


6 


1 




2 




13 


225 


216 


561|3rd Friday 


6 


7 


8 


3 


. 




1 


3 


'151 


156 


56212nd Monday 


1 


2 


2 


1 


2 


2 


1 


17 


260 


244 


563i2nd Tuesday 


2 


5 


6 






5 


1 


7 


260 


249 


564 


1st Friday 


2 


2 


2 


1 





2 


2 


1 


186 


184 


565 


3rd Friday _ 


2 


1 


3 


3 




7 


9 


16 


385 


358 


566 


1st Friday 


1 


1 








6 




6 


136 


125 


567 3rd Friday 


1 

1 


1 
1 


1 
1 






4 






72 
43 


69 


568|Tues. on or bef. F M. 






44 


569|Tues. on or aft. F.M. 


2 


2 


2 








1 




61 


60 


570|lst Tuesday . _ 


9 


8 


7 




2 


1 


2 


5 


225 


228 


571 


4th Tuesday 


3 


3 


3 


1 


2 


1 




5 


156 


157 


57X 


4th Thursday 

1st Tuesday 

2nd Friday . . 


1 
3 


1 
3 

1 
6 


2 

1 
2 
5 






1 


1 
1 

2 


5 
2 
5 
4 


14 

1 
4 


276 

132 

76 

182 


257 


573 




132 


574 




70 


575 


2nd Thursday _ . . . 


6 




179 


576 


1st Monday 
1st Wednesday 


2 
4 


2 
6 


1 
4 






10 
5 


1 
2 


18 
6 


201 
207 


174 


577 


1 


199 


578 


2nd Wednesday 


8 


6 


6 


1 


3 


3 




4 


208 


213 


579 


1st Thursday 


5 


8 


8 






2 


2 


5 


165 


161 


580 


2nd Saturday 


3 


2 


2 




1 


2 


2 


8 


178 


170 


581 


3rd Wednesday 


2 


2 


2 


1 




4 


? 




93 


89 


582 


3rd Wednesday 


1 


2 


2 






11 


1 




2 


209 


196 


583 


2nd Monday 


4 


5 


6 


2 




3 


4. 


6 


316 


309 


584 


3rd Tuesday _ 


5 


6 


6 








1 


5 


148 


147 


585 


4th Friday 


4 


5 


4 






1 


2 


2 


132 


131 


586 


1st Friday 


4 


3 


4 


2 


1 


1 


3 


2 


199 


200 


587 


2nd Wednesday 


2 


1 


1 






4 


2 


3 


190 


183 


588 


1st Tuesday 


5 


6 


5 


1 


1 




3 


1 


98 


101 


589 


1st Monday 


3 


2 


2 


1 






4 




147 


146 


590 


1st Wednesday 


5 


3 


3 


2 




5 




2 


118 


118 


591 


4th Thursday . 


5 


5 


5 


2 




1 


2 


3 


171 


173 


592 


3rd Monday 


3 


3 


3 


4 




1 


4 





113 


115 


593 


4th Wednesday 


6 


6 


5 






3 


5 


5 


350 


343 


594 


2nd Monday 


1 


3 


6 


2 




1 


1 


4 


160 


157 


595 


2nd Thursday 


9 


9 


3 






1 


2 


1 


149 


154 


596 


2nd Thursday 










....__.. 


2 




2 


3 
3 


42 
165 


39 


597 


2nd Friday _ _ . 


3 


4 


3 


1 


163 


598 


1st Wednesday 


4 


5 


5 




2 


1 


-^ 


1 


87 


91 


599 


1st Wednesday 


3 


3 


4 




2 


2 




4 


172 


171 


600 


2nd Tuesday 


4 


4 


5 






3 


2 


4 


123 


118 


601 


2nd Wednesday 


7 


6 


7 


2 






2 


3 


122 


126 


602 


3rd Tuesday 


6 


4 


4 




1 





3 


6 


212 


210 


603 


1st Tuesday 


3 


3 


2 


1 




1 


2 


1 


78 


78 


604 


2nd Thursday 


11 


11 


9 






1 




4 


88 


94 


605 


2nd Tuesday _ 


2 


3 


3 


1 




3 


3 


2 


165 


160 


606 


4th Monday „ . . 


4 


1 


2 




2 


3 


1 


1 


96 


97 


607 


3rd Thursday _._ 


1 


2 


3 


3 


2 


5 


2 





lis 


117 


608 


3rd Monday 


2 
1 


4 
1 1 


4 

1 1- 


2 


2 








. ._. 


91 
60 


97 


609 1 2nd Tuesday ..._ 


1 






60 



18 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

RETURNS OF LODGES AS 

For Secretary's Address look first at list of Special Addresses, pages 250 to 254. 
Lodges marked (a) hold their Installation of Officers on or near the Festival 

The names of the W. M. and Secretary 



553 



Lodge 



610|aAshlar 

6 1 1 1 aHuron-Bi uce 
612|aBirch Cliff 
613|aFort Erie 
6141aAdanac.... 
615|aDominion 
616|aPerfection 
617|aNorth Bay 
618|aThunder Bay 
619iaRunnymede 
620|aBay of Quinte 
621 aFrontenac 

622iaLorne _ 

6231 Doric _ - 

624|aDereiham _____ 
625|aHatherly__ . _ _ 

626|aStamford 

627laPelee 

628|aGlenrose. . 

629|aGrenville 

eSOlaPrince of Wales 

631|aManitou.. 

632 aLong Bi anch 

633|aHastings 

634|aDe!ta 

635|aWellington 
636|aHornepayne 
637|aCaledonij\ 
6381aBedford.. 

639|aBeach 

640|aAnthony Sayer 

641|aGarden 

642|aSt. Andrew's 
643|aCathedral _ 
644|aSimcoe.... 
645|aLake Shore 
6461 Rowland 
647|aTodmorden 
648|aSpruce Falls 

649|aTemple 

650|aFidelity... - 

651|aDentonia 

652|aMemorial _ 

653|aScarboro 

654|aAncient LandmaAs 

eSRIaKingswav 

656 1 Kenogamisis 



Where held 



Byron.... 

Toronto 

Birch Cliff 

Fort Erie 

Merritton 

Ridgeway 

St. Catharines 

North Bay 

Port Aithui 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Sharbot Lake_ _ 

Chapleau 

Kirkland Lake 

Mount Elgin 

Sault Ste. Marie- 
Stamford Centre. 

Scudder 

Elmira 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Emo 

M i m i CO 

Hastings 

Toronto 

Toronto _ — 

Hornepayne 

Toronto — 

Toronto 

Hamilton Beach... 

Mimico 

Windsor 

Windsor 

Toronto. 

Toronto. 

Mimico 

Mount Albert 
Todmorden.... 
Kapuskasing _ _ 

O sh a wa 

Toledo 

Toronto 

Toronto. „ 

Agincourt 

Hamilton 

Lambton Mills 

Geraldton 



W. Master 



D. R. Sanderson 

T. F. Graydon 

E. M. Baird 

W. D. Brown 

F. W. Kennedy 

K. S. Ellsworth 

L. Werden 

Walter Little 

Hugh Dalzell 

C. R. Davis 

R. S. Welsh 

E. J. Walker 

C. C. McKnight 

H. W. Newington 

Wm. Boyd 

W. E. Hunt 

G. S. Bridge 

H. K. Quick 

H. A. Feil 

H. E. Brown 

D. S. Puffer 

Alex. Hood 

A. G. Pratt 

W. S. Fife 

N. E. Radford 

W. B. Young 

W. Vaughan 

Geo. Duguid 

A. J. Pirie.. 

H. L. Chown 

D. R. Russell 

E. H. Medland 
G. Saundercock 
Alex. Irvine.. 
W. H. Stoddart 
H. E. Newton 
E. R. Lepard 
H. G. Miles 

D. S. Arnot 
M. N. Jackson 
G. N. Moore 
R. J. Mawhinney 
John Jeffrey 
C. E. Ma.son 
G. G. McEwen 

A. P. Reid.. 

M. Rabbitt 



Secretary 



N. T. Sanderson 

Peter Muir 

V. G. Moore 

H. A. Yeo 

S. A. Moffatt - 

Dr. G. E. Teal 

G. H. Davis 

E. R. Herbert 

O. R. Tanner 

W. M. Hamshaw _ 

S. Chamberlain 

P. S. Millikin 

H. D. Hobbs 

N. E. Loney 

J. D. Flanders 

G. E. Richardson 

R. F. Cooper 

W. F. Wiper 

F. C. Ruppel 

J. A. Eyre 

A.. G. Stewart 

E. T. McComb 

G. A. Brandow _ 

C. P. Plant 

Alex. Lawrence 

G. W. Smith _ 

L. Leggatt.- _ 

J. C. McAllister - 

C. H. R. Devey. 

H. S. Marshall - - 

E. J Hutchins. — _ 

John Briggs _.. 

N. Burbridge — 

J. K. McGuire 

W. G. Mackay 

E. H. Glenn _ 

R. N. Armstrong 

H. Minett 

E. Marshall 

R. H. Crossley 

R. R. Eaton....... _ 

Wm. Tennant _ 

S. J. Boyde - 

R. M. Owen 

Jas. McKay 

G. .T. Bartholomew 

A. G. Pudden, Act'g... 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 

AT DECEMBER 31, 1939. 

If not there, then Secretary's Address is where lodge is held. 

of St. John the Evangelist, all others on or near that of St. John the Baptist. 

are corrected up to July 31, 1940. 



249 



i2 


Night of Meeting 


<u 

.2 


i 

Cm 


•9 


■© 


T3 



1 


P 


g 


P. 

s 




2 r 


filO 




2 
3 
3 


2 
4 
2 

1 
5 


2 
4 
1 
1 
6 




1 1 

. 1 1 1 


2 
4 
2 


75 

110 

130 

81 

108 

80 

92 

115 

153 

186 

148 

74 

89 

245 

61 

47 

117 

60 

45 

154 

134 

73 

69 

44 

202 

162 

88 

243 

153 

108 

40 

71 

78 

89 

135 

127 

53 

130 

99 

129 

45 

139 

140 

66 

117 

89 


76 


611 
fiTJ 


2nd Thursday _.... 


3 

2 


1 


2 
2 
2 
1 
6 
3 
3 
2 
7 
5 
2 


2 
2 
2 


111 
127 


fin 


3rd Tuesday 


75 


614 
615 
616 
617 
618 
619 
620 
621 
622 
623 
624 
625 
626 
627 
628 
6?9 


1st Thursday 

1st Thursday 


5 


1 


113 


1 
1 
2 
3 
2 
6 


1 
4 
7 

1 

"""1" 


72 




3 

7 
7 
2 
1 
5 
1 
7 
2 


2 
2 

7 
2 
1 
4 
2 
7 
2 


2 
3 
5 
2 


1 
3 
5 
2 


88 


2nd Friday . 

1st Thursday 

2nd Wednesday „ 

1st Tuesday _ 


113 
159 
181 
138 


1 

5 

10 

2 


1 
2 


77 


1st Thursday 


90 


1st Thursday _ 


1 


11 
2 


2 


12 


229 




61 


3rd Friday 


2 
2 

1 

3 
2 
1 

i ' 

3 
3 

4 
2 
3 

1 

1 
2 

1 


2 
2 


43 


1st Wednesday 

Tues. on or bef. F.M 

3rd Tuesday _ 


8 

3 
2 
2 


8 
1 
3 
3 
1 
1 
8 
3 
9 
9 
4 
6 
7 
7 
4 
5 
1 
6 
3 
2 
2 
2 
4 
3 
1 
11 
2 
1 
4 
4 
2 


17 
1 
3 
3 
1 
1 
6 
3 
6 
8 
3 
5 
7 
9 
4 
6 
1 
5 
3 
3 
2 
2 
4 
4 
1 

12 
2 
2 
2 
4 


2 

..._....„.„.. 





1 


122 
59 


1 

1 

3 
2 
1 

2" 


3" 

6 
1 
2 

1 
2 
3 
1 
9 
6 
1 
1 

"""2" 
1 
3 
1 


3 

2" 

""""1"" 
3 
4 
2 


45 
151 


680 


4th Friday 




129 


631 


3rd Thursday 


71 


63? 


3rd Tuesday 


7 
4 
8 
7 
5 
5 
6 
9 
3 
5 
2 
6 
3 
3 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
9 
2 


1 

""""i 

4 
2 
2 


75 


633 
634 

635 


Fri. on or bef. F.M 

2nd Tuesday 


46 

205 
164 


636 
637 
638 


2nd Wednesday 

3rd Monday _ 

3rd Tuesday 

2nd Tuesday 

3rd Friday ... 


93 
237 
153 


639 


1 


114 


640 


4 
1 
9 
5 


38 


641 


1st Friday 

2nd Friday 


75 


64'' 


1 
2 
1 

"i 

1 


69 


643 
644 

645 


3rd Tuesday „ 

2nd Thursday 


94 
134 


1st Monday 


1 

6 


127 


646 


2nd Friday 


55 


647 






1 


1 


124 


648 


2nd Monday 




101 


649 
650 


3rd Tuesday 


3 

'""2"""' 
2 
2 


"T 


5 

1 
2 


2 




126 

45 


651 


1st Thursday 


1 


3 

1 


144 


65^ 


2nd Monday .. 


1 2 

2 1 

3 1 


141 


653 


4th Monday 


65 


654 
655 
656 


4th Tuesday 


5 
4 
4 


118 


1 
30 


3 




91 


1st Wednesday 






34 






1876 


1894 


1879 


521 


288 


1013 


1538 


1700 


95462 


93842 



250 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

P. O. ADDRESSES OF SECRETARIES 

Special addresses of Secretaries of Lodges in the Cities and in other places 
where the Secretary's address is not the same as that of the Lodge. 

No. Lodge Location Secretary and P.O. Address 

3 Ancient St. John's.Kingston A. W. Cathcart, 60 Brock St. 

5 Sussex Brockville Thos. H. Guest, 374 King St. W. 

6 Barton Hamilton _ _ B. E. James, Box 304 

10 Norfolk Simcoe D. G. Campbell, 154 Colborne St. N. 

11 Moira _ Belleville J. W. Cook, 7 Forin St. 

15 St. George's St. Catharines C. H. Hesburn, 54 George St. 

16 St. Andrew's Toronto Wm. Lawrence, 202 Westminister 

Ave. 

17 St. John's Cobourg Thos. Hardcastle, R.R. No. 3 

20 St. John's London Rich. Booth, 230 Wellington St. 

22 King Solomon's Toronto - R. A. Woodley, 130 Evelyn Cres. 

24 St. Francis Smith's Falls C. G. Jones. 102 Queen St. 

25 Ionic Toronto _ R. M. W. Chitty. 350 Bay St. 

39 Mount Zion Brooklin R. V. Mowbray, R.R. No. 1 

27 Strict Observance. Hamilton R. M. Allworth, 28 James So. 

40 St. John's Hamilton C. F. Marshall, 43 Fairleigh Av. 

South 

42— St. George's London C. M. Linnell, 105 Oxford St. W. 

43 King Solomon's Woodstock A. W. Massie, 717 Rathbourne Av 

44 St. Thomas St. Thomas F. R. Palmer, 332 Talbot St. 

45 Brant Brantford Geo. Whitwill, 149 Sheridan St. 

46 Wellington Chatham W. J. McCall, 24 Stanley Ave. 

47 Great Western Windsor A. M. Wright, 167 Erie St. E. 

50 Consecon Consecon W. W. Locie, R.R. No. 1 

52 Dalhousie Ottawa _ H. W. Jackson, 50 Park Ave. 

54 Vaughan Maple E. A. Carson, R.R. No. 1 

56 Victoria Sarnia _ H. W. Unsworth, 219 Mitton St. N 

57 Harmony Binbrook las. D. Rose, Blackheath 

58 Doric. . Ottawa _ T. A. Ross, 480 Cooper St. 

61 Acacin Hamilton C. E. Kelly, 73 Melrose Ave 

64 Kilwinning London „ W Lancaster, 15 Stanley St 

65 Rehoboam Toronto Geo. W. Slack, 40 Fermanagh Ave. 

72 A'lina Gait A. G. Malcolm, 76 Rose St. 

74 St. James S. Augusta H. H. Throop, R.R. No. 2, Brock- 
ville 

75 St. John's Toronto... Chas. F. Boddy, Port Credit 

76 Oxford Woodstock E. E. Dougall. 122 Wilson St.. 

77 Faithful Brethren. Lindsay. C. L. Davidson, 102 Kent St. W. 

86 Wilson Toronto... W. L. Lawer, 78 Grosvenor St. 

88 St. George'.s Owen Sound C T. Waujrh, 1321 4th Ave. W. 

92 Cataraqui Kingston T. N. Clarke, 101 Livingston Ave. 

99 Tuscan _ Newmarket R. L. Pritchard, 35 Lome Ave. 

100 Valley Dundas... F. A. Latshaw, 30 Melville St. 

101 Corinthian Peterborough R. F. Downey, 298 Boswell Ave. 

103 Maple Leaf St. Catharines A. E. Coombs, 197 Church St. 

105 St. Mark's Niagara Falls Fred Trelford, 766— 4th Ave. 

107 St. Paul's Lambeth R. A. McDougall, R.R. No. 1, 

Glanworth 

108 Blenheim Princeton S. C. Robson, Drumbo 

119 Maple Leaf Bath D. F. Aylsworth, R.R. No. 2 

120 Warren Fingal C. P. Silcox, R.R. No. 3, Shedden 

121 Doric. Brantford I P. Temple, 42 Nelson St. 

123 Belleville Belleville C. D. Crosby, 245 Coleman St. 

125 Cornwall Cornwall A. W. Gammon, Box 1181 

127 Franck Frankford ..S. D. Wright, R.R. No. 1 

128 Pembroke Pembroke - C. W. Fraser, 423 McKay St. 

139 Lebanon Oshawa W. A. Hare, 8 Bond St E. 

140 Malahide Aylmer Geo. Stewart, Springfield 

144 Tecumseh Stratford S. W. Rust, 203 Douglas St. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1940 251 

No. Lodge Location Secretary and P.O. Address 

146 Prince of Wales Newburgh _ D. Sexsmith, R.R. No. 1. Wilton 

148 Civil Service Ottawa _ A. M. Hill, 652 Gilmour St. 

151 Grand River _ Kitchener P. Fisher. 11 Elgin St. 

153 Burns _ Wyoming- Alex. McManus. R.R. No. 1 

155 Peterborough Peterborough J. H. Vallery. 310 Pearl Ave. 

156 York _ Toronto W. E. Hofland. 5 Eglinton Av. B. 

158 Alexandra _ Oil Springs N. D. Munro, R.R. No. 2 

159 Goodwood _ Richmond S .B. Gordon. R.R. No. 1 

164 Star-in-the-Eaet Wellington N. A. Tice, R.R. No. 1 

168 Merritt - Welland _ L. R. Brennan. 62 Hellems Ave. 

177 The Builders Ottawa J. J. McGill, 189 Holmwood Ave. 

178 Plattsville Plattsville- J. Bristow, Bright 

180 Speed Guelpb B. Whetstone. 90 Yorkshire St. 

193 Scotland Scotland E. E. Messecar, R.R. No. 1 

195 Tuscan London W. D. Jackson. Box 624 

209a. St. John's London _ C. J. Atkins, 348 Tecumseh Ave. 

215 Lake _ Ameliasburg J. A. Weese, R.R. No. 7, Belleville 

218 Stevenson Toronto A. Robertson. 29 Mortimer Ave. 

222 Marmora _ Marmora C. H. Buskard. Deloro 

228 Prince Arthur Listowel _..E. S. Parrott, R.R. No. 1 

230 Kerr Barrie V. E. Knight. 280 Bradford St. 

231 Lodge of Fidelity-.. Ottawa .._ Robt. Wilson, 21 Fifth Ave. 

233 Doric Parkhill Geo. Portice, R.R. No. 8 

237 Vienna -...Vienna R. McLean. R.R. No. 2 

242 Macoy Mallorytown H. L. Scott. R.R. No. 3 

247 Ashlar .Toronto H. C. Davies, Ass't Sec, 35 Glebe 

Road W. 

253 Minden Kingston G. H. Veale, 218 Nelson St. 

254 Clifton _. Niagara Falls J. D. Muir, 1028 St. Clair Ave. 

257 Gait Gait E. F. Hetherington, 50 Cedar St. 

258 Guelph .Guelph. F. F. Sweetman, 394 Woolwich St. 

264 Chaudiere ..Ottawa G. C. Bennett, 31 Euclid Ave. 

267 Parthenon _ -..Chatham ...J. N. Eddington, 124 William St. 

North 

270 Cedar Oshawa _N. J. McDongall. 101 Ontario St. 

271-.... Wellington Erin G. T. Lacey, Box 136. Hillsburg 

272 Seymour _ Ancaster E. McMullen, R.R. No 1, Hamilton 

283 Eureka Belleville R. D. -Adams. 272 Albert St. 

287 Shuniah Port Arhtur. A. P. Freed. Box 85 

289 Doric Lobo. J. McGugan. R.R. No. 1, Denfield 

292 Robertson _ King F. E. Boys, R.R. No. 2 

296 Temple _ .St. Catharines C. A. Brown, 222 St. Paul St. 

299 Victoria Centreville H. A. Carscallen, Enterprise 

300 Mt. Olivet Thorndale J. A. Elgie, R.R. No. 1, Belton 

302. -St. David's St. Thomas W. H. Stapleton. 12 Drake St. 

304 Minerva _ Stroud A. L. Webb. R.R. No. 4, Barrie 

305 Humber Weston _ A. E. Scythes, 170 King St. 

309 Morning Star Carlow...- - R. D. Munro. Auburn 

312 Pnyx Wallaceburg D. F. Johnson, 329 William St. 

316 Doric .Toronto R. H. Dee. 17 Constance St. 

322 North Star - Owen Sound - E. E. Vanstone, 976 Sixth Ave. E 

324 Temple -...Hamilton J. Wilkinson, 55 Nightingale St. 

326 Zetland Toronto J. Bennett, 332 Kennedy Ave. 

328 Ionic __Napier Fred. Richardson, Kerrwood 

329 King Solomon's Jarvis R. E. Miller, R.R. No. 3 

330 Corinthian London W. E. Bradt, 16 Cove Rd. 

332 Stratford Stratford. -E. Denroche, 46 Erie Ave., Apt. 1 

339 Orient _ Toronto W. J. Cordell, 117 Benson Ave. 

343 Georgian Toronto. P. W. Davies, 229 Symington Ave, 

345 Nilestown Nilestown _J. F. Johnson, R.R. No. 8, 

London 

346 Occident Toronto A. G. Greenwood, 1985 Dufferin St. 

357 Waterdown — ...Millgrove J. R. Nicol, R.R. No. 4, Dundas 



252 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 
No. Lodge Location Secretary and P.O. Address 

361 Waverley Guelph A. Jaffray, 54 Preston St. 

364 Dufferin Melbourne J. A. McGugan, R.R. No. 1 

367 St. George Toronto A. B. Hutchcroft, 112 Kingsway 

368 Salem Brockville W. H. Drummond, 53 Pearl St W 

369 Mimico Lambton Mills W. A. Beecroft, 31 Palisades 

371 Prince of Wales Ottawa H. J. Sykes, 364 Wellington St 

373 Copestone „.Welland A. Tattersall, 30 Franklin St. 

377 Lome Shelbourne S. Patterson, R.R. No. 5 

378 King Solomon's London Jas. White, 354 Picadilly St. 

379 Middlesex Bryanston _. Chas. Gloyne, R.R. 2, Denfield 

380 Union London R. E. Tillson, 121 Rectory St 

382 Doric Hamilton.... L. P. Robertson, 112 South Oval 

384 Alpha Toronto.... Wm. Moull, 11 Lindsay Ave. 

388 Henderson Ilderton .„ B. R. Clemance, R.R. 1, Denfield 

390 Florence _ Florence S. Hanks, R.R. 2, Croton 

394 King Solomon .Thamesford J. MacKay, R.R. No. 3 

399 Moffat Harrietsville G. Marsh, R.R. No. 1, Mossley 

401 Craig _ Deseronto C. G. Thompson, R.R. No. 5 

403 Windsor Windsor H. Beardmore, Apt. 315, 1616 

Ouellette Ave. 

404 Lome Tamworth A. Stinson, R.R. No. 2 

410 Zeta Toronto S. J. Boyde, 1542 Dufferin St. 

412 Keystone Sault Ste. Marie N. Grant, 31 Grace St. 

415 Fort William Fort William .W. T. Biggar, 506 Grain Exchange 

419 Libeity Sarnia W. J. Aitchison, 140 N Euphemia 

420 Nipissing North Bay B. F. Nott, Box 55 

424 Doric Pickering J. C. Stork, R.R. No. 1 

426 Stanley Toronto P. A. Holbrow, 118 Pendrith Ay. 

430 Acacia Toronto. M. E. Steele, 157 St. Germain Av 

434 Algonquin Elmsdale „ H. R. Hayward, Scotia 

437 Tuscan Sarnia W. J. Barrie, Room 5, Masonic 

Building 

438 Harmony Toronto G. H. Simmons, 915 Logan Ave. 

452 Avonmore Avonmore Allan McKinnon, R.R. No. 2, 

Monkland Sta. 

453 Royal Fort William R. J. Aldrich. 1437 McGregor Av 

469 Algoma Sault Ste Marie M. J. Campbell, 156 Church St. 

473 The Beaches Toronto S. A. Griffin, 113 Rainsford Rd. 

474 Victoria Toronto D. L. McPherson, 11 Abbott Av 

475 Dundurn Hamilton G. Milne. 85 Lottridge St. 

481 Corinthian Toronto _ F. E. Ansell. 149 Wright Ave. 

494 Riverdale Toronto R. F. Thomas, 933 Woodbine Av. 

495 Electric Hamilton ...Bert Culm, 259 Province St. S. 

496 Univeibity Toronto W. Dowd?. 74 McLean Ave. 

499 Port Arthur Port Arthur S. H. Green, 105 Pine St. 

500 Rose Windsor D. W. F. Nichols, 916 Ottawa St. 

501 Connaught Mimico _ J. T. Lee, 96 Hillside Ave. 

503 Inwood . Inwood J. R. Graham, RR. No 3, Oil City 

504 Otter . _ Lombardy E. W. Joynt, R.R. No. 1 

508 Ozias Brantford E. W. Lavery, 51 Brunswick St. 

509 Twin City Kitchener G. DeKleinhans, 561 Queen St. S. 

510 Parkdale Toronto J. H. Mills, 6 Baby Point Terrace 

511 Connaught Fort William E. C. Schoales, Canada Foundries 

513 Corinthian Hamilton J. R. Croft, 104 Burris St. 

514 St. Albans Toronto G. F. Frankland, 35 Gough Ave. 

515 Reba Brantford S. W. Seago, 182 Brant Ave. 

517 Hazeldean Hazeldean J. H. Nesbit, R.R. 2, Stittsville 

519 Onondaga Oonondaga A. A. Barton, R.R. 1, Cainsville 

520 Coronati . Toronto H. Spencer, 32 Sorauren Ave. 

521 Ontario Windsor A. R. Graham, 359 Partington Av 

522 Mt. Sinai Toronto H. R. Fox. 157 Beatrice St. 

523 Royal Arthur Peterborough G. W. Haley, 85 Benson Ave. 

524 Mississauga Port Credit R. E. Malpass, Cooksville 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 



No. 



Lodge 



Location 



Secretary and P.O. Address 



525 Temple Toronto 

526 Ionic Westboro... 

528 Golden Beaver Timmins..., 



531 High Park Toronto 

532 Canada Toronto 

533 Shamrock Toronto 

535 Phoenix Fonthill 

537 Ulster Toronto 

539 Waterloo Waterloo... 

541 Tuscan Toronto 

542 Metropolitan Toronto 



543 Imperial Toronto 

544 Lincoln Abingdon _ 

545 John Ross 

Robertson Toronto 

546 Talbot St. Thomas 

547 Victory _ Toronto 

548 General Mercer Toronto 

549 Ionic...._ Hamilton 

550 Buchanan- Hamilton 

551 Tuscan Hamilton 

552 Queen City Toronto 

553 Oakwood Toronto 

554 Border Cities Windsor 

555 Wardrope Hamilton 

558 Sidney Albert 

Luke Ottawa 

559 Palestine Toronto 

560 St. Andrew's Ottawa 

561 Acacia Toronto 

562 Hamilton Hamilton 

563 Victory Chatham 

564 Ashlar Ottawa 

565 Kilwinning Toronto 

566 King Hiram Toronto 

S67 St. Aidans Toronto 

570 Dufferin Toronto 



571 Antiquity Toronto....- 

572 Mizpah Toronto 

573 Adoniram _ Niagai a Falls 

574 Craig Ailsa Craig 

575 fidelity Toronto 

576 Mimosa Toronto 

577 St. Clair Toronto 

578 Queens _ Kingston 

579 Harmony -Windsor 

580 Acacia _ _ London . 

581 Harcourt _ Toronto 



582 Sunnyside Toronto 

583 Transportation Toronto 

584 Kaministiquia Fort William 

585 Royal Edward Kingston 

586 Remembrance Toronto 

587 Patricia _ Toronto 

589 Grey Toronto 

590 Defenders - Ottawa 



.-F. R. Fleet, 129 Annette St. 
-.P. E. Watters, 139 Bayswater Av 
.-Dr. I. T. Brill, Marshall-Ecclestone 

Building 
...R. B. Magill, 35 Armadale Ave. 
.. Alex. Wilson, 24 Badgerow Ave. 
.. E. W. Leith, 84 Gothic Ave. 
.,F. H. Clark, R.R. No. 2. Welland 
.. G. Chambers, 211 Browning Ave. 

- C. O. Hemphill, 56 Alexandra Av 
.. Jas. Herriot, 8 Glen Avon Rd. 
„.J. A. Troyer, 127 Old Orchard 

Grove 
-E. E. Reid, 380 Manor Rd. East 
-A. E. Pyett, R.R. No. 2, Caistor 

Centre 
W. J. S. Graham, 16 Herbert Av 
W. A. McPher.son, 38 Metcalfe St 
J. N. Pike, 467 Roselawn Ave. 
W. H. Quinn, 301 Pacific Ave. 
J. P. Simpson, 21 Belview Ave. 
A. M. Moore, 31 Genesee St. 
R. A. Carter, 13 Blythe St. 
Walter Carey, 2052 Gerrard St E 
S. H. McElwain, 90 Cloverlawn 

Ave. 
E. T. Howe, 969 London St. W. 
M. E. Smith, 250 Main St. W. 

R .M. Stanton, 124 Aylnier Ave. 
H. Melvin, 167 Winona Drive 
J. N. Salter, 8 Westmount Ave. 
W. A. Dier, 26 Cole Ave. 

E. L. Kerr, 432 Main St. E. 

C. E. Clements, 121 King St. W. 
G. Powers, 16 Rideau Terrace 
M Strachan, 85 Mavety St. 
C. V. Tottle, 1990 Bloor St. W. 
H. L. Bennett, 515 Federal Bldg. 
J. A. Hodgins, 105 Mount Pleasant 

Rd. 
W. P. Burns, 54 Raglan Ave., 

Apt. 14 

F. Howell, 24 Olive Ave. 

G. E. Pedar, 671 Eastwood Cresc. 

- W. G. Smith, R.R. 6, Parkhill 
W. Moull, 11 Lindsay Ave. 

G. F. Empringham, 142 Dawes Rd 
Philip Bach, 183 Grace St. 
L. T. Rutledgc. 604 Earl St. 
W. H. Kent, 1571 Goyeau St. 
J. W. Bradshaw, 798 Hellmuth 

Ave. 
..G. T- Clark, Ass't, 320 University 

Ave. 
K. N. Carrie, 58 Roncesvall^ Av 
J. G. Dunn, 65 Armadale Ave. 
N. B. Darrell, 331 South May St. 
S. A. Hitsman, 637 Johnson St 
C. H. Ward, 48 Mortimer Ave. 
Robt. Somerville, 127 Garden Ave 
E. G. Armstrong, 29 Roe Ave. 
J. D. Gardner, 143 Echo Drive 



•254 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

No. Lodge Location Secretary and P.O. Address 

591 North Gate Toronio \ G. Roberts, 70 Broadway Ave. 

592 Fairbank Toronto T. G. Taylor, 3017 Dufferin St. 

593 St. Andrew's Hamilton F.W.Davidson, 52 Barnesdale Ave.S 

594 Hillcrest Hamillon G. A. Sweatman, 40 Alpine Ave. 

595 Rideau Ottawa . G. Chequer, 3 Ashbury PI. Lin- 

denlea, Ottawa 

597 Temple London W. G. Stewart, 201 Richmond St. 

598 Dominion Windsor J A. Wickens, 680 Dougall Ave. 

599 Mt. Dennis Weston F. Thain, 12 Craydon Ave., Mt. 

Dennis 

600 Maple Leaf Toronto A R. Howlett, 33 Ridley Gardens 

601 St. Paul's Sarnia J T. Elliott, 110 Crawford St. 

602 JIugh Murray Hamilton J. Eaglesham, 15 Emerald St. S. 

604 Palace Windsor J G. Moncrieff, Heintzman Bldg. 

605 Melita Toronto E. W. Skirrow, 47 Eastbourne 

Cresc. 

606 Unity -.Toronto E F. Trumper, 162 St. John's Rd 

607 Golden Fleece Toronto R. Macfarlane, 275 Vaughan Rd. 

608 Gothic Lindsay .„ W R. Allely, Town Hall 

610..._Ashlar _ _._.... Byron _ N. T. Sanderson, R.R. No. 7 

London 

611 Huron-Bruce Toronto Peter Muir, 41 Ben Lamond Ave. 

612 Birch Cliff Birch Cliff V. G. Moore, 8 Avalon Blvd. 

616 Perfection St. Catharines G. H. Davis, 9 Trafalgar St. 

617 North Bay North Bay E. R. Herbert, 159 First Ave. E. 

618 Thunder Bay Port Arthur O. R. Tanner, 404 Public Utili- 
ties Bldg. 
619 Runnymede Toronto W. McK. Hamshaw, 76 Glendale 

Ave. 
620 Bay of Quinte Toronto S. Chamberlain, 201 Cottingham 

Street 

623 Doric Kirkland Lake N. E. Loney, Box 670 

625 Hatherly Sault Ste. Marie. G. E. Richardson, 14 The Drive 

626 Stamford Stamford Centre...R. F. Cooper, 436 Longhurst St. 

627 Pelee Scudder W. F. Wiper, Pelee Island 

629 Grenville Toronto J. A. Eyre, 460 Gladstone Ave. 

630 Prince of Wales Toronto A. G. Stewart, 60 Chudleigh Ave. 

632 Long Branch Mimico _ G. A. Brandow, 64 — 8th St., New 

Toronto 

634 Delta Toronto A. Lawrence, 148 Roehampton Av 

635 Wellington Toronto R. W. Smith, 75 Highbourne Rd. 

637 Caledonia Toronto J. C. McAllister, 147 Browning A 

638 Bedford Toronto C. H. R. Devey, 67 Yonge St. Bid 

639 Beach Hamilton Beach H. S. Marshall, 554 Beach Blvd. 

640 Anthony Sayer Mimico E. J. Hutrhins, 36 Eastbourne Cr 

641 Garden Windsor John Briggs, 1553 Marentette Av 

642 St. Andrew's Windsor M. Burbridge, 167 Cameron Ave. 

643 Cathedral Toronto J. K. McGuire, 174 Rosewell Ave. 

644 Simcoe Toronto W. G. Mackay. 319 Kennedy Ave. 

645 Lake Shore ..Mimico E. H. Glenn, 17 Eastbourne Cres. 

Toronto 

646 Rowland Mt. Albert R. A. Armstrong, Zephyr. Ont. 

647 Todmorden Todmorden H. Minett, 1029 Rape Ave. 

649 Temple _ Oshawa R. H. Crossley 99 Frederick St. 

651 Dentonia- Toronto..... _ Wm. Tennant, 19 Avonlea Blvd. 

652 Memorial Toronto S. J. Boyde, 1542 Dufferin St, 

654 Ancient 

Landmarks Hamilton J. McKay, 153 Kensington Ave. S 

655 Kingsway Lambton Mills G. J. Bartheolomew, 67 Grenview 

Blvd. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 



List of Lodges — By Districts 



ALGOMA DISTRICT— (9 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. C. E. Watkins, Fort William 

No. 287 — Shuniah Port Arthur No. 511 — ConnaughtW. Fort William 

No. 415 — Fort William Fort William No. 584— Kaministiquia Ft. William 

No. 453— Royal Fort William No. 618— Thunder Bay Pt. Arthur 

No. 499 — Port Arthur.Port Arthur No. 636 — Hornepayne ..Hornepayne 

No. 656 — Kenogamisis Geraldton 

BRANT DISTRICT— (14 Lodges) 

D.D.G.M.— R.W. Bro. H. S. Liittich, Brantford 

No. 35 — St. Johns Cayuga No. 243— St. George St. George 

No. 45 — Brant _ Brantford No. 319 — Hiram - Hagersville 

No. 82 — St. Johns Paris No. 329 — King Solomon Jarvis 

No. 106 — Burford _ Burford No. 505 — Lynden Lynden 

No. 113— Wilson ...._ Waterford No. 508— Ozias Brantford 

No. 121 — Doric Brantford No. 515 — Reba _Brantford 

No. 193 — Scotland - Scotland No. 519 — Onondaga Onondaga 

BRUCE DISTRICT— (12 Lodges) 

D.D.G.M.— R.W. Bro. J. W. Potts, Dobbinton 

No. 131 — St. Lawrence Southampton No. 393 — Forest Chesley 

No. 197 — Saugeen ...._ -....Walkerton No. 396 — Cedar -..- Wiarton 

No. 235— Aldworth Paisley No. 429— Port Elgin Port Elgin 

No. 262 — Harriston Harriston No. 431 — Moravian Cargill 

No. 315— Clifford Clifford No. 432— Hanover ..._ Hanover 

No. 362 — Maple Leaf Tara No. 436 — Burns — Hepworth 

CHATHAM DISTRICT— (14 Lodges) 

D.D.G.M.— R.W. Bro. J. M. Coutts, Thamesville 

No. 46 — Wellington Chatham No. 327 — Hammond _Wardsville 

No. 245 — Tecumseh _ Thamesville No. 336 — Highrate Highgate 

No. 255— Sydenham Dresden No. 390— Florence -..- Florence 

No. 267 — Parthenon _ Chatham No. 391 — Howard _ Ridgetown 

No. 274— Kent Blenheim No. 422— Star of the East. Both well 

No. 282 — Lome Glencoe No. 457— Century Merlin 

No. 312 — Pnyx _Wallaceburg No. 563 — Victory Chatham 

EASTERN DISTRICT— (18 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M.— R.W. Bro. W.R. Hall. Vankleek Hill 

No. 21a— St. Johns Vankleek Hill No. 418— Maxville Maxville 

No. 125 — Cornwall Cornwall No. 439 — Alexandria Alexandria 

No. 142 — Excelsior Morrisburg No. 450 — Hawkesbury ..Hawkesbury 

No. 143 — Friendly Brothers Iroquois No. 452 — Avonmore Avonmore 

No. 186— Plantagenet Riceville No. 458— Wales Wales 

No. 207 — Lancaster Lancaster No. 480 — Williamsburg Williamsburg 

No. 256 — Farran's Point Aultsville No. 491— Cardinal Cardinal 

No. 320— Chestervillp Chesterville No. 557— Finch Finch 

No. 383 — Henderson Winchester No. 596 — Martintown _Martintown 

FRONTENAC DISTRICT— (18 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M.— R.W. Bro. J. W. Simmons, Chaffey's Locks 

No. 3— Ancient St. Johns Kingston No. 253— Minden Kingston 

No. 9 — Union Napanee No. 299 — Victoria Centreville 

No. 92— Cataraqui _.._ Kingston No. 404 — Lome _ — Tamworth 

No. 109— Albion Harrowsmith No. 441— Westport — Westport 

No. 119— Maple Leaf Bath No. 460— Rideau Seeley's Bay 

Nfo. 146— Prince of Wales Newburgh No. 497— St. Andrew's _..Arden 

No. 157 — Simpson Newboro No. 578— Queen's .....Kingston 

No. 201 — Leeds _ Gananoque No. 585— Royal Edward Kingston 

No. 228 — Prince Arthur Odessa No. 621 — Frontenac Sharbot Lake 



256 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



GEORGIAN DISTRICT- 

D.D.G.M.— R.W. Bro. N. R. 

No. 90 — Manito Collingwood No. 

No. 96 — Corinthian Barrie No. 

No. 137 — Pythagoras Meaford No. 

No. 192— Orillia - Orillia No. 

No. 230 — Kerr Barrie No. 

No. 234 — Beaver Thornbury No. 

No. 236 — Manitoba Cookstown No. 

No. 249 — Caledonia Midland No. 

No. 266— Northern Light Stayner No. 

No. 285— Seven Star _ AUiston 



-(19 Lodges) 
Doolittle, Orillia 

304 — Minerva Stroud 

348 — Georgian Penetanguishene 

385— Spry Beeton 

444 — Nitetis Creemore 

466 — Coronation Elmvale 

467 — Tottenham -Tottenham 

470 — Victoria Victoria Harbour 

492 — Karnak Coldwater 

538— Earl Kitchener Pt.McNicol 



GREY DISTRICT— (11 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M.— R.W. Brou M. G. Fitzgerald, Orangeville 



No. 88 — St. George 'S...0 wen Sound 

No. 200— St. Alban's...Mount Forest 

No. 216 — Harris Orangeville 

No. 306— Durham Durham 

No. 322— North Star Owen Sound 

No. 333 — Prince Arthur ...Flesherton 



No. 334 — Prince Arthur Arthur 

No. 377 — Lome Shelburne 

No. 421— Scott Grand Valley 

No. 449— Dundalk Dundalk 

No. 490 — Hiram Markdale 



HAMILTON DISTRICT A— (16 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M.— R.W. Bro. A. E. Barnby. Hamilton 

No. 6 — Barton Hamilton 

No. 40— St. Johns Hamilton 

No. 100 — Valley Dundas 

No. 135— St. Clair Milton 

No. 165 — Burlington Burlington 

No. 272 — Seymour Ancaster 

No. 291— Dufferin W. Flamboro 

No. 324— Temple JHamilton 



No. 357 — Waterdown Millgrove 

No. 400— Oakville Oakville 

No. 475 — Dundurn Hamilton 

No. 513 — Corinthian Hamilton 

No. 551 — Tuscan Hamilton 

No. 562 — Hamilton Hamilton 

No. 602 — Hugh Murray Hamilton 

No. 603— Campbell Campbellville 



HAMILTON DISTRICT B— (17 Lodges) 



D.D.G.M.— R.W. Broi. A. 

No. 7 — Union Grimsby 

No. 27 — Strict Observance Hamilton 

No. 57 — Harmony Binbrook 

No. 61 — Acacia „....JIamiIton 

No. 62 — St. Andrews Caledonia 

No. 166 — Wentworth ...Stoney Creek 

No. 185— Enniskillen York 

No. 382— Doric Hamilton 

No. 495 — Electric _ Hamilton 



E. McArthur, Hamilton 

No. 544 — Lincoln Abingdon 

No. 549 — Ionic Hamilton 

No. 550 — Buchanan Hamilton 

No. 555 — Wardrope Hamilton 

No. 593 — St. Andrews Hamilton 

No. 594— Hillcrest Hamilton 

No. 639 — Beach Burlington Beach 

No. 654 — Ancient Landmarks _ 

Hamilton 



No. 


20- 


No. 


42- 


No. 


64- 


No. 


107- 


No. 


190- 


No. 


195— 


No. 


209a- 


No. 


289- 


No. 


300- 


No. 


330- 


No. 


344- 


No. 


345— 



LONDON DISTRICT— 

D.D.G.M.— R.W. Bro. J. W. 

St. Johns' London No. 

■St. George's London No. 

Kilwinning London No. 

St. Paul's Lambeth No. 

Belmont Belmont No. 

Tuscan London No. 

. — St. John's London No. 

Doric -..Lobo No. 

Mount Olivet Thorndale No. 

Corinthian London No. 

Merrill Dorchester Sta. No. 

Nilestown Nilestown 



(23 Lodges) 
Carson, I^ondon 
358 — Delaware Valley Delaware 

378 — King Solomon's London 

379^-Middlesex Bryanston 

380 — Union London 

388 — Henderson Ilderton 

394 — King Solomon Thamesford 
399 — Moffat Harrietsville 

529 — Myra Komoka 

580 — Acacia London 

597 — Temple London 

610 — AsMar Byron 



MUSKOKA DISTRICT— (8 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M.— R.W. Bra. J. M. Gerow, Burk's Falls 



No. 352— Granite Parry Sound 

No. 360 — Muskoka Bracebridge 

No. 376— Unity Huntsville 

No. 409 — Golden Rule Gravenhurst 



No. 423 — Strong Sundridge 

No. 434 — Algonquin - Emsdale 

No. 443 — Powassan Powassan 

No. 454 — Corona Burk's Falls 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 



257 



NIAGARA A DISTRICT— (12 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. W. D. Fairbrother, Beamsville 



No. 2 — Niagara Niagara 

No. 15 — St. George's St. Catharines 

No. 32 — Amity Dunnville 

No. 103 — Maple Leaf St. Catharines 

No. 115 — Ivy -..Beamsville 

No. 221 — Mountain Thorold 



No. 277 — Seymour Port Dalhousie 

No. 296 — Temple St. Catharines 

No. 338— Dufferin Wellandport 

No. 502 — Coronation Smithville 

No. 614 — Adanac Merritton 

No. 616 — Perfection St. Catharines 



NIAGARA B DISTRICT— (13 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M.— R.W. Bro. W. J. (Joodyear, Stamford Centre 



No. 105 — St. Marks Niagara Falls 

No. 168— Merritt Welland 

No. 169 — Macnab _ Port Colborne 

No. 254 — Clifton Niagara FalLs 

No. 337 — Myrtle Port Robinson 

No. 372— Palmer Fort Erie North 

No. 373— Copestone — Welland 



No. 471 — KingEdwardVII Chippawa 

No. 535— Phoenix FonthiU 

No. 573 — Adoniram Niagara Falls 

No. 613— Fort Erie Fort Erie 

No. 615 — Dominion Ridgeway 

No. 626— Stamford Stamford Centre 



NIPISSING EAST DISTRICT— (8 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M.— R,W. Bro. H. H. Abell. Cobalt 

No. 405 — Mattawa Mattawa No. 485 — Haileybury Haileybury 

No. 420— Nipissing North Bay No. 486— Silver Cobalt 

No. 447— SturgeonFa. SturgeonFalls No. 507— Elk Lake Elk Lake 

No. 462 — Temiskaming NewLiskeard No. 617 — North Bay - North Bay 

NIPISSING WEST DISTRICT— (12 Lodges) 

D.D.G.M.— R.W. Bro. M. Nisbet, Capreol 

No. 412 — Keystone Sault Ste. Marie No. 487 — Penewobikong Blind River 

No. 427 — Nickel - Sudbury No. 527 — Espanola . Espanola 

No. 442 — Dyment Thessalon No. 536 — Algonquin ....-Copper Cliff 

No. 455 — Doric Little Current No. 588 — National Capreol 

No. 469 — Algoma Sault Ste. Marie No. 622 — Lome CJhapleau 

No. 472 — Gore Bay _. Gore Bay No. 625 — Hatherly Sault Ste. Marie 

NORTH HURON DISTRICT— (12 Lodges) 

D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. R. C. Redmond, Wingham 

No. 93 — Northern Light Kincardine No. 286 — Wingham Wingham 

No. 162— Forest Wroxeter No. 303— Blyth __-..Blyth 

No. 184 -Old Light Lucknow No. 314— Blair __Palmerston 

No. 225 — Bernard Listowel No. 331 — Fordwich Fordwich 

No. 276 — Teeswater Teeswater No. 341 — Bruce _...- Tiverton 

No. 284 — St. Johns Brussels No. 568 — Hullett Londesboro 

ONTARIO DISTRICT— (13 Lodges) 

D.D.G.M.— R.W. Bro. O. W. Rolph, Orono 

No. 17 — St. John's Cobourg No. 114 — Hope Port Hope 

No. 26 — Ontario Port Hope No. 139 — Lebanon Oshawa 

No. 30 — Composite Whitby No. 270 — Cedar Oshawa 

No. 31 — Jerusalem Bowmanville No. 325 — Orono Orono 

No. 39— Mount Zion Brooklin No. 428— Fidelity Port Perry 

No. 66 — Durham Newcastle No. 649 — Temple Oshawa 

No. 91 — Colborne Colborne 



OTTAWA DISTRICT— (27 Lodges) 



D.D.G.M.— R.W. Bro. 

No. 52 — Dalhousie _ Ottawa 

No. 58 — Doric _ Ottawa 

No. 63— St. John's Carleton Place 

No. 122 — Renfrew Renfrew 

No. 128 — Pembroke Pembroke 

No. 147 — Mississippi -...Almonte 

No. 148 — Civil Service - Ottawa 

No. 159 — Goodwood Richmond 

No. 177— The Builders Ottawa 



C. M. Pitts, Ottawa 

No. 196 — Madawaska - Arnprior 

No. 231— Lodge of Fidelity -Ottawa 

No. 264 — Chaudiere Ottawa 

No. 371 — Prince of Wales Ottawa 

No. 433 — Bonnechere Eganville 

No. 459 — Cobden - _(3obden 

No. 465 — (Tarleton ...__._ Carp 

No. 476 — Corinthian -North Gower 
No. 479 — Russell -Russell 



258 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



No. 516 — Enterprise Beachburg 

No. 517 — Hazeldean Hazeldean 

No. 526 — Ionic Westboro 

No. 558 — Sidney Albert Luke Ottawa 
No. 560 — St. Andrew's Ottawa 



No. 561 — Acacia _ Westboro 

No. 564 — Ashlar Ottawa 

No. 590 — Defenders Ottawa 

No. 595 — Rideau ;. Ottawa 



PETERBOROUGH DISTRICT— (11 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M.— R.W. Bro. D. H. Webster, Lakefield 



No. 101 — Corinthian ...Peterborough 

No. 126— Golden Rule Campbellford 

No. 145— J. B. Hall Millbrook 

No. 155 — Peterborough Peterborough 

No. 161 — Percy Warkworth 

No. 223 — ^Norwood Norwood 



No. 313-— Clementi Lakefield 

No. 374 — Keene Keene 

No. 435 — Havelock Havelock 

No. 523 — Royal Arthur Peterborough 
No. 633 — Hastings Hastings 



No. 
No. 



PRINCE EDWARD DISTRICT— (16 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M.— R.W. Bro. A. L. Hill, Belleville 



11 — Moira Belleville 

18 — Prince Edward Picton 



No. 29 — United Brighton 

No. 38— Trent Trenton 

No. 48 — Madoc Madoc 

No. 50 — Consecon Ck)nsecon 

No. 69— Stirling Stirling 

No. 12.3— Belleville Belleville 



No. 127— Franck Frankford 

No. 164— Star in the East Wellington 

No. 215 — Lake Amcliasburg 

No. 222 — Marmora Marmora 

No. 239— Tweed _ Tweed 

No. 283— Eureka Belleville 

No. 401 — Craig Desei'onto 

No. 482- Bancroft Bancroft 



SARNIA DISTRICT— (21 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M.— R.W. Bro. A. Flynn, Thedford 



No. 


56- 


No. 


81- 


No. 


83- 


No. 


116- 


No. 


153- 


No. 


158- 


No. 


194- 


No. 


238- 


No. 


260- 


No. 


263- 


No. 


294- 



-Victoria Sarnia 

-St. Johns Mount Brydges 



-Beavei 

-Cassia 

-Burns 

-Alexandra 

-Petrolia 

-Havelock 

-Washinuton 

-Forest 



Strathrov 

Thedford 

Wyoming 

Oil Springs 

Petrolia 

Watford 

Petrolia 

Forest 



No. 307- 
No. 323- 
No. 328- 
No. 392- 
No. 397- 
No. 419- 
No. 425- 
No. 437- 
No. 503- 
No. 601- 



— Moore Courtright 



-Arkona 
-Alvinston 
Ionic ... 
-Huron 
-Leopold 
-Liberty 
-St. Clair 
-Tuscan 
-Inwood 
-St. Paul 



Arkona 

Alvinston 

Napier 

Camlachie 

Brigden 

Sarnia 

Sombra 

Sarnia 

Inwood 

Sarnia 



SOUTH HURON DISTRICT— (17 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M.— R.W. Bro. H. B. M. Tichborne, Goderich 



No. 

No.. 



33— Maitland Goderich 

73— St. James St. Maury's 



No. 84— Clinton .... Clinton 
No. 133— Lebanon Forest Exeter 

No. 141— Tudor Mitchell 

No. 144— Tecumseh SItratford 

No. 154 — Irving Lucan 

No. 170— Britannia Seaforti^ 

No. 224 — Huron Ilensall 



No. 233— Doric Parkhill 

No. 309 — Morning Star Carlow 

No. 332— Stratford Stratford 

No. 456 — Elma Monkton 

No. 478 — Milverton Mi'.verton 

No. 483 — Granton Granton 

No. 574 — Craig Ailsa Craig 

No. 609— Tavistock Tavistock 



ST. LAWRENCE DISTRICT— (19 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M.— R.W. Bro. M. R. Hough, North Augusta 



No. 5 — Sussex Brockvil'" 

No. 14— True Britons Perth 

No. 24— St. Francis ..Smith's Falls 

No. 28 — Mount Zion Kemptville 

No. 55 — Merrickville ...Merrickville 

No. 74 — St. Jam"s South Augusta 

No. 85 — Rising Sun Athens 

No. 110— Central .... Preseott 

No. 209 — Evergreen Lanark 

No. 242 — Macoy Mallorytown 



No. 368— Salem Brockville 

No. 370 — Harmony Delta 

No. 387 — Lansdowne Lansdowne 

No. 389 — CrystalFountain N.Augusta 

No. 416 — Lyn .... Lyn 

No. 489 — O'^iris .'^^mith's Falls 

No. 504 — Otter Lombardy 

No. 556 — Nation Spencerville 

No. 650— Fid3litv Toledo 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1940 



259 



ST. THOMAS DISTRICT— (U Lodges) 



No. 44- 

No. 94- 

No. 120- 

No. 140- 

No. 171- 

No. 232- 



No. 506- 

No. 528- 

No. 530- 

No. 534- 



D.D.G.M.— R.W. Bro. 

-St. Thomas St. Thomas 

-St. Marks Port Stanley 

-Warren Fingal 

-Malahide _ Aylmer 

-Prince of Wales lona Sta. 
-Cameron Dutton 



P„ Tufford, St. Thomas 

No. 302— St. Davids St. Thomas 

No. 364 — DufEerin _ Melbourne 

No. 386— McColl West Lome 

No. 411 — Rodney - — _ Rodney 

No. 546— Talbot St. Thomas 



TEMISKAMING DISTRICT— (7 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. J. W. Fanning, Kapuskasing 

-Porcupine Porcupine No. 540 — Abitibi Iroquois Falls 

-Golden Beaver Timmins No. 623 — Doric Kirkland Lake 

-Cochrane Cochrane No. 648 — Spruce Falls -.Kapuskasing 

-Englehart Englehart 



TORONTO DISTRICT A— (30 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M.— R.W. Bro. A. Maynes, Toronto 



No. 229 — Ionic Brampton 

No. 305 — Humber Weston 

No. 346 — Occident Toronto 

No. 356 — River Park Streetsville 

No. 369 — Mimico Lambton Mills 

No. 426— Stanley Toronto 

No. 474 — Victoria ..Toronto 

No. 501 — Connaught Mimico 

No. 510— Parkdale Toronto 

No. 522— Mt. Sinai Toronto 

No. 524 — Mississauga „...Port Credit 

No. 525— Temple Toronto 

No. 531 — High Park Toront/j 

No. 548 — Genera! Mercer Toronto 

No. 565 — Kilwinning Toronto 



No. 566 — King Hiram Toronto 

No. 575 — Fidelity Toronto 

No. 582 — Sunnyside Toronto 

No. 583 — Transportatior Toronto 

No. 587 — Patricia Toronto 

No. 599 — Mt. Dennis Weston 

No. 600 — Maple Leaf Toronto 

No. 605— Melita ...._ .....Toronto 

No. 619 — Runnymede Toronto 

No. 630— Prince of Wales ..Toronto 

No. 632 — Long Branch Mimico 

No. 640 — Anthony Sayor Mimico 

No. 645 — Lake Shore Mimico 

No. 652 — Memorial Weston 

No. 655 — Kingsway ...Lambton Mills 



TORONTO DISTRICT B— (30 Lodges) 



D.D.G.M.— R.W. Bro. 

No. 16 — St. Andrews Toronto 

No. 25 — Ionic Toronto 

No. 75 — St. John's Toronto 

No. 87 — Markham Union. Markham 

No. 136 — Richardson Stouffville 

No. 218 — Stevenson Toronto 

No. 220— Zeredatha Uxbridge 

No. 269 — BroughamUnion Claremont 

No. 316— Doric Toronto 

No. 339— Orient Toronto 

No. 343 — Georgina _ Toronto 

No. 354 — Brock Cannington 

No. 424 — Doric Pickering 

No. 430 — Acacia Toronto 

No. 464 — King Edward ...Sunderland 



S. S. Crouch, Toronto 

No. 473 — Beaches Toronto 

No. 494 — Riverdale Toronto 

No. 520— Coronati Toronto 

No. 532— Canada Toronto 

No. 543 — Imperial Toronto 

No. 545 — JnoRossRobsrtson Toronto 

No. 552 — Queen City Toronto 

No. 567— St. Aidans Toronto 

No. 576 — Mimosa -..Toronto 

No. 612— Birch Cliff -Birch Cliff 

No. 620 — Bay of Qulnte Toronto 

No. 637— Caledonia - Toronto 

No. 647 — Todmorden _ Todmorden 

No. 651 — Dentonia Toronto 

No. 653 — Scarboro Agincourt 



No. 


22- 


No. 


23- 


No. 


65- 


No. 


79- 


No. 


86- 


No. 


97- 


No. 


99- 


No. 


129- 


No. 


156- 


No. 


247- 


No. 


265- 


No. 


326- 


No. 


438- 


No. 


481- 



TORONTO DISTRICT C— (27 Lodges) 

D.D.G.M —R.W. Bro. N. G. McDonald, Willowdale 

-King Solomon's Toronto No. 512 — Malone Sutton 

-Richmond -Richmond Hill No. 542 — Metropolitan Toronto 

-Rehoboam Toronto No. 553 — Oakwood Toronto 

-Simcoe Bradford No. 577 — St. Clair Toronto 

-Wilson Toronto No. 581 — Harcourt Toronto 

-Sharon Queensvllle No. 591 — North Gate Toronto 

-Tuscan Newmarket No. 592 — Fairbank _. Toronto 

-Rising Sun Aurora No. 606 — Unity Toronto 

-York Toronto No. 607 — Golden Fleece Toronto 

-Ashlar Toronto No. 629— Grenville Toronto 

-Patterson Thornhill No. 634 — Delta Toronto 

-Zetland _ Toronto No. 63S — Bedford Toronto 

-Harmony „..- Toronto No. 646 — Rowland Mt. Albert 

-Corinthian Toronto 



260 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

TORONTO DISTRICT D— (25 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M.— R.W. Bro. T. R. W. Black, Toronto 



No. 54 — Vaughan Maple No. 541- 

No. 98— True Blue Bolton No. 547- 

No. 118 — Union Schomberg No. 559- 

No. 292— Robertson King No. 570- 

No. 311 — Blackwood Woodbridge No. 571- 

No. 367— St. George Toronto No. 572- 

No. 384— Alpha _ Toronto No. 586- 

No. 410— Zeta Toronto No. 589- 

No. 468— Peel Caledon East No. 611- 

No. 496— University Toronto No. 635- 

No. 514— St. Alban's . .. Toronto No. 643- 

No. 533— Shamrock Toronto No. 644- 

No. 537— Ulster Toronto 



-Tuscan Toronto 

-Victory Toronto 

-Palestine Toronto 

-Dufferin Toronto 

-Antiquity Toronto 

-Mizpah Toronto 

-Remembrance Toronto 

-Grey Toronto 

-Huron-Bruce Toronto 

-Wellington Toronto 

-Cathedral Toronto 

-Simcoe Toronto 



VICTORIA DISTRICT— (12 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M.— R.W. Bro. R. T. Robertson, Coboconk 



No. 77 — Faithful Brethren.Lindsay 

No. 268 — Verulam Bobcaygeon 

No. 375 — Lome _ Omemee 

No. 398— Victoria Kirkfield 

No. 406 — Spry Fenelon Falls 

No. 408 — Murray Beaverton 



No. 440 — Arcadia Minden 

No. 451 — Somerville Kinmount 

No. 463 — N'rth Entrance Haliburton 

No. 477 — Harding Woodville 

No. 498 — King George V Coboconk 

No. 608— Gothic Lindsay 



WELLINGTON DISTRICT— (20 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M.R.W. Bro. H. E. Cosford, Guelph 



No. 72- 

No. 151- 

No. 172- 

No. 180- 

No. 203- 

No. 205- 

No. 219- 

No. 257- 

No. 258- 

No. 271- 



-Alma 

-Grand River 
-Ayr . 
-Speed 
-Irvine 



Gait 
Kitchener 

Ayr 

Guelph 
Flora 



-New Dom'n.New Hamburg 
-Credit Geoi getown 

-Gait ...Gait 

-Guelph Guelph 

-Wellington - ..Erin 



No. 279 — New Hope Hespeler 

No. 295 — Conestogo Drayton 

No. 297 — Preston Preston 

No. 318— Wilmot Baden 

No. 321 — Walker Acton 

No. 347 — Mercer Fergus 

No. 361 — Waverley Guelph 

No. 509 — Twin City Kitchener 

No. 539 — Waterloo Waterloo 

No. 628 — Glenrose Elmira 



WESTERN DISTRICT— (8 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M.— R.W. Bro. E. E. Jess, Rainy River 



No. 414 — Pequonga Kenora 

No. 417 — Keewatin Keewatin 

No. 445 — Lake of the Woods .Kenora 
No. 446 — Granite Fort Frances 



No. 461 — Ionic Rainy River 

No. 484— Golden Star Dryden 

No. 518 — Sioux Lookout Sioux L'out 
No. 631 — Manitou Emo 



WILSON DISTRICT— (20 Lodges) 
D.D.GM — R.W. Bro. B. M. Pearce, Simcoe 



No. 


10- 


No. 


37- 


No. 


43- 


No. 


68- 


No. 


76- 


No. 


78- 


No. 


104 


No. 


108- 


No. 


149 


No. 


174 



-Norfolk Simcoe No. 178- 

-King Hiram Ingersoll No. 181- 

-King Solomon's Woodstock No. 217- 

-St. John's Ingersoll No. 237- 

-Oxford Woodstock No. 250- 

-King Hiram Tillsonburg No. 259- 

-St. John's Norwich No. 261- 

-Blenheim Princeton No. 359- 

-Erie Port Dover No. 569- 

-Walsingham ...Port Rowan No. 624- 



-Plattsville Plattsville 

-Oriental Port Burwell 

-Frederick Delhi 

-Vienna Vienna 

-Thistle Embro 

-Springfield Springfield 

-Oak Branch Innerkip 

-Vittoria Vittoria 

-Doric Lakeside 

-Dereham Mt. Elgin 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 



WINDSOR DISTRICT— (19 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R,W. Bro. L. N. Malott, Leamington 



No. 34— Thistle Amherstburg No. 500- 

No. 41 — St. George Kingsville No. 521- 

No. 47 — Great Western Windsor No. 554- 

No. 290 — Leamington Leamington No. 579- 

No. 395 — Parvaim _ Comber No. 598- 

No. 402— Central Essex No. 604- 

No. 403— Windsor Windsor No. 627- 

No. 413— Naphtali ..Tilbury No. 641- 

No. 448 — Xenophon .Wheatley No. 642- 

No. 488 — King Edward _ Harrow 



-Rose Windsor 

-Ontario Windsor 

-Border Cities Windsor 

-Harmony Windsor 

-Dominion _ Windsor 

-Palace Windsor 

-Pelee Scudder 

-Garden - Windsor 

-St. Andrew's -...Windsor 



RECAPITULATION 



Algoma District 

Brant District _ - 

Bruce District 

Chatham District 

Eastern District 

Frontenac District _.. 

Georgian District 

Grey District 

Hamilton A District 

Hamilton B District 

London _ 

Muskoka District 

Niagara A District _ 

Niagara B District 

Nipissing East District _. 
Nipissing West District -... 

North Huron District 

Ontario District 

Ottawa District ..._. 

Peterborough District 

Prince Edward District -.. 

Sarnia District 

South Huron District 

St. Liwrence District - 

St. Thomas 

Temiskaming District 

Toronto A District _ _ 

Toronto B District 

Toronto C District 

Toronto D District 

Victoria District 

Wellington District 

Western District 

Wilson District 

Windsor District — 



Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 



262 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



LODGES BY LOCATION 



Location Name and No. 

Abingdon Lincoln 544 

Acton Walker 321 

Agincourt Scarboro 653 

Ailsa Craig Craig 574 

Alexandria Alexandria 439 

AUiston Seven Star 285 

Almonte Mississippi 147 

Alvinston Alvinston 353 

Ameliasburg Lake 215 

Amherstburg ._ Thistle 34 

Ancaster Seymour 272 

Arden St. Andrew's 497 

Arkona Arkona 307 

Arnprior Madawaska 196 

Arthur Prince Arthur 334 

Athens Rising Sun 85 

Aultsville J'arran's Point 256 

Aurora Rising Sun 129 

Avonmore Avonmore 452 

Aylmer Malahide 140 

Ayr Ayr 172 

Baden ...._ Wilmot 318 

Bancroft _ Bancroft 482 

Barrie Corinthian 96 

Barrie - Kerr 230 

Bath Maple Leaf 119 

Beachburg Enterprise 516 

Beamsville Ivy 115 

Beaverton Mui ray 408 

Beeton Spry 385 

Belleville Euieka 283 

Belleville Moira 11 

Belleville The Belleville 123 

Belmont Belmont 190 

Binbrook Harrhony 57 

Birch Cliff . Birch Cliff 612 

Blenheim Kent 274 

Blind River Penewobikong 487 

Blyth .... Blyth 303 

Bobcaygeon Verulam 268 

Bolton . Tiue Blue 98 

Bothwell Star of the East 422 

Bownianville Jerusalem 31 

Bracebridge ..Mukoka 360 

Bradford ...Simcoe 79 

Brampton Ionic 229 

Brantford Brant 45 

Brantford _ . Doric 12t 

Brantford Ozias 508 

Brantford . ._ Reba 515 

Brigden _ . ..Leopold 397 

Brighton _ _ . _ ...United 29 

Brockville Sussex 5 

Brockville Salem 368 

Brooklin Mount Zion 39 

Brussels St John's 284 

Bryanston Middlesex 379 

Burford Burford 106 

Burk's Falls ...Corona 454 

Burlington Burlington 165 

Burlington Beach Beach 639 

Byron .. ...Ashlar 610 

Cnledon East Peel 468 

Caledonia St. Andrew's 62 

Campbellford Golden Rule 126 

Campbellville Campbell 603 

Camlflchie Huron 392 

Cannington Brock 354 



Location Name and No. 

Capreol - National 588 

Cardinal Cardinal 491 

Cargill - Moravian 431 

Carlow Morning Star 309 

Carp _ Carleton 465 

Carleton Place St. John's 63 

Cayuga St. John's 35 

Centreville Victoria 299 

Chapleau Lome 622 

Chatham Parthenon 267 

Chatham Victory 563 

Chatham Wellington 46 

Chesley Forest 393 

Chesterville Chesterville 320 

Chippawa King Edward VII 471 

Claremont Brougham Union 269 

CI i fford .....Clifford 3 1 5 

Clinton Clinton 84 

Cobalt - Silver 486 

Cobden _ Cobden 459 

Cobouig St John's 17 

Coboconk King George V 498 

Cochiane Cochrane 530 

Colboine Colborne 91 

Coldwatei Karnak 492 

Collingwood . Manito 90 

Combet Parvaim 395 

Consecon Cons^con 50 

Cookstown Manitoba 236 

Copper Cliff Algonquin 536 

Cornwall - Cornwall 125 

Courtright - - Moore 294 

Creemoie - Nitetis 444 

Delawaie Delaware Valley 358 

Delhi _ Fiederick 217 

Delta Harmony 370 

Deseronto Craig 401 

Dorchestei Sta Merrill 344 

Drayton Conestogo 295 

Dresden Svdenham 255 

Dryden Golden Star 484 

Dundalk _ Dundalk 449 

Dundas Valley 100 

Dunnvillc Amity 32 

Durham Durham 306 

Duttoii Cameron 232 

Eganvill" Bonnechere 433 

Elk Lake Elk Lake 507 

Elmiia Glenrose 628 

Klmvale Coronation 46fi 

Elora Irvine 203 

Embro . Thistle 250 

Emo - ... Manitou 631 

Emsdale Algonquin 434 

Englehart Englehart 534 

Erin Wellington 271 

Espanola Espanola 527 

Essex Central 402 

Exeter Lebanon Forest 133 

Fenelon Falls . The Spry 406 

Fergus Mercer 347 

Finch Finch 5.57 

Fingal - Warren 120 

Flesheiton Prince Arthur 333 

Florence Florence 390 

Fonthill Phoenix 535 

Forest Forest 263 

Fordwich Fordwich 331 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 



263 



Location Name and 

Fort Erie .Fort Erie 

Fort Erie North Palmer 

Fort Frances Granite 

Fort William Kaministiquia 

Fort William _ Royal 

Fort William _.Fort William 

Frankford Fran ok 

Gait Alma 

Gait Gait 

Gananoque _ _ Leeds 

Georgetown _ Credit 

Geraldton _....Kenogamisis 

Glencoe _ _Lorne 

Goderich _ _.Maitland 

Gore Bay _.... Gore Bay 

Grand Valley _ ...Scott 

Granton - Granton 

Gravenhurst ..Golden Rule 

Grimsby Union 

Guelph _ Guelph 

Guelph -Speed 

Guelph _ Wayerley 

Hagrersville -_ .....Hiram 

Hail eybury Hailey bu ry 

Haliburton North Entrance 

Hamilton _ ...Acacia 

Hamilton ...Ancient Landmarks 

Hamilton _ _ Barton 

Hamilton _ ....Buchanan 

Hamilton Corinthian 

Ham i 1 ton _. Dor i c 

Hamilton Dundurn 

Hamilton _ Electric 

Hamilton Hamilton 

Hamilton _ Hillcrest 

Hamilton Hugh Murray 

Hamilton Ionic 

Hamilton St. Andrew's 

Hamilton ...St. John's 

Hamilton Strict Observance 

Hamilton _ Temple 

Hamilton Tuscan 

Ha m i 1 ton _ .Wa rdrope 

H a nov sr ...Ha nover 

Harrietsville Moffat 

Harriston Harriston 

Harrow King Edward 

Hirrowsmith Albion 

Hastings .Hastings 

Havelock _ Havelock 

Hawkrsbury _ Hawkesbury 



Ha^eld-'an 

Hensall 

Hepworth 

Hespeler 

High.cate 

Hornepayne 

Huntsville 

Ildsrton . 

IngersoU 

Ingersoll 

Innerkip 

Inwood 

lona Station 



-Hazeldean 

..Huron 

..Burns 

New Hope 

Highgate 

Hornepayne 

Unity 

Henderson 

King Hiram 

St. John's 

Oak Branch 

Inwood 

Prince of Wales 



Iroquois Friendly Brothers 

Iroquois Falls Abitibi 

Ja.rvis King So'.omon 

Kapuskasing Spruce Falls 

Keene Keene 

Keewatin _ Keewatin 

Kemptville -Mount Zion 

Kenora Lake of the Woods 



No. 
613 
372 
446 
584 
453 
415 
127 

72 
257 
201 
219 
656 
282 

33 
472 
421 
483 
409 
7 
258 
180 
361 
319 
485 
463 

61 
654 
6 
550 
513 
382 
475 
495 
562 
594 
602 
549 
593 

40 

27 
324 
551 
555 
432 
399 
262 
488 
109 
633 
435 
450 
517 
224 
436 
279 
336 
636 
376 
3*8 

37 

68 
261 
503 
171 
143 
540 
329 
648 
374 
417 

28 
445 



Location Name and No. 

Kenora Pequonga 414 

Kincardine Northern Light 93 

King Robertson 292 

Kingston Cataraqui 92 

Kingston Minden 253 

Kingston Queen's 578 

Kingston Royal Edward 585 

Kingston.The Anct. St. John's 3 

Kingsville ..St. George's 41 

Kinmount Somerville 451 

Kirkfield Victoria 398 

Kirkland Lake Doric 623 

Kitchener ..Grand River 151 

Kitchener Twin Ctiy 509 



Komoka 

Lakefield 

Lakeside 

Lambeth ., 

Lambton Mills 
Lambton Mills 

Lanark 

Lancaster 

Lansdowne —. 
Leamington 

Lindsay 

Lindsay 
Listowel 
Little Current 

Lobo 

Lombardy 

Londesboro 

London 

London 

London 

London 

London 

London 

London 

London 

London 

London 

Lucan 

Lucknow 

Lyn 

Lynden 

Madoc 

Mallorytown . 

Maiile 

Markdale 

Markham 
Marmora 



-Myra 529 

Clemen ti 313 

Doric 569 

-St. Paul's 107 
-.Kingsway 655 

Mimico 369 

Evergreen 209 

Lancaster 207 

Lansdowne 387 

Leamington 290 

Faithful Brethren 77 

— -...Gothic 608 

Bernard 225 

--Doric 455 

Doric 289 

Otter 504 

Hullett 568 

Acacia 580 

Corinthian 330 

- Kilwinning 64 

.King Solomon's 378 

St. George's 42 

St. John's 20 

St. John's 209a 

Temple 597 

Tuscan 195 

Union 380 

Irving 154 

Old Light 184 

Lyn 416 



Lynden 505 

Madoc 48 

Macoy 242 

Vaughan 54 

._ Hiram 490 

-Markham Union 87 

- Marmora 222 

Martintown - Martintown 596 

Mattawa Mattawa 405 

Maxville - Maxville 418 

Meaford Pythagoras 137 

Melbourne Dufferin 364 

Merlin Century 457 

Merrickville Merrickville 55 

Merritton Adanac 614 

Midland Caledonian 249 

Millbrook J. B. Hall 145 

Millgrove Waterdown 357 

Mi'ton St. Claii- 135 

Milverton Milverton 478 



Mimico 

Mimico 

Mimico 

Mimico 

Mindon 

Mitchell 

Monkton . . 
Morrisburg 



-Anthony Sayer 640 

Connaught 501 

Lake Shore 645 

Long Branch 632 

Arradia 440 

Tudor 141 

Elma 456 

Excelsior 142 



264 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



Location Name and No. 

Mount Albert Rowland 646 

Mount Brydges — St. John's 81 

Mount Elgin - — Dereham 624 

Mount Forest St. Alban's 200 

Napanee - Union 9 

Napier Ionic 328 

Newboro Simpson 157 

Newburgh Prince of Wales 146 

Newcastle Durham 66 

New Hamburg.New Dominion 205 

New Liskeard - Temiskaming 462 

Newmarket - Tuscan 99 

Niagara Niagara 2 

Niagara Falls Adoniram 573 

Niagara Falls Clifton 254 

Niagara Falls St. Mark's 105 

Nilestown Nilestown 345 

North Augusta-Crystal Fount. 389 

North Bay Nipissing 420 

North Bay North Bay 617 

North Gower Corinthian 476 

Norwich -St. John's 104 

Norwood Norwood 223 

Oakville Oakville 400 

Odessa ...._ Prince Arthur 228 

Oil Springs Alexandra 158 

Oniemee Lome 375 

Onondaga Onondaga 519 

Orangeville Harris 216 

Orillia _ Orillia 192 

Orono Orono 325 

Oshawa Cedar 270 

Oshawa Lebanon 139 

Oshawa Temple 649 

Ottawa _ Ashlar 564 

Ottawa Civil Service 148 

Ottawa _ Chaudiere 264 

Ottawa - Dalhousie 52 

Ottawa .....Defenders 590 

Otta\-.a Doric 58 

Ottawa Lodge of Fidelity 231 

Ottawa Prince of Wales 371 

Ottawa Rideau 595 

Ottawa - _ St. Andrew's 560 

Ottawa Sydney Albert Luke 558 

Ottawa The Builders 177 

Owen Sound North Star 322 

Owen Sound St. George's 88 

Paisley Aldworth 235 

Palmerston Blair 314 

Paris St. John's 82 

Parkhill Doric 233 

Parry Sound Granite 352 

Pembroke Pembroke 128 

Penetanguishene Georgian 348 

Perth True Britons 14 

Peterborough Corinthian 101 

Peterborough _ Peterborough 155 

Peterborough Royal Arthur 523 

Petrolia Petrolia 194 

Petrolia .Washington 260 

Pickering Doric 424 

Picton Prince Edward 18 

Plattsville Plattsville 178 

Port Arthur Port Arthur 499 

Port Arthur Shuniah 287 

Port Arthur Thunder Bay 618 

Port Burwell Oriental 181 
Port Credit Mississauga 524 
Port Colborne Macnab 169 
Port Dalhousie Seymour 277 
Port Dover . - Erie 149 



Location Name and No. 

Tara ....Maple Leaf 362 

Port Elgin Port Elgin 429 

Port Hope _ Hope 114 

Port Hope Ontario 26 

Port McNicol .....Earl Kitchener 538 

Port Perry Fidelity 428 

Port Robinson Myrtle 337 

Port Rowan Walsingham 174 

Port Stanley .St. Mark's 94 

Powassan Powassan 443 

Prescott Central 110 

Preston Preston 297 

Princeton _ Blenheim 108 

Queensville ...: _ Sharon 97 

Rainy River Ionic 461 

Renfrew Renfrew 122 

Riceville Plantagenet 186 

Richmond Goodwood 159 

Richmond Hill Richmond 23 

Ridgetown Howard 391 

Ridgeway Dominion 615 

Rodney _ - Rodney 411 

Russell - ..„ Russell 479 

Sarnia Liberty 419 

Sarnia St. Paul 601 

Sarnia .- Tuscan 437 

Sarnia Victoria 56 

Sault Ste. Marie Algoma 469 

Sault Ste. Marie Hatherly 625 

Sault Ste. Marie Keystone 412 

Schomberg Union 118 

Scotland Scotland 193 

Seaforth Britannia 170 

Scudder _ Pelee 627 

Seeley's Bay Rideau 4^60 

Sharbot Lake Frontenac 621 

Shelbourne Lome 377 

Simcoe Norfolk 10 

Sioux Lookout Sioux Lookout 518 

Smith's Falls Osiris 489 

Smith's Falls St. Francis 24 

Smithville Coronation 502 

Sombra St. Clair 425 

Southampton St. Lawrence 131 

South Augusta St. James 74 

South Porcupine Porcupine 506 

Stamford Centre Stamford 626 

Spencerville Nation 556 

Springfield Springfield 259 

Stayner Northern Light 266 

St. Catharines Maple Leaf 103 

St. Catharines Perfection 616 

St. Catharines St. George's 15 

St. Catharines Temple 296 

St. George St. George 243 

Stirling Stirling 69 

St. Mary's : St. James 73 

Stoney Creek Wentworth 166 

Stouffville Richardson 136 

Stratford Stratford 332 

Stratford ....._ Tecumseh 144 

Strathroy Beaver 83 

Streetsville River Park 356 

Stroud Minerva 304 

St. Thomas St. David's 302 

St. Thomas St. Thomas 44 

St. Thomas Talbot 546 

Sturgeon Falls Sturgeon Falls 447 

Sudbury Nickel 427 

Sunderland King Edward 464 

Sundridge Strong 423 

Sutton West Malone 512 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1940 



265 



Location Name and No. 

Tamworth Lome 404 

Tavistock Tavistock 609 

Teeswater Teeswater 276 

Thamesford King Solomon 394 

Thamesville Tecumseh 245 

Thedford Cassia 116 

Thessalon Dyment 442 

Thornbury _ Beaver 234 

Thorndale Mount Olivet 300 

Thoinhill Patterson 265 

Thorold _ Mountain 221 

Tilbury .._ Naphtali 413 

Tillsonburg King Hiram 78 

Timmins Golden Beaver 528 

Tiverton Bruce 341 

Tbdmorden .Todmorden 647 

Toledo Fidelity 650 

Toronto Acacia 430 

Toronto _ Alpha 384 

Toronto Antiquity 571 

Toronto Ashlar 247 

Toronto Bay-of-Quinte 620 

Toronto Bedford 638 

Toronto Caledonia 637 

Toronto _ Canada 532 

Toronto Cathedral 643 

Toronto Corinthian 481 

Toronto Coronati 520 

Toronto Delta 634 

Toronto Dentonia 651 

Toronto Doric 3 1 6 

Toronto Dufferin 570 

Toronto Fairbank 592 

Toronto Pidelity 575 

Toronto Georgina 343 

Toronto General Mercer 548 

Toronto Golden Fleece 607 

Toronto Grenville 629 

Toronto „..Grey 589 

Toronto _ Harcourt 581 

Toronto Harmony 438 

Toronto High Park 531 

Toronto Huron-Bruce 611 

Toronto Imperial 543 

Toronto Ionic 25 

Toronto King Solomon's 22 

Toronto Kilwinning 565 

Toronto King Hiram 566 

Toronto John Ross Robertson 545 

Toronto Maple Leaf 600 

Toronto Melita 605 

Toronto „ Memorial 652 

Toronto ....Metropolitan 542 

Toronto _ Mizpah 572 

Toronto Mimosa 576 

Toronto Mt. Sinai 522 

Toronto North Gate 591 

Toronto Oakwood 553 

Toronto Occident 346 

Toronto Orient 33.9 

Toronto Palestine 559 

Toronto Parkdale 510 

Toronto Patricia 587 

Toronto Prince of Wales 630 

Toronto — Queen City 552 

Toronto Rehoboam 65 

Toronto _ Remembrance 586 

Toronto Riverdale 494 

Toronto . Runnymede 619 

Toronto Shamrock 533 

Toronto . Simcoe 644 

Toronto Stanley 426 

Toronto Stevenson 218 



Location Name and No. 

Toronto _ Sunnyside 582 

Toronto _ St. Aidan's 567 

Toronto St. Albans 514 

Toronto „..St. Andrew's 16 

Toronto -St. Clair 577 

Toronto St. George 367 

Toronto St. John's 75 

Toronto Temple 525 

Toronto The Beaches 473 

Toronto — Transportation 583 

Toronto Tuscan 541 

Toronto .....Ulster 537 

Toronto Unity 606 

Toronto University 49b 

Toronto „ Victoria 474 

Toronto Victory 547 

Toronto „ _ .Wellington 635 

Toronto Wilson 86 

Toronto York 156 

Toronto „ Zeta 410 

Toronto Zetland 326 

Tottenham Tottenham 467 

Trenton _ Trent 38 

Tweed ...._ Tweed 239 

Uxbridge „ Zcredatha 220 

Vankleek Hill St. John's 21 

Victoria Harbor Victoria 470 

Vienna Vienna 237 

Vittoria Vittoria 359 

Wales _ Wales 458 

Walkerton Saugeen 197 

Wallaceburg ■ ._ Pnyx 312 

Wardsville Hammond 327 

Warkworth Percy 161 

Waterford __Wilson 113 

Waterloo Waterloo 539 

Watford Havelock 238 

Welland Copestone 373 

Welland Merritt 168 

Wellandport Dufferin 338 

Wellington .....Star in the East 164 

Wesboro Acacia 561 

Westboro Ionic 526 

West Flamboro Dufferin 291 

W. Fort William ...Connaught 511 

West Lome McColl 386 

Weston Humber 305 

Weston Mount Dennis 599 

Westport Westport 441 

Wheatley Xenophon 448 

Whitby Composite 30 

Wiarton .__ — Cedar 396 

Williamsburg Williamsburg 480 

Winchester Hender.son 383 

Windsor _ Border Cities 554 

Windsor Dominion 598 

Windsor _ Garden 641 

Windsor Great Western 47 

Windsor Harmony 579 

Windsor Ontario 521 

Windsor __ Palace 604 

Windsor Rose 500 

Windsor St. Andrew's 642 

Windsor .Windsor 403 

Wingham „ Wingham 286 

Woodbridge Blackwood 311 

Woodville — Harding 477 

Woodstock King Solomon's 43 

Woodstock „ Oxford 76 

Wroxeter Forest 162 

Wyoming _ ...Burns 153 

York Enniskillen 185 



266 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

LODGES, ALPHABETICALLY 



No. and Name Location No. 

540 Abitibi Iroquois Falls 110 

61 Acacia Hamilton 402 

430 Acacia Toronto 270 

561 Acacia Westboro 396 

580 Acacia London 457 

614 Adanac .„ Merritton 264 

573 Adoniram Niagara Falls 320 

109 Albion Harrowsmith 148 

235 Aldworth Paisley 313 

158 Alexandra Oil Springs 315 

439 Alexandria Alexandria 254 

469 Algoma Sault Ste. Marie 84 

434 Algonquin Emsdale 459 

536 Algonquin Copper Cliff 530 

72 Alma , - Gait 91 

384 Alpha Toronto 30 

323 Alvinston - Alvinston 295 

32 Amity Dunnville 501 

654 Ancient Landmarks ...Hamilton 511 

3 Ancient St. Johns Kingston 50 

640 Anthony Sayer Mimico 373 

571 Antiquity - Toronto 96 

440 Arcadia Minden 101 

307 Arkona Arkona 476 

247 Ashlar Toronto 330 

564 Ashlar Ottawa 481 

610 Ashlar Byron 513 

452 Avonmore Avonmore 125 

172 Ayr - Ayr 454 

482 Bancroft Bancroft 520 

6 Barton Hamilton 466 

620 Bay of Quinte Toronto 502 

639 Beach Hamilton Beach 401 

473 Beaches Toronto 574 

83 Beaver Strathroy 219 

234 Beaver Thornbury 389 

638 Bedford Toronto 52 

123 Belleville Belleville 590 

190 Belmont Belmont 358 

225 Bernard Listowel 634 

612 Birch Cliff Birch Cliff 651 

311 Blackwood "Woodbridge 624 

314 Blair Palmerston 598 

108 Blenheim Princeton 615 

303 Blyth Blyth 58 

433 Bonnechere Eganville 121 

554 Border Cities Windsor 233 

45 Brant Brantford 289 

170 Britannia Seaforth 316 

354 Brock _ Cannington 382 

269 Brougham Union — Claremont 424 

341 Bruce Tiverton 455 

550 Buchanan Hamilton 569 

177 Builders _ Ottawa 623 

106 Burford Burford 291 

165 Burlington Burlington 338 

153 Burns Wyoming 364 

436 Burns Hepworth 570 

637 Caledonia - Toronto 449 

249 Caledonian Midland 475 

232 Cameron Dutton 66 

603 Campbell Campbellville 306 

532 Canada Toronto 442 

491 Cardinal - Cardinal 538 

465 Carleton Carp 495 

116 Cassia Thedford 507 

92 Cataraqui Kingston 456 

643 Cathedral Toronto 534 



Central ..... 




Cedar 


O sh awa 


Cedar 


Wiarton 




Merlin 


Chaudiere 


Ottawa 


Chesterville 


Chesterville 


Civil Service .... 


Ottawa 


Clementi 


Lakefield 


Clifford 


Clifford 


Clifton 


..Niagara Falls 




Clinton 




_ Cobden 


Cochrane _ 


-....Cochrane 




_.Colborne 


Composite 


.._ Whitby 


Conestogo 


Drayton 


Connaught _ 


Mimico 


Connaught W. 


Fort William 


Consecon 


Consecon 


Copestone .-.. 


Welland 


Corinthian . - 


...Barrie 


Corinthian 


Peterboro 


Corinthian 


North Gower 


Corinthian 


X(Ondon 


Corinthian 


_ _ Toronto 


Corinthian 


. . -Hamilton 


Cornwall 


Cornwall 


Corona 


Burks Falls 




Toronto 


Coronation 


Elmvale 


Coronation 


_ Smithville 




Deseronto 




Ailsa Craig 


Credit 


Georgetown 


Crystal Fountain N. Augusta 


Dalhousie - 


— Ottawa 


Defendeis 


Ottawa 


Delaware Valle> 


Delaware 


Delta ... - 


Toronto 


Dentonia 


Toronto 


Dereham 


Mount Elgin 


Dominion 


Windsor 


Dominion 


Ridgeway 




Ottawa 




Brantford 




. Parkhill 




. - Lobo 




Toronto 




_ _ Hamilton 




Pickering 




Little Current 




Lakeside 




Kirkland Lake 


Dufferin 


W Flamboro 


Dufferin 


Wellandport 


Dufferin 


Melbourne 


Dufferin 


Toronto 


Dundalk 


Dundalk 


Dundurn 


Hamilton 




Newcastle 




Durham 


Dyment 


Thessalon 


Earl Kitchener 


...Port McNicolI 




Hamilton 


Elk Lake 


Elk Lake 


Elma ... 


Monkton 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 



267 



No. and Name Location 

185 Enniskillen _ York 

516 Enterprise Beachburg 

149 Erie Port Dover 

527 Espanola _ Espanola 

283 Eureka _ _ Belleville 

209 Evergreen Lanark 

142 Excelsior Morrisburg 

592 Fairbank Toronto 

77 Faithful Brethren Lindsay 

256 Farran's Point Aultsville 

428 Fidelity Port Perry 

575 Fidelity Toronto 

650 Fidelity - Toledo 

557 Finch .Finch 

390 Florence Florence 

331 Fordwich _ Fordwich 

162 Forest „ Wroxeter 

263 Forest Forest 

393 Forest _ Chesley 

613 Fort Erie Fort Erie 

415 Fort William Fort William 

127 Franck Frankford 

217 Frederick _ Delhi 

143 Friendly Brothers Iroquois 

621 Frontenac Sharbot Lake 

257 Gait Gait 

641 Garden _ Windsor 

548 General Mercer Toronto 

348 Georgian _ Penetanguishene 

343 Georgina _ Toronto 

628 Glenrose Elmira 

528 Golden Beaver Timmins 

607 Golden Fleece Toronto 

126 Golden Rule Campbellford 

409 Golden Rule Gravenhurst 

484 Golden Star Dryden 

159 Goodwood Richmond 

472 Gore Bay Gore Bay 

608 Gothic Lind.say 

151 Grand River Kitchener 

352 Granite Parry Sound 

446 Granite _ Fort Frances 

483 Granton Granton 

47 Great Western Windsor 

629 Grenville Toronto 

589 Grey Toronto 

258 Guelph Guelph 

485 Haileybury ...._ Haileybury 

562 Hamilton Hamilton 

327 Hammond Wardsville 

432 Hanover Hanover 

581 Harcourt _ Toronto 

477 Harding Woodville 

57 Harmony Binbrook 

370 Harmony Delta 

438 Harmony _ Toronto 

579 Harmony Windsor 

216 Harris Orangeville 

262 Harriston Harriston 

633 Hastings Hastings 

625 Hatherly Sault Ste. Marie 

238 Havelock _ Watford 

435 Havelock Havelock 

450 Hawkesbury Hawkesbury 

517 Hazeldean .....Hazpldean 

383 Henderson .Winchester 

388 Henderson Ilderton 

336 Highgate Highgate 

531 High Park _.. Toronto 

594 Hillcrest Hamilton 

319 Hiram Bagersville 

490 Hiram _ .Markdale 



No. and Name 

114 Hope , 

636 Hornepayne 



Location 
..Port Hope 
..Hornepayne 



391 



Howard Ridgetown 

602 Hugh Murray . Hamilton 

568 HuUett Londesboro 

305 Humber .Weston 

224 Huron Hensall 

392 Huron Camlachie 

611 Huron-Bruce Toronto 

543 Imperial Toronto 

503 Inwood Inwood 

25 Ionic Toronto 

229 Ionic _. _ Brampton 

328 Ionic Napier 

461 Ionic Rainy River 

526 Ionic Westboro 

549 Ionic Hamilton 

203 Irvine Elora 

154 Irving Lucan 

115 Ivy Beamsville 

145 J. B. Hall Millbrook 

31 Jerusalem Bowmanville 

545 John Ross Robertson.Toronto 

584 Kaministiquia Fort William 

492 Karnak Coldwater 

374 Keene Keene 

417 Keewatin „ Keewatin 

656 Kenogamisis Geraldton 

274 Kent _ „ Blenheim 

230 Kerr _ Barrie 

412 Keystone Sault Ste. Marie 

64 Kilwinning London 

565 Kilwinning Toronto 

464 King Edward Sunderland 

488 King Edward Harrow 

471 King Edward VII Chippawa 

498 King George V Cobogonk 

37 King Hiram Ingcrsoll 

78 King Hiram Tillsonburg 

566 King Hiram ...._ ..Toronto 

22 King Solomon's _ Toronto 

43 King Solomon's ...Woodstock 

329 King Solomon's Jarvis 

378 King Solomon's London 

394 King Solomon Thamesford 

655 Kingsway Lambton Mills 

215 Lake Ameliasburg 

445 Lake of the Woods Kenora 



Lake Shore _ Mimico 

Lancaster Lancaster 

Lansdowne Lansdowne 

290 Leamington Leamington 

139 Lebanon Oshawa 

133 Lebanon Forest Exeter 

201 Leeds _ Gananoque 

397 Leopold Brigden 

419 Liberty r^Trnin 

544 Lincoln Abingdon 

Lodge of Fidelity. ...Ottawa 

Long Branch Mimico 

Lome Glen cos 

375 Lome _ Omemee 

377 Lome Shelburne 

404 Lome Tf>m worth 

Lome Chapleau 



645 

207 
387 



231 
632 

282 



622 



416 Lyn .._ 
505 Lynden 
242 Macoy 



.Lyn 



Lynden 

_- ..Mallorytown 

169 Macnab Port Colborne 

196 Madawaska Arnprior 

48 Madoc Madoc 

33 Maitland Goderich 



268 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



No. and Name Location 

140 Malahide — Aylmer 

512 Malone Sutton W. 

90 Manito Collingwood 

236 Manitoba Cookstown 

631 Manitou Emo 

103 Maple Leaf St. Catharines 

119 Maple Leaf _ Bath 

362 Maple Leaf _._ _Tara 

600 Maple Leaf -Toronto 

87 Markham Union ..Markham 

222 Marmora Marmora 
596 Martintown Martmtown 
405 Mattawa Mattawa 
418 Maxville Maxville 

605 Melita . Toronto 

652 Memorial Toronto 

347 Mercer .. Fergus 

55 Merrickville . Merrickville 

344 Merrill Dorchester 

168 Merritt . "Welland 

542 Metropolitan _ Toronto 

379 Middlesex Bryanston 

478 Milverton _ _ Milverton 

369 Mimico Lambton Mills 

576 Mimosa Toronto 

253 Minden Kingston 

304 Minerva Stroud 

524 Mississauga Port Credit 

147 Mississippi „_ Almonte 

572 Mizpah Toronto 

399 Moffat Harrietsville 

11 Moira _ _ Belleville 

294 Moore _ Courtright 

599 Mt. Dennis Weston 

300 Mt. Olivet Thorndale 

522 Mt. Sinai Toronto 

28 Mt. Zion _.., Kemptville 

39 Mt. Zion Brooklin 

431 Moravian Cargill 

309 Morning Star Carlow 

221 Mountain Thorold 

408 Murray Beaverton 

360 Muskoka Bracebrijige 

529 Myra Komoka 

337 Myrtle Port Robinson 

386 McColl .West Lome 

413 Naphtali Tilbury 

556 Nation Spencerville 

588 National _ Capreol 

205 New Dominion...New Hamburg 

279 New Hope - Hespeler 

2 Niagara Niagara 

427 Nickel Sudbury 

345 Nilestown Nilestown 

420 Nipissing North Bay 

444 Nitetis Creemore 

10 Norfolk Simcoe 

617 North Bay _ North Bay 

463 North Entrance Haliburton 

591 North Gate Toronto 

322 North Star _ Owen Sound 

93 Northern Light Kincardine 

266 Northern Light- - Stayner 

223 Norwood Norwoo3 

261 Oak Branch - Innerkip 

400 Oakville _ .'. Oakville 

553 Oakwood Toronto 

346 Occident Toronto 

184 Old Light _ Lucknow 

519 Onondaga Onondaga 

26 Ontario Port Hope 

521 Onatrio _ -....Windsor 



No. and Name Location 

339 Orient Toronto 

181 Oriental -..Port Burwell 

192 Orillia Orillia 

325 Orono - Orono 

489 Osiris Smiths Falls 

504 Otter Lombardy 

76 Oxford Woodstock 

508 Ozias Brantford 

604 Palace Windsor 

559 Palestine Toronto 

372 Palmer Fort Erie North 

510 Parkdale Toronto 

267 Parthenon Chatham 

395 Parvaim Comber 

587 Patricia ....Toronto 

265 Patterson Thornhill 

468 Peel _.Caledon East 

627 Pelee _ Scudder 

128 Pembroke „ Pembroke 

487 Penewobikong Blind River 

414 Pequonga Kenora 

161 Percy _ Wark worth 

616 Perfection „St. Catharines 

155 Peterborough Peterborough 

194 Petrolia Petrolia 

535 Phoenix ._ Fonthill 

186 Plantagenet Riceville 

178 Plattsville _ Plattsville 

312 Pnyx .Wallaceburg 

506 Porcupine S. Porcupine 

499 Port Arthur -Port Artliur 

429 Port Elgin Port Elgin 

443 Powassan _ Powassan 

297 Preston Preston 

Prince Arthur Odessa 



228 

333 Prince Arthur 

334 



...Flesherton 

Prince Arthur Arthur 

18 Prince Edward Picton 

146 Prince of Wales .....Newburgh 

171 Prince of Wales lona Sta. 

371 Prince of Wales Ottawa 

630 Prince of Wales _ Toronto 



137 Pythagoras 

552 Queen City ... 

578 Queen's 

515 Reba 

65 Rehoboam 

586 Remembrance 

122 Renfrew 



..Meaford 

Toronto 

-...Kingston 
-Brantford 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Renfrew 



136 Richardson Stouflville 

23 Richmond Richmond Hill 

460 Rideau Seeley's Bay 

595 Rideau —Ottawa 

85 Rising Sun Athens 

129 Rising Sun Aurora 

494 Riverdale Toronto 

356 River Park _ -Streetsville 

292 Robertson King 

411 Rodney - Rodney 

500 Rose Windsor 

646 Rowland Mt. Albert 

453 Royal Fort William 

523 Royal Arthur Peterborough 

585 Royal Edward Kingston 

619 Runny mede -Toronto 

479 Russell Russell 

567 St. Aidan's Toronto 

200 St. Albans _ Mt. Forest 

514 St. Albans -....Toronto 

16 St. Andrew's Toronto 

62 St. Andrew's Caledonia 

497 St. Andrew's Arden 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1940 



269 



No. 
560 
593 
642 
135 
425 
577 
302 

24 

15 

41 

42 

88 
243 
367 

73 

74 

17 

20 

21a 

35 

40 

63 

68 

75 

81 

82 
104 
209a 
284 

94 
105 
131 
107 
601 

44 
368 
197 
558 
653 
193 
421 
285 
272 
277 
533 

97 
287 
486 

79 
644 
157 
518 
451 
180 
259 
385 
406 
648 
626 
426 
164 
422 
218 

69 
332 

27 
423 
447 
582 
5 
255 
546 
609 



and Name Location 

St. Andrew's _ Ottawa 

Andrew's _._ Hamilton 

Andrew's Windsor 

Clair _ Milton 



Clair Sombra 

Clair Toronto 

David's St. Thomas 

Francis Smith's Falls 

George's St. Catharines 

George's Kingsville 

George's -London 

George's Owen Sound 

George St. George 

George Toronto 

James St. Marys 

St. James So. Augusta 

St. Johns Cobourg 

St. Johns London 

St. Johns Vankleek Hill 

St. Johns Cayuga 

St. Johns Hamilton 

St. Johns Carleton Place 

St. Johns Ingersoll 

St. Johns Toronto 

St. Johns Mt. Brydges 

St. Johns ...- _ Paris 

St. Johns Norwich 

St. Johns London 

_ Brussels 



St. Johns 

St. Marks Port Stanley 

St. Marks Niagara Falls 

St. Lawrence Southampton 

St. Paul's ..- Lambeth 

St. Paul's Sarnia 

St. Thomas ...St. Thomas 

Salem _ Brockville 

Saugeen Walkerton 

S. A. Luke _ - Ottawa 

Scarboro Agincourt 

Scotland Scotland 

Scott Grand Valley 

Seven Star Alliston 

Seymour _ Ancaster 

Seymour Port Dalhousie 

Shamrock _ Toronto 

Sharon Queensville 

Shuniah ...Port Arthur 

Silver „.. Cobalt 

Simcoe Bradford 

Simcoe Toronto 

Simpson .Newboro 

Sioux Lookout ..Sioux Lookout 

Somerville ...Kinmount 

Speed Guelph 

Springfield Springfield 

Spry — _ _ Beeton 

Spry Fenelon Falls 

Spruce Falls Kapuskasing 

Stamford Stamford Centre 

Stanley Toronto 

Star in the East .Wellington 

Star of the East Bothwell 

Stevenson Toronto 

Stirling ™ Stirling 

Stratford — Stratford 

Strict Observance .....Hamilton 

Strong Sundridge 

Sturgeon Falls. Sturgeon Falls 

Sunnyside Toronto 

Sussex -Brockville 

Sydenham ..-Dresden 

Talbot St. Thomas 

Tavistock Tavistock 



No. 
144 
245 
276 
462 
296 
324 
525 
597 
649 

34 
250 
618 
647 
467 
583 

38 

98 

14 
141 

99 
195 
437 
541 
551 
239 
509 
537 
7 
9 
118 
380 

29 
376 
606 
496 
100 

54 
268 

56 
299 
398 
470 
474 
547 
563 
237 
359 
458 
321 
174 
555 
120 
260 
357 
539 
361 

46 
271 
635 
166 
441 
480 
318 

86 
1L3 
403 
286 
448 
156 
220 
410 
326 



and Name Location 

Tecumseh Stratford 

Tecumseh Thamesvil le 

Teeswater _ Teeswater 

Temiskaming New Liskeard 

Temple St. Catharines 



Temple 

Temple 

Temple 

Temple 

Thistle 

Thistle 

Thunder Bay 

Todmorden 

Tottenham _.. 

Transportation 

Trent 

True Blue 

True Britons 

Tudor 

Tuscan 

Tuscan 

Tuscan 

Tuscan 

Tuscan 

Tweed 

Twin City 

Ulster 

Union 

Union 

Union 

Union 

United 

Unity 

Unity 

University 

Valley . 

Vaughan 

Verulam 

Victoria 

Victoria 

Victoria 

Victoria 

Victoria 

Victory 

Victory 

Vienna 

Vittoria 

Wales 

Walker 



Hamilton 

Toronto 

London 

Oshawa 

.Amherstburg 

Embro 

-Port Arthur 

Todmorden 

Tottenham 

Toronto 

Trenton 

Bolton 

Perth 

-Mitchell 

Newmarket 

London 

Sarnia 

Toronto 

Hamilton 

Tweed 

Kitchener 

.Toronto 

Grimsby 

Napanee 

Schomberg 

London 

Brighton 

Huntsville 

Toronto 

Toronto 

.Dundas 

Maple 

-Bobcaygeon 

Sarnia 

Centreville 

_ Kirkfield 



Victory Harbor 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Chatham 

Vienna 

Vittoria 

Wales 

Acton 

Walsingham .Port Rowan 

Wardrope Hamilton 

Warren Fingal 



. Petrolia 

.Millgrove 

-Waterloo 

.Guelph 

.Chatham 

Erin 

Toronto 



Washington ... 

Waterdown 

Waterloo 

Waverley 
Wellington 
Wel'ington 
Wellington 

Wentworth Stoney Creek 

West port Westport 

Williamsburg Williamsburg 

Wilmot Baden 

Wilson _ ...Toronto 

Wilson - Water ford 

Windsor Windsor 

Wingham Wingham 



Xenophon _- 

York 

Zeredatha — 

Zeta 

Zetland _. 



-Wheat ley 

.. Toronto 

... — -Ujcbridge 

Toronto 

Toronto 



270 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 
RESTORATIONS, 1939 

2— J. Hanniwell, C. W. Inksater. 5— F. R. Levia. 10— N. Watts. 11— J. 
M. Boyd. 17~R. A. Lev. 18— A. T. Kerr. 20— G. E. Tudor, T. A. 
Blanchard. 26— N. N. Brimstin. 31— A A. Hills. 34— J. L. Fryer. 31— 
W. E. Cragg. 40— A. T. Waddell. 42— J. A. Beenier. 44— C. L. Spitler, 
E. B. Di.xon, L. S. Fairbairn, G. J. Young. 45— A. Kyle. G. S. Scragg. 
46 — C. A. Jewiss. 47—1. K. Arnott, J. H. Lowe, E. R. Eves, R. J. 
Campbell, W. C. Harwood. 48— B. C. Sills. 50— D. W. Alexander, H. A. 
McConkey. 52— H. P. Wright. 56— J. Rutter. 57— E. H. Duffy. 58- F. 
L. Watson. 61— V. Wirtz. 63— W. J. Porterfield. S. C. McDiarmid. 64— 
O. B. Musselman. 65— A. E. Dilworth, R. Watt. 69— W. E. Emmons. 
72— F. H. MacDonald. 76— J. Pattinson. 84— J. P. Turner. 86— H. E. 
McCallum. 8S— J. McKay. 94— G. E. McComb, W. H. Wlliam.son. 97— 
J. B. Aylward. 98— G. Munroe. liiO- W. G. Rowe, G. A. Coombes. R. 
Coombes, J. S. Gillespie. 103— G. F. Whitaker, E. S. Nicholson. K. R. 
Atkinson. J. O. Thomp.son, C. W. Holmes. 104— R. J. Milner. E. M. 
Kealey. 105— S. H. Coombes. W. B. Storms. 108— B. C. Moore. 113— 
K. L. Duncombe. 114— L. H. Giddy, J. A. Getty. 11.5— H. W. Howell, 
W. H. High. 118— M. K. Dillane. 121— J. A. McNabb, E. S. Howard. 
123— C. E. Wilmot. 129— R. G. Filkin. 131— T. E. Sparling. 137— D. 
W. Greenlaw. 154— W. D. Hodgins, 155— H. B. Hill. 161— O. A. Richard- 
son. J. L. Phillips. 162— J. Lovell. 174— J. P. Pierce. 195— W. H. 
Morgan. 216— N. M. Parks. 220— J. H. Olmsted. 222— W. Davidson. 
225— H. G. Bartley. 23.3— W. J. Baker. J. H. McDonald. 238— J. C. 
Bowman. 247— C. H. Bower. 254— N. G. Helwigg, F. W. Jones, F. 
Sowerby, J. J. Woodward, G. G. Hanes, A. G. King. 257— H. M. Gordon. 
258— W. Martin. 261— J. Borland. 262— R. J. Martin. 263— V. R. 
Maylor. 265— R. C. Nelles, D. Riddell. 266— W. C. Thompson. 267— 
A. S. Buesnell, J. S. Thomas 269— T. Gregg. 270— A. F. McCulloch. 
272— E. Brown. 285— S. McPhee. 290— H. F. Mclntyre, W. C. Wheaton. 
291— A. Baker. 292— W. Bosworth. 296— W. A. Deakins. 297— H. F. 
Little. 299— E. W. Lockhead. 302— N. Richardson, F. G. Hind. 304— 

E. C. A. Reynolds. F. R. Meredith, L. Pickering. 305— W. Stewart. 
319— C. L. Reichold, F. W. Creswell. 320— W. A. Brown. 323— J. P. 
McVicar, N. Jones. 324— A. E. Halmshaw. 325— C. B. Terrill. 327— J. 
L. Watterworth. 331 — P. Ashton, M. Cook. 333 — W. J. W. Armstrong. 
337— J. Easterbrooke. 339— N. E. Ingram. 341— N. Grunder. 343— F. 
W. Cooper, S. Y. Meiedith, J. H. Pritchard. 345— V. M. Mar.ston. 346— 
A. J. Juniper, V. E. Forbes, H. C. Patten, G. A. Benton. 348— R. B. 
Davis. 356— B. L. Drennan. 361— C. S. L. Palmer. 367— N. S. Warren, 
R. A. Muir, C. R. Stin.son. 368— A. G. Davy. 371— G. H. York. 378— 
R. Waddington, J. Hartley. 380— C. E. Carruthers. 383— M. A. Black. 
384— D. C. Barger. 386— N. R. Spooner. 387— F. W. B. Fitzgerald, G. 
Hamilton, R. K. McDonald. 392— W. A. Trusler. 393— A. H. Elliot. 
395— J. Carder. 398— A. W. Vassar. 403— C. H. Perry, J. R. Newton, 

F. C. White. 405— K. M. MacKie, J. McOrmond, R. J. Leach. T. W. 
Adams. 411— L. J. Miller, R. Ward. W. J. Lowry, R. Anthes. 415— 
D. McKinnon, J. K. White, C. W. McEwen, E. H. Lindey. 418— E. W. 
Munro. 426— C. H. Nelson. 428— E. King. 435— R. F. Covert. 437 — 
C. M. Farrow. 442— C. R. Brown. 453— W. E. Hogg. J. W. Ramsey. 
457— G. Ward. R. E. Fisher W. B. Shaw. 461— H. H. Lowe. 467— C. W. 
Taylor A. P. Potter. 470— A. E. Cartmill. 474— J. A. Currie. 475— A. 
W. Wilkes. H. R. Jackson. 477— D. P. Sproul. A. W. Grant. 485— J. 

G. Mills. 486— C. Appleby. F. A. Harrison, T. R. Rowe, J. C. Houston. 
487— J. H. Graham. 488— E. S. Her. 494— H. H. Camm. F. Tripp. 495— 
W. A. Place. J. R. Wright, R. Moffatt. 496— C. B. Tyrell. 499— R. H. 
Huffman. 500— L. E. Treanor, H. J. Yeandle. M. W. Cullington. 502— 
T. H. Holland. 505— S. G. Cornell. C. H. Ramey. 507— G. W. McLeod. 
514— J. B. Preston. 515— F. B. Robinson. 516— J. J. Bromley. R. H. 
Wright. 520— A. L. Shortt. 521— H. W. Baxter. 522— M. Simonsky. 
525— N. C. Moore. 531— W. T. McBride. J. C. Barker. 532— H. R. 
Shook. 533 — A. D. Adcock. R. J. Anderson. 537— E. R. B. Williamson, 
G. C. MacDonnell. 541 — W. Ayres. 544— E. D. Lampman. 545 — G. H. 
Maveal, R. McMullen. 551— H. Carter. 552— W. E. Hawkins, A. Folkes, 
W. H. Drake. 553— F. M. Rynex. 555— J. A. McDonald. 562— N. Mayall, 
H. J. MacDougall. 570 — D. Kirkness, G. M. Jackson. 571— N. M. Lewis, 
S. Gledhill. 575— W. Birdsall. 578— H. A. Brown. R. H. Bray. J. D. 
Hermann. 580—1. Siskind. 586— H. M. Webb. 588— G. H. Napier. 597 — 
F. S. Young. 598— P. Such. F. J. Gerrish. 599— A. Rowan. N. Cuth- 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1940 271 

bertson. 602— C. J. Allcock. 606— F. J. Morrison, A. T. Pike. 607— 
J. D. McNish, R. S. C. Stalker. 608— H. Goodman, J. G. Terrill. 611— 
O. A. Lewis. 62.3— J. Saqui. 629— L. A. Spofford. 630— W. G. Clarke. 
632— R. K. Shields. 636— G. H. Napier, T. H. Quigg, W. V. Williams. 
637— A. Macpherson, C. M. Mackie. 638— F. C. Rogers. 643— G. C. 
Kemp, R. C. Ludlow. 652— W. Young. 



SUSPENSIONS, 1939 

5— W. Crothers, F. D. Higgins, G. W. Glen, A. H. Logan. D. MacMillan, 
H. W. Swain, W. E. Winters, J. A. Hepburn. 6— W. S. Connolly. W. N. 
McCartney. 10— W. J. Sutton, L. Vanderburg, T. Lyles. 11— W. E. 
Clarke, C. E. Day, R. C. Gilbert. W. E. Gartley. R. A. Hunter. G. E. 
Ketcheson. 15— C. W. Baker, O. F. Jacobson, J. A. Pearce, W. J. 
Wilsher, G. Bauer, R. W. Ginn, D. Laraman, F. W. Richardson, F. W. 
Butler, A. F. Goring, J. M. McKee, W. H. Swayze. 16— J. Hillock. F. 
G. Ander.son. F. B. Brown, A. S. Deeks. R. A. Gibson. C. R. Seaton, 

F. R. Stevens. W. G. Wilson. 17— R. M. Best. H. J. Campbell, R. B. 
Fitzgibbon, F. D. Greer, C. E. Jex, R. A. Ley, L. R. Millar, C. P. Niles, 
F. G. E. Osland, W. Shirra. 20— M. E. Ashton, W. F. Compton. H. C. 
Murdy, R. R. Stothers, W. R. Reid, A. C. White. W. F. Wainwright, 
W. A. Say. 21A— C. N. MacLaren. N. McCuaig. C. A. MacCa'.lum. 22— 
J. D. Howe. H. Rudkin, C. J. Currie, D. Rollaston, B F. Stanton. W. F. 
Ashman, T. Gascaigne, H. G. Williams. 26— C. J. Bate, R. F. Forrest. 
A. H. Hugh, S. H. McCannell. E. S. Harness. H. T. O'Neil. W. C. 
Roadhouse. 27— C. W. Brown, J. Gradwell, J. K. Gunton, G. W. Love, 
J. M. Peebles. 28— C. E. Sarney, A. Patterson, J. G. Davidson. 30 — 
W. R. Marshall, J. J. Kierran. 31— A. J. Wadhams. 35— A. J. Bromley, 
J. H. Young, J. H. Clark. 37— M. B. Neely, A. G. Swartz. B. B. 
Crawford, W. Rigney, J. McCarter, G. E. Nichols. 38— O. Alyea. C. L. 
Bonter, F. G. Burrows, J. B. Grainger. T. H. Jarrett, B. A. Newton, 

C. W. Paro. 40— M. L. Batchelor, H. J. Charak. J. E. Golden. L. Griffiths, 
E. M. Hall. F. A. Patterson. R. Horning. 42— C. F. Schwab. E. A. Saylor, 
J. T. Denley, C. E. Finch, P. T. Scott. 43— H. R. Chipperfield, H. O. 
White, J. Steele, R. W. Paterson. 44— E. A. Wase. 45— J. C. McGregor, 
J. Fletcher. H. N. J. Maynard, G. S. Cragg, J. Whitfield, T. C. Whitfield, 
R. W. L. Hunt, T. W. Clark. S. W. Bartle. 46— E. G. Bartley, R. L. 
Blackburn, W. A. Cowie, T. MacKay. W. R. Peck, T. S. Rhodes. W. A. 
Sample, N. A. Thomson, C. B. Stevenson. W. McKim. 47— C. C. Bear, 

D. W. Crookes, C. O. Erwin, H. H. Karley, J. B. McAlpine. A. A. 
McDermaid. B. S. McPherson, C. E. Needham, J. W. Patterson. J. T. 
Snelling, S. W. Anson. J. L. Bain. R. Beckett, J. R. Brown. A. M. 
Cameron, P. F. Carr. C. W. Day, W. Donaldson, C. K. Evans, R. D. 
Fawcett, G. A. Finkbeiner, C. W. Grenville. F. L. Kellv. W. F. Locke, 
J. McCauley. J. F. McKellar. R. J. McLarty, J. N. Nickell, W. T. Norris, 
A. J. Pickering, L. F. Robertson, F. Stroud, H. W. Taylor. W. E. Wrenn. 
48— F. W. Allan. R. H. Stout. W. H. Govier. E. L. McCarey. H. C. 
Lloyd, J. E. McCaw, F. W. Tumelty. C. D. Hill. 50— H. C. Davidson, 
H. A. McConkey, H. Onderdonk. 52— A. Emond. B. Stotesbury. W. H. 
Whitehorne. 55— J. Eidenger, S. E. Errett, J. M. Church. W. H. Laidlaw, 
J. Silver. F. Telford. 56— A. A. L. Duncan, L. H. Hillier. H. H. Hodgins. 
A. A. McKinnon, J. Russell, E. B. West. 58— L. B. Cairns. F. L. Gibson. 
61— L. H. Waldron, W. F. Ayres, G. Brownlee, J. Butler, H. J. Durfey, 

G. R. Goddard, G. R. Keller. R. W. Matchett, J. W. O'Neil. M. Pli.skow. 
C. R. Robertson. W. A. Smith. P. Suttie, R. D. Winslow, T. H. Sinclair. 
63— C. F. Yates, M. C. Newman, N. M. McGregor, M. S. Moulton. A. G. 
Miller, F. H. Hemery, W. S. Box, R. A. Patchell, W. J. Porterfield, L. 
J. McDiarmid, F. C. McDiarmid, L. Abel. 64— E. Arndt. W. R. Bennett, 

E. C. Canning, J. A. Groshow, H. M. McEwan, W. R. Nevin, J. T. Smith. 
H. J. Tichbourne, D. Webb, J. W. Wild. 65— H. R. Holway, T. R. Ough, 
R. Brydie. 66— B. L. Dunn, S. B. Scobell. 68— J. W. Greenwood. H. W. 
Young. 69 — T. W. Donnan, H. Morton. 72— C. H. Allen, W. J. Foot, 
W. C. Oliver, O. L. Chell, A. Moore, E. M. Holtzman. 75— H. F. Anthony, 
J. Preece. C. W. Davies. 76— R. J. Renwick. C. R. Burton. S. G. Burgess, 
C. H. Clark. 77— A. E. Walker. C. S. Christiansen, F. Crandell, S. P. 
Beal, G. H. Blackwell, M. W. Minaker, H. Fever. 79— E. J. Glover. 
82— G. H. Alderson, J. Borthwick, J. Creeden, C. Miller, G. H. Wilson. 
E. Evans. 83— W. E. Armstrong, I. D. Bateman, W. Shackleton, J. R. 
Steele, H. C. Creighton. 84— H. W. Clark, H. C. Cox, J. R. Middleton. 



1 



272 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



W. E. Seeley, J. P. Turner. 86— J. G. R. Alison. A. C. Mitchell, H. G. 
Popham, V. S. Wellington. 90— M. M. Fowlie. E. H. Reynolds, J. H. 
Stotenburg, F. W. Daggett, T. E. Hawkins, A. Irwin, W. S. Foley. 
91 — E. Branigan, A. E. Quinn, B. Chatterson, W. J. Cochrane, D. D. 
Mallory. 92— C. Willard, J. F. Martin. 97— F. Rye. A. J. Doane, M. G. 
Cody, R. A. Cowieson. 98 — A. J. C. Drummond, W. A. D. Gordon. 99 — 

F. J. French, H. S. Rinehart, K. A. Miles, F. S. Thompson. 100— R. T. 
Pawley, A. S. Brown, E. H. Greenwood, J. G. Henderson, I. Amberg, 

G. E. Whiton, O. M. Bates, W. T. Bates. 103— W. J. Sinnerton, R. M. 
Bewelt, C. Curtis, W. S. Griffis, R. E. Hawke, H. MacKenzie, J. R. Secord. 
108 — J. W. Bailey, E. J. Hilderley, A. E. Lawrence. 110 — F. G. Robinson, 
W. A. Moxan, E. Huff, J. Maley, D. E. Hilborn, J. L. Drummond, W. C. 
Elliott. R. A. Edwards, H. E. Lauderville, P. M. Drummond, R. H. Eyres, 
G. S. Williamson. J. E. Hall, R. A. Ward, H. Tripp, O. White, W. G. 
Appleton. E. Scott, T. A. Bare. 113— J. M. Shook, G. R. Penhall. K. L. 
Duncombe. 118— J. Archibald, M. K. Dillane. H. H. Hood, W. H. Stephen- 
son, A. Edwards, J. C. Osborne, M. Gould, E. L. Dillane. 120— R. J. 
Newman, H. W. Hagerty. 121— F. A. R. McFadden, A. J. Emmett, E. 
J. Chevens. W. J. Keep, C. Page. 122— J. Purvis, C. Hutcheson, E. C. 
Wilson, W. D. Steele. 123—0. E. Smith, R. A. Wardle, W. R. Wensley, 
A. R. Newman. W. S. Juniper, R. M. Elmer, K. A. Wensley. 126— P. 
A. Tweedie, C. E. McKelvie, W. J. Mitchell. V. Wilson, M. H. Johnston, 
L. A. Burbank, R. J. H. Lowrey. 129— B. J. Charles, R. G. Filkin. 
133— J. F. Gollings, W. H. Sanders. 135— W. G. Young, T. C. Bowen. 
W. H. Ptolmey, B. Lindsay, J. F. McCallum. 137— W. A. Masters. 139— 
C. W. Lord, G. W. Jackson, J. M. Carnegie. 140— F. R. Oliver. 141— 
N. J. Hiscox, H. Vlochos, M. B. Rixon. 144— H. W. Bucher, K. S. Lott, 
H. V. Swanson, R. S. Yeo, J. H. Wilson. 145— R. A. L. Hutchinson. 
147— D. W. Cochran, O. A. McPhail, E. McLellan, W. I. Lee. 149— R. 
E. Boyle. 153— S. S. Morson, E. G. Duncan. 156— F. Birkett, W. Neill, 
C. W. Maddison, C. G. Wells, A. G. Grainger. 157— R. H. Wilde. 158— 

A. E. Harper, W. K. Ray. 161— H. Richardson. 165— G. V. Gates. 
170— C. Layton, J. R. Murdie, W. R. Plant, W. F. Deacon. 174— J. P. 
Pierce, W. C. Hopkins, G. W. Ryan, M. C. Smith, J. H. Williams. 177— 
C. H. Cotton, J. Kerr, J. B. Macfarlane, R. Walker. 180— J. A. Brown, 
W. E. Bluhum, J. R. Brydges, A. Cain. W. A. Farby, R. G. Jackson, 

E. Menzies, R. G. Allen, C. R. Foster, E. Gilham, C. V. Bustard, J. 
Preater. 181 — J. R. Stephenson. 184 — G. R. Moore, H. Anderson. 186— 
G. E. Buck. 193— A. C. Eddy, W. E. Beemer. 194— W. Spencer, G. R. 
Anderson, F. E. Balls, J. F. Crooks, E. G. Gardiner, R. A. Gregory, 
G. Haley, W. Hackett, J. E. Stonehouse, F. Stonehouse, S. A. Whiting, 

B. M. Sutherland. 195— F. G. Mar.shall, E. M. McLean. 196— J. C. 
McLean, A. B. Laidlaw. 201— V. E. Ranous, S. R. Balkwill, R. C. 
Donaldson, C. A. Gibson, C. Swann. 209A— J. F. Aitken, A. O. Car- 
rothers, A. J. Evans. S. E. Kipp, W. C. Keen. 209— A. O. Miller, J. E. 
Caldwell, W. G. Rothwell, T. J. H. Rothwell, J. S. Somerville. 215—0. 
L. Gall. 216— D. Bishop. T. H. Greenis. 218— J. E. Pountney, J. G. 
Larkin, W. Duncalf. 221— G. E. Bradley, R. H. Ford, W. A. Hagerman, 

F. W. Kerr, F. R. C. Peterson, A. A. Porter, D. B. Ripley. B. E. Upper, 

A. F. Smith. 225— G. Johnstone, W. Stevenson, J. E. Wilson. 228— 
S. R. Peters. 230— G. E. Theaxton, W. Poole. H. Barron, R. B. Stephens, 
T. Godden. 231— H. F. Gardner. 237— A. Grant, J. E. Jackson, K. 
Wolfe. 242— J. D. Kane. 245— W. O. Harmon, N. M. Ford, C. G. Roe. 
247— G. E. Chandler, T. Hartwick, W. F. Hayes, M. C. E. Lindsay. A. 

B. Odium. A. E. Rea, T. M. Rees, J. H. Ryding. 250— J. M. Hinchley, 
E. Sutherland. 253— W. J. Burns, Jr., R. H. F. Boyce, G. V. Clubbe, 
N. B. Derry, J. F. Tou-signant. 256 — H. Donnelly, P. J. Prunner. W. D. 
Bendfield, C. I. Cranner, J. M. Neville, A. Collins, G. W. Markell, A. 
Hollister, C. McCracken, W. Jarvis, C. Johnson, F. Jackson, R. Beding- 
field. A. D. Floyd, A. Robertson, P. M. Alexander, J. Simsie, J. Stewart, 
B. I. Daugherty, C. E. Johnson, J. W. Sheets, G. S. Postelwaite, R. A. 
Brown. E. Rupert, G. W. Thorn, C. C. Stubbs. 257— F. Johnson, W. 
R. Robinson, J. A. Sifton, G. W. Peeling. 259— C. L. Sinclair, G. W. 
Whaley. 262— A. Sanderson. 263— C. Tayler, G. Kernohan, V. R. Maylor, 
W. S. Manson, H. N. McCordie. 265— R. Holmes. R. C. Nelles, R. 
Rankin, L. Winch. E. J. Smith. 266— W. C. Thompson, W. McTaggart 
267— V. Spiers, C. E. Suitor, P. J. Chinnick. W. C. Elmer, W. J. Easton, 
J. Gilbert, A. B. Suitor, N. E. Whiteley, R. O. Springer. 268— J. A. 
Anderson, J. McCallum, W. L. Davis, G. K. Tinney, C. A. Gordon. 269 — 
J. Jones, C. A. Reynolds. 270— C. D. Smith. 272— G. B. Smith. J. A. 



"SORONTO, ONTARIO. 1940 273 

Powell, H. Brooks. L. D. Woodworth. 283— G. J. Ballentyne. S. Howes. 
W. J. Carter. M. W. Young, J. A. Wilson, S. B. Palmer. G. G. Saunders. 
A. Cooke. E. V. Foster, R.Willianis, G. J. R. Ellis, E. Lawrence. G. J. W. 
Anderson. 285— D. L. Fee, M. H. Bunt, W. J. Coulter, A. I. Ferris. 
F. W. R. Scott, S. MacPhee. 286— H. G. McKay, N. S. Hutcheson. 289— 

E. E. Pincombe, W. K. Routledge, D. C. McGugan. 295— C. Orr. 296— 
H. G. Bristol, A. A. Cox, E. Chamberlain, W. McBride. 297— C. G. Gray, 
H. R. Lamb, J. Leslie. 299— M. I. Huffman, J. A. Wartman, R. W. 
Milligan. 300— T. P. Elgie. 302— C. Rose, J. L. Gray, J. W. Noble, 
R. Mills. 303— K. M. Taylor, J. M. Ross, N. R. Sanderson. 305— J. G. 
Lucas. 306— W. R. McGowan, E. C. McQueen, A. E. Kress. 311— H. E. 
Horsley. 312 — J. G. Fowlie, G. W. Granger, I. Hammond, G. S. Dean. 
316— E. Barnes, A. W. Artendale, H. M. Kirkpatrick, P. S. Chapman, 
W. T. A. Bell, G. E. Butterworth, C. L. Holmes, E. B. Henry, W. J. 
Moore, R. R. McKay, B. D. Proctor. 319— W. C. Garber, W. H. Kieper. 
320— H. Steen, A. C. Casselman. 322— S. Tackaberry, W. D. Mercer. 

F. A. Cox. 323— C. D. Munro, N. Jones, H. H. Middleton, W. C. Whitton. 
324— V. Ross, G. R. Haselwood, W. A. Rae, S. J. Kersey, S. A. Woods, 
L. Riley. C. Taggart, W. M. Arthurs, R. J. Headon, L. E. Dunham. 
325— C. S. Tyrell. 327— R. Johnston, A. J. Grant, R. Henderson. S. 
Lutchen. H. M. Patterson, W. Miller, J. Parks, R. F. Radcliffe. 329— 
R. H. Johnson. 330— E. C. Rea. A. J. Busch, W. H. Brandon. 332— H. 
Johnson, S. Hoy, A. Neely, A. E. Cash, E. Emerson, C. E. Dunbar, 
D. R. Challenger. 334— W. McGaughey. 339— N. E. Ingram, W. A. 
Spear. 341— N. Grunder, A. W. Kirkeonnell, R. McLellan. 343— T. 
Ransford. H. H. Bowen. L. G. Hoidge. W. J. Weston, F. H. Jackson. 
345— G. Kirby. V. S. O'Brien, J. A. Pond, J. W. Elhvood, C. Biggs, 
J. S. King. 346 — A. L. Broad, M. L. Jones, G. A. Parker, A. Sommer- 
ville, G. A. Benton. 347 -A. D. Jupp, N. D. Kyle, A O. McDonald. 
352— J. McDonald, F. G. B. Cochlin, A. F. Parker. A. M. Robert.son. 
J. R. Tait, J. Wilson, Jr., W. F. Bradey, E. A. Taylor. 356— T. Still- 
waugh. 358—1. Scott. 359— E. C. Hanson. 361— A. C. Heron, A. L. 
Mennie, J. B. Mitchell, J. D. McNeill, H. A. Thomas, W. Tym. 362— 
D. Gilchrist, W. J. Crawford, G. M. Couse. 364— C. H. Willoughby, J. 
H. Middaugh, P. Sutherland, F. G. Sponenburg, J. I. Siwnenburg, G. W. 
Olde, R. C. Harrison, G. B. Little. 367— J. H. Ander.son, H. W. Brown, 

A. M. Larter, H. L. Norman, G. O. Woodhouse. 369— C. G. Carroll, 

B. T. Graham, E. L. Harrison, R. J. Haley, R. J. G. McFarland, W. L. 
Willcocks. 370— J. Scotland, W. E. Jackson, Z. Ja'-k.son, J. F. Wedder- 
burn, J. T. Moorhead. 372— A. E. Bartlett, N. D. Graham, R. N. Graham, 
W. V. Graham. H. Hawkins, F. R. Hawkins. H. W. Jamieson, A. M. 
Mumby, E. B. Shaver. J. E. Edwards. C. R. Meldicott, G. H. Stratton, 

C. S. Young. W. G. Willson, C. C. Wintermute, R. W. Donnelly, C. G. 
Tait. 373 — S. L. Lambert, A. Mickelham, E. Jones, E. L. Robbins, J. D. 
Colquhoun, C. L. Robins. 376— J. E. W. Conroy, R. J. Gilchrist. J. H. 
Sproat. 377— D. E. Dean. C. Taylor. L. May. 378— H. Deacon. F. W. 
Ellerson. W. B. Fitzpatrick, W. H. Legg, J. W. Sims. S. G. Si)ence, 

D. H. Williams, H. L. Watts. 380— C. E. Armstrong. B. W. Kennedy. 
A. J. Jones. A. H. V. Looker. D. C. Scott, A. Walker, E. K. Walkam, 
C. L. Knox, F. R. Davey, W. H. Gallup, R. Johnston, K. J. McEachren. 
W. H. Wood. 382— W. Carrigan. W. G. Applegarth. D. Whyte. L. 
Varley. W. H. Schram. C. Martin. T. W. Black, H. W. Ward, A. J. 
Pitts, P. A. North, J. P. McLeod, J. M. Brown, W. S. White. 383— 
J. P. Miltimore. 384— H. J. Low, B. W. Hinchey, E. Haves, A. C. 
McCurdy, R. Munn, H. E. While, T. F. Sayman, J. W. F. Petican. W. 
Porrill. 391— J. G. Crawford. 393— H. R. Cobean, G. C. Green. H. B. 
Krug, W. F. Pringle, H. F. Pickard, R. J. Reid. 395— A. A. Edmunds. 
N. H. Wallace, L. Sova. 396— W. J. Eldridge, J. W. Kastner, W. V. 
Myles, H. A. Leaney. 400 — T. B. Blakelock, F. Cavanaugh, J. Pengelly, 
L. A. Wilkinson. 401 — J. A. Consaul, A. Stewart, T. E. Emmons, J. 
A. Moran, V. G. Pearce. 403— J. Conely, W. Cook, W. J. Folland. A. 
Hatchard, R. A. Laws, P. J. McConnell, T. W. Nairn, H. J. Neal. W. F. 
Peck, J. W. Oberg. G. A. Reade. S. E. Rigg. D. Robertson. R. G. Ross. 
J. L. VanLuven. F. L. Walker, A. Welch, H. H. Burt, F. G. Corby, K. S. 
Lowrie, J. P. Walker. 404— G. H. Richardson. T. J. Watters, H. M. 
Detlor. G. J. Wolfe. 406— C. M. McArthur. 408— C. White. W. Bruce, 

E. McAIpine. E. E. Rennie. 410— G. Parrington, F. Walker. C. W. 
Mintern, G. Roberts, J. Graham, G. Moore, W. J. McLeod, T. W. Smith, 
H. G. Carter, H. G. Wilson. A. McNeely. A. L. Cumpston, J. H. Payne, 
C. H. Green, R. H. Stanley, R. J. McLean. 411— C. E. Walter. 412— 



274 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



J. E. Leacock, J. A. Martin. 413— C. Taylor, C. W. Biggins, T. R. 
Ainslie, R. C. Lounsbury, R. A. Roseburgh, C. C. Stamm, W. S. Rozell, 
R. Shaw. 414— N. R. Wickstrom, G. S. Speight, H. S. Murphy, P. J. 
Sherrington. 415— O. J. Hodginson, W. J. Duffey, C. W. McEwen, J. 
W. Crowe, J. Nixon, N. T. Owens, F. J. Rathbone, G. E. Hymers, S. 
Clarke, R. E. Cooper, G. C. Kirkpatrick, W. Sampson. 418— L. McEwen, 

E. W. Munroe, R. Hanley, D. D. McKinnon. 419— C. L. Ensor, 425— 
J. Davis. 426— E. F. Alton, T. J. Armstrong, E. D. Baxter, F. V. 
Bayne, J. W. Fulton, F. N. W. Jewett, N. D. Kerr, E. A. Parkes, G. 
Vickers. 428— F. M. Campbell. C. W. Bowerman, E. R. Trewin. 430— 
W. T. Brown, J. Craddock, J. Laing, B. Powell. 431— J. E. Braun. 
434— F. Lamke, R. N. Shaw. 435— J. R. Beatty, R. F. Covert, C. W, 
Rose. 436 — R. R. Cain. 437 — G. C. Cameron, G. Hutchinson, J. C. 
Grant, T. S. Crawford, V. C. Huntley, G. M. Prudson, V. H. Shaw, J. 
Struthers, J. Stewart. 438— T. V. W. Ainley, D. B. Logan, R. J. 
Lillico, H. J. Lougheed, F. L. Dinsmore, W. Nicholson, W. Wheelans, 
L. D. Siems, J. Davidson. 439 — J. E. Divine, A. Obleman, R. McGillivray, 

F. McKinnon, D. A. McMillan, J. R. Mcintosh, D. Markson. 440— B. M. 
Porter. 442— A. Taylor, J. E. Bishop, G. E. Wright, R. D. "Wiper, 
V. S. Grigg, M. J. Phillips, W. S. Burt, C. R. Brown, W. C. Home. 
443— H. Peeling. 444— A. C. Bates, G. A. Brothers, R. J. Coker, L. M. 
Watson, S. R. Walker. 448— J. H. Healey, Y. White, D. C. Crilley. 
449— J. H. Arnott. 450— A. Cass, H. S. Franklin. 452— J. R. Blair, 

G. A. Helmer, D. N. McNeil, D. M. Ross. 453— A. Stewart, J. D. 
Forrest, F. G. Jackson, C. J. Moore, W. M. Wood, W. F. Ede, L. O. . 
Browne, H. W. Ellard, H. Hewlett, G. S. MacKenzie, O. H. Charlton, 
J. G. Davidson, J. D. Craigie, R. I. Thornton, J. R. Williams, N. S. 
McLeod, A. F. L. Spence. 457— E. R. Stevenson, L. G. C. Mitchell, 
J. M. Harvey, C. W. J. Tasker, L. A. Sheets. 459— W. F. Weedmark, 
H. C. Wilson, R. G. Little. 461— V. H. Ricci, R. W. Race, H. H. Lowe, 
C. K. Han.son. T. Walters, S. L. Rasmussen. 463— R. R. McDonald, J. 
MacGregor. 464— F. King, L. A. Shier. H. J. Miller, A. J. Cody, H. A. 
Shier, A. G. Tomlinson, W. Doble. 467— H. D. Hammell, A. P. Potter, 
H. J. C. Wright, A. I. Boyce. J. H. C. Goddard, J. S. Potter, J. L. L. 
Purdon. 469— H. E. Bryan, V. W. Biggings, H. Watkins, S. Goodwin. 
470— A. Evans. 472— A. W. Aiken, W. D. Love, C. Pearson, S. A. 
Pearson, W. J. Ainslie, M. T. Wagg, N. McDermid. 473— K. S. Budd, 
G. D. Reid, A. F. Reilly. R. T. Francis. 474— W. E. Brass, A. Graystone, 
H. S. McLoan, E. Tisdall, E. J. Bush, H. B. Christie, W. Dickson, G. 

E. Macklin. A. M. Wilson, G. H. Weston. 475— A. Curran, J. O. Duck- 
worth, C. F. Furminger, L. Hardie, H. R. Jackson, A. Palmer, J. E. 
Piatt, J. Stowe, P. W. Timmons, A. C. Young. 476— L. H. Blackmore, 
K. C. Eraser. 478— W. Zurell. A. G. Kreitzweiser, W. A. Ogram, E. 
C. A. Crawford. 479— W. T. Twigg, T. Tumulty, R. J. Smith, C. H. 
Smith, H. S. Latimer, C. N. Latimer. 481— L. V. Dixon, C. L. Hannan, 
J. H. Holdbeck, F. F. Mannan, T. Robertson, R. C. Ayling, R. G. Cook, 
J. W. Crown, G. R. Harkley. E.W. Lawley, A. L. Derry, C. Welch, 

F. W. Arnold, W. N. B. Dawson, T. Haden. W. McMurray, R. W. Brown, 
L. W. Harris. 482— R. E. Haryett, J. J. Bronson, W. J. Baker, T. 
Liscum, G. H. Woodcox, J. H. O'Brien, F. Slater, W. McGee, N. A. 
Muffitt, W. H. Norton, R. L. Barker, W. S. Davis, J. Pringle, J. G. 
Carlisle. T. W. Chidley, A. W. Barr, R. Graham, R. A. Cousins. 486— 
W. J. Hacker, T. H. Wainwright. 487— B. Barlow, D. Mitchell. C. 
Nordrum. 489—1. D. Eastman, B. Hamilton. 494— F. Brown, F. F. 
Sheriffs, W. J. Wilson. 495— T. Scott, A. Stead, K. McPherson, A. J. 
Fletcher, W. T. Davitt, R. Taziken, H. E. Hawkins. 496— C. B. Tyrrell. 
499— A. Peckett, J. M. Hansen, W. A. McMitchell. 501— G. H. Edgar, 

G. M. Wort. 503— J. H. Styles, C. E. Atkin, N. G. Parr, E. C. Elliott, 
G. E. Linthwaite, T. K. Thompson, J. E. Smith. 505— M Brooks, R. 
Barlow, A. M. Hunt, A. K. Kitchen, E. Krouse, A. Patrick, C. Pattinson, 

C. H. Ramey, H. Ross, O. W. Robb. M. R. Stenbaugh, J. Scroggie, W. 

D. Scott, D. G. Sutherland, R. A. Thompson, A. E. Vansickle, E. Weaver, 
J. H. Weaver, L. E. Weir, H. E. Watson, F. C. Ward. 506— J. Watt, 
H. A. McDougall, J. R. Clark, W. Farmer. 508— C. A. Strange, T. 
Cooper, H. J. Wallace, D. L. Winter. 509— J. W. Kirklnad, P. N. 
Bryan, F. L. Ernst, A. J. Damman, H. L. Neff. 510—1. E. Brock, W. 

E. Rudd, B. R3es. 512— H. C. Thayer, W. L. Bailey, W. Burton. 513 — 
R. Avis, E. H. Burritt, W. Bowman, E. R. Campbell, J. B. Cowan. W. 

F. Devsrell, A. C. Dadd, L. E. Ellsworth, B. D. Ferry, A. V. Gillies, 
J. Imeson, G. L. Martin, G. Nswlove, W. L. Rodwell, J. Rycroft, G. 



TORONTO. ONTARIO. 1940 



E. Spree. R. F. Shepherd. W. H. Swain. J. R. Woolway. J. H. Whitham, 
H. R. Young. W. C. Dodgson. K. R. Swan. W. A. Stanton, E. H. Taylor, 
H. F. Vincent. 514— C. A. Davidson, J. L. Wettlaufer. E. F. Singer, 
J. W. Perry. G. E. O'Brien. W. Dick. W. S. Herbert, V. Allsopp, P. W. 
Armitage, W. E. Thompson, W. H. Evans. J. D. Warington, C. E. 
Franks, G. Gregson, H. H. Windeler, E. R. Kinzinger. G. Hawker. G. V. 
Abrahams. H. R. Cooper, A. S. Lukeman, W. Edwards, L. A. Newcombe, 
A. Hollands. 515— M. F. Murphy, W. H. Sutch. J. A. H. Gilchrist, 
J. F. Hanke. 520— F. R. Allison. R. E. Alidred, B. F. Berry, S. I. Boyd, 
D. A. Birrell, T. W. G. Pettit, N. M. Richardson, J. Stevenson. 521— 
L. B. Connor, H. Moore, S. Thompson, A. Clark. 522— M. Kates, J. 
Surogg, M. Barrett, L. Rose, S. Surogg, J. Ross, B. Willinsky, H. Mannis, 
M. Wilks, S. Manson, C. Lipton, M. Berger, J. Singer, M. Cohen, J. 
Levine, H. Lipton. 525— R. D. Broadfoot. A. M. Pullin, C. A. W. Jacobs, 

F. M. Mogford. 527— G. Thompson. 528— F. N. Wallingford, R. H. 
Gray, G. M. Corrigan, W. F. Morgan. 531— W. G. Downard. W. B. 
Drury, W. T. McBride. E. R. Harris, T. F. Brooks, J. H. Elliott, J. B. 
Cronk, S. B. Hueston, G. J. Reid, R. H. Jack.son. N. R. Mansell. 532— 

F. Youngs, C. J. Davis. J. H. Gibson, W. F. Miller, W. F. Mills, R. L. 
McEwen, F. L. Roberts, T.F. Till, M. D. Wallace. 534— C. W. Wright, 
J. B. Tarzwell, R. H. Armstrong. 536 — A. H. Armstrong, N. C. Kilpat- 
rick, A. H. Naylor, P. C. Smith, J. E. Treasure. 537— W. Stephenson, 

G. C. Cunningham, W. W. Jamieson, E. Drake, H. C. Murrav, \V. Moore, 
Sr., J. Rice, M. Young, A. W. Pratt, J. D. Bryan. 539— W. G. Weichel, 
N. A. Zeick. 541— B. J. Gilmore, M. P. Gilmore. W. H. Morgan. O. F. 
Morrison, F. N. Oakley. 542— A. H. Middleton. 543— H. L. R. Hepburn, 
W. B. McCuaig, T. W. Rae, R. T. Thomson, A. O. Heather, W. H. 
Walker. 545— R. C. Cheetham. 546— G. M. Fulton. W. G. McAdams, 
W. G. Lyle, R. M. Hepburn, G. Rowe, J. G. Roberts, R. W. Gray. A. W. 
Davis, J. S. Lyle, O. Gray, S. Robinson. R. Taylor. 548— J. Bentlev. 
W. C. Caulton, A. Fillinpnam, E. B. Ross, J. A. Wilson. 549— H. M. 
Armstrong, E. P. Chamberlain, B. T. Gill. T. C. Joslin. D. W. Stalder, 
W. Thorpe. 550— T. F. Acton, A. F. Campbell, G. Hawkins. J. D. 
Hawkins. F. B. McCuIly, W. A. Crockett. 551— W. F. Donahue, J. W. 
Kinnear, G. E. Mitchell, B. B. Farr. J. Robertson. T. F. Sttvens, L. A. 
Book, R. Kirkham. H. Lodge, J. Stewart, B. M. Winn, L. S. Hall. A. E. 
Kew, W. L. Griffen. 552— A. Booth. B. Hart. H. W. Marks. A. Rennie, 
R. T. Robertson. 554— J. B. Smith, H. J. Price, J. W. Patti.son, E. D. 
Rivers. 555— S. Walker, R. F. Shaw. 558— S. R. Maley. 559— W. 
Wolfish, J. M. Stuchen, H. Skolnick, S. C. Brownstein. 560— J. H. 
Brown, J. A. Forward, W. C. Tuttle, H. Waters, S. Woodman. C. H. 
Graham. J. H. Morrow, H. N. Hertz. N. Davidson, C. H. Blakeney. W. 
R. Rowland. W. E. Hawkins, J. Hender.son. 561— N. S. Byron. J. J. S. 
Rice, W. G. Bell. 562— R. Hamill, W. D. Allen, G. A. Carnegie, C. B. 
Gibbs, C. Gildart, D. B. Gordon. A. Gower. R. Griffiths. R. Hampson, 
C. W. King. D. D. McRae. A. J. Ramsay, W. Sansome, F. Sutherst, S. 
Whitney, A. Wood, S. Stevens. 563— E. Gwythe, J. Lett, W. Robert.son, 
Jr., W. G. Love, L. Arnold, R. C. Buck, C. Nelson. 564— J. Kincaid. 
565— F. Almond, J. Dow. R. G. Davies. A. R. Endersby. L. F. Ennis, 
R. G. Eraser, J. Gray. N. W. Martin. G. H. Mavnard, D. McCullogh, 
A. Shields, D. M. Seggie. F. L. Talbot. H. W. Thompson. W. H. Whillier. 
J. Wilson. 566— W. H. Cope, A. Forbes, C. R. Eraser. J. Harvey. A. E. 
Kennedy, C. Kerr. 570—1. H. Burns, G. M. Jackson, J. R. Ferrell, M. 
R. Ferguson. C. G. Thomas. 571— F. J. Peake. W. H. Healey. E. A. 

•-Howard, E. H. Whiting, J. T. Lester. 572— A. Hugli. J. G. Cox, R. S. 
Hinds, T. Payne. S. A. Woodhams. H. Lewis. G. A. Heron. A. Hall, 
N. Knight, J. O. Leask, R. Morrison, J. McParlane. E. P. Parker. J. 
Ward. 574— D. J. Harris. 575— J. Robson. H. J. Finkle. S. Walsh, 
G. S. Warner. 576— R. Andrews, A. Anderson, G. L. Bailley, T. Bland, 
A. C. Bryson, F. W. Gardner, A. W. Hughes, W. E. Krier, C. Martin, 
W. H. MacLeod, F. W. Wilson, A. F. Demary, H. L. Giles. J. C. Mc- 
Cannell, D. F. Clinton, G. A. McKay. W. J. McDermid. J. B. Ritchie. 
577— J. A. Robin.son. G. Good. J. W. Mallabon, A. R. Richardson. H. L. 
Sutherland. J. R. Watson. 578— W. P. Cusick. A. E. Creery, P. C. King. 
W. B. Thompson. 579 — L. Griesmann, L. Perlman, N. Schulmann, M. 
M. Sumner, F. G. Clowes. 580— F. Crossley, E. Thornton, E. D. Carpen- 
ter, A. C. Simpson, A. F. Graf.stein, B. Tuxford, P. Watkins. W. C. C. 
Hope. 582— A. E. Thomas, W. Walker. 583— W. Neilson, W. B. Hillis, 
W. H. Fitzgerald. D. G. Davis. W. E. Mellor. F. M. Rutter. 584— D. G. 
Mathias. J. W. Thomson, A. H. Goodrich, F. J. Rathbone. Thos. Walker. 



276 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

585— H. C. Peacock, H. L. Hurling. 586— A. Chamberlain, H. M. Webb. 
587— G. S. Warner, G. J. Campbell, M. L. Biddie. 588— S. S. Strachan. 
590— D. W. Mitchell, L. F. Fielder. 591— C. M. Lemon, A. C. Campbell, 
W. H. Bartlett. 593 — J. Burgess, W. A. Cheyne, A. Gray, P. Forrester, 
J. D. M. Munro. 594— C. Burley, A. Gillispie, E. B. Roberts, Thos. Ross. 
595— H. A. Reid. 596— Wm. McCreadie, D. H. McDougall, G. McMartin. 
597— W. W. Cunningham, F. G. Hudson, G. W. Carrothers. 598— V. 
Williams. 599— A. T. Byers, E. Baddeley, R. Hughes, J. F. Pilkington. 
600— A. W. Eraser, A. S. Grealis, K. E. Bartlett, T. S. Haslam. 601— 
F. W. Holloway, F. J. Fulkerson, T. E. Smuck. 602— F. Gallimore, C. 
Oates, J. King, E. Hunsperger, J. T. Marshall, R. E. Bates. 603— W. H. 
Chisholm. 604— R. Ruppman, G. E. Woltz, T. W. Clarke, C. V. Allen. 
605— A. E. Long, W. W. Ludlam. 606— W. T. Aitken. 611— R. J. Lillico. 
R. W. Hoffman. 612— H. V. Brisbin, E. Atkins, S. S. Moore, H. A. 
Robson. 613 — A. G. Ray, W. I. Rodgerson. 615— L. E. James. 616^ 
F. J. Hara, H. A. Leak, F. S. Reed, J. H. Campbell. 617— S. H. Bullett, 
D. C. Grassick, R. R. Lounsbury, A. S. Davidson, W. J. McGillivray, 
H. G. Turner, I. V. lies. 618— G. W. Matthews. 621— S. D. Stinchcombe. 
623— T. Henderson, E. H. Williams, A. C. Stevens, G. W. Bigelow, T. 
W. Mitchell, J. Thomas, J. Pearson, H. O. Shane, D. H. Sharp, Jos. 
Saqui. A. R. Surcess, T. J. C. Smith. 625— G. W. Goodwin, T. H. 
McAdam. 626— W. D. Haylor, W. Davidson. 628— G. LeMarche, H. E. 
Haack, C. J. Holman. 632— J. W. DeClute, H. K. Watterson. 634— E. 
W. Murray. 635— L. E. DeFoe, W. M. Ellsworthy, A. H. Creighton. 
636— H. E. Foster, R. H. Smith, G. E. Lipsitt, J. R. Sine. 637— W. H. 
Pateson, H. Simpson. 640 — C. F. Moore, W. F. Bryans, T. Shannon, 
L. Law. 641— J. D: Fick. 642— C. M. Graham, R. Haire, G. Binns, 
J. H. Wilkie, Wm. Boucher. H. Callwood, A. E. Garden, T. R. Hall, 
J. Lewis. 643— R. C. Ludlow, T. J. Wickett, F. R. M. Geh. 645— J. 
MacKay. 647 — A. Anderson, R. W. Brown, S. Dunn, N. McKay, H. 
Short, F. Holmes. 651— J. M. Mcintosh, S. J. McRae, J. D. Crawford. 
652— A. E. Taylor. 



SUSPENSIONS U.M.C. 



447— E. W. Innes. 



EXPULSIONS 

16— F. G. Anderson. 410— Harry Gilpin. 549— Clifford Sprowson. 

DEATHS, 1939 

2— J. Hanniwell, Jan. 13 ; O. Taylor, Mar. 14 ; F. G. Curd, Apr. 15 ; 
C. T. Gilleland, June 13. 3— J. E. Slade, May 7 : P. B. Chown, Apr. 24 ; 
G. A. Jobbitt. June 5 ; J. K. Eraser. Feb. 23 ; R. E. Burns, Oct. 1 ; J. 
Marshall, Nov. 22 ; A. M. Stroud, Dec. 4 ; R. J. Prittie, Dec. 25. 5— 
T. W. Miller, Feb. 19 ; G. Graham, Apr. 26 : D. M. Bissell, Mar. 28 ; 
V. deCarle, July 13 ; F. E. Fairbairn. Sep. 8 ; C. W. Easton, Oct. 8 ; W. 
M. Oshourne, Dec. 16. 6— E. P. Schultz, Jan. 24 ; T. H. Watson, Feb. 
22; A. H. Dodsworth, Feb. 26; J. G. Gauld, Mar. 4; J. Moodie, Mar. 30; 
W. W. Hammond. Apr. 14 ; G. M. Brown, June 27 ; H. Givin, Oct. 11 ; 

C. E. Cameron, Nov. 16. 7-'^A. E. Phipps, Jan. 7 ; J. B. Marlatt, Nov. 
26 ; G. E. Miller, Dec. 3 ; M. L. Yeager, Dec. 17. 9— A. W. H. Callaghan, 
Oct. 23. 10— J. H. Shaw, Feb. 19; A. E. Aitken, Jan. 21 ; W. M. McGuire, 
Dec. 14 ; A. A. Winter, Dec. 3 ; S. Sebring, Dec. 26. 11— J. Harris, Feb. 
15 ; F. W. Smythe, Apr. 3 ; S. E. Churchill, Apr. 24 ; J. R. Finkle, Apr. 
28 ; G. E. Gill, May 26 ; R. J. E. Graham, Nov. 12. 14— M. Avery, June 
19 ; S. Clarke, May 12 ; W. T. Hands. May 24 : W. A. Gray, Nov. 10 ; 
W. A. Moore, Nov. 5; M. Rigney, Sept. 5. 15— H. Bliss, Jan. 28; C. H. 
Baines, Feb. 17 ; W. I. Bradley, Mar. 23 ; J. L. Wilbur, June 12 : E. W. 
Smith, Oct. 30 ; A. N. Lindsay. Dec. 16. 16— W. H. Shaw, Jan. 5 ; J. W. 
Rogers, Feb. 15 ; H. W. Tinkess, Mar. 18 ; A. E. Beckwith, Apr. 7 ; C. E. 
Price, Apr. 18 ; J. A. Dobrow, Mar. 8 ; F. W. Boustead, June 15 ; W. F. 
Bilger, Aug. 9 ; J. C. Clarke, Aug. 17 ; W. N. Ponton. Sep. 6 ; O. H. 
Zeigler, Sep. 11; T. P. Bellinger, Sep. 21. 17— R. S. Gilchrist, Jan. 22; 
J. C. Andrews, Mar. 1 ; J. Miller, Mar. 27 ; F. D. Allport, Sep. 21. 18 — 

D. A. Kelly, Apr. 29 ; E. E. Vanskiver, May 16 ; E. W. Case, June 19 ; 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1940 277 



M. Wright. June 30 ; E. S. Rorke. Dec. 3. 20— N. J. Ireland. Mar. 11 ; 
B. Harrison. May 19 ; P. L. Doig. June 11 ; R. Black. Aug. 26 ; D. Murray, 
Sep. 10 ; F. R. Churcher, Sep. 28 ; W. G. Young. Oct. 25 ; C. A. Pratt, 
Nov. 10 ; J. E. Thorne, Dec. 14. 21A— W. MacMorane. Apr. 30. 22— J. 
E. Squirrell, Jan. 24 ; N. Elder, Apr. 12 ; S. P. Smith, Jan. 23 ; D. 
Shepard, Apr. 29 ; J. Carr, Oct. 12 ; W. C. Whitney, Nov. 15 ; W. J. 
Hambly, Nov. 25 ; W. J. Smith, Dec. 6. 23— N. Batty, May 30 ; B. G. 
Newton, Jan. 25 ; R. N. Endean, Sep. 10 ; T. N. Frisby, Sept. 28 : H. J. 
Mills. Nov. 15. 24— E. F. Rothwell, Jan. 16 ; W. J. Hudson, Mar. 19 ; 
R. G. Edwards, June 20 ; F. G. Graves, Aug. 20. 25— E. G. Long, Jan. 

12 ; A. E. Knox. Feb. 19 ; J.H. Spence, Feb. 21 ; J. B. McLeod, June 6 : 
J. C. Saul, June 4 ; S. B. Woods, July 21 ; W. R. Wadsworth, June 19 ; 
G. E. Evans. June 23 ; G. F. Macdonnell, June 25 ; E. W. Wright, Nov. 19. 
26— W. G. Noble. Mar. 24 ; F. R. T. Blucher. Sep. 30. 27— H. J. Hale, 
Jan. 11 ; E. W. Klotz, Jan. 23 ; G. W. Robinson, Jan. 28 ; T. L. Moore, 
Mar. 4 ; W. A. Clapperton, Mar. 7 ; F. J. Howell, Mar. 16 ; R. T. Hunter, 
Mar. 18 ; J. M. Peregrine. Apr. 18 ; H. H. Davis. June 11 ; W. Ainslie, 
June 11; W. M. Carrick, July 2 ; W. D. Booker, July 15; G. W. Raw. 
Sep. 24 ; H. S. Murdock. Dec. 5. 29— D. C. Stuart. Aug. 20. 30— F. J. 
Maguire. Mar. 4 ; J. J. Lynde, Mar. 15 ; W. Bellamy. May 23 ; W. A. 
Yule. June 5 ; F. A. Nixon. Nov. 14. 31— J. W. Bowdler. July 8. 32— 
T. M. Bond. May 7 ; W. D. Masson, June 14. 33— S. G. Price, Mar. 13 ; 
R. F. Young, July 24 ; F. G.Weir. Sep. 3 ; R. G. Reynolds, Oct. 13 ; 
T. T. Murphy, Nov. 7. 34— E. J. Gott, June 15 ; H. C. Cook, Dec. 15 : 
E. R. Lewis, July 20. 35— H. Freund, Oct. 18. 37— J. Patterson, Jan. 
31 ; R. A. Skinner. May 13 ; R. B. Hutt, Nov. 16 ; W. H. Byerlay. Oct. 

24 ; J. Mitchell. Oct. 10. 38— D. Duff. July 11. 40— H. D. Jackson. 
Jan. 14 ; H. White, Feb. 2 : H. A. Stares, Feb. 15 ; D. A. Quick, Feb. 26 ; 
W. Kelday. Feb. 28 ; J. Gill. Mar. 9 ; E. Truscott. Mar. 17 ; A. G. Bain, 
Mar. 29 ; J. Moodie, Mar. 30 ; S. J. Heath, Apr. 30 ; H. Blackwell, May 

25 ; L Kern, Aug. 2 ; C. Sauorman. Sept. 9 : J. Dill. Oct. 6 ; J. B. Marlatt, 
Nov. 26 ; C. W. Moodie. Nov. 28 ; G. A. Matheson. Dec. 23. 41— A. J. 
Scratch. Jan. 9 ; G. Thornton. Feb. 12 ; A. L. Brown. Mar. 15 ; E. S. 
Hughes, May 18 ; G. G. Knight. Aug. 7. 42— E. Morkin. Mar. 20 ; C. H. 
Drew, Apr. 24 ; L. J. Munroe, Nov. 29. 43 — W. B. Murray, June 6 ; 
J. Stevenson, Aug. 7 ; W. A. Sawdon. Aug. 17 ; F. M. Tobin. Oct. 15. 
44— J. A. Walker. Feb. 15 ; J. S. Robertson. June 24 ; G. H. Laidlaw, 
July 2 ; W. J. Babe. July 8 ; G. H. Brewer. Aug. 30 : J. W. J. Andrew. 
Sep. 19 ; J. A. Ryckman.Nov. 30 ; I. H. Kayser. Dec. 7. 45— W. E. 
Lochead. Mar. 18 ; J. G. Pickell, Mar. 28 ; W. C. Wilcox, May 16. 46— 
J. W. Rutherford, Feb. 27 ; J. W. Grainger. Mar. 25 ; A. W. Chrysler, 
Mar. 28 ; E. Loney, May 3 ; A. J. Dyer. Nov. 1 ; T. W. Poile. Nov. 25 ; 
E. Cape, July 21. 47— D. Robinson. Jan. 8 ; R. J. Williamson. Mar. 15 ; 
J. A. Bedford. Mar. 21; W. Carmody, Apr. 29; G. O'Neil. June 17; W. 
M. Walker, Sep. 26 ; R. A. Spencer, Nov. 26 ; J. E. Williams. Dec. 20. 
50— J. W. Wood. May 4. 52— E. E. Stockton. Feb. 1 ; T. C. Bate. Mar. 
22 ; J. A. Grierson, Apr. 6 ; G. H. Woodruff, Sep. 27 ; J. H. Innes, 
Nov. 23. 54 — T. H. Keys, May 15. 55 — W. W. Ireland, Date unknown ; 
A. E. Burchill, Feb. 1 ; A. F. Benn, Apr. 18 ; J. E. Angus. Nov. 7 ; W. 
J. Ford. Nov. 11. 56— W. J. Batten. May IS ; W. B. Elsworth. Sep. 10. 
58— W. H. Gresley. Apr. 27 ; H. L. Merkley. May 28 ; W. J. Hagan. 
July 25 ; F. H. Deachman. Sep. 24 ; T. W. C. Stewart. Dec. 15. 61— 
L. Lee. Jan. 4 ; W. G. Thompson. Jan. 7 ; A. Benzie. Feb. 22 ; F. J. 
Howell. Mar. 15 ; I. Raphael. Aug. 24 ; G. J. Anderson, May 9 : C. O. 
Nichol. Sep. 21 ; W. Smye. Oct. 15 ; D. M. Scott. Oct. 21 ; A. S. Levy, 
Nov. 17. 62— W. J. Cleland. Apr. 8 ; W. D. Young. Nov. 6. 63— J. 
Williamson, June 25 ; W. E. Buse. July 8 : J. A. Eraser, Nov. 21. 64 — 
W. J. Robins. Mar. 20 ; U. A. Buchner. Mar. 13 ; C. L. MacKav. June 
21 ; W. Wright. July 13 ; W. T. C. Carter, Oct. 25 ; A. Marvell. Nov. 14. 
65— J. H. Forest. Jan. 14 ; A.W. Switzer. Jan. 17 ; A. Fairbanks, Mav 

13 ; W. M. Fitzgerald. May 15 ; E. Lankin. June 1 ; T. E. Till. June 5 ; 
A. W. Stewart, July 12 ; J.P.Gardner, Oct. 31 ; D. Stocks, Nov. 9 ; O. 
S. Freer. Dec. 9 ; E. J. Lye. Dec. 15. 66— F. W. Flegg, Apr. 27. 68— 
W. G. Francis, Apr. 14 ; L. H. Thompson, Dec. 12. 72— A. J. Oliver, 
Feb. 20 ; C. R. Despond, Apr. 1 ; W. F. Cober. Nov. 3, 1938 ; J. Bryce, 
Nov. 23 ; W. J. Taggart. Dec. 12 ; W. Pickering. July 24. 73— N. L. 
Brandon. Feb. 18 ; J. L. Webster. Oct. 15. 74— R. Edwards, June 14 ; 
G. J. Byers. Aug. 4. 75— T. Pretty. Jan. 10 ; E. J. Cashmore. Feb. 12 ; 
H. Hooper. Mar. 12 ; T. H. Gillis, Mar. 26 ; J. S. Howard. Apr. 16 ; J. A. 
Latimer, May 4 ; H. Truss, Sep. 3 ; R. Fishleigh. Nov. 24. 76— C. 



278 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Otterbein. May 24 ; A. W. Sutherland, Dec. 13, 1938 ; W. S. Thornton, 
June 13 ; R. A. Marsh, July 22 ; M. Sherwood, Nov. 5. 77— W. S. 
Hutchinson, Dec. 31, 1938 ; G. Wilson, Feb. 5 ; D. Ray, Mar. 28 ; F. B. 
Hegg, May 11 ; G. Nursey, May 22 ; F. Curtiss, Apr 29. 78— T. Lowrie, 
May 18 ; J. Green, Aug-. 22 : D. Patterson, Oct. 23. 82— C. B. Barker, 
Sep. 10 ; R. E. Paine, Aug. 15 ; J. Wishart, Dec. 18. 83— A. E. McNeice, 
Jan. 28 ; T. E. Smith, Dec. 1. 84- 1. Rathwell, June. 85— J. D. Johnson, 
Oct. 18. 86— G. W. Crowther, Dec. 31, 1938 ; J. Scott, Mar. 8 ; C. E. 
Waterhouse, July 9 ; A. M. McCaw, July 11 ; M. Sinclair, July 24 ; W. W. 
Russell, Aug. 8 ; N. J. Brooker. Aug. 29 ; A. F. Smith, Oct. 4 ; W. 
Harpjr Nov. 16 ; E. A. Haist, Dec. 13 ; W. H. Cox, Dec. 19. 87— G. 
Scott, Feb. 26. 88— P. Mclntyre, June 1 ; O. E. Carr, Feb. 23 ; E. W. 
McQuay, Dec. 2. 90— W. J. Honeyford, Jan. 23 ; C. Lowe, Apr. 21 ; 
J. McCannell, June 28 ; J. Turner, Aug. 1 ; A. Mclntyre, July 4. 91— 
W. Bellamy, May 22 ; J. Johnstone, Apr. 19. 92 — H. Woodlaver, Dec. 
30, 1938 ; W. J. Crawford, Jan. 9 ; G. H. Forsythe, Jan. 21 ; J. Pearson, 
Feb. 9 ; J. J. MacDonald, May 9 ; J. McGall, June 10 ; A. E. Hunt, July 
2 ; F. M. Williamson. Sep. 13. 93— W. D. Bradley, May 15. 94— A. C. 
Brown, Jan. 31 ; M. Berry, May 10 ; J. D. Ellison, Oct. 27. 96— P. 
Bremner, Feb. 16 ; G. H. Sewrey, Mar. 19 ; R. W. Burton, Apr. 7 ; W. 
C. Walls, May 17 ; S. C. Walker, Oct. 4. 97— A. Willson, Mar. 11 ; H. 
J. Brooks, Nov. 27 ; C. White, Sep. 27 : R. H. Tillett. July 29 ; S. 
Brown, Nov. 2. 98— H. H. Matson, Sep. 29. 99— G. E. Ayers, Mar. 8 ; 
L. G. Reilly, May 10 ; J. G. Muir, Aug. 19 ; T. D. Stoddart, Sep. 3, 1938. 
100 — E. R. Laing, May 19 ;C. E. Dickson, June 7 ; N. Vickers, June 14 ; 
R. Stott, July 28. 101 — W. G. Morrow, Mar. 13 ; W. G. Henderson, May 
1 : E. H. D. Hall, Sep. 28 : G. B. Boucher, Sep. 30 : A. W. McPherson, 
Nov. 19 ; A. H. Stratton, Dec. 17. 103— S. H. Flanders, Nov. 13 ; J. M. 
Wilkinson, Dec. 17. 104 — J. E. Haines, Apr. 3 ; J. L. Derybshire, May 
29. 105— R. A. Woodhouse, Jan. 26 ; M. H. Biggar, Mar. 11. 107— H. 
Poole, Mar. 8 ; J. W. Crinklaw, Dec. 13. 109— F. R. Leslie, Feb. 20 ; 
F. G. Dennison, May 27 ; G. F. Goodfellow, June 2. 110— W. H. B. 
Dowsley, June 1 ; J. B. Coates, June 11. 113 — L. L. Sovereign, May 8 ; 
A. Stickles, May 20 ; T. H. Duncombe, Dec. 5. 114— H. C. Bailey, Feb. 
11; J. L. Westaway, Mar. 30; M. G. Hancock, June 30; M. F. Wilson, 
Sep. 15. 115— E. F. Hurst, Feb. 25; W. J. Reid, Apr. 13; W. Scull, May 
30 ; F. H. Jory, Sep. 17 ; J. G. Moggach, Oct. 9 ; L. Gulp, Oct. 14. 118— 

E. Aitchison, Sep. 16. 119— P. D. Weese, Mar. 14 ; S. J. Morrow, Feb. 
13 ; C. S. Chambers, Oct. 12. 121— W. H. Fairfax, Jan. 11 ; W. J. Allen, 
Jan. 23 ; H. Baxter, Feb. 6 ; W. E. Phin, Feb. 16 ; J. B. Walker, May 17 ; 

F. C. A. Clayton, Oct. 16 ; J. M. Walker, Oct. 19 ; H. J. Smith, Nov. 5 ; 
W. A. Berger, Oct. 4 ; J. J. Rouse, Nov. 7 ; W. B. Jago, Nov. 24 ; J. 
Allen, Dec. 30. 122— N. McCormack, Apr. 11 ; D. Brownlee, Aug. 11. 
123— J. Campbell, June 2 ; S. T. Legott. Feb. 15 ; W. Christie, Apr. 5, 
J. E. Ketcheson, May 29 ; J. Lorimer, June 9 ; R. A. Choquette, Aug. 19, 
W. N. Ponton, Sept. 6, W. D. Simmons, Oct. 19 ; A. S. Long, Dec. 6. 
12.5— A. E. Jardine, Mar. 13 ; A. Hewitson, Sep. 14 ; E. M. Atkinson, 
Oct. 30. 126— F. Atkinson, Feb. 16. 127— E. E. Moynes, Apr. 25, C. 
M. Hendrick. Nov. 10. 128— G. Thrasher, Apr. 18 ; J. C. Hunter, Aug. 
21 ; R. B. Harri.son, Aug. 26 ; F. Watt, Sep. 20 : H. M. Dover. Nov. 16. 
129— W. J. Stevenson. Jan. 22 ; S. C. Taylor, Jan. 10 ; J. W. Fo-c, Feb. 

17 ; E. V. H. Underhill. Nov. 12. 131— J. D. McLeod, Sep. 13 ; A. 
McNeill, Oct. 7. 133— A. O. Musser. Aug. 31. 135— A. A. Armstrong, 
Feb. 27 ; S. Wilson, Oct. 17. 137— F. H. Finley, Mar. 2 ; W. M. Dillon, 
May 2 ; J. W. Horsley, June 17. 139— R. M. Armstrong, Apr. 14 ; A. R. 
McLean, Mar. 11 ; D. Smith, Apr. 25. 140— F. Eggleton, Mar. 22, W. 
Baker, June 10 ; C. H. Minard, Oct. 16. 141— A. Robinson, Feb. 28 ; 
J. H. Colquhoun, Mar. 2. 143— H. D. Knox, Aug. 7 ; J. H. Grisdale, 
Aug. 24 ; H. R. Seely. Dec. 5. 144— H. F. Johnston, June 14 ; F. Mingav, 
Aug. 9 ; J. Abray, . Sep. 15 ; A. R. Vivian, Nov. 6. 145— G. S. Carvetn, 
Apr. 15 ; W. A. Jakeman, Nov. 20. 146— L. J. Innis, Feb. 28 ; J. E. 
Slade, May 7 ; A. A. Aylesworth, Nov. 30 ; E. Richardson, Sep. 7. 147^ 
W. L. Campbell, Apr. 17 ; G. B. Horton, Nov. 4. 148— E. F. Drake, 
May 8 ; C. C. Caldwell, June 1 ; H. D. Marshall, June 15 ; A. G. W. 
Duncan, Sep. 12. 149— E. L. Horn, Apr. 15. 151— O. R. Forsythe, Mar. 

18 ; E. D. Heist, May 15 ; A. H. Cochrane, June 16, C. Huehnergard, 
June 21 ; A. J. Prittie, Aug. 30 ; J. H. Keown, Nov. 22. 153— W. L. 
Travis, Oct. 4 ; T. Simpson, Dec. 25. 154— R. H. Collins, Mar. 9 ; W. 
Young, Mar. 19 ; J. Carter, Mar. 26 ; J. Abbott, Mar. 2. 155— F. Morrow, 
May 31 ; F. J. Metheral, Feb. 24 ; G. Evans, Feb. 28 ; A. A. Ringer, Jan. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 



25 ; J. H. Greer, Apr. 30 ; H. O. Fisk, May 21 ; H. Huffman, May 1 ; 
R. F. Perry, Aug. 11 ; E. H. D. Hall, Oct. 29 ; T. M. Richardson, Oct. 
6 ; J. L. Allen, Oct. 25 : A. Gibson, Oct. 31 ; R. Mann. Nov. 30. 156— 
W. G. Workman, Feb. 18 ; T. E. Kyle, May 17 ; H. E. Ferguson. June 
21 ; J. J. Jackson, Nov. 8 ; T. H. Scott, Sep. 9 ; W. R. McRae, July 4. 
157— G. S. Stuart, Feb. 24. 159— D. A. Brov.-nlee, Feb. 15 ; F. H. Pri^tt, 
June 23. 161— J. H. Johnston, May 4. 162— J. W. Green, April 6. 
165— T. J. Baker, Mar. 21 ; A. W. McGrath, May 14 ; M. E. Manning, 
Nov. 20 ; W. J. Breckon, Dec. 8. 166— J. H. Stevens, Jan. 30 ; F. E. 
Howitt, Aug. 25 ; J. T. Chittick, Sep. 2 ; J. E. Dunham, Dec. 7. 168— H. 
Weller, Aug. 5 ; W. Ball, Oct. 19 ; A. S. Bemiss. Nov. 7. 169— C. Dun- 
ham, Aug. 13 ; R. Mathews, Nov. 5 ; C. D. Winn, Feb. 3 ; G. S. Martin, 
Apr. 12. 170— W. Clark, Oct. 8 ; J. H. Smith, Nov. 14. 174—1. E. 
Nichols, Jan. 5 ; J. L. Beaman, Mar. 24 ; J. Hathway, Apr. 7, W. Mattice, 
Sep. 6. 177 — R. E. Sproule, Oct. 15 ; R. V. Nicholson, Jan. 2 ; H. F. 
Alward, Jan. 13 ; J. N. McWood, Feb. 20 ; J. N. Ferguson, Feb. 22 ; C. 
G. Cameron, Feb. 23 ; G. A. McNeil, Feb. 25 ; R. Robb, Feb. 27 : T. A. 
Brown, May 20 ; J. A. Wallace, July 15. 178— D. McLennan, Mar. 26. 
180— J. Ross, Oct. 14. 1938. 185— P. Senn, Feb. 24. 186— F. W. Dent, 
June 8 ; E. H. McCauley, July 3 ; W. T. Franklin, Sep. 2. 190— A. W. 
Venning, Nov. 30. 192 — D. McDougald, June 17. J. Carruthers. Apr. 21 ; 
W. Martin, June 15 ; W. A. Quibell, Apr. 29 ; F. Smith. Dec. 10 : G. W. 
Gross, Nov. 6 ; F. Pilgrim. Sep. 9 ; W. R. McLean, Dec. 17 ; T. G. King, 
Dec. 10. 193— W. M. Edy, Mar. 18 ; C. Mitchell, Apr. 18 ; W. Smith, 
Oct. 8. 194— M. J. Boges, Mar. 13 ; J. W. McCutcheon. Mar. 24 ; W. R. 
Smith. Mar. 14 ; J. T. Collins. Nov. 12. 195— J. F. Grant. Apr. 2 ; J. 
E. Hughson. Dec. 30. 1938 ; W. F. Babb. Dec. 1. 196— J. P. Jeffrey, 
Oct. 11 ; A. E. deRenzy. Sep. 27. 197— L. Anderson. Sep. 2 ; T. T. 
Gibson. Sep. 7 ; R. W. King. Sep. 4 ; M. Stalker, Oct. 17. 200— A. Dale. 
Nov. 1. 201— W. G. Rogers. Jan. 21 ; H. W. Cooper. Mar. 3 ; A. E. 
Meggs. Mar. 13 ; E. B. Sliter, May 7. 203— W. E. Broley. May 22. 
209A— H. M. Dodsworth, Nov. 3, 1938; F. J. Floyd. Jan. 20; H. B. 
Muir, Jan. 25 ; A. E. Lenox, Feb. 8 ; A. McLean. Oct. 1. 1926 ; T. F. 
Kingsmill. Mar. 1 ; W. S. Westland. Mar. 21 ; W. Prodger. Apr. 22 ; 
H. R. Ferguson, Apr. 25 ; C. S. Fleming, May 21 ; J. L. Roberts. June 
18 ; F. T. Ball. Jan. 24 ; D. L. Carter. Aug. 7 ; O. H. Talbot. Nov. 9 ; 
A. W. Wallace. Dec. 8 ; J. T. Doherty, Dec. 18. 209— W. D. Cooper, 
Nov. 6. 21.5— E. P. Bellyou. May 2 : F. W. B. Russell, Oct. 24. 216— 
W. A. Dorrington, Feb. 10 ; M. C. Hillock, Mar. 11 ; R. J. McConnell, 
Aug. 20. 217— W. A. Crysler, June 12. 218— R. B. Foster, Jan. 17 ; 
A. Cahoon, Apr. 5 ; A. McLean, Apr. 18 ; A. Walls, May 29 ; J. Ferguson, 
Oct. 8 : R. Coupland, Nov. 25. 219— J. McDermid, May 26 ; C. Bescoby, 
Apr. 27 ; E. A. Benham, Sep. 8 ; J. M. Moore. Oct. 30 ; A. C. Robinson, 
Dec. 30 : T. A. Murray, Jan. 8. 1940. 220— E. S. Tavlor. Apr. 5 ; W. T. 
Ryan. May 19; J. H. Johnston.Oct. 3 ; G. E. Gilfillan, Oct. 28. 221— L. 
Morris, June 15 : E. J. Adams, Sep. 16 ; W. G. Baker. Nov. 29 ; J. N. 
Delmer, Aug. 15 ; J. H. Turner. July 25. 222— S. S. McComb, Mar. 2. 
223— R. J. Stuart. Aug. 24. 224— J. Robertson. Nov. 10. 225 E. Chamney. 
Jan. 24 ; J. A. Watson, Feb. 5. 229— J. A. Hewson, Mar. 18 ; W. J. 
Beatty, June 24 ; J. H. Burns, Aug. 29 ; N. R. Carter, Dec. 19. 230— 
J. G. Scott, May 11 ; C. A.Keleey, Jan. 19 ; F. Ravell. June 27 ; A. T. 
Coopar, July 12 ; D. W. B. Spry, July 13. 231— G. Powers, Jan. 29 ; 
H. F. Beaven, May 17 ; J. Morrison, Aug. 26. 233— P. Ravelle, Feb. 
^0. 234— J. A. Parks, May 13. 235— J. M. Hopper. Feb. 2 ; G. J. 
Davison. Nov. 15. 236— W. J. Corbett, Jan. 6 ; W. J. Scott. Mav 7. 
237— W. T. Moore, Nov. 26 ; B. Brian, Aug. 5 ; 239— R. H. Johnston, 
May 5 ; L. W. Martin, Oct. 2. 242— E. T. Scott. Feb. 10 ; J. P. Miller, 
Apr. 28 ; D. S. Clow. Oct. 9 ; E. Tennant, Oct. 6. 245— F. J. Weekes, 
June 24. 247— H. Scott, Jan. 24 ; J. B. Goff, Feb. 19 : R. W. Eyre, 
July 28, 1938 ; P. C. R. Keys. May 4 ; T. C. Kent. May 23 : W. E. 
Robertson. Aug. 6 ; W. N.Ponton. Sep. 6 ; J. H. O. Whittam. Sep. 10 ; 
J. J. Higman. Oct. 30 : J. P. Spragge. Nov. 24. 249— A. E. Clarkson. 
June 3 ; L. L. Brown. Dec. 18. 250— D. A. McLeod, June 12. 253— C. 
E. Kennedy. Jan. 31 ; H. B. Card. June 29 ; A. E. Knapp, Nov. 27 ; D. 
Shannon. Dec. 21. 254— R. H. Smith. Dec. 29. 1938; J. W. Rossborough. 
Apr. 1 ; W. L. Fenwick. Mar. 15 ; J. Harriman. June 8 ; D. A. Smith, 
Oct. 1 ; A. G. Smeaton. Nov. 1. 255— W. T. Crofts, Sep. 29. 257 — 
W. J. Barringham, May 19 ; H. Watson, May 24 ; G. V. J. Greenhill, 
May 29 ; 258— R. Dunbar, Jan. 10 ; G. H. Dennis. Mar. 23 ; T. F. 
Savage. June 28 ; E. M. Stewart, Sep. 27 ; L. T. Phelps, Dec. 18. 259 — 



280 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

D. A. Campbell, May 21. 260— W. L. MacKenzie, Aug. 26 ; W. Clifford, 
Oct. 10 ; W. L. Stewart, Oct. 31. 262— F. F. White, Jan. 31. 263— J. 
H. Bond, June 12 ; R. Hair. Aug. 26. 264— D. Campbell, Jan. 9 ; J. M. 
Dunn, Mar. 17 ; J. A. Donaldson, Apr. 7 ; P. N. Mason, Apr. 13 : D. J. 
McCuaig, Aug. 2 ; C. E. Warner, Sep. 20 ; C. O. Maass, Nov. 15 ; J. H. 
N. Crawford, Dec. 8. 265— O. Cox, May 10; W. J. Nelson, Aug. 3; D. 
W. Nelson, Sep. 11. 266— L. Wood, Apr. 28. 267— D. S. French, Mar. 
29 ; W. R. Greenwood, May 9 ; W. E. Rispin, June 6 ; M. McCormock, 
June 21 ; F. W. Charteris, Aug. 11 : S. Carder, Sep. 4 ; L. H. Holmes, 
Nov. 21. 268— J. Cain, July 11 ; W. J. Kelly, Nov. 4 : E. J. Broad, 
June 26. 269— S. Rumohr, June 2. 270— W. F. Flintoff, Jan. 11 ; A. 

E. Thompson, Mar. 10 ; R. J. Herancourt, Apr. 11 ; E. L. Miller, Aug. 
4; D. S. Hoig, Aug. 7; F. L. Fowke, Aug. 24. 271— A. H. Dyer, Apr. 8; 
T. McQuarrie, Nov. 6. 272 — J. H. Bates, Apr. 5 ; A. W. Richardson, 
June 20 ; G. J. Filman, June, 1939 ; C. Duff, Sep. 22. 274— J. Rigby, 
Feb. 6 ; C. B. Langford, Apr. 1. 276— J. H. L. Thacker, June 14. 27r— 
N. M. Angus, May 21 ; A. E.Ness, Oct. 3. 279— G. Boynton, Apr. 5. 
282 — E. T. Huston, June 29 : A. Finlayson, Sep. 11 ; R. J. Giles, Sep. 
1 ; J. A. McLachlan, Nov. 26 ; G. A. McAlpine, Dec. 16. 283— G. L. 
Raether, Jan. 21 ; H. E. Fairfield, Mar. 30 ; M. A. Day, Aug. 1 ; W. N. 
Ponton, Sep. 6 ; E. N. Baker, Oct. 6. 284— S. Kressler, Apr. 27 ; T. W. 
Bone, Oct. 23 ; D. N. Hackwell, Nov. 6. 285— J. C. Gallagher, Jan. 6 ; 

F. B. Elliott, Apr. 9 ; E. McCracken, Oct. 29. 287— T. Binnie, Dec. 13, 
1938 : S. W. Ray, Mar. 7 ; R. B. Curran, May 2 : J. I. Pratt, May 3 ; 

G. H. Otto, May 26 ; G. M. Campbell, June 12 ; G. W. L. Hawkins, Oct. 
4 ; A. Anderson, Nov. 9 ; W. J. Hodgscm, Nov. 14 ; F. H. Hincks, Nov. 
16. 289— R. L. Tuckey, Jan. 13 ; S. Zavitz, May 4 ; A. Lamont, Nov. 
4. 290— W. C. Hilborn, Dec. 30, 1938 : R. Maxwell, Jan. 14. 291— J. 
Simon, Mar. 21 ; G. H. Ofield, May 13 : C. E. Dickson, June 8 ; W. J. 
Adams. Oct. 25. 292— J. Wells, Feb. 19 ; H. S. Crawford, Feb. 19 ; D. 
McMurchy, July 31. 294— R. G. Stewart, May 24. 295— D. T. Slimmon, 
Dec. 27. 296— W. H. Johnston, Oct. 13. 297— G. A. Roos. Jan. 19 ; 
E. J. Merkel, Mar. 13 ; J. H. Woolner, Mar. 17 ; D. C. Edgar, May 19. 
302— E. S. Brown, Jan. 19 ; H. W. Westaway, Jan. 25 ; R. A. Hamilton, 
Mar. 8 ; F. Turner, Apr. 1 ; E. T. Andrews, May 31 ; A. Tansley, Mar. 
24; C. D. Lloyd, Aug. 13; G. Herbert. Dec. 3. 303— P. W. Scott, June 
13. 304— C. Pickett, Sep. 5 ; R. Warnica, Sep. 23 ; G. D. Shannon, Dec. 
3. 305— C. C. Grubbe. Mar. 17 : J. A. Meldrum. June 24. 306— E. A. 
Dean, Mar. 27 ; G. Kress, Aug. 2 ; E. F. McClocklin, Nov. 24 : W. 
Thomson, Nov. 2. 307— R. Dowding, Oct. 20. 311— A. Frost, Feb. 6; 
W. H. C. Wood, Aug. 29. 313— G. F. Erskine, May 25. 314— W. J. 
Wisdom, Apr. 9 ; W. E. Moore, Feb. 12 ; T. W. Palos. Dec. 20. 315— 
J. L. Taylor, Feb. 18 ; H. Graef, Sep. 23 ; R. Wenger, Nov. 13 ; S. Smith, 
Oct. 3. 316— J. A. MacMurchy, Mar. 6 ; G. E. Membery, Mar. 8 ; M. S. 
Lester, Apr. 21 ; J. A. Montgomery, May 6 ; W. F. Bilger, Aug. 29 ; 
G. H. Graham. Oct. 5 ; E. Bussell. May 19 ; W. R. Anderson, Date 
unknown. 318 — J. R. Livingstone, Jan. 7. 319 — C. R. Evans, Jan. 28 ; 
W. H. Hobbs, Oct. 27. 320— A. McMillan, Mar. 30 ; H. H. Casselman, 
Oct. 2 ; C. W. Casselman, Oct. 6. 321— B. G. Arnold. Feb. 4. 322— J. H. 
Chalmers. Jan. 9 ; E. J. Harrison. May 10 ; A. F. Armstrong. Aug. 13 ; 
A. J. McNab. Nov. 18 ; R. H. Perry. Dec. 15. 323— J. P. McVicar. Mar. 
1. 324— T. C. Haslett. May 12 ; J. C. Crawford. May 26 : F. E. Howitt, 
Aug. 25 ; A. O'Dell. Sep. 16 ; G. H. Carley, Sep. 30 ; A. Sprowson, Oct. 
17 ; D. B. Dewar, Oct. 29 ; G. J. Dunn, Nov. 22 ; R. A. Gilmore, Dec. 
14 ; S. W. Somerville. Dec. 29 ; M. W. Morton, June 4 ; J. A. Tansley, 
June 19. 326— E. M. Klotz, Jan. 23 ; E. J. Powell, Jan. 25 ; J. J. 
Warren. Jan. 28 ; F. J. Stowe, Mar. 27 ; W. Mclnroy, Apr. 18 ; R. 
Connable, Apr. 18 ; M. T. Lester, Apr. 21 ; J. H. Warren, Apr. 25 ; G. 

D. MacAllister, June 24 ; M. J. Cockburn, July 12 ; A. J. H. Eckardt, 
July 28 ; J. Doust, Oct. 6 ; A. E. Skinner, Oct. 7 ; F. Kennedy, Oct. 13. 
329— E. T. Carter, July 16. 330— J. W. Stiling, Mar. 8 ; F. T. Trebilcock, 
Mar. 10 : W. Richman, Apr. 15. 331— H. W. Laird. Dec. 21. 332— W. J. 
Stanford. Jan. 17 ; W. Wharry. Sep. 21 ; W. Shore, Nov. 21. 333— J. A. 
Carruthers, Aug. 25. 336— R. Kerr, Feb. 16 ; W. A. J. Palmer. Aug. 23 ; 
J. G. Lee, Nov. 29. 337— W. Rogers, June 5. 339— M. Hutchinson, June 
23 ; A. J. Allan, June 24 ; A. Gillies, Aug. 15 ; R. Johnston, Sep. 2 ; 

E. McNaughton, Sep. 3 ; A. Liddiard, Sep. 26. 341— G. Clelland, Jan. 
29 ; J. McKellar, Nov. 19. 343— H. P. Kennedy, May 7 : W. S. Hazlitt, 
Dec. 4 ; T. Boyd, Oct. 18 ; C. H. Collins, Nov. 1 ; W. D. Hay, Dec. 5. 
345— C. E. Jack.son, Jan. 3 ; W. Barker. Mar. 15. 346— W. R. Hardy, 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 281 

Jan. 15 ; T. E. Hutchinson, Mar. 14 ; J. Clayton, May 24 ; G. W. Patterson, 
May 28 ; S. E. Faulkner, Dec. 27 ; W. G. B. Duguid, Nov., 1939, R. 
Leckie, Oct. 30 ; I. Smith, Nov. 1. 347— J. C. Templin, Mar. 22 : D. G. 
McGregor, May 31. 348— J. G. Whiteacre, Nov. 21 ; J. E. Belyea, Nov. 6. 
352— J. Campbell, May 18 ; J. Watkinson, June 4 ; F. Smith, July 26 ; 

F. C. Hillis, Nov. 26. 354— F. Halward, Feb. 22 ; C. G. Cowan, Nov. 
18. 357— J. G. Gauld, Mar. 5 ; J. M. Smith, June 14 ; G. H. Bowman, 
July 9. 359— C. A. Dunkin. Feb. 2. 360— G. C. Parlett, Jan. 9. 361— 
R. A. Brooks, Mar. 28 ; J. Curzon, Apr. 12. 364— F. T. Hathaway, Mar. 
3 ; P. A. Griswold, Mar. 19. 367— J. Caslor, Feb. 7 ; W. B. Hall, Feb. 
22 ; J. M. Harvie. Feb. 28 ; F. H. Smith. Apr. 22 ; C. F. Vanhorn, June 
30 ; T. Hobbs, Nov. 25. 368— A. W. Burtch, Jan. 2 ; W. H. Woodrow, 
Feb. 25 ; H. A. Brown, Mar. 2 ; G. Ross, Mar. 17 ; H. A. Clark, Mar. 19 : 
A. G. Davie, Oct. 5 ; J. H. Perkins, Dec. 3 : J. Davis, Dec. 17 ; J. A. 
Herron, Dec. 21 ; J. C. Beecher, Dec. 23. 369— F. J. Hughes, Dec. 15. 
370— O. Brown, Nov. 22 ; H. E. Eyre. Aug. 9. 371— R. H. Lake, Apr. 
10 ; R. W. Stewart, Apr. 26 ; W. J. Holt, June 19 ; R. H. Beck. Oct. 4 ; 
T. A. C. Kennedy. July 19. 373— P. W. Frank. Apr. 16 ; H. C. Herpel. 
Apr. 27 ; G. P. Somerville, May 2 ; G. Patton. Oct. 31. 374— W. L. 
Baynes-Reed, Jan. 27. 375— H. Bradley, Aug. S. 376— T. M. Cullon, 
Mar. 12. 378— J. Newall, Dec. 30. 1938 ; E. Smith, Jan. 2 ; G. R. Scott. 
Jan. 6 : J. H. Hambly. Jan. 11 ; W. Buchanan, Jan. 30 ; H. S. Gartside, 
Feb. 10 ; A. Gordon, Mar. 5 ; A. F. Rawne, Apr. 24 ; J. Daniels. Aug. 
19 ; F. W. Fortner. Aug. 25 ; G. A. Slade. Sep. 15 ; C. H. Parsons. Sep. 
28 ; G. Mulligan, Oct. 9. 379— T. W. Needham. July 28. 380— N. McNeil,. 
Jan. 3 ; H. McKenna, Jan. 21 ; H. Gardener, Feb. 13 ; H. M. Ryan. Apr. 
3 ; G. Angles. June 22 ; J. R. McPetrie. July 26 ; J. Dean. Aug. 6 ; W. 
L. Johnston, Oct. 12. 382— J. Hazen, Jan. 22 ; A. G. Andrews. Apr. 4 ; 
J. T. Truman, July 17 ; R. Thornton, Dec. 5 ; A. H. Lyle. Dec. 29. 383— 

G. C. Ferrier, May 5. 384— J. E. Rogers, Apr. 11 ; W. G. Howard. Mar. 
26; T. H. Bell, Mar. 14; W.H. Reid. May 4; W. Glen-Airston, July 19; 
J. W. Ough, Sep. 29 : W. H. McVicar. Sep. 30 ; A. H. Webster, Oct. 7 ; 
W. E. Ramsey, Nov. 17 ; G. F. Oldfield, Nov. 30 ; H. Freeman, Nov. 28 ; 
R. J. Johnston, Dec. 5. 386— M. Dykes, Apr. 5. 387— J. C. Coveney, 
Jan. 11 ; J. R. Beauprey, Nov. 30. 388— B. Kennedy, Dec. 13. 389— D. 
Leacock, Feb. 28 ; J. Aldrich. Apr. 27. 390— C. H. Carruthers. June 30. 
391— A. G. Peters, Feb. 13; J. Richardson, Mar. 11; A. G. Kennedy, 
Mar. 16 ; J. R. Smith, Apr. 24 ; R. Watson, June 8 ; C. A. Dunkley. Sep. 
23 ; N. Watson. Nov. 20. 392— J. Bright. Mar. 7 ; R. W. Jones. Aug. 23. 
393— A. J. Woelfle. July 17. 394— H. J. Hogg. Feb. 13 : A. W. Morri.son. 
Mar. 10. 395— C. N. Anderson, June 14 ; W. Wallace. Nov. 1. 396— 
J. E. Sutherby, Feb. 24 ; H. R. Hay, Aug. 21. 398— R. E. Smith. Mar. 3. 
400— A. Belyea, Feb. 26. 401— M. Parks, Jan. 7. 403— H. G. Elsey, Jan. 
17 ; A. D. Barr, Apr. 20 ; D. H. Swanston, Apr. 20 ; C. J. Stodgell. Nov. 
12 ; C. Fox, Dec. 24. 405— D. Lunan, Apr. 20 ; C. W. Thomson. June 

25 : M. Rothschild. Mar. 26 ; R. J. Leach, Oct. 18 ; W. Smith. Sep. 12. 
406— H. B. Johnston, Feb. 22 ; W. G. DuGuid. Nov. 4 ; D. J. Hartle, 
Nov. 8 ; C. J. Martin, Dec. 10. 408— G. A. Heron, Feb. 4 : J. Gilpin, 
Nov. 11. 409— R. Watt, Jan. 25 ; W. W. McPhee. Feb. 16. 410— J. S. 
Fyfe, Jan. 17 ; R. J. Fady, Jan. 23 ; J. B. Scharfe. Jan. 28 : F. J. 
Cheesworth. Feb. 21 ; J. W. Wigham, Feb. 28 : A. W. Appleyard. Apr. 

26 ; H. Braun. May 22 ; H. E. Ferguson, June 21 ; W. E. Robson, July 
19 ; R. G. Pointer. Nov. 23 ; W. N. Ponton. Sep. 6 : S. G. Stoothoff, Oct. 

^15. 411— E. F. Pangburn. Nov. 2 ; E. A. Hugill. Nov. 9. 412— F. W. 
Caddy, Jan. 19 ; J. O. O'Flynn, Feb. 9 ; W. E. Wamsley. Feb. 13 ; E. 
Doherty, Apr. 30 ; J. B. Way, July 19 ; E. I. Scott, June 25 : J. A. 
Mitchell, Sept. 2 ; J. T. Ferguson, Nov. 24. 413— C. Heath, Aug. 1, 
1938; C. W. Wrenshall, Feb. 6 ; W. J. Scriven, May 11; D. M. Mulcahy, 
Sep. 3. 414— W. Whitaker, Mar. 22 ; J. R. Dowd, Apr. 22 ; A. Gordon, 
June 4 ; A. K. York, Aug. 7 ; W. Andrews. Nov. 26. 415 — A. J. Campbell, 
Jan. 8 ; R. McGregor, Feb. 9 ; L. L. Peltier, Mar. 7 ; R. A. McManus, 
May 19 ; W. Morrison. Nov. 16 ; E. Bowie. July 1. 417 — J. H. Robinson, 
Jan. 31 ; J. Good. Mar. 26 ; W. D. Armstrong, July 27 ; W. J. Beatty, 
Aug. 23 ; G. A. Walls, Sep. 22. 418— G. W. Sheppard. July 27 ; F. F. 
Munroe. Oct. 27. 419 — J. T. Henderson, July 24. 420— C. D. D. Udy. 
Mar. 13 ; R. G. Boast, Apr. 28 ; G. A. Biers, May 26 ; J. S. Douglas, 
Oct. 26 ; S. J. Cherry. Dec. 14. 422— B. Allen, May 22 ; A. D. Graham, 
Dec. 9. 423— D. Roberts, Mar. 18 ; J. Christie, Nov. 6 : G. H. Windrim, 
Dec. 3. 424— O. M. Gormley, Apr. 27 ; E. C. Jones, July 16. 425— H. 
E. Banks, Sep. 11 ; H. Watson. June 5 ; J. Harris, Sep. 10. 426— A. E. 



282 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Stewart, Feb. 18 ; W. G. Clendenan, Mar. 18 ; G. Gibson, June 2 ; J. H. 
Fulford, June 9 ; C. S. Maharg, July 3 ; J. Jolly, Oct. 7 ; W. Roach, 
Oct. 28 ; R. Whittaker, Nov. 4 ; W. Abernethy, Nov. 23. 427 — A. Ander- 
son, May 2 ; R. Martin, July 17 : W. N. Ponton, Sep. 6 ; G. Duncan, 
Sep. 4 ; G. E. Taylor, Sep. 19. 428— J. A. Hayden, Nov. 16. 430— W. 
L. Baynes-Reed, Jan. 27 : J. Clarke, Mar. 20 ; J. White. Apr. 19 ; T. 
Burns, Jan. 7 ; F. B. Abbott, July 9 ; W. Michael, Sep. 5. 435— J. N. 
Paget, Mar. 6. 437 — G. W. Hardy, June 13 ; A. McLean, Feb. 6 ; E. C. 
Wrighton, Jan. 31 ; J. Skeoch. May 6 ; F. E. A. Couse, Jan. 18 ; A. 
Forbes, May 22 ; E. T. Hill, Dec. 15. 438— H. M. Bennett. Jan. 1 ; W. 
H. Shaw, Jan. 4 ; W. J. Robertson, Mar. 7 : J. H. Cameron, Mar. 7 ; 
S. M. Early, Aug. 31. 439— G. W. Sheperd, July 25 ; B. Wittes, Nov. 3. 
440— W. G. Archer, Oct. 3 ; J. G. Snell, Oct. 7 ; J. H. MacGill, Jan. 19 ; 

D. J. Hartle, Nov. 7. 441— J. P. Graham, Apr. 13 ; T. H. Croskery, 
June 4 : F. T. Stafford. July 29. 443— E. Anderson, Jan. 3 ; W. Car- 
michael, Nov. 30. 445— W. Benson, Feb. 28 ; J. P. Earngey, May 26. 
446— A. Spencer, May 30 ; G. R. Harmeling, June 13 : W. A. Hunt, Sep. 

26 ; D. C. McKenzie, Oct. 21 ; J. Jamieson, Dec. 18. 447 — H. Montgomery, 
July 27. 448 — F. J. Walker, Oct. 14. 450— W. Gwynne, Nov. 4. 451— 
W. M. Magee, June 18 : D. J. Hartle, Nov. 7. 452— A. McRae, Dec. 21. 
453_-VV. W. Bourdot, Jan. 14 ; W. W. Southon. July 9. 454— W. M. 
Kennedy, Dec. 7. 455— T. J. Patten, Jan. 14. 456— J. A. Moffat, June 6. 
457— W. F. Robertson, Mar. 6. 458— A. O. Adams, Mar. 1 ; J. B. Tinkiss, 
Dec. 10. 460— J. Dillon, Apr. 15. 464— J. J. Ruan, Dec. 30, 1938. 465— 

E. Scharfe, July 17. 466— J. Rutledge, Aug. 24. 467— J. J. McKnight, 
Dec. 22. 468— H. McLeish, Jan. 10 ; J. H. Moffatt, Dec. 29, 1938 ; T. 
Ankers. June 19 ; J. Carr, Aug. 4. 469 — E. B. Books, June 19 ; J. Dudley, 
Dec. 24. 470— W. Stephenson, July 17 ; J. H. Holmes, Aug. 22 ; E. B. 
Brown, Oct. 20 ; J. P. Schissler, Nov. 4. 471— H. W. Tufts, Jan. 31 ; 
J. Lennox, Aug. 29 ; L. Mogford, July 10. 472— H. McLean, Jan. 26 ; 
J. Fisher, May 5 ; R. T. Jaffray, Aug. 25. 473— W. H. Brooks, Jan. 24; 
A. H. Harding, July 1 ; A. M. Bond, July 20 ; W. Candler, Nov. 4. 
474 — A. J. Faulkner, June 28 ; N. Neargard, July 18 ; E. J. Farnworth, 
Aug. 23 ; F. R. Lindsay, Sep. 7 ; C. L. Hyney, Dec. 13 ; W. Greatrix, 
Dec. 16. 475— W. B. Marshall, Feb. 10 ; J. McConnell, Mar. 1 : H. 
McKosky. Apr. 29 ; J. Carter, May 14 ; A. G. Bain, Mar. 29 ; W. Hardie, 
Sep. 1 ; E. Roylance, Sep. 8. 477— J. J. Ruan, Dec. 30. 1938 ; R. A. 
Byer, May 7 ; W. J. P. Veale, Dec. 23 ; M. D. Morrison, July 8. 479^ 

D. A. Harris, Jan. 23 ; C. F. McArthur, Nov. 17. 481— F. R. Marshall, 
Jan. 31 ; C. Emery, Apr. 13 ; W. A. Downer. May 27 ; G. H. Bryden, 
July 14. 482— C. H. Jones, Apr. 6. 484— A. M. Taylor, Sep. 14 ; J. A. 
McKenzie, Sep., 1939 ; H. E. Bei-rey, Dec. 10. 485— J. H. McFarlane, 
Jan. 3 ; J. E. McCuaig, Nov. 1. 486— E. S. Webb, Mar. 10 ; A. I. 
Poland, Apr. 17 ; A. T. Clarke, June 22 ; E. J. Bailiff, Aug. 30 ; H. 
Phelps. Nov. 28. 487— P. Lesser. June 3 ; H. C. Hawkins, Dec. 20. 
488— G. W. LeRov, Nov. 24. 489— S. Warmington, Jan. 26 ; P. Corless, 
June 8 ; J. H. Phillips, June 14. 490— D. M. Brown, May 3 : J. W. 
Rutledge, June 16. 491— H. T. Hunter, Jan. 21 ; J. Jackson, June 10. 
492 — C. E. Rawson, Jan. 3 ; J. Kingsborough, Mar. 3 ; J. C. Wolfraim, 
June 29. 494— S. Haslam, Feb. 23 ; W. W. Perkins, Nov. 20. 495— T. 
Dawson, Jan. 6 ; F. J. Howell, Mar. 16 ; W. S. Paterson, Feb. 1 ; F. J. 
Potter, Mar. 3 ; E. G. Richardson. Feb. 22 ; J. Varley. July 6 : E. May. 
June 23 ; A. Saipe, Dec. 20. 496— W. N. Ponton, Sep. 6 : F. E. Coombs, 
Dec. 16. 497— W. Bath, Oct. 16. 498— J. S. Moore, Sep. 25. 499— H. 

E. James, Jan. 5 ; J. W. Watts. June 28 ; G. M. Anderson. Sep. 22. 
500— A. W.Reid. Jan. 31 ; J. F. O'Neil, Feb. 4 ; G. H. P. Walker. July 

27 : G. S. Campbell. Aug. 14. 501— H. McGee. Apr. 10. 502— G. L. 
Griffin, Nov. 3. 505— C. C. Cornell. Oct. 24 ; W. R. Vansickle. May 1. 
506— S. J. Crawford, Apr. 21. 507— A. N. Eraser, Oct. 10 : G. A. Porter. 
Dec. 23 r W. B. Deadman, Feb. 13. 508— F. Webster. Mar. 16 ; J. H. 
Hope, Apr. 15 ; J. A. Scace, Apr. 4 ; R. S. Hope, June 13 ; J. M. Young, 
June 15. 509— G. W. Stewart, Apr. 9 ; H. A. Wells, Apr. 20. 510— J. 
M. Redmond, June 17 ; H. Detlor. June 25 ; 511— H. Stafford, July 27 ; 
G. H. I'Anson, Sep. 25. 512— S. Brown, Nov. 2 ; C. J. Smalley, Nov. 23. 
513— W. M. Johnson, Jan. 30, A. J. Frid, Mar. 29 ; J. D. Nairn, Apr. 6 ; 

5. P. Nuhn, Oct. J. J. Dorsey, Oct. 24 ; A. Beckwith, Dec. 1. 514— 
T. P. Thornton, Feb. 19 ; L. R. VanWert, May 28 ; W. N. Ponton, Sept. 

6. 515— T. Shellard, Feb. 24 ; F. B. Robinson. June 10 ; W. D. Hepton, 
July 21; J. S. Brown, Dec. 6. 516— W. G. Kirby, Feb. 17. 517— R. E. 
Williams, Feb. 11 ; C. H. Lewis, May 12. 519— W. E. Ludlow, Dec. 7. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 283 



520— J. Cockrell, Feb. 22 : E. A. Johnston. Apr. 13 : A. Gillies, Aug. 1 ; 
H. G. Ashton, Aug. 5 ; H. Fitzsimons. Nov. 4 ; S. N. Saba. Nov. 15. 
521— E. R. Myles, Feb. 26 ; A. G. Stephens. May 29 ; J. F. Duncan, July 
19. 522— L. Gilbert. Feb.. 1939; W. Mitchell, Sep. 26. 523— J. H. Miller. 
Jan. 1 ; F. O. Phillips. Aug. 5 ; E. H. D. Hall, Sep. 27 ; A. Gibson, 
Oct. 31. 525— J. F. Judge, Mar. 22 ; H. Cole, May 9. 526— H. C. 
Schroeter. Jan. 22 ; C. E. Living. Nov. 7 ; G. A. Johnston. Dec. 9. 528— 
W. W. White, June 22. 529— W. R. McBlain, Apr. 19. 530— E. M. 
Hobson, May 1. 531 — W. J. Osborne, Feb. 9 ; C. Armstrong, Feb. 27 ; 
H. H. Sparks. Feb. 27 ; J. Woolfreg. Apr. 29 ; G. Warburton, July 1 ; 
M. Sinclair, July 24 ; D. D. MacMillan. Dec. 2. 532— A. J. Russell, 
Feb. 11; C. W. Russell, Feb. 12; W. H. Bailey, Mar. 18; W. H. Belfry, 
Nov. 8 ; A. A. Auld, Nov. 20. 533— H. McGee, Apr. 10 ; F. Storey, June 
23 ; W. F. Bilger. Aug. 9. 535— H. E. Hill. May 18. 537— A. Anthony, 
June 1 ; J. Hutchison, June 22 ; C. L. Williams, Oct. 26 ; W. Fergu.son, 
Sept. 13 ; W. N. Ponton, Sep. 6. 538— W. Stephenson. July 17. 539— 
J. R. Livingston. Jan. 7 ; H. Dearie, Apr. 13 ; A. H. Cochrane, June 17 ; 
J. A. Parks. July 15 ; R. S. Bean. Aug. 10 ; C. W. O'Donnell. Dec. 16 ; 
T. H. Taylor, Sep. 3. 541— C. Mcintosh, Feb. 25 ; T. J. Worsfold, May 
25 ; L. E. Lane, July 1 ; W. N. Ponton, Sept. 6 ; H. I. Simpson. Dec. 15 ; 
W. Forbes, Oct. 4. 545— P. F. Harman. Feb. 7 ; W. N. Ponton. Sep. 6 ; 
P. A. Johnston. Jan. 8 : G. R. Howell. Dec. 5. 546— W. H. Grose. July 
5 ; H. A. Balch. July 13 ; E. Newman. Sep. 20 ; J. D. Elli.'son. Oct. 26 ; 
J. Farley, Nov. 26 ; J. A. Ryckman, Nov. 30. 547— C. H. Collins, Nov. 1 ; 
H. J. Unwin, Oct. 23. 548— F. L. Harris. Feb. 17 ; W. N. Ponton. Sep. 6. 
550 — F. Holloway. Jan. 25. 551 — L. Johnson. Apr. 1 ; C. Millar. June 
14 ; T. A. Roadhouse, July 19 ; F. T. Thomson, July 21. 552— H. Halford, 
Feb. 10 ; H. M. Binns, May 29 ; F. G. Sanders. Apr. 3 ; W. A. Wood. 
Mar. 25 ; T. H. Gibbons, Oct.l6. 553— M. A. Brillinger. June 13. 554— 
A. A. Hudson. Nov. 25. 555 — T. Anderson, Mar. 7 ; J. L. Roberts, June 
19 ; A. Smith, Oct. 14 ; R. M. Harbinson. Nov, 28 : C. O. Nichot. Sent. 
21. 557— S. D. Ouderkirk, Sep. 20. 558— H. W. Chamberlain, Mar. 31 : 
H. S. Ivey, Oct. 2 ; G. Shierlaw. Nov. 27. 559— .A., i^. Sinscr far a-i : 
C. S. Mandel. May 7 ; H. Freifield. July 19 ; W. N. Ponlon, Sept. 6 ; L. 
E. Lane. July 1. 561— W. H. E. Hamilton, May 27. 562— J. Brindle, 
Nov. 21. 563— G. Blackburn. Dec. 16. 564— J. Yuill. Feb. 28 : G. Powers, 
Feb. 29. 565— A. B. Hutchison. Jan. 30; T. Thomson. Jan. 15: J. Gray. 
Feb. 25 ; J. Halworth, Mar. 24 ; A. McLean, Mar. 10 ; W. N. Ponton, 
Sep. 6 ; A. G. Andrews. Nov. 8 ; A. L. Burtch, Nov. 23 : J. C. W. Levark. 
Dec. 9. 569 — A. E. Thompson. July 29. 570— J. Stevenson. Feb. 27 ; 
C. E. Wilson. Mar. 15. 572— C. T. Hattey. Mar. 9 ; A. Cahoon. Apr. 5 ; 
L. E. Lane. July 1 ; J. Ferguson, Oct. 8 ; H. Gooder, Oct. 15. 573— E. 
Thomas. June 18 ; D. K. Mundell. June 14. 574— H. M. Campbell, Jan. 
25 ; N. McMillan. Feb. 28 ; J. H. McKay. Mar. 26 ; A. K. Stewart. Mar. 
30 ; D. A. Stewart, Dec. 17. 575— J. M. Tamblyn. Apr. 3 ; J. H. Parker, 
Apr. 14 ; J. Wilson, July 31 ; W. Flemming, Aug. 3. 576— W. L. Baynes- 
Reed, Jan. 27. 577 — L. E. Lane, July 1 ; J. Jamieson, Sep. 26. 579 — W. 
Owen, May. 1939 : R. J. Keith, May, 1939. 580— R. C. Crawford. Aug. 
23 ; J. B. A. Markham. Aug. 21. 581— C. W. I. Woodward. Date unknown ; 
W. E. Robertson. Aug. 6 ; R. Parker. Oct. 30. 582— D. Adams. Mar. 4. 
.=^83- D. J. McCuaig. Aug. 2 ; J. Thomson. Sep. 13 ; F. E. Lye. Oct. 1 ; J. 
H. Johnston, Oct. 3. 584 — J. Rolloson, June 30. 585 — M. A. Griffith, 
Aug. 9 ■ F. M. Williamson. Sep. 13. 586— J. Angus. Jan. 24; E. Hubbard. 
Mar. 17 ; W. N. Ponton. Sep. 6. 587— J. Jaffray. June 8 : J. A. Gunn, 
Sep. 30. 588— J. H. Scott, Aug. 14 ; J. H. Healey. Oct. 18 ; C. W. Miller, 
Nov. 2. 589— T. B. Perigoe. Jan. 9 ; W. D. McKay. Feb. 8 ; L. E Lane, 
July 1 : W. N. Ponton. Sep. 6. 591— W. R. Young. July 24 ; R. Carman, 
Aug. 6. 592— W. P.. J. Courtney. Dec. 18. 1938; J. M. Christie. Apr. 15; 

C. Chombprlain. May 17 ; W. H. Franklin. Mar. 28. 593— A. G. Bain, 
Mar. 29 ; W. G. Cranston, Feb. 1 ; W. McLea, Oct. 23 ; C. Dumbray, Oct. 
1 ; W. Scott, Dec. 14. 594— J. H. Cooper, Sep. 8. 595— F. W. Utton, 
Jan. 23 ; A. F. McCallum, Aug. 26. 597— W. C. McArthur. July 8 ; 

D. A. Curie. July 21. 600— L. E. Lane. July 1 ; T. H. Shepherd, Dec. 6. 
601— W. J. H. Johnston. June 8 ; J. H. Selman, June 26. 602— T. S. 
Mitchell. Aug. 25 ; E. Wilkinson, Sep. 26 ; T. Leeming. Oct. 13. 603 — F. 
G^rrett. Feb. 12 ; N. Koella. Jan. 21. 605— T. Eldridge, Apr. 26 ; M. J. 
Sinclair, July 24 ; E. Aziz. Nov. 2. 606 — R. G. Broadhurst, July 26. 
607— W. P. Bennett. June 10 ; W. Y. Back, July 8. 610— U. A. Buchner. 
Apr. 13. 611— S. Smith. Feb. 16; J. H. Spence, Feb. 21. 612— W. G. 
Allen, Mar. 15 ; J. K. Fordyca. Juns 23. 013— tJ. H. Randill. A-r. 16 ; 



284 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

A. C. Franklin. Oct. 23. 615— C. Durham, Nov. 14. 616— W. S. Thomp- 
son, June 26. 617 — R. Moggatt, Jan. 16 ; C. E. Hammond, Oct. 24. 618 — 
J. I. Pratt, May 3 ; W. R. Grant, Apr. 25 ; W. L. Harrison, Aug. 19. 
619— G. W. Weese, Jan. 17 ; H. Parker, July 14. 620— R. S. Gee. Feb. 
26 ; B. S. Hooey, Apr. 26 ; R. A. Choquette. Aug. 18 ; W. N. Ponton, 
Sep. 6 ; C. E. Waterhouse, July 7 ; W. A. Wylie, July 30. 623— E. M. 
Murphy, Feb. 28 ; A. E. Johnston. Dec. 3. 625 — E. V. McMillan, June 
28 ; J. B. Way. July 9. 626— R. H. Smith, Dec. 29. 1938 ; J. W. Secord, 
Jan. 16. 627— W. T. Wires. Oct. 27. 629— G. W. Beach. Mar. 23 ; A. 
H. Ireland, Aug. 23 ; W. L. Jackson, Oct. 28. 630— W. A. Cerswell, 
Apr. 30 ; J. A. Copland, May 22. 631— C. R. Langstaff, July 21. 633— 
W. W. Humphries. Mar. 17. 634— H. C. Parker. June 13 ; P. M. Frew, 
Dec. 15 ; W. R. McRae, July 4. 635— D. G. McGregor. May. 31 ; J. A. 
Copland, May 22 ; T. C. Macdonald, Oct. 19. 637— W. Whittaker, Jan. 
13 ; A. Cahoon. May 4 ; J. Ferguson. Oct. 8 : R. Dick. Nov. 30. 638— P. 
J. Giffen. Feb. 19 ; L. Hoyle, June 19. 639— F. A. Neison. May 24 ; J. G. 
Shutler. Oct. 9 ; T. C. Wilkes. Sep. 22. 642— S. H. Croker, Dec. 3. 643— 
J. Gourlay, June 9. 644— E. L. Higgs, May 3 ; T. L. Hughes, Sep. 18. 
645— J. R. Serson, May 29. 646— H. E. Johnston. June 6. 647— J. E. 
Jackson. Feb. 3. 649 — B. J. Hazelwood. Feb. 17 ; L. V. Disney. Dec. 6. 
651— W. J. Waring. Sep. 14. 652— H. Tupholme, Apr. 11 ; W. H. Smith, 
Dec. 16. 653— G. Scott, Feb. 20. 654— J. B. Marlatt, Nov. 26. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1940 



285 



LIST OF GRAND LODGE OFFICERS, 1940-41 

The Grand Master 

M.W. Bro. J. A. Dobbie....- - -.._ -Ottawa 

The Deputy Grand Master 
R.W. Bro. J. A. McRae - ...- Kingston 



The District Deputy Grand Masters 



Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce 

Chatham- 
Eastern 



-C. E. Watkina 

..H. S. Liitich— 

.James D. Potts-. 
.John M. Coutts- 
.Wm. R. aHll 



Frontenac Jas. W. Simmons 

Georgian N. Ray Doolittle 

Grey M. G. Fitzgerald 

Hamilton "A".. Dr. A. E. Barnby 

Hamilton "B" A. E. McArthur _. 

London Jos. W. Carson _ 

Muskoka _Joh n M. Gero w 

Niagara "A".. W. D. Fairbrother 

Niagara "B" W. J. Goodyear 

Nipissing East Dr. H. H. Abell 

Nipissing West Matthew Nisbet 

North Huron Dr. R. C. Redmond- 
Ontario O. W. Rolph 



Fort William 

Brantford 

Dobbinton 

Thaniesville 

- Vankleek Hill 

Chaffey's Locks 

Orillia 

Orangeville 

„ Hamilton 

Hamilton 

London 

Burk's Falls 

Beamsville 

Stamford Centre 

Cobalt 

Capreol 

Wingham 

..Orono 



Ottawa „C. M. Pitts - _ Ottawa 

Peterborough D. H. Webster Lakefield 

Prince Edward Arthur L. Hill - -. _- . Belleville 



Sarnia- 
South Huion 
St. Lawience 
St. Thomas 
Temiskaniing 
Toronto "A" 
Toronto "B" 
Toronto "C" 
Toronto "D" 
Victoria 
Wellington 
Western 
Wilson. 
Windsoi 



Andrew Flynn _.. 

H. B. M. Tichborne -. 

M. R. Hough 

_Ross Tufford 

John W. Fanning 

Albion Maynes - „ Toronto 



Thedford 
. Goderich 
. North Augusta 

St. Thomas 
. Kapuskasing 



Dr. S. S. Crouch- 

N. G. McDonald 

T. R. W. Black 

R. T. Robertson...-. 

H. E. Cosford 

E. E. Jess 



-Toronto 

Willowdale 

Toronto 

Coboconk 

Guelph 

Rainy River 

B. M. Pearce Simcoe 

L. N. Malott Leamington 



The Grand Wardens 

R.W. Bro. M. J. Kinnee _ Maple 

R.W. Bro. G. J. Hinton - -..„- _ Mt. Dennis 

The Grand Chaplain 
R.W. Bro. Geo. F. Kingston 



Sault Ste Marie 

The Grand Treasurer 

M.W. Bi-o. John A. Rowland _ - Toronto 



The Grand Secretary 



R.W. Bro. E. G. Dixon.. 



..Hamilton 



The Grand Registrar 

R.W. Bro. G. S. Warren _ Niagara Falls 



Historian 



M.W. Bro. W. S. Herrington.. 



..Napanee 



286 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



Appointed Officers 

Grand Senior Deacon V.W. Bro. E. 

Grand Junior Deacon V.W. Bro. F. 

Grand Sup't of Works V.W. Bro. H. 

Grand Dir. of Ceremonies V.W. Bro. H. 

Assistant Grand Chaplain V.W. Bro. P. 

Assistant Grand Chaplain V.W. Bro. M. 

Assistant Grand Chaplain V.W. Bro. H. 

Assistant Grand Chaplain V.W. Bro. T. 

Assistant Grand Secretary V.W. Bro. J. 

Assistant Gr. Dir. of Ceremonies V.W. Bro. P. 

Grand Sword Bearer V.W. Bro. J. 

Grand Organist V.W. Bro. E. 

Assistant Grand Organist V.W. Bro. J. 

Grand Prusuivant V.W. Bro. T. 



MacLean.St. Catharines 
Haffner Kingston 

S. Stears Hamilton 

J. Sykes Ottawa 

H. Streeter Aylmer 

Sellars Toronto 

R. Pettem Prescott 

S. Watson Port Arthur 

A. Wilson Port Arthur 

E. Baker Keewatin 

Ferguson Belmont 

L. Treitz Sarnia 

F. McDonald Emsdale 

S. Cooper Markdale 



Grand Stewards 



V.W. Bro. Wm. Anderson Havelock 

W. H. Armitage Sturgeon Falls 

" J. Armstrong Wroxeter 

" J. P. Ballantyne Kapuskasing 



Wm. Boquist 
John Brislow 
T. C. BroN\n 
R. A. Carter 
J. O. Coulter 
A. S. Couper 

G. Davis 

A. J. DeLong 
W. H. Drummond 



Kenora 

Plattsville 

Claremont 

Hamilton 

Thessalon 

Peterborough 

St. Catharines 

West Lorne 

Brockville 



H. Frosch Paris 

Robt. Galbraith Mount Forest 

Jas. Goodman Timmins 

S. B. Gordon Richmond 

S. A. Goring Tavistock 

T. R. Hawkins Hamilton 

T. A. Howson Toronto 

P. C. Hunstein Cargill 

C. A. Hunt Dorchester 

T. G. Idle Thornbury 

Robt. Johnston Ancaster 

J. Kenney Acton 



T. C. Kremer 
J. J. Linton 
Wm. MacBeth 
F. S. Magce 
R. E. Malpass 

E. Manifold 
T. H. Man sell 
John Marr 

F. Mcintosh 

J. H. Mclntyre 



Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Omemee 

Port Credit 

Toronto 

Ottawa 

Toronto 

Acton 

Wardsville 



J. W. McKay _ Muirkirk 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1940 



287 



Grand Stewards 



V.W. Bro. S. R. McKelvey - 

" " J. F. McLean 

" " J. L. McMullan 

" S. R. Mitchell 

" " N. F. Moore 

" W. F. Moiley 

" " O. H. Murray 

" C. W. Newell - 

" J. H. Page...- . 

" V. Pow '. 

" A. Reid 

J. E. Robertson 
Wm. Robertson 

" D. A. Ross - 

" R. F. Rourke 

" Robt. Scarlett 

" F. Scott 

" Herbert Smith . 

" J. R. Smith. 

" " C. E. Stephenson 

" W. J. Stoddait 

" A. Storie 

" N. A. Tice... 

" F. Want 

'• W. D. Wells. 

" B. Whetstone 

" C. V. Wilkins 

" H. F. Wintei 



Beeton 

AUiston 

Windsor 

South River 

Cornwall 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Embro 

Paris 

Toronto 

Fingal 

Niagara Falls 

Toronto 

Elora 

Martintown 

Port Arthur 

Seaforth 

Toronto 

Sharbot Lake 

GormuUy 

Port Hope 

Woodville 

Oshawa 

Wellington 

Niagara Falls 

Londesboro 

Guelph 

Trenton 

Petrolia 



Grand Standard Bearers 



V.W. Bro. C. C. Jones 

V.W. Bro. R. E. Lonnee.. 



Smith's Falls 
Windsor 



Grand Tyler 

W. Bro. G. T. Wild .._'... 



Westboro 



288 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

BOARD OF GENERAL PURPOSES 

President 

R.W. Bro. J. A. McRae 226 Frontenae St., Kingston 

Vice-President 

R.W. Bro. Alex. Cowan _ Barrie 

By Virtue of Office 

M.W. Bro. J. A. Dobbie, Grand Master, Ottawa Civic Hospital.Ottawa 

W. H. Wardrope, Past Grand Master, 35 Glenfern Ave. Hamilton 

J. A. Rowland, Past Grand Master, 320 Bay St Toronto 

" R. B. Dargavel, Past Grand Master, 234 Evelyn Ave. Toronto 
" " W. S. Herrington, Past Grand Master Napanee 

F. A. Copus, Past Grand Master, Bk of Montreal Bldg. Stratford 
A. J. Anderson, Past Grand Master, 2881 Dundas St. W. Toronto 
W. J. Dunlop, Past Grand Master, 608 Jarvis St Toronto 

R.W. Bro. M. J. Kinnee, Grand Senior Warden Maple 

G. J. Hinton, Grand Junior Warden, 1242 Jane St.. Mt. Dennis 
" " Geo. F. Kingston, Grand Chaplain Sault Ste. Marie 

E. G. Dixon, Grand Secretary, Drawer 217 Hamilton 

" " G. S. Warren, Grand Registrar, 1060 Morrison St. Niagara Falls 
V.W. Bro. H. J. Sykes, Gr. Dir. Ceremonies, 364 Wellington St Ottawa 

Tlie District Deputy Grand Masters 

District Name Address 

Algoma C. E. Watkins, 235 Ross St Fort William 

Brant H. S. Liittich, 259 Erie Ave Brantford 

Bruce - James D. Potts, R.R. No. 1 Dobbinton 

Chatham John M. Coutts Thamesville 

Eastern Wm. R. Hall _ Vankleek Hill 

Frontenae Jas. W. Simmons Chaffey's Locks 

Georgian N. Ray Doolittle, 5 Coldwater St. E Orillia 

Grey _.M. G. Fitzgerald Orangeville 

Hamilton "A" Dr. A. E. Barnby, 16 Leinster Ave. S... Hamilton 

Hamilton "B" A. E. McArthur, 87 Erie Ave Hamilton 

London Jos. W. Carson, 689 Colborne St London 

Muskoka John M. Gerow Burk's Falls 

Niagara "A" W. D. Fairbrother Beamsville 

Niagara "B" W. J. Goodyear, 570 Portage Rd. Stamford Centre 

Nipissing East Dr. .H H. Abell, Box 213 Cobalt 

Nipissing West Matthew Nisbet, Box 151 Capreol 

North Huron Dr. R. C. Redmond Wingham 

Ontario O. W. Rolph Orono 

Ottawa C. M. Pitts. 349-A Elgin St. Ottawa 

Peterborough D. H. Webster, Box 555 Lakefield 

Prince Edward. Arthur L. Hill, R.R. No. 8 Belleville 

Sarnia Andrew Flynn Thedford 

South Huron H. B. M. Tichborne, Trafalgar St. Goderich 

St. Lawrence M. R. Hough North Augusta 

St. Thomas ._Ross Tufford. R.R. No. 1 _ St. Thomas 

Temiskaming John W. Fanning, 13 Bouman Ave Kapuskasing 

Toronto "A" Albion Maynes, 322 Quebec Ave. Toronto 

Toronto "B" Dr. S. S. Crouch, 123 Glenayr Rd Toronto 

Toronto "C" N. G. McDonald, 48 Parkview Ave Willowdale 

Toronto "D" T. R. W. Black, 95 Dunvegan Rd Toronto 

Victoria R. T. Robertson , Coboconk 

Wellington H. E. Cosford, 392 Woolwich St Guelph 

Western E. E. Jess _ Rainy River 

Wilson .B. M. Pearce Simcoe 

Windsor L. N. Maoltt Leamington 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 289 

Honorarj Members 

R.W. Bro. Alex Cowan _ - _ Barrie 

C. E. Kelly, 73 Melrose Ave. S. Hamilton 

J. B. Smith, 1005 Maitland St. .....London 

" " G. C. Bonnycastle Bowmanville 

Elected by Grand Lodge 

R.W. Bro. Dr. B. F. Nott. Box 55 _ North Bay 

W. D. Love, 40 Craig St London 

T. H. Simpson, Birks Bldg. Hamilton 

C. W. Robb, 8.3 Alberta Ave Toronto 

" " John Ness, 83 Chatsworth Drive Toronto 

C. S. Hamilton, 302 Bay St _ Toronto 

E. T. Howe, 969 London St. W Windsor 

Smith Shaw, 223 Evelyn Ave - Toronto 

Dr. O. J. Newell, 323 Wentworth St. S Hamilton 

" " W. C. N. Marriott, 171 Powell Ave - Ottawa 

Appointed by Grand Lodge 

R.W. Bro. R. A. Stewart, 496 Windermere Ave. _ Toronto 

C. M. Forbes _ Perth 

G. H. Jefferson Clinton 

C. E. Clements, 121 King St. W. Chatham 

" " H. S. Tapscoit, 109 East Ave. Brantford 

V.W. Bro. A. P. Freed, 329 Van Norman St. Port Arthur 

R.W. Bro. H. J. Alexander, 165 Rosemount Ave - Weston 

" " J. P. Maher, .5 Nina Ave _ Toronto 

T. C. Wardley __ Elora 

And for one year 

R.W. Bro. N. C. Hart, 959 Maitland St _ London 



COMMITTEES 
Audit and Finance 

R.W. Bro. C. S. Hamilton (Chairman) ; R.W. Bro. B. F. Nott. W. D. 
Fairbrother, N. G. McDonald, E. E. Jess, J. W. Car.son, R. T. Robertson, 
G. J. Hinton, H. S. Liittich, G. S. Warren, J. M. Gerow. 

Condition of Masonry 

R.W. Bro. W. C. N. Marriott (Chairman) ; R.W. Bros. N. R. Doolittle, 
W. J. Goodyear, M. Nisbet, A. L. Hill, M. J. Kinnee, O. W. Rolph. 

Warrants 

R.W. Bro. E. T. Howe (Chairman) ; R.W. Bros. G. C. Bonnycastle, 
C. E. Watkins, M. G. Fitzgerald, H. J. Alexander, V.W. Bro. H. J. Sykes. 

Benevolence 

R.W. Bro. T. C. Wardley (Chairman) ; M.W. Bro. R. B. Dargavel, 
R.W. Bros. H. S. Tapscott, C. M. Forbes. O. J. Newell, C. E. Clements, 
J. P. Maher, E. T. Howe, W. D. Love, R. C. Redmond, A. Maynes, T. 
R. W. Black. A. E. McArthur. C. M. Pitts, D. H. Webster, V.W. Bro. 
A. T. Freed. 



290 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Grievances and Appeals 

R.W. Bio. T. H. Simpson (Chairman) ; M.W. Bros. W. H. Wardrope, 

J. A. Rowland, R. B. Dargavel, W. S. Herrington, F. A. Copus, A. J. 

Anderson, W. J. Dunlop, R.W. Bros. Alex. Cowan, E. G. Dixon, Smith 
Shaw. J. M. Coutts, W. R. Hall. A. E. Barnby. 

Constitution and Laws 

M.W. Bro. W. H. Wardrope (Chairman) ; M.W. Bros. J. A. Rowland. 
R. B. Dargavel. W. S. Herrington, F. A. Copus. A. J. Anderson, W. J, 
Dunlop. 

Fraternal Dead 

R.W. Bro. Smith Shaw (Chairman) ; R.W. Bros. C. E. Kelly. J. D. 
Potts, H. B. M. Tichborne, M. R. Hough. J. W. Simmons. R. Tufford, 
O. J. Newell. 

Printing 

R.W. Bro. W. D. Love (Chairman) ; R.W. Bros. J. B. Smith. A. 
Flynn, G. H. Jefferson, L. N. Malott. 

Masonic Education 

R.W. Bro. C. W. Robb (Chairman) ; M.W. Bros. W. S. Herrington. 
W. J. Dunlop, R.W. Bros. E. G. Dixon, N. C. Hart. John Ness. C. E. 
Clements, B. M. Pearce. G. F. Kingston. H. H. Abel. J. W. Fanning, 
H. E. Cosford. R. A. Stewart, G. H. Jefferson. A. Maynes, H. B. M. 
Tichborne. M. Nisbet. 

Library 

R.W. Bro. John Ness (Chairman) ; R.W. Bros. A. Maynes, S. S. 
Crouch, N. G. McDonald, T. R. W. Black, R. A. Stewart. 

Fraternal Correspondence 

M.W. Bro. W. S. Herrington, Chairman. 



m> ' lft<Dt*cco5 0wc^«-*lntor^cooJO,HWcr^^o«D^-ooo>Or^Mrt3;l£5cg^-o050TH^^cO'4^lO 

ri*)-)^ O QO<30O0OO0O00a0X00QOQOC)0a0XO0OOoo00a0(X}00O0XO0 0000COO0O0Q0QOCOa0 0OO0O00000 00GO00 







a! ° ""S 
Eh ^1 f4 M H Q K K Q (*5>! *< Q 03 Q 






SpQ 

i-idi-;Qi-s' 







o o • 



►^of5h,-w^-doodudoo'^'-'fcJSSS(^'d^o^QQH<^^HJiJpQ*<»-ift!K<i^W 



m •mmojojoimmmmminmramoimmmcCCCCecCCCCCCCCCCCCCSa 
, fc. ., 'E 'E 'E 'E '<^ 'E 'E 'fc. 'E 'i- 'E 't. 't. 'C 'E 'p 'C 'E o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o 

WommpiMPqmwwmpq'MPQPQMpq'mMtt'h^Hji-Jh^Hjh^HjH^h-jHjH^ 



CS~-3SS^'"^'5v.*JSH'lH<tH<M<»-i<«>«'*-.>l-.CCtJUUOtlOOOOOOOUOOI 






Si > 

■50 



O 



OS 



Wl^'■«iE-i 



CO . . . m . -cc •..»•.>,- „ 

H o t: >.fes i! c ■"'"•^ " •o'CtioJ • • c oj oj <u OS 
►-5o3>S;'2'''<ii °* t^ D-— (D >> S V !3 t' ►'3t<fe'""cfe 
5l^gS^ES3fcES2^Sg§§gt^^Som^r':5^-So :sn 



,9 0) 






' ciJ to ■ " « 

•^ tl£ O 'H 
.CO • 



° S • '5 -o 3 

„fci.S'(U — CC.!< 




fcfaqHtfWw-^ii^Mi-ifeti^Himp^dwdcqQaj&.K^fqdpiHj-^^KiHiK^ 



)o o o o j 
Q. c a p< 2 



u tM m n 



2 C^ -a J5 c e c c > > > > 3 3 a . . .f< « a''2'2SiJ 

S CCtjKWwajWMMMWwEEE""'^""'^ 



. a c 



>, >> >.J3 J3£;* 



gg.S^«Sgg.§:2 



•««oof 



A.O 



3|m«MdQWwm'M<!<<<i<i^'|'I^&lK^-ww<j-<;gS^;is««t^tH-j^-p^,^^ 



o o o o o 



a C B C 
o o o o 

Ci£b£'DO bo O O O 5 

C C c C mm mm 

■S'SssesII 



CCCCOOq -CCC 



■ se 



.oaojw 



O^ 












c a • • • • 

o O • • • " 
lo n c C 4) « 



s . . 



^^w 






WjSbhSbSSt 






jSW 



MW^-^-JioiS 



e c „ _ 
•^ " J3 .2 — " 

tl ^g_3 a-g'g 



(tip; 






■i-Ji-sf 

00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 0000 00 00 X 0000 00 0000 M 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 0000 X 00 0000 00 00 0000 oo 



) o iH cs P5 ■«)< in «5 

3Q0OOQ0O0OOO00O00 



OS? 






" *■- -^ - " C O o^ '-^ • 



■g •& :5>> -^g : : :2: :5 : : 



•^- • -o • o 
•- ' - at. , 

~5 C ! 






'BCCBCCCCCcBBCcCCCB 
rtoJ«flcdrtcdrtrttac^c^rtctf(flctfedct)edBBoB 



• E 



OS 



0000000 ■••• -EBBBacBBBcBWltlOMUlEltiacUIMlMltillUjtiilWlSMUItilJMOoxO 
mrammra«oi>>>.>>>.>>cEBBcEBBcccooooooooooooOoOoOQX><~>< 



'-j'^'^^'-i'^'^. 



,;ajtiiaiajKKc4K;p{ciic5'=^(^'(^c4(^^>>.^^.^&>>>>>p=^^^^^Mc^^« 



TS-o-o'O'dTj s'H 



a}a)o>a>aja>a}a''Va>aj^vaJa>a)ajva;aja>cja>aja^aja>a}VmEcS 

EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEBEEceijSS 

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 . . . 



o o o o o 



<<!<!<:«< 








o 



3 cO 



<iw6s<iHMP:f:>;W'-iwei4'-'^Ww'd&^^^fcH!iidfc 



■a-o 
. o o 






ajiUmSMtJ] 55 • •'"'" • •tct-33cc • -CE ■ •22mm ■ OOdftOJajoa; 






■ • ••o'd 
. • • fci I. 

.••00 

, CB .'"^SS .--*--.-, fear 
o o 



. o o 



• <u a BE •• 

•o-S-ti-t _• • "vHSB • ■ S "3 • • • • 

rggSSgg : :•§■§ : :>>^^ : ■ZSad'o^ 
-■H-S g 8|| as.1 §£ £ SSI-S § 3 fe S °s|S 

o o o n > &.-e-e l^ h fc fc Q.Q.'O'O B EJ3X! 
BE 3 300 



oS 






S»-l a> 5 (»C»0>2 0000000000rtT-(,-lrtrHr-(rtr-(.-lr-ICMINNO»MMMW(NC<MCOP5COS2MCOCOM2:'* 
U W ♦J rt "-1 i-l "H r-( rt rt iH r-liH rH >H iH iH F-( tH r-l r-( tH r-l r-liH tH rH r-( .H >H tH r-l rt iH rt r-l .H rH rt r-( rH r-l r-l r-(r-l rH i-< rt 



294 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

HONORARY OFFICERS 

♦Henry T. Backus Michigan 1857 P.G.M. 

♦Philip C. Tucker Vermont _ 1857 P.G.M. 

•Michael Furnell Ireland 1857 — P.D.D.G.M. 

♦Robert Morris Kentucky 1858 P.D.G.M. 

♦Thos. .G Ridout Toronto .1859 P.G.M. 

♦Aldis Bernard _ Montreal - 1860...... P.G.M. 

♦Thomas Drummond __ .1862 P.G.J.W. 

*John H. Graham Richmond ....1864 P.G.J.W. 

*Jas. V. MacKey Ireland. 1867 P.G.S.W. 

* Brackstone Baker England — - 1868 P. G. S. W. 

•Sir John A. Macdonald Kingston 1868 P.G.S.W. 

•John V. Ellis New Brunswick 1869 P.G.S.W. 

♦Rev. C. P. Bliss New Brunswick 1871 P.G. Chap. 

♦Wm. H. Fraser Wisconsin 1873 _ P.G. Reg. 

*H. A. MacKay -...Hamilton 1873 P.G. Reg. 

*Thos. White, jr Montreal 1874 P.G.M. 

*J. A. Lockwood _ New York. 1882 P.G.S.W. 

•Otto Klotz .„.. Preston 1885 P.G.M. 

•Geo. C .Patterson Toronto -.1 1897 P.G. Reg. 

*T. R. Barton Toronto. 1897...... P.G. Reg. 

•J. J. Ramsay .. Toronto 1897 P.G. Reg. 

•Kivas Tully Toronto.- _ 1897 P.G.M. 

* W. A. Sutherland New York - 1900..... P.G.M. 

•J. J. Mason _ Hamilton 1900 P.G.M. 

•Chief Justice Gerald Fitz- 

Gibbon Ireland 1900 P.G.S.W. 

•R. L. Shriner Toronto 1900 _ P.G. Reg. 

•Alex. Patterson Toronto 1901 P.G. Reg. 

H.R.H. Duke of Connaught England 1902 — P.G.M. 

•Lord Ampthill - England -.. 1919 — P.G.M. 

Gerald Fitzgibbon. K.C Ireland - - 1920 P.G.S.W. 

Rt. Hon. Lord Desborough, 

K.C.V.O England _ 1920 -P.G.S.W. 

Stanley Machin, J.P Englnad 1920 P.G.S.W. 

Jas. H. Stirling Ireland 1920 — P.G.S.W. 

A. Cecil Powell England 1920 P.G.J.W. 

John Dickens England 1920 P.G.J.W. 

R. F. Richardson Strathroy 1920 P.G. Reg. 

•Sir George McLaren Brown. England 1921 P.G. Reg. 

Sir John Ferguson _ England - 1923 P.G.S.W. 

H. Hamilton.Wedderburn England - 1923 P.G.J.W. 

Arthur E. Carlyle England 1923 P.G.J.W. 

•Dudley H. Ferrell Massachusetts ...1923 -P.G.M. 

Chas. Ramsay .Massachusetts 1923 P.G.S.W. 

Frank H. Hilton Massachusetts.-.- 1923 P.G.J.W. 

A. Beitler „ _ Pennsylvania 1923 P.G.M. 

S. W. Goodyear -Pennsvlvania 1923 P.D.G.M. 

•George Ross Toronto 1925 P.G. Re*?. 

•Chas. B. Murray Toronto 1925 P.G. Reg. 

•Sir Alfred Robbins .England 1927 P.G.S.W. 

Earl of Stair.. Scotland 1931 P.G.M. 

Lord Donoughmore. Ireland 1931 P.G.M. 

Viscount Galway _ England 1931 P.G.S.W. 

Canon F. J. C. Gillmor England 1931 -P.G. Chap. 

J. Bridges, Eustace England 1931 P.G. Reg. 

Robt. J. Soddy England .1933 P.G.S'd. 

Gen. Sir Francis Davies England 1938 P.D.G.M. 

Canon Thomas T. Blockley England 1938 P.G. Chap. 

Rt. Hon. Viscount de Vesci.._ England 1938 - P.G.S.W. 

Major R. L. Loyd England 1938 P.G. Reg. 

Raymond F. Brooke Ireland 1938 P.D.G.M. 

Rt. Hon. Lord Farnham .Ireland 1938 _ P.G.S.W. 

Dr. W. E. Thrift -Ireland 1938 P.G.J.W. 

Gen. Sir Norman A. 

Orr-Ewing Scotland 1938 P.G.M. 

T. G. Winning Scotland 1938 P.G.J.W. 

Joseph E. Perry Massachusetts - 1938 P. G.M. 

Reginald Harris Nova Scotia 1938 P.G.M. 

Norman T. Avard Nova Scotia 1938.... P.G.M. 

E. C. Cooper England 1940 P.G. Reg. 

•Deceased 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 295 

LIST OF GRAND LODGES 
With Name and Address of the Grand Secretaries 

The United Kingdom 

England Sydney A. White I,ondon 

Ireland _ H. C. Shellard Dublin 

Scotland T. G. Winning Edinburgh 

Dominion of Canada 

Alberta ...J. H. W. S. Kemmis Calgary 

British Columbia Frank S. McKee Vancouver 

Manitoba J. H. G. Russell ...Winnipeg 

New Brunswick R. D. Magee St. John 

Nova Scotia -..James C. Jones ...Halifax 

Prince Edward Is C. M. Williams Charlottetown 

Quebec W. W. Williamson Montreal 

Saskatchewan Robt. A. Tate Regina 

Other British Countries 

New South Wales..-J. S. Miller „__ Sydney 

New Zealand - H. A. Lamb ™Christchurch 

Queensland Leslie P. Marks Brisbane 

South Australia ..R. Owen Fox Adelaide 

Tasmania _ W. H. Strutt ..Hobart 

Victoria ,Wm. Stewart Melbourne 

Western Australia A. E. Jensen ....Perth 

United States of America 

Alabama Guy T. Smith Montgomery 

Arizona H. A. Drachman Tucson 

Arkansas .-W. A. Thomas Little Rock 

California .^John Whicher San Francisco 

Colorado Chas. A. Patton Denver 



296 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Connecticut „.Winthrop Buck Hartford 

Delaware C. R. Jones Wilmington 

Dist. of Columbia J. Claude Keiper Washington 

Florida „..Geo. W. Huff Jacksonville 

Georgia Frank F. Baker Macon 

Idaho - Curtis F. Pike Boise 

Illinois R. C. Davenport ......y Harrisburg 

Indiana Wm. H. Swintz ...Indianapolis 

Iowa - Chas. C. Hunt Cedar Rapids 

Kansas G. F. Strain Topeka 

Kentucky A. E. Orton Louisville 

Louisiana _ D. P, Laguens New Orleans 

Maine C. E. Leach Portland 

Maryland - H. C. Mueller Baltimore 

Massachusetts Frank H. Hilton Boston 

Michigan F. H. Newton Grand Rapids 

Minnesota John H. Andersosn St. Paul 

Mississippi Sid. F. Curtis _.. Meridian 

Missouri Arthur Mather St. Louis 

Montana L. T. Hauberg Helena 

Nebraska Lewis E. Smith Omaha 

Nevada ...E. C. Peterson Carson City 

New Hampshire J. M. Dresser Concord 

New Jersey Isaac Cherry Trenton 

New Mexico A. A. Keen Albuquerque 

New York Chas. H. Johnson New York 

North Carolina J. H. Anderson -..Raleigh 

North Dakota ...Walter L. Stockwell Fargo 

Ohio _ Harry S. Johnson Cincinnati 

Oklahoma _ C. A. Sturgeon - Guthrie 

Oregon _..D. R. Cheney Portland 

Pennsylvania Matthew Gait, Jr _ Philadelphia 

Rhode Island _..H. L. McAuslan Providence 

South Carolnia 0. Frank Hart Columbia 

South Dakota W. D. Swain Sioux Falls 

Tennessee T. E. Doss Nashville 

Texas W. D. Pearson Waco 

Utah S. H. Goodwin Salt Lake City 

Vermont A. S. Harriman Burlington 

Virginia Jas. M. Cliff Richmond 

Washington Horace W. Tyler Tacoma 

West Virginia I. W. Coffman Charleston 

Wisconsin Wm. F. Weller , - Milwaukee 

Wyoming „.J. M. Lowndes Casper 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 297 

Other Countries 

Bahia A. A. DaSilva Bahia 

Chile R. C. Oliveria Santiago 

Colombia 

Barranquilla Gualberto Barba Barranquilla 

Colombia Bogota Americo Camicelli Bogota 

Colombia CartagenaA. J. Valverde _ Cartagena 

Costa Rica G. F. Bowden _ San Jose 

Cuba _L. M. Reyes Havana 

Denmark _..A. T. Troedsson Copenhagen 

Ecuador ...Clodoveo Alcivar Guyaquil 

France, Nationale ...G. H. Hargreaves Paris 

Guatemala Pedro Bonis Guatemala 

Mexico York F. T. Berger Mexico City 

Netherlands A. F. L. Faubel ..The Hague 

Norway J. P. Graff- Wang Oslo 

Panama M. Solis Panama 

Para A. N. de Figueiredo Para 

Paraiba J. C. C. Nobrega Paraiba 

Peru Pedro F. Rodo Lima 

Philippines T. M. Kalaw Manila 

Porto Rico R. R. Pabon San Juan 

Sweden R. v. Heindenstam Stockholm 

Switzerland Arnold Wirth Basle 



296 GRANP LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

GRAND REPRESENTATIVES OF THE GRAND 

LODGE OF CANADA, NEAR OTHER GRAND 

LODGES 

The United Kingdom 

England Viscount Galway Wellington, N.Z. 

Ireland Gerald Fitzgibbon, K.C.Dublin 

Scotland ...P. MacAuslan Lanark 



Dominion of Canada 

Alberta J. A. Jackson _ Lethbridge 

British Columbia W. C. Ditmars Vancouver 

Manitoba W. D. Lawrence Winnipeg 

New Brunswick J. B. M. Baxter iSt. John 

Nova Scotia J. H. Winfield Halifax 

Prince Edward Is T. Gordon Ives Charlottetown 

Quebec _ A. F. C. Ross Montreal 

Saskatchewan A. S. Gorrell Regina 



Other British Countries 

New South Wales D. Cunningham Sydney 

New Zealand Sir Stephens S. Allen Morrinsville 

Queensland Abraham Hetzberg Toowoomba 

South Australia T. Phelps Adelaide 

Tasmania H. J. Wise Hobart 

Victoria Walter Kemp Melbourne 

Western Australia H. B. Collett Perth 



United States of America 

Alabama Ethridge J. Garrison Ashland 

Arizona Louis G. Moyers Globe 

Arkansas M. E. Bradford Little Rock 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1940 299 

California _..Earl Thaxter Los Angeles 

Colorado _„E. J. Wittelshofer Denver 

Connecticut A. W. Keeier Norwalk 

Delaware F. W. Ireland Ellendale 

Dist. of Columbia Wm. T. Ballard Washington 

Florida Jesse C. Clark Pensacola 

Georgia P. I. P. Edenfield Millen 

Idaho M. W. Kelley Gooding 

Illinois _S. O. Spring Chicago 

Indiana ......Orvis A. Dellinger. Fort Wayne 

Iowa ...E. A. Westfall iVIason City 

Kansas George 0. Foster Lawrence 

Kentucky Fred Acker Paducah 

Louisiana D. H. Selph Bunkie 

Maine J. Abernethy West Pembroke 

Maryland _..H. B. Wright Baltimore 

Massachusetts ...H. C. Pollard Lowell 

Michigan W. H. Parker Otisville 

Minnesota Herman Held Mankato 

Mississipi Thomas Q. Ellis Jackson 

Missouri Robt. C. Duffin St. Louis 

Montana Geo. P. Porter Helena 

Nebraska - Edward F. Carter Lincoln 

Nevada ...V. G. Kester Reno 

New Hampshire H. C. Edgerton Hanover 

New Jersey Ernest A. Reed ...Newark 

New Mexico Arthur C. Culver Albuquerque 

New York Dana B. Hellings Buffalo 

North Carolina H. M. Poteat Wake Forest 

North Dakota Wm. W. Shaw Enderlin 

Ohio Geo H. Hess Springfield 

Oklahoma Guy F. Blackmer Miami 

Oregon ...Percy R. Kelly Salem 

Rhode Island Clarence P. Bearce E. Providence 

South Carolina Arden A. Lemon Harnwell 

South Dakota M. E. Crockett Sisseton 

Tennessee Geo. R. Martin ...Winchester 

Texas Elmer Renfro Fort Worth 

Utah ...Robert J. Turner Price 

Vermont L. P. Wilkins Rutland 

Virginia Wm. S. Pettit Richmond 

Washington Ford Q. Elvidge Seattle 

West Virginia Geo. W. McClintic Charleston 

Wisconsin Wallace M. Comstock... Oconto 



300 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Other Countries 

Bahia _ 

Chile _..A. I. Palma _ Saetago 

Colombia Alex. S. Hamilton Barranquilla 

Barranquilla 

Colombia Bogota A. Carnicelli Bogota 

Colombia Cartagena. W. R. Blackmore Mexico City- 
Costa Rica _ 

Cuba — .Jose L. Vidaurretta Havana 

Denmark __Wm. Mailing Copenhagen 

Ecuador Ramon G. Martin Guyaquil 

France, Nationale A. V. Clark Paris 

Guatemala Bernardo A. Tello Guatemala 

Mexico York 

Netherlands Dr. A. M. R. Beguin The Hague 

Norway A. B. Laurentzon Oslso 

Panama Chas. Qvistgard Colon 

Para 

Paraiba, BraziL A. de A. Simoes Paraiba 

Peru Eduardo Laverque Lima 

Philippines Quintin Paredes ...Manila 

Porto Rico Antonio Corretjer, Jr.... Ponce 

Sweden 0. A. E. Lithander Gothenberg 

Switzerland E. Baumgartner Bienne 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 301 

GRAND REPRESENTATIVES OF OTHER GRAND 

LODGES NEAR THE GRAND LODGE 

OF CANADA 

The United Kingdom 

England ...John A. Rowland Toronto 

Ireland ...Walter S. Herrington Napanee 

Scotland - Wm. H. Wardrope Hamilton 

The Dominion of Canada 

Alberta Thos. A. Carson Toronto 

British Columbia Geo. L. Gardiner Toronto 

Manitoba Frederick Cook ♦ Ottawa 

New Brunswick J. A. V. Preston Orangeville 

Nova Scotia ...John D. Spence Toronto 

Prince Edward Is Geo. H. Ryerson Brantford 

Quebec Roderick B. Dargavel... Toronto 

Saskatchewan Ewart G. Dixon Hamilton 

Other British Countries 

New South Wales Walter T. Robb Orangeville 

New Zealand John Boyd Toronto 

Queensland - Alexander Cowan Barrie 

South Australia Andrew M. Heron Toronto 

Tasmania E. W. E. Saunders Toronto 

Victoria A. B. Rice — Toronto 

Western Australia John Stevenson Stratford 

United States of America 

Alabama B. B. Hodge Hamilton 

Arizona Charles E. Kelly Hamilton 

Arkansas - 

California Frank K. Ebbitt Iroquois Falls 

Colorado A.ndrew H. Dalziel Windsor 

Connecticut W. F. Reynolds -..Brockville 

Delaware Robert C. Blagrave Hamilton 

Dist. of Columbia John Wilson Toronto 

Florida ...Harry J. Alexander Weston 



302 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Georgia W. J. Thompson :... Sault Ste, Marie 

Idaho W. H. Gregory :.... Stratford 

Illinois George S. Henry Toronto 

Indiana _ Donald M. Sutherland... Woodstock 

Kansas .'...... T. C. Wardley Elora 

Kentucky F. H. Huffman Fort Frances 

Louisiana H. C. Tugwell Toronto 

Maine J, R. Crocker. Hamilton 

Maryland H. R. H. Kenner Peterborough 

Massachusetts ...F. A. Copus Stratford 

Michigan 

Minnesota J. S. McCuIlough New Liskeard 

Mississippi F, M. Morson Toronto 

Missouri ...Geo. DeKleinhans _ Kitchener 

Montana J. Birnie Smith ...London 

Nebraska W. C. N. Marriott Ottawa 

Nevada —W. R. Ledger _ Toronto 

New Hampshire Gerald C. Bonnycastle... Bowmanville 

New Jersey Wm. J. Moore Toronto 

New Mexico - Wm. Bailey Toronto 

New York A. J. Anderson Toronto 

North Carolina John A. McRae Kingstson 

North Dakota John A. Dobbie Ottawa 

Ohio Geo. Stewart Springfield 

Oklahoma _ R. Reade Davis Toronto 

Oregon C. E. Clements - Chatham 

Rhode Island „ J. Fred Reid Windsor 

South Carolina Joseph C. Bartram Ottawa 

South Dakota _ B. S. Sheldon Toronto 

Tennessee , ._R. B. Pow Fort William 

Texas .....A. W. Baker Guleph 

Utah E. S. Macphail Ottawa 

Vermont Jas. M. Malcolm [ngersoll 

Virginia J. G. McDonald Aurora 

Washington N. F. D. Kelley Toronto 

West Virginia ...Joseph Fowler Sudbury 

Wisconsin Gerald M. Malone ..-..Toronto 

Other Countries 

Bahia A. P. Freed Port Arthur 

Chile Ed. Worth Chatham 

Colombia 

Barranquilla B. F, Nott North Bay 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1940 303 

Colombia Bogota J. H. Burke ..Port Stanley 

Colombia Cartagena. Ernest E, Bruce Kincardine 

Costa Rica - F. Davey Diamond Belleville 

Cuba A. Macomb - Toronto 

Denmark _ Chas. A. Seager ..London 

Ecuador _ J. N. Allan Dunnville 

France, Nationale Chris M. Forbes Perth 

Guatemala r^...:. Wm. J. Attig Hamilton 

Mexico, York H. F. Goodfellow Sault Ste. Marie 

Netherlands J. Owen Herity Belleville 

Norway Axel Knutson Port Arthur 

Panama Walter H. Davis Hamilton 

Para A. D. McRae Vankleek Hill 

Paraiba Albert E. Bottum Babcaqgeon 

Peru - _F. C. Bonnycastle Campbellford 

Philippines P. N. Knight AUiston 

Porto Rico Karl B. Conger Ottawa 

Sweden _ C. H. Reeve Toronto 

Switzerland John O'Connor Toronto 



FOREWORD 

1940 



A DISAPPOINTMENT awaits those of our readers who 
annually look forward with pleasurable anticipation to- 
wards this part of our Proceedings. In vain will they 
look for the familiar name of M. W. Bro. W. N. Ponton, 
whose facile pen has, for so many years, ably recorded his 
impressions of the progress of the Craft throughout the 
Masonic world. 

For sixteen years he carefully analysed the Proceedings 
of the eighty-eight jurisdictions recognized by our Grand 
Lodge and presented in readable form a summary of the ac- 
tivities of each of them. The magnitude of such a task can 
only be appreciated when we bear in mind that it was not 
a matter of mere routine but called for a discriminating selec- 
tion of those topics which were of interest to jurisdictions 
other than that whose proceedings were reviewed. All this 
he did with scrupulous care, but apart from the subject 
matter so fully covered by him and the commendable method 
adopted in preparing his reviews, his masterly command of 
the English language never failed to elicit words of praise 
from his contemporaries who we believe will gladly concede 
to him the well merited title of Dean of Reviewers. His 
latest production which appeared in our Proceedings of 1939 
may well be given precedence over all other efforts and 
accepted as his masterpiece. When we reflect that this was 
dictated from a sick bed by a brother, physically incapable 
of holding a pen, who had passed his four score years and 
four we marvel at that brilliant intellect which to the end 
held mastery over a body racked with pain and rapidly ap- 
proaching its dissolution. 

Grand Lodge is deeply concerned in its endeavor to 
secure a capable successor, willing to assume the duties of 
the office which will make heavy inroads upon the time and 
talents of the incumbent. The following pages represent the 
work of a committee to whom was assigned the task of 
preparing this year's report. While it may fall far short of 
the expectations of the reader and be severely lacking in the 
delicate touches and eloquent flashes eagerly looked for from 
the pen of M. W. Bro. Ponton yet it is hoped that it will 
be found to contain, in a somewhat condensed form, such 
desired information as could reasonably be expected from 
inexperienced reviewers. 



Fraternal Correspondence and Reviews 
CANADA 1940 



ALBERTA— 1939 

Thirty-fourth Annual Communication held in the City 
of Calgary, June 14th and 15th, 1939. 

Archibald West, Grand Master. 
Total Membership, 10,897. 

Thirteen Past Grand Masters were present. The Grand 
Master of the Grand Lodge of Canada, in the Province of 
Ontario, was a guest and was honoured by election as an 
Honorary Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Alberta. 

M. W. Bro. West has for twenty-three years rendered 
a valuable public service as Bursar of the University of 
Alberta. Of him his biographer says: 

"During his year of office as Grand Master he gave 
particular attention to the business affairs of the lodges, 
striving to impress upon them the importance of members 
keeping in close touch with this part of lodge life, feeling 
that with a better understanding of their own affairs they 
would avoid many expenditures which in the past have been 
a burden. That his work has not been without results is 
apparent; for, he says, 'The financial position of the con- 
stituent lodges is encouraging.' " 

The Mayor of Calgary, R. W. Bro. A. Davidson, in wel- 
coming Grand Lodge, said, in part: 

"However, brethren, I have no intention of speaking at 
length, as I know you have a very heavy agenda to con- 
sider. I think that 1939 will always be remembered as the 
Royal Visit Year. I am sure that all we Masons were de- 
lighted with the ovations extended to our King and Queen, 
not only in this Dominion but in the United States as well. 
This is the first time that a reigning Sovereign has visited 
a Dominion and he came to us not as the King of Great 
Britain and Northern Ireland, but as the King of Canada, 
and as such we welcomed him. I think it is most unfortunate 
that the dictates of custom made it impossible for us as 
Masons to extend to our King, as a member of our Fraternity, 
the honours with which we should like to have met him, but 
there is nothing to prevent this Grand Lodge at this time 
from passing a resolution of loyalty and devotion." 

The following paragraphs are taken from the Grand 
Master's address: 

"Ivanhoe Lodge No. 142 requested a dispensation to 
remove their Charter to the Anglican Mission Hall, located 



4 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

at Coppermine, or as the Hudson's Bay Conipany call it, 
Fort Hearne, at the mouth of the Coppermine River on 
Coronation Gulf, N.W.T., 1,200 miles directly north of Ed- 
monton, being- actually on the Orctic Ocean, and about 150 
miles north of the Arctic Circle. This lodge was regularly 
opened and the first degree was conferred during the after- 
noon of August 30th, 1938. After the ceremony the party 
was flown back to Great Bear Lake and finally to civilization 
by the Acting Junior Deacon, Bro. (Capt.) Wilfred May, 
the General Superintendent of the Canadian Airways Ltd. 

"A brother was elected and installed as Master of his 
lodge. Immediately following installation he left the juris- 
diction and never acted as the Master of his lodge. No ob- 
jection was raised by his lodge to his continuance in office. 
After the twelve months' term his right to the rank of Past 
Master was questioned. Your Grand Master ruled that under 
the circumstances he was entitled to the rank of Past Master 
on the election and installation of his successor. 

"Your Grand Master ruled that a regular meeting at 
which none of the principal officers were present was irregu- 
lar and any business transacted was null and void and of no 
effect, and that the business done must be re-introduced and 
dealt with at the next regular meeting. 

"Our membership figures for the year ending December 
31st, 1938, show a net decrease of 158 as compared with 309 
for the preceding year. Complete details will be shown in 
the Grand Secretary's report. These figures indicate that 
the rather alarming shrinkage of membership of the last 
few years has practically come to an end and we may expect 
in the near future a steady increase to be resumed. 

"The financial position of the constituent lodges is en- 
couraging though Grand Lodge itself, for reasons previously 
stated, is still facing difficulties. 

"It is surprising, in view of the legislation passed at 
the last Annual Communication, that very few lodges took 
advantage of the reduced initiation fee, only eleven taking 
full advantage of the authorized reduction, by reducing the 
initiation fee to $25.00. So the improvement in membership 
statistics must be explained on some other basis than that 
of reduced fees. This means that we have in effect in this 
Grand Jurisdiction, what amounts to a graduated scale of 
initiation fees, according to age, presumed earning ability, 
and financial standing of candidates. The result is sufficiently 
gratifying for me to feel safe in recommending the con- 
sideration of the scheme to other Grand Jurisdictions." 

This is a demonstration of the fact that circumstances 
alter cases. One can imagine what short shrift would be 
given by our Grand Lodge to a proposal to inaugurate a 
graduated scale of fees. 

"It is a particular pleasure to note than an increasing 
number of younger men are being initiated. It is the reasoned 
opinion of your Grand Master that the membership of the 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE . 5 

Craft, having been purged by the difficulties of the past 
few years, now consists of brethren who have a vital interest 
in Masonry and what it ought to and does stand for in the 
lives of its members and in the life of the community. From 
all sides the opinion is heard that the morale among the 
constituent lodges is better now than it has been for several 
years past." 

An important item of business and one which necessarily 
occupied a good deal of time was the revision of the "York" 
ritual, but all was carried through harmoniously under the 
efficient direction of our own Grand Representative, M. W. 
Bro. His Honour, Judge J. A. Jackson. To us in Ontario it 
seems, at first sight, strange that two rituals should be in 
use in the same Grand Jurisdiction. The following quotation 
explains the situation: 

"A short reference to the history of the Grand Lodge 
of Alberta would not be out of place. At the Second Annual 
Communication of this Grand Lodge on the 20th February, 
1907, 0. W. Kealy, the Grand Master, reported he found it 
necessary to appoint a committee on the "American Rite" 
because of lack of uniformity and many variations in this 
Rite. At this time Grand Lodge was working and has ever 
since worked under two rituals, known now as the "Canadian" 
and "York" Works, a legacy no doubt from the mother Grand 
Lodge of Manitoba and due probably to the immigration of 
many Masons from Eastern Canada and the United States 
of America. He made the further suggestion of a combined 
ritual, using the Canadian first degree, the American second 
degree and either for the the third degree, the opening to 
be in the Canadian Rite and the closing in the American. 
This met with no favour. A committee appointed on the 
Canadian Rite found little trouble, but the committee on the 
Ancient York ritual, under the chairmanship of M. W. Bro. 
E. A. Braithwaite, recommended the appointment of a com- 
mittee of two and three in more than one place, to report 
at the next meeting of Grand Lodge." 

The Grand Secretary, M. W. Bro. J. H. W. S. Kemmis, 
presented a comprehensive and inspiring report. M. W. Bro. 
George Moore of Calgary is Grand Master for 1939-40. A 
Mason who visits the Grand Lodge of Alberta finds himself 
at once among warm, loyal, and optimistic friends, who 
highly prize those bonds which make Masonry one great, 
grand brotherhood. On reading the Proceedings one is im- 
pressed by the strict attention to detail and to regularity 
and is convinced that in Alberta the Craft is strong, sub- 
santial, and gifted with true and farsighted vision. 

ARIZONA— 1939 

In Douglas, Arizona, the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge 
of Free and Accepted Masons of Arizona met for their Fifty- 
Seventh Annual Communication on March 29th and 30th, 
1939. 



6 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

Most Worshipful Grand Master, Brother Quintus James 
Anderson, presided. 

In his address he expressed pleasure that there were so 
few complaints, due, in his opinion, to the fact that the 
constituent lodges are in the hands of competent and faithful 
officers. 

This he maintained was due to the divisional (district) 
meetings of the lodge secretaries under the guidance of the 
Grand Secretary. He recommended a continuation of such 
district meetings. 

The condition of Masonry, he said, was healthy, both as 
to finances and membership. The attendance has increased 
because of the services rendered by the Educational Com- 
mittee. 

This Grand Lodge contributed a goodly sum for Chilean 
Relief. The earthquake had left four hundred masonic 
families destitute and had destroyed twelve Masonic Temples. 

This Grand Lodge is a strong supporter of the Masonic 
Service Association, the Grand Secretaries' Conference, and 
the Grand Masters' Conference. At the latter, the chief topic 
of discussion was a "Declaration of Masonic Principles" 
v.'hich would define the nature, objectives and purposes of 
Freemasonry. 

This Conference could not adopt any measure — it was 
for discussion only. All matters were left for the individual 
Grand Masters to take up at their respective annual com- 
munications. 

Benevolence in the State of Arizona is based on the 
general rule that the burden should be divided between the 
local lodge and Grand Lodge. This is a sensible rule. If it 
were otherwise, there would not be a complete and unbiased 
investigation of the individual case by the local lodge 
officers. 

Masonry is not an insurance organization, a pension 
bureau, nor a relief agency. If the local lodge carries its 
share of benevolence granted to its own members, it is quite 
certain that the members of that lodge will exercise proper 
care and caution in admitting new members. This is as it 
should be. 

During the year, Grand Lodge contributed $1,711.00 to 
twelve lodges to assist twenty dependent Masons or the 
widows of Masons; the lowest record in a number of years. 
This was in part accounted for by some dependents receiving 
help from public soairces under social security legislation. 

The following is a quotation from the report of the 
Chairman of the Committee on Masonic Education: 

"The Chairman wishes to warn you that, although noth- 
ing has previously been said in this report about the Lodge 
System of Masonic Education, that system is greatly favored 
by him. and you are going to hear a lot about it during the 
coming year. 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 7 

"We hear on all sides complaints that most of the men 
raised become Masons in name rather than in fact, and that 
lodge meetings are so poorly attended that there are hardly 
enough present to do the work. Why so few Masters attempt 
to correct the situation by adopting the Lodge System of 
Masonic Education and making lodge meetings so interesting 
that brothers will wish to be present, is a mystery to mem- 
bers of your Committee. If any Master here wishes his 
lodge to have the best year in its history, he will adopt and 
follow rigidly the system mentioned, and will arrange at least 
six meetings during the year at which interesting and inspir- 
ing addresses are delivered or masonic plays presented. It 
has been definitely proven in numerous instances that the 
suggestions made will produce the result stated." 

We congratulate any Grand Master who can go through 
his term of office without having (a) to give any decisions 
or rulings, (b) to grant any dispensations. 

The finances of this Grand Lodge are highly saiisfactory. 
The grand total of cash and securities on hand in all the 
funds is over $400,000.00. The membership of the 39 lodges 
is 5,477. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA— 1939 

Sixty-Eighth Annual Communication held on June 22nd 
and 23rd, 1939, in the City of Victoria. 

Dr. C. M. Kingston, Grand Master. 
Total Membership, 13,648. 

The Grand Master is a brother of our own V. W. Bro. 
George A. Kingston. The inimitable M. W. Bro. Frank J. 
Burd (who so loves the resonant and sonorous appellation 
of our Grand Lodge) introduced the visitors. After the civic 
welcome and the transaction of some formal business. Grand 
Lodge was called from labour and the brethren repaired to 
Christ Church Cathedral where Divine Service was held. 

The Grand Master's Address was a complete and a faith- 
ful report of his work throughout his term of office. The 
Deputy Grand Master also gave an account of his steward- 
ship. There is a strong and active Committee on Masonic 
Education and Research. One of the most interesting 
features of the Proceedings is the report of the Grand 
Historian; he gives a fascinating story of Masonry in the 
early days in British Columbia. Apparently, he does this 
each year and presumably all these reports will some day 
be published in book form as "The History of the Grand 
Lodge of British Columbia." 

On his election as Grand Master, M. W. Bro. G. A. B. 
Hall said, in part: 

"Every business person at least once a year takes stock 
to see if his business has been successful. Has it gone ahead 
or gone behind ? I think we, as Freemasons, should also take 



8 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

stock of ourselves to see if we are progressing. I do not 
mean numerically or financially, but are we cultivating and 
developing those qualities in our nature that will tend to 
make us better Freemasons and more useful citizens? If 
Freemasonry is to mean anything to us it must be practical, 
something we can use in our everyday life. 

"If v,'e, as Freemasons, will exemplify in our everyday 
lives the true principles of our institutions we will indeed 
prove ourselves worthy of the name of Freemasons, be an 
honour to ourselves, worthy citizens, and benefactors in the 
community in which we live. May it be so." 

For years it has been the hope of this reviewer that he 
might some day meet and talk with the former Grand Sec- 
retary and present Chairman of the Committee on Fraternal 
Correspondence, M. W. Bro. W. A. DeWolf Smith. To us in 
Ontario he has been for years a legendary figure, one who 
has been a tower of strength to his Grand Lodge, a real 
Mason. Perhaps he will do us the honour to visit our Annual 
Communication. He reviews our Proceedings most kindly. 
Here are some of his comments: 

"The Grand Master's Address was brief as such Address- 
es go, and differs from the usual run of Addresses in that 
it is not burdened with lists of visits made, dispensations 
granted, etc., all of which are found in an appendix and are 
only mentioned casually in the Address proper. 

"Altogether this is a most excellent Address and one 
which in our opinion nearly approaches the ideal. 

"An excellent report was submitted by the Grand Treas- 
urer, M. W. Brother J. A, Rowland, and by the Grand Sec- 
cetary, R. W. Brother E. G. Dixon, Although a new hand 
at the bellows. Brother Dixon's report is a model of what a 
Grand Secretary's report should be. 

"So long as regular Grand Lodges continue to recognize 
these spurious bodies they will continue to flourish. Ontario 
has in its list of representatives twelve or fourteen organ- 
izations which are not regular Masonic bodies, and British 
Columbia seems to be heading in the same direction." 

He points out that British Columbia was not reviewed 
by us last year. For that omission we tender our sincere 
apologies. Our late reviewer, M. W. Bro. W. N. Ponton, was 
ill for more than a year before he passed to the Grand Lodge 
Above. Labouring under incredible difficulties, he persisted 
in carrying on the work he loved. He was not able to do 
all that he tried to do and he missed a few of the Proceed- 
ings that were sent to him. Among them was British 
Columbia. In this Grand Jurisdiction we have the highest 
regard for the Grand Lodge of British Columbia. It is sixty- 
nine years old — not so many years younger than our own; 
and it is stalwart as a Douglas fir. We like to think of our 
nine Canadian Grand Lodges as a chain of lighthouses, from 
British Columbia on the Pacific to Nova Scotia on the 
Atlantic, — lighthouses proclaiming symbolically to the con- 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 9 

tinent and to the world that the light of Masonry shines 
forth undimmed, beckoning men of goodwill to a higher and 
a better life. 



CALIFORNIA— 1939 

Ninetieth Annual Communication held in San Francisco, 
October 10th, 11th, 12th, and 13th, 1939. 
Leon O. Whitsell — Grand Master. 
Membership— 126,739. Number of lodges— 580. 

From the Grand Master's Address the following para- 
graphs are taken: 

"I have had occasion during the past year to observe 
critically and thoughtfully the condition of the Craft through- 
out the entire Grand Jurisdicion. Having visited all the 
districts, I am pleased to report that Masonrj' is definitely 
on the up-grade. There is a healthy feeling of optimism and 
enthusiasm manifest in practically every district. I feel that 
Masonry in our Grand Jurisdiction has definitely passed its 
low spot and that we may face the future with pride and 
thanksgiving. 

"The number of young men applying for the mysteries 
of Masonry is highly gratifying. For the most part they 
evince a hunger for further light in Masonry — for definite 
and authentic information with respect to the symbolism, the 
philosophy, and the history of the Craft. Their interest ex- 
ends not only to the history of Masonry in the State, but 
to the history of Masonry throughout the world from the 
earliest time of which we have any record. I find them recep- 
tive and eager to play their part in the activities and develop- 
ment of the Craft. They are imbued with a fine spirit of 
constructive service. 

"Several times there has been called to my attention a 
matter to which the Craft should give serious consideration. 
I refer to the lack of care exercised on the part of some of 
our California brethren in discussing, in the presence of the 
profane, the so-called secrets of the Craft. There is an all- 
too-common practice to discuss too plainly and openly some 
of these things which should only be discussed behind tiled 
doors. There can be no possible excuse for this laxity. 

"In the olden days, the secrets of the Fraternity, includ- 
ing what was done at the stated meetings, were scrupulously 
guarded from the ears and eyes of others. The slightest 
disclosure of what took place under the gavel brought down 
upon the heads of the offenders the punishment which their 
delinquencies so richly deserved. 

"With respect to those things we are under obligation 
not to disclose, let us in the presence of non-masons 'set a 
guard over our thoughts, a watch at our lips, and post a 
sentinel over our actions.'" 



10 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

Taking as his topic, "The Quest", the Grand Orator de- 
livered a notable oration from which only one paragraph 
can be quoted here: 

"Masonry is unlike other organizations, and the greatest 
danger it faces in this nation is the possibility that its mem- 
bership may unwittingly tend to make it a prototype of 
others. It is not alone its claim to great antiquity which 
commands respect. Antiquity is a liability to most groups. 
There is much beyond age which in turn actually is respons- 
ible for its survival and great age. It cannot invite candi- 
dates; they must come of their own free will and accord, 
and they continue to come because of certain factors which, 
though they may not entirely understand before initiation, 
are attributable to its distinguishing features, its high pur- 
poses and policies. If, then, they are attracted by a dif- 
ference, how foolish to try to simulate other groups. The 
wise Master will bear in mind those differences and plan 
his activities accordingly. He will then find that attendance 
will not be a problem and that, while not every member can 
participate in the conferring of degrees, every member can 
find inspiration, noble thoughts and deeds within the Lodge 
and his own part therein. Within the Lodge room is to be 
found the chart and compass which will guide his footsteps 
in The Quest." 

So numerous are spurious lodges and so-called grand 
lodges in California that Grand Lodge has a standing Com- 
mittee on Clandestine Masonry. The "Lodge system" of 
Masonic Education has been adopted and is in fairly general 
use. There is a Committee on Masonic History which' each 
year presents an interesting and instructive report. 

California's Reviews are wonderful. There is a Com- 
mittee on Correspondence, with Jesse M. Whited as Chair- 
man, a position he has occupied for eighteen years. Twenty- 
three topics were selected and all Proceedings were searched 
for comments thereon. All this makes fascinating reading. 
In California, as apparently in most Grand Jurisdictions, the 
problem of Masonic funerals is a difficult one. 



CONNECTICUT— 1939 

The One Hundred and Fifty-First Annual Communica- 
tion held in the City of Hartford, February 1st and 2nd, 
1939. 

Morris B. Payne — Grand Master. 

Membership — 35,250. Number of Lodges — 128. 

The Endowment Fund stood at $549,266 which included 
an addition of $27,197 made during the year. 

Grand Master Payne read a comprehensive and inspir- 
ing Address. He expressed the opinion that only a few of 
the Grand Representatives had written to the Grand Lodge 
they represent and recommended that definite steps be taken 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 11 

to establish cordial relationship through Grand Representa- 
tives. One wonders how many of these, in most Grand 
Lodges, accept the honour and ignore the responsibility and 
the duties involved. Only a very little actual labour on the 
part of every Grand Representative would create a chain 
of many links which would bind together the Grand Lodges 
of the civilized world in an effective manner. 

The Grand Master advised leniency in regard to physical 
defects and the Committee on Jurisprudence left the prob- 
lem to be decided by each constituent lodge on the merits 
of the individual case. We require our Grand Master to 
decide on each case after he has received full information 
and a recommendation from the District Deputy Grand 
Master. 

In Connecticut, District Deputy Grand Masters are 
appointed by the Grand Master and not all of them, it ap- 
pears, take the performance of their duties as seriously as 
they should. "A millstone around the neck of the lodge" is 
the description given of an inefficient secretary. 

To the Grand Lodge of the Nutmeg state goes the dis- 
tinction of being the first (so far as is known by this re- 
viewer) to require that every candidate have his finger-prints 
taken. And all present members are asked to submit to 
finger-printing. What would be the reaction here, if we tried 
that? 

M. W. Bro. Thomas H. Desmond was elected Grand 
Master for 1939-40. With two of his brethren he visited 
our Annual Communication in July and a wonderfully genial 
guest he was. The present reviewer was invited by him to 
deliver the principal address at the annual banquet in Hart- 
ford in February, 1940, and he v,-as there presented with the 
Pierpont Edwards Medal, of beautiful design and of historical 
and sentimental significance. One has a wonderful time at 
an Annual Communication in Connecticut; their Past Grand 
Masters are a group of the finest of men; the Grand Secre- 
tary is a leader and an example among Grand Secretaries; 
the business is carried through with precision and despatch. 

The Committee on Masonic Education "attempted to 
create and to satisfy a desire for masonic knowledge on the 
part of both new and old members." Questionnaires on 
Masonic subjects, suggested talk? on suggested topics, bul- 
letins, and a speakers' bureau were tried. Not all the lodges 
nominated a member to take charge of Masonic education; 
the questionaires were used; a fev,- talks were given; but 
no use was made of the speakers' bureau. In some lodges 
there was a display of real enthusiasm and wonderful work 
v,'as done in several lodges. 

Admirable is the work of benevolence carried on by the 
Grand Lodge of Connecticut. The following paragraph is 
taken from the Report of the Committee Home. 

"Masonry and Benevolence are synonymous terms the 
world over. Since the verv beginning of our Order it has 



12 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

been, and it still is, the duty and the custom of individual 
Masons and of lodges to render temporary or occasional 
relief to members of the fraternity and to their widows and 
orphans. As society 'became more complex, it was found that 
there were certain members and dependents of members who, 
through no fault of their own, required more than temporary 
relief. They needed permanent care and assistance, often 
covering several years. The Masonic Fraternity was a 
pioneer in providing means for such assistance." 



DELAWARE— 1939 

One hundred and thirty-fourth Annual Communication 
held at the City of Wilmington on the fourth of October, 1939. 
George E. Vandergrift, Grand Master. 
Total membership, 5,188. 

The Grand Master must have been deluged with invita- 
tions to describe his visit to the United Grand Lodge of Eng- 
land upon the occasion of the installation of His Royal High- 
ness the Duke of Kent as Grand Master of the mother Grand 
Lodge of the world. That he was deeply impressed with 
what he saw and heard is manifest by his description of the 
concluding event of that memorable gathering of represen- 
tatives from all parts of the world. 

"That evening I attended a reception and dinner at the 
Mansion House, the home of Rt. Hon. The Lord Mayor of 
London, Col. Sir Frank Bowater, Grand Treasurer. It was 
■a great affair. We were individually presented again to The 
Most Worshipful The Grand Master, H.R.H. The Duke of 
Kent and our host of the evening, Brother Bowater, Rt. Hon. 
The Lord Mayor. 

"Full evening dress and Decorations were worn on this 
occasion and the truly great were there, but as Masonry 
teaches us that worldly wealth and honor does not represent 
the main qualifications for Masonic privileges, so was it 
exhibited on this occasion, for those of Royal blood and rank 
could not be distinguished from those of lesser stations in 
life because of the good fellowship and fraternal equality 
that prevailed. 

"Thus came to a conclusion one of the greatest Maosnic 
events in the history of the world. "To know one is to love 
one", and while my regard for my English brethren was 
ahvays great I learned to appreciate through my visit to 
them a finer conception of what Masonry is and the possi- 
bilities it has through its high ideals of creating a better 
understanding among the nations of the world. 

'Just a short while ago we met in Peace; and harmony 
prevailed. Now, our English brethren are perplexed by War. 
May goodwill soon prevail and may they soon again have 
contentment within their borders. 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 13 

"Our blessing and our thanks for their kindnesses to 
Delaware's representative." 

The Grand Master is very outspoken upon the subject 
of gambling and liquor. Under this heading he gave the 
following expression of his views in his annual address. 

"Neither of these have any plac.e in the Masonic frater- 
nity. 'Masonry is an institution designed to enlighten the 
intellect and improve the moral nature' and these ideals 
cannot be accomplished by the indulgence in liquor or the 
participation in gambling, whether petty or otherwise. 

"Approved decision No. 34, Proceedings of 1899 denies 
the right to petition by a seller of liquor. It v/ould certainly 
not be consistent to allow this privilege to one after he has 
become a Mason. Standing resolution No. 9, Proceedings of 
1895, clearly defines Delaware Masonry's stand on this 
question. 

"You cannot encourage a man on one occasion to look 
to the better things of life and then permit him to do the 
things which destroy 'moral fibre and lead to the baser 
things in life. 

"During the year I have been approached on the question 
of whether an org-anization, the prerequisite for membership 
being membership in the Masonic Fraternity, could conduct 
Bingo Games as a means of raising funds. My answer v.'as 
that they could not. Masonic Law under section 30 clearly 
states that gambling is not permitted and those participaing 
are guilty of un-Masonic conduct; I further stated that should 
they carry out their plans I had no alternative but to prefer 
charges against those responsible for the violation. 

"The principles and purposes of Masonry are too noble 
to be sacrificed for the sake of paltry dollars, let alone the 
fact that in recognizing such practices we condone disrespect 
for civil authority." 

The proceedings contain a very interesting history of 
the establishment of a Masonic Home. It began in 1910 with 
a contribution of $3.60 from one of the constituent Lodges. 
The project was slow in getting under way but through the 
untiring efforts of an energetic committee the brethren be- 
came enthused over the idea. Generous donations were forth- 
coming, a per capita tax v.Tas levied and now the Grand 
Lodge is the proud possessor of a well equipped institution 
with assets of over $300,000.00. 

Thirty-four "guests", as the inmates are styled, are now 
housed in the Home and lovingly cared for by faithful at- 
tendants. This is a most praiseworthy accomplishment for 
a jurisdiction with only 5,188 members. 

ENGLAND— 1939 

H.R.H. The Duke of Kent, K.G., Grand Master. 
The Rt. Hon. The Earl of Harewood, K.G., Pro Grand 
Master. 



14 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

R. W. Brig.-Gen. W. H. V. Darrell, C.B., Assistant Grand 
Master. 

Quarterly Communications were held at Freemasons' 
Hall in Gt. Queen St., London in March, June, September and 
December, and the Annual Festival on the 26th day of April, 
1939, and an Especial Grand Lodge was held at Olympia, 
Kensington, London, on the 19th day of July, 1939. For the 
first time in thirty-eight years the Grand Lodge of England 
had to face the problem of selecting a new Grand Master. 
At the end of 1938 H.R.H. The Duke of Connaught had re- 
quested that owing to his advancing years he be relieved 
of the duties of his office at the end of his then current 
term. His request was received with universal regret, and 
a resolution was passed expressing the gratitude of Grand 
Lodge for his long and devoted service, and the reverence 
and affection of the members for one who had been a great 
Mason, and had becom.e a greater figure among Masons year 
by year. It was suggested by the Pro Grand Master that 
many of the lodges might wish to continue to drink the 
health of His Royal Highness notwithstanding his retire- 
ment, and that such a toast should be given a place of 
honour next after the toast of the M.W. The Grand Master, 

H.R.H. The Duke of Kent, K.G. was selected as his 
successor, and was duly installed at an especial Grand Lodge 
held at Olympia on the 19th of July. A meeting which 
would in itself have been outstanding was made one of the 
most memorable in the history of Grand Lodge by the fact 
that the installation ceremony was performed by M.W. Bro, 
His Majesty the King. More "than 12,000 Masons were pres- 
ent representing Grand Lodges in all parts of the Masonic 
world. At the conclusion of the ceremony His Majesty re- 
minded the Grand Master of the long and intimate associ- 
ation between the Royal House of England and their Grand 
Lodge, and added: "You know that you have my good wishes 
and, as a brother Mason, I shall always follow with great 
interest your rulership of the Craft and the progress of the 
Order." Congratulations and good wishes were also tendered 
by the Grand Master of Ireland, the Grand Master Mason 
of the Grand Lodge of Scotland, the Grand Master of the 
Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, and the Grand Master of the 
Grand Orient of the Netherlands. Our own Grand Lodge 
was represented on the occasion by M.W. Bros. Dargavel 
and Copus. 

There are many items of interest in the Proceedings 
for the past sixteen months, some of them arising out of 
general conditions existing during that period, and others 
relating directly to the War. Reference was made at the 
Quarterly Communication in March to matters of political 
import. As had already been pointed out in the statement 
dealing with the aims and relationships of the Craft issued 
in the previous September, any member of the Order is 
entitled to hold his own opinions regarding matters of a 
political nature or of state policy, but lodges and brethren 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 15 

in their capacity as Freemasons were reminded that any 
cause, however humanitarian it may be, which arises out of 
political action, either in this country or elsewhere, is out- 
side the scope of Freemasonry, and support of such causes 
in any form, or by any means, by Freemasons as such, is 
not allowed. It was pointed out that the prohibition of the 
support of these humanitarian objects was not directed 
against an individual in his private capacity but was directed 
against the practice of using lodges or Masonic connections 
for purposes which, although benevolent, were personal 
rather than purely Masonic. 

At the same Quarterly Communication the Board re- 
ported that they had again received inquiries from certain 
quarters with regard to the attitude to be adopted with respect 
to Quasi-Masonic bodies or Bodies imitative of Masonry. This 
matter was discussed in Grand Lodge in 1929 and the members 
were then advised to exercise caution as to association with 
such Bodies. It was recommended that in order to make the 
position clear the matter should be dealt with specifically 
by Grand Lodge, and at the Quarterly Communication in 
June the rules of the Book of Constituti.ons were amended 
to provide that any person who had in any way been con- 
nected with any such Body .-should neither be initiated into 
or retained as a member of a lodge except by leave of the 
Grand Master. 

For more than three years a Committee under the Chair- 
manship of R.W. Bro. J. Russell McLaren, P.G.W. has been 
engaged in the work of revising the Constitutions. Interim 
reports have been presented from time to time but the final 
report was adopted at the Quarterly Communication held in 
December, — the new Constitutions to be effective as of the 
1st of January, 1940. There is much in the new book that 
is of interest to Masonic students, and one feels that the 
resolution of gratitude which was extended to Bro. McLaren 
and his Committee for a good job well done was thoroughly 
deserved. 

At the beginning of September an Order v/as issued to 
the lodges to suspend their meetings temporarily until con- 
sideration could be given as to how they might carry on 
under existing conditions. The restriction was later removed 
but regulations were adopted at the Quarterly Communica- 
tion in December for the government of lodges during the 
war. The Master is given power to cancel or to change the 
date of any regular meeting. A lodge may by resolution 
decide to meet on other than its regular dates for the time 
being, and alter the subscriptions to be paid by members. 
In the case of candidates on Active Service, where the cir- 
cumstances seem to warrant it, the period between degrees 
may be shortened, but the same precautions must be observed 
and the same inquiries made in the introduction of new can- 
didates as in times of peace. 



16 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

The Report of the Board was presented to Grand Lodge 
at the Quarterly Communication held in March last, and a 
resolution was adopted reading in part as follows: 

"No brother being a National of any State with 

which Great Britain is at war shall attend or be 

admitted to any Masonic Meeting held under fhe 

English Constitution." 

The question of enemy alien refugees in England was 
considered but it was felt that no exception need be made 
in their favor because "those of them who are truly in 
sympathy with us will, we believe, be very ready to assist 
us by abstaining from Masonic activities during the progress 
of the present hostilities." The discussion of this very 
delicate and diflficult problem is exceedingly interesting, and 
was marked by that eminent sense of fairness which is so 
characteristic of the Mother Grand Lodge. 

The hand of death was busy during the year among the 
present and Past Grand Officers of the Grand Lodge. In 
the list, which is all too long, appear the names of — 

R.W. Bro. Rt. Hon. Lord Selsdon, P.C, Past Grand 
Warden, 

V.W. Bro. Sir' Stanley Machin, Past Grand Treasurer. 

V.W. Bro. Frederick Hyde, P.G.D. 

and our own Sir George McLaren Brown, who was a 

Past Grand Deacon of the Grand Lodge of England, and 

a Past Grand Registrar of our Grand Lodge. 

A portrait of the late. The Rt. Hon. Lord Cornwallis, 
who at the time of his death was Pro Grand Master — an 
office to which he had been appointed just a few weeks 
before his death — was unveiled during the year, and a 
Committee was appointed to procure a similar memorial 
CO the late Grand Secretary V.W. Bro. Sir P. Colville Smith. 

It is impossible to make personal references among 
those who were honored with Masonic rank, but perhaps 
the reviewer may be permitted to extend our congratula- 
tions to Bro. C. R. I. Nicholl who was promoted from the 
office of Grand Director of Ceremonies to that of Provincial 
Grand Master for Berkshire. M.W. Bro. Nicholl is succeeded 
in his former office by Lieut.-Col. Philip C. Bull, D.S.O. 

FLORIDA— 1939 

The One Hundred and Tenth Annual Communication 
was held at Jacksonville, April 18, 19 and 20, 1939. It was 
opened in ample form by M. W. Bro. George Fish, Grand 
Master. 

Membership, 19,852; number of Lodges, 223. 

Fifty-nine pages of the Proceedings are occupied by the 
Grand Master's address but this includes a reproduction of 
an illustrated booklet issued within the year by the Grand 
Lodge of Florida on their Masonic Home at St. Petersburg 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 17 

of which Florida Masons are justly proud. The Grand Master 
reported that he had spent a busy, strenuous year in the 
discharge of his duties and that he had settled a number 
of troublesome matters which had been outstanding for 
several years. These included the refunding of the sub- 
stantial indebtedness of Grand Lodge which was effected at 
the very low interest rate of 2 per cent. A modern account- 
ing system was installed for the better financial administra- 
tion of the Home. The booklet on the Home was issued to 
every Mason of the Jurisdiction and also to a number of 
newspapers. It is expected that its publication and distribu- 
tion v/ill bring "the humanitarian work of our Institution 
before the public and the Craft in general and enlist their 
sympathy and co-operation in the furtherance and expansion 
of the work." 

The Grand Master found it necessary to take vigorous 
action with regard to so-called masonic clubs of which 
several existed in the state. For example, a good many years 
ago a luncheon club was organized at Jacksonville whose 
membership is said to be confined to Master Masons in good 
standing. Through the years it has been known by various 
names but latterly by the name "Masonic Club". No author- 
ity had ever been given for the organization of this and other 
similarly constituted clubs and it (and they) had been "per- 
mitted to exist because no one in authority had raised ob- 
jection to it." At the weekly luncheons of this Jacksonville 
club discussions took place and addresses were made some- 
times on matters entirely unconnected with Masonry, and 
sometimes these were of a highly controversial character. 
These addresses and discussions were reported and com- 
mented upon in the local press in a manner which alleged 
definitely that the opinions expressed on such occasions were 
the views that Masons were taking on these controversial 
questions. The Grand Master found it necessary to take 
action when a definite complaint was made to him concerning 
an address made on a highly controversial subject. His cor- 
respondence with the officers of the club was of an unsatis- 
factory nature and he was obliged therefore to promulgate 
an Edict reading in part as follows: "All clubs or societies 
organized subsequent to 1910 meeting and functioning in this 
Grand Jurisdiction as Masons . . . using the name Masonic, 
or any name indicating, implying or suggesting Masonic 
connection are hereby interdicted and ordered to cease meet- 
ing . . . ". Grand Lodge confirmed this action and framed 
and passed a regulation asserting its jurisdiction in all 
masonic affairs in Florida including the supervision of all 
organizations "whose fundamental or principal predicate for 
membership is masonic affiliation of the members of such 
organization". It forbade that such organizations be used 
for the purpose of serving as a forum for the debate of 
partisan and controversial questions on the penalty of 
masonic discipline. 



18 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

Another interesting controversial matter with which the 
Grand Mastet was obliged to deal was that of a lodge of 
small membership which had been unable to secure the 
requisite permission of the Grand Master to proceed with 
the erection of a new and costly masonic temple. In spite 
of fruitless repeated efforts to secure this permission the 
lodge went ahead with the construction of the edifice, selling 
bonds for the payment of the work. The Grand Master, faced 
with this flaunting of his authority, arrested the charter 
and recommended to Grand Lodge that the charter be not 
restored. The Committee on Masonic Jurisprudence approved 
the action of the Grand Master but, after the officers of the 
lodge had appeared and disclaimed any intention of dis- 
regarding the authority of Grand Lodge and had apologized 
to the Grand Master, the committee recommended that the 
charter be restored, especially in view of the fact that the 
lodge was situated in a rapidly-growing community. 

Many other interesting matters were dealt with by the 
Grand Master. The membership stands at 19,852, a net gain 
of 4 for the year. The Grand Master, in his detailed review 
of his stewardship, was able to conclude that Masonry in 
Florida has had a healthy growth and that its influence 
steadily advances. 



GEORGIA— 1939 

The One Hundred and Fifty-Third Annual Communica- 
tion of the Grand Lodge of Georgia was held in the City 
of Macon, October 31, and November 1, 1939, with M. W. 
Bro. William M. Sapp, Grand Master Presiding. 

The total membership was shown to be 39,360 as at 
August 31, 1939, a decrease for the year of 353. 

The Grand Lodge is the sponsor of a program lasting 
for a month and known as "Education and Good Citizenship 
Month." It extended over the period from September 15th to 
October 15th and was carried out through co-operation with 
the state superintendent of schools. The Grand Master and 
other prominent Masons delivered radio addresses. The 
Grand Master stated that the object of the program was the 
preservation of civilization through the medium of patriotic 
and righteous education of the youth of the land. 

The Grand Master, in his address, made this suggestive 
comparison, — "It required King Solomon, with the assistance 
of 70,000 Entered Apprentices, 80,000 Fellow Crafts, 3,300 
Masters and Overseers, their Avives, sisters, mothers, widows, 
daughters and sv/eethearts seven years to erect the Temple 
at Jerusalem. It required the vandals about as many days 
to 'destroy this wonderful structure. It has required three 
great agencies of progress, the Church of God, Education, 
Masonry, kindred organizations and womankind several 
thousand years to attain our present civilization, which Com- 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 19 

munism and like 'isms' would destroy in one great battle 
on the plains of Armageddon." 

Under the direction of an able committee the Masonic 
Code of Georgia is being revised, amended and indexed. 

The Grand Master in his message to Grand Lodge 
recommended that any of the lodges of Georgia which found 
the continuation of their existence difficult should unite 
forces with some neighboring lodge. The advent of good 
roads and new modes of conveyance made this more inviting 
than formerly. 

The Grand Master further points out: "The momentous 
period through which the nations of the earth are passing, 
while parlous and portentous, is not new to Masonry. It is 
not the first time it has been banned and proscribed. It has 
been the object of hatred by dictators. It has been perse- 
cuted but its faith has been in God and, soothed and sus- 
tained, it has witnessed victory emerge from ever}' contest. 
Masonry is the democracy of democracies. It has ever allied 
itself on the side of justice and right against the foes of 
humanity and civilization. Masonry is peace-loving but not 
to the extent of pacifism. It is peacefully patriotic. It has 
produced Washington^ and Reveres, Magna Chartas and 
constitutions and has the material to do it again." 

The Grand Lodge allows exemption from dues to Masons 
over 60 years of age, provided they have been contributing 
members for a period of twenty years. This applies only 
to the fee due on such Masons by the subordinate lodge to 
the Grand Lodge. They are still liable to the subordinate 
lodge for dues to it, unless such subordinate lodge shall by 
by-law exempt them. 

In addition to the usual fee for initiation the Grand 
Lodge of Georgia has ordered that six dollars shall be col- 
lected from each candidate at the time of his initiation. 
Five dollars of this must be paid into the Grand Lodge and 
be used strictly as a benevolent fund. 

The Grand Lodge of Georgia apparently works in co- 
operation with the Order of the Eastern Star. The latter 
supplied the benevolent committee of the Grand Lodge with 
gifts of clothing for children, quilts, linen and other ne- 
cessaries. 

The Grand Lodge maintains a Masonic Home, of which 
all are deservedly proud, for needy brethren and members 
of their families. Realising that many of the children in 
homes aided by the Relief Fund are not getting proper 
medical attention, it was decided to bring a number of such 
children to the Home for a stdy of two or three weeks 
during which time they were given thorough physical and 
dental examinations and all defects corrected as far as pos- 
sible. The children's eyes were tested and glasses furnished 
when needed. A camp in Mcintosh county is provided for 
children to spend part of their vacation. The buildings, 
equipment and grounds are adequate for a large number of 



20 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

children at a time. Fruit trees of many varieties have been 
planted as well as grape vines. The camp is regarded as a 
children's paradise for the fatherless and motherless children 
of deceased brethren. Boating, fishing and swimming are 
enjoyed at the camp. 

This is thought to be a wonderful service and is perhaps 
one of the most outstanding programs ever undertaken by 
Georgia Masonry. 

At the Home there is a school of industries where boys 
receive manual training, a gymnasium for the children's 
pleasure and physical development, a hothouse where plants 
are propagated as well as a print shop, a school of photog- 
raphy and commodious barns with a herd of cows valued at 
$10,000. 

Some years ago the Grand Lodge of Georgia abolished 
the office of district deputy grand master and in its stead 
established a board of custodians. But after several years 
of experience it was decided to re-establish the system of 
district deputy grand masters as being more satisfactory. 

The Masons of Georgia have been forbidden to engage 
in the manufacture or sale of intoxicating liquor. There was 
a movement to remove this restriction but the Grand Lodge 
decided that it would be unwise and unfortunate to repeal 
this regulation. 

In the Georgia Review of Fraternal Correspondence for 
Canada there is appreciative reference to the life and work 
and character of our late Past Grand Master, William Nisbet 
Ponton: "We never think of Canadian brethren but what 
we think of W. N. Ponton and of his service to the entire 
Masonic world. We valued his worth when he served as 
Chairman of the Committee on the Condition of Masonry, 
then as Grand Master and afterwards as Grand Corres- 
pondent. Masonry has been proud of him." 

IDAHO— 1939 

Grand Master— Clyde I. Rush. 
Grand Secretary — Curtis F. Pike. 

91 lodges — 8,862 members, a decrease of 59 from 1938. 

Seventy-Third Annual Communication at Twin Falls, 
Idaho, September 12, 13, 14, 1939. 

Accredited representatives — 360 from 88 lodges. 

Near the commencement of the Grand Master's address 
these words appear: 

"As men are taught at the very beginning of their 
Masonic lives that no man should enter upon any great or 
important undertaking without first invoking the blessing of 
God, so do we later learn to look to the same divine authori- 
ty for help and guidance. — Let us pause a moment and 
thank Him," 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 21 

The Grand Master spoke feelingly in appreciation of the 
visitors, and paid a fine tribute to many who had been called 
away by the Grim Reaper. 

A quotation from a letter the Grand Master received 
from Bro. Condon In Costa Rica holds up a high ideal: 

"We are justified in believing that the Masonic order 
is composed, in general, of a class of men who are sub- 
stantial elements in their respective communities, wherever 
they may reside, who have expressed public approval of the 
finer things of life, and who have taken solemn vows to 
render themselves more extensively serviceable to their 
fellow-creatures, and where such worthy sentiments predomi- 
nate in the hearts of groups of men uniting under a single 
banner the world over, there is no need of endeavouring to 
rationalize or seek further justification for the existence of 
such organizations." 

The Grand Master travelled over 18,000 miles in visiting 
in Idaho, and fraternized with neighboring Grand Lodges. 
One visit, October 22, was to attend a banquet in Vancouver, 
British Columbia, in honor of M. W. Bro. Chas. M. Kingston, 
Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of British Columbia. 

Approval was gi\en to a change in the By-laws of some 
lodges to reduce the fees for degrees, and also to permit 
their payment in parts. One such change reads: 

"E. A. Degree, $30.00 which is to accompany application 
for the degree; F. C. Degree, S15.00 payable in advance, 
and M. M. Degree, $15.00 payable in advance." 

Payment of dues in instalments may be feasible where 
complete membership is not attained until all the degrees 
are received. It would scarcely do in Ontario where the re- 
ceipt of the first degree gives full voting privileges. 

Among twelve questions answered by the Grand Master 
these three are of interest: 

Q. — Is it permissible for a brother who has never held 
any of the three principal offices to confer the E. A. Degree? 

A. — Yes. There is no specific law for or against the idea, 
but I think it an excellent custom to use any brother in 
degree work who is interested enough to qualify himself. 

Q. — Can a lodge receive the petition of a man who has 
all the qualifications of a candidate for the degrees except 
that he is blind" 

A. — No. The new Code and Digest . . . states, "He 
must be a man and have the senses of a man, especially 
those of hearing, seeing and feeling." 

Q. — Can the Master order the reading of the names of 
delinquent members withheld or postponed on the first stated 
meeting in January? Can the lodge, by motion, duly second- 
ed and carried, postpone the reading or order it dispensed 
with on the first stated meeting in January? 

A. — No. ... it would be setting aside a Grand Lodge 
By-law, and this they do not have the authority to do." 



22 GEAND LODGE OF CANADA 

Due emphasis was placed on the Conference of Grand 
Masters at Washington and many of the decisions were in- 
cluded in the address. 

The Grand Master closed his address with these words: 

"Let us reconsecrate ourselves to the service of the 
Great Builder and rededicate our lives to the high ideals 
and principles of Freemasonry so that our standards may 
be held just as high in the future as they have been in the 
past." 

For benevolence the Grand Lodge expended $5,955.75 
and added considerable amounts to various permanent funds. 
The Grand Treasurer's report showed assets of $212,563.35. 

The Grand Secretary, R. W. Bro. Pike, who is also 
Chairman of the Committee on Masonic Education presented 
very interesting reports. From them the following items 
are worthy of note: 

"It is more important to awaken an interest in Masonic 
subjects in the minds of Masons than it is to tell them of 
the history or the teachings or the philosophy of Masonry. 
When once a man's interest is aroused he will find a way 
to satisfy his curiosity. Knowledge acquired through self- 
help is of far more value than when handed to him without 
effort. The first step in any kind of education is to arouse 
interest." 

"We are in no way inclined to neglect older members, 
for many of them are quite receptive to further studies, but 
we are of the conviction that effort spent on the new mem- 
ber brings he greatest returns in the lon^ run." 

"It may be observed that the most successful master of 
a lodge is the one who finds work for the greatest number 
of members." 

"The best Master is apt to be that brother who deliber- 
ately forgoes the opportunity of doing everything himself 
and arranges it so that many details are done by members 
who ordinarily sit on the sidelines." 

R. W. Bro. Pike commends a D.D.G.M., R. W. Bro. R. V. 
Locey, who donated a trowel for presentation with fitting 
ceremony, during lodge visits. The trowel has travelled all 
through the jurisdiction and beyond the limits of the State, 
and has created much interest and friendly intercourse. 

The Grand Orator, W. Bro. Marcus J. Ware, delivered 
an address on "Freemasonry and the World of To-morrow." 

The address was filled with thoughtful suggestions, 
pointing out the necessity of an enthusiastic support of 
Masonic principles. The following quotations will serve to 
stress its importance: 

"As we meet we find Europe once again engulfed in a 
war of proportions calculated to affect if not encompass the 
whole world. Neutral though we are and neutral though we 
remain, we cannot escape the effects of this struggle. Con- 
temporaneous with it, the fusion of the Russian and German 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 23 

dictatorships in an alliance, or, at least, an understanding, 
demonstrates that the differences between communism and 
naziism are more superficial and theoretical than real." 

"The times will be a continuing test of strength and 
enduring qualities of our democratic institutions, in the es- 
tablishment and maintenance of which members of our 
fraternity have in the past had such an intimate and promi- 
nent connection. Our duty to God, our country, our neigh- 
bour and ourselves require that this historic attitude of Free- 
masons in behalf of democratic institutions be maintained." 

"The forces which have swept through Russia, Germany 
and Italy and threaten to sweep through the rest of Europe, 
are World Forces. They are the product of certain condi- 
tions, weaknesses or dislocations in the world. Since Ameri- 
cans are but transplanted Europeans or descendants of trans- 
planted Europeans, America will have its variant of these 
forces and the character of the variant will be determined 
by the young men and women of to-day." 

"This force, insofar as it exists or may exist in America, 
must be so modified and directed that it will not destroy 
our institutions and civilization. And here is where our 
Fraternity may prove its worth as one of the bulwarks of 
the Republic." 

"No civilization has long endured where the doors of 
opportunity have been closed and there can be no true 
political equality without economic freedom." 

Reports of the ten District Deputy Grand Masters are 
not included in the proceedings. 

The newly elected Grand Master was W. Wade Wilson. 

W. Bro. Marion W. Kelley, Gooding, represents the 
Grand Lodge of Canada in Idaho, and R. W, Bro. R. F. 
Richardson, Strathroy, represents Idaho in Ontario. 



ILLINOIS— 1939 

Lodges, 994; Membership, 197,623; Loss, 6,147. 

The One Hundredth Annual Meeting of The Most Wor- 
shipful Grand Lodge of Ancient Fi-ee and Accepted Masons 
of the State of Illinois was held in the Citv of Chicago on 
the 10th of October, 1939, M. W. Bro. Everett L. Lawrence, 
Grand Master, presiding, and supported by eight Past Grand 
Masters. 

The meeting opened with prayer by R. W. Bro. Rev. 
Ira W. Bingaman, Grand Chaplain. And following this, the 
Grand Marshall with the Grand Stewards entered bearing 
the Stars and Stripes which was placed in the Grand East 
as the brethren sang "America". 

After the many distinguished guests from neighboring 
grand jurisdictions were received and accorded Grand 
Honors, the Grand Master presented his Report on the j^ear's 



24 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

work. That he has had little time for other responsibilities 
during the year is quite evident when a careful study of the 
account of his stewardship is made. He impresses one with 
the business-like manner in which he has conducted the 
duties of his high and important office. But his biography 
discloses that "his life, since his maturity, has been prac- 
tically lived with the masonic fraternity". And naturally 
one would expect to find recorded a year full of service to 
the Craft, which "aside from his home, has been the prin- 
cipal interest of his life". In closing he pays tribute to the 
work of the efficient and genial Grand Secretary, M. W. 
Bro. Richard C. Davenport, whose valued judgment and 
counsel he sought and obtained on many occasions. 

During the year three lodges were consolidated, three 
new temples were dedicated, and four corner stones were 
laid, — one of a High School Gymnasium, one of a Church, 
one of a Masonic Temple and one of a County Court House. 

Twenty-six Veterans of the Craft were awarded the 
Fifty-Year Button and the masonic record of each with the 
date of the presentation, is reported. 

The Treasurer's Report shows an expenditure of $297,- 
597.19 from the General Fund for charity during the year. 
In addition, the lodges expended for benevolence $59,257.00. 

Two homes are maintained, — the Orphans Home at La 
Grange and the Masonic Home at Sullivan. Each year 
through the several lodges the graduates from the Orphans 
Home are placed in positions. The two institutions take care 
of approximately 375 individuals. 

A very comprehensive report is presented by a commit- 
tee whose duties are something new to us, the Committee 
on Lodge Finances. In this report is contained a complete 
statistical and financial review of all lodges with much in- 
teresting data on rates of dues, percentage of dues collected 
to expenses, total assets and liabilities and the aggregate 
net worth of all lodges. 

An amendment to the Constitution was adopted per- 
mitting among other things, the use of a loose leaf minute 
book by lodges. This, of course, has never been permitted 
in our Grand Lodge for sound reasons. 

Illinois, like many other Grand Lodges in the United 
States, has deemed it advisable to introduce an amendment 
in respect to the reception of petitions from those engaged 
in the liquor business. I cjuote the amendment in full: 

"No lodge shall receive a petition for the degrees or 
for affiliation from any person who is engaged, as his prin- 
cipal business or occupation, in the manufacture, sale or 
distribution of intoxicating liquors, either at wholesale or 
retail." 

Masonic education and instruction is disseminated 
through Grand Lecturers who are chosen by appointment 
after having passed satisfactory examinations set by a board 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 25 

of examiners. Six schools were held during the year at 
different places in the State. 

In the 126 pages given to statistical data we find some 
interesting information. Since the formation of this Grand 
Lodge 173 lodges have become defunct, many by consolida- 
tion, some by surrender of charters, and others by having 
their charters arrested. 

I would that space permitted giving in full the oration 
delivered by Bro. Charles F. Eichenauer, Grand Orator. To 
quote in part would merely result in spoiling the effect that 
this literary and masonic gem must have on all those per- 
mitted to read it. But what must have been the effect on 
those who were privileged to hear it! It is the first time your 
reviewer has read one of Brother Eichenauer's orations. But 
never has he read or heard a more inspiring and instructive 
masonic literary endeavour. Thank you, Bro. Eichenauer, 
for your great contribution. 

In the Foreword to the 236 pages devoted by the re- 
viewer M. W. Bro. Elmer E. Beach, to the proceedings of 
63 Grand Lodges, he suggests two causes for the apparently 
abnormal loss in membership in most Grand Lodges, namely 
indifference and hard times. He does not suggest that the 
remedy lies in a reduction in lodge dues. "Xo one," he says, 
"ever received so much for so little." Nor would he relax 
the rule forbidding the solicitation of petitions for mem- 
bership. We give his remedy in his own words, "In my 
humble opinion the only legitimate way to increase masonic 
membership is by so living and conducting ourselves so that 
good men everywhere shall continue in greater numbers than 
heretofore to form a favorable opinion of Freemasonry and 
for that reason shall in greater numbers seek membership 
in the fraternity." His report on Masonic Correspondence 
is one of the finest that your reviewer has been permitted 
to read. It is a real encyclopedia of masonic information 
containing only the wheat and retaining the full kernel, 
reporting important discussions, edicts and regulations and 
commenting fairly on them. It is with pride we read his 
summation of M. W. Bro. Dunlop's Address which he records 
as "filled with splendid suggestions and advice and is so 
manifestly sincere and earnest that it may be studied with 
keen interest and certain benefit by every Mason in the 
jurisdiction." 

We regret to note that our Grand Representative did 
not answer the roll call. 

M. W. Bro. Dan De Baugh was elected and installed as 
Grand Master. 

INDIANA— 1939 

The One Hundred and Twenty-Second Annual Communi- 
cation of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of the State of 
Indiana was held at Indianapolis on May 23rd and 24th, 1939. 



26 GEAND LODGE OF CANADA 

Most Worshipful Bro. William H. Morrison presided. 

The statistical report indicated a membership of 106,257, 
showing a net loss of 996. 

The Grand Master in his address devoted some time to 
a description of his visit to Canada when the Bi-Centenary 
Anniversary of Masonry in Canada was celebrated in 1938. 
He concluded with these words, "I feel that this visit among 
the Canadian Brothers was a mission spreading goodwill and 
understanding, not only among nations, but also among the 
citizens of two great Democracies." 

Twenty-three dispensations were granted for inter- 
jurisdictional visitations with lodges of four neighbouring 
States. This is an excellent idea. Get away from home and 
ascertain how others do it and widen your own horizon. 

It is delightful to know that the Grand Lodge and its 
officers will suffer no further embarrassment when they are 
recjuired to lay a corner-stone, or to dedicate a lodge room, 
by not having the working tools, — the Square, Level and 
Plumb-rule. Grand Lodge has completed its equipment by 
purchasing these tools. 

The Committees of the Masonic Libraries and Masonic 
Education and Research prepared a Treatise and Historical 
Survey upon the Constitution of the United States of 
America; its foundation; the part which Masons had in its 
formation and adoption; and some of the present-day trends 
and tendencies which threaten to impair or destroy the Con- 
stitution and Constitutional Government in the United States. 

A copy of this document was sent to each constituent 
lodge, so that the 150th Anniversary of the installation of 
George Washington as the first President of the United 
States could be fittingly observed. 

This is a well worth-while document for anyone to read 
who wishes to broaden his horizon regarding the achieve- 
ments of Masons among our neighbours to the South. 

One wonders, how in a Jurisdiction of over 500 lodges, 
any system of supervision can be carried out without a 
division into districts with an Inspector or District Deputy 
Grand Master for each, but apparently Indiana has nothing 
in its administrative set-up to provide for the thorough in- 
spection of each lodge at least once a year. 

The greatest contribution to charity made by the Masons 
of Indiana seems to be to the Masonic Home at Franklin. 
The activities of this Home include the operation of schools. 
Grade, High and Technical. 

The health is well cared for by a staff of physicians 
and dentists. 

The greenhouse, the farm and garden, and dairy furnish 
many of the elements of livelihood and reduce the cost of 
operation. 

Religion, entertainment and recreation find a prominent 
place in the life of this fine institution. It is so popular that 



FEATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 27 

there is a lengthy list of applicants waiting for admission 
to this Home. 

It is noted that a Committee was appointed to select a 
design for a fifty-year emblem, which would be presented 
to members with a continuous membership of fifty years as 
a recognition of a long and honoured membership in the 
Fraternity. 

The Grand Representative of Indiana is Donald M. 
Sutherland of Woodstock, Ontario. 



IOWA— 1939 

Grand Master — RealfF Ottesen. 

Grand Secretary — Charles C. Hunt. 

Active Lodges — 548; membership 67,238, a net loss of 
305. 

Ninety-Sixth Annual Communication at Sioux City, June 
13, 1939. 

A total of 702 in attendance was reported by the Com- 
mittee on Credentials. 

Included in the preliminary ceremonies was an address 
of welcome by Bro. D. F. Laepp, Mayor of Sioux City, and 
a suitable reply by the Grand Chaplain, Eugene Maunheimer. 

The Grand Secretary announced that the gavel in use 
was one made from poplar wood from the Guilford battle- 
ground, and was being circulated for annual communications 
in various Grand Jurisdictions. The altar was one used by 
Lodges of Sioux City previous to the fire. 

The Grand Master's address occupies forty pages of the 
Proceedings, containing much useful information and many 
inspiring passages. 

Near the opening one reads: 

"It has always been a great privilege to be a Mason. 
This privilege is enhanced just now by reason of the strained 
conditions throughout the civilized world. To be a Mason 
to-day is to have the rare privilege of being enlisted in a 
great crusade to preserve the eternal verities of life, the 
great ideal of the Brotherhood of all Men under the Father- 
hood of One Ever-living God, against the attacks of racial 
arrogance, religious intolerance, class antagonism, and per- 
sonal greed." 

The Grand Master praised the exhibits in the "Hall of 
Masonry" which depicted the history and work of the Grand 
Lodge of Iowa, and believed it should be "a liberal education 
for any Mason." 

The duties of "Special Representatives of the Grand 
Master" to visit, inspect and instruct the several lodges were 
outlined in detail and commented upon. These nine points 
of efficiency were commended to the representatives: 



28 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

"Proficient and efficient ritualistic work. An inspiring 
education program. Ample opportunities for Fraternal fel- 
lowship. Co-operation in inter-lodge activities. Active par- 
ticipation in Grand Lodge activities. Adequate provision for 
Masonic Charity. A well organized system of Lodge ad- 
ministration. Careful handling of Lodge finances. A proper 
regard for the dignity of Masonry in the community served." 

The purchase of Carl Claudy's "The Master's Book" was 
recommended to every Master of Iowa. 

The Grand Master deplored the loss in membership, but 
pointed out that it was less than in former years indicating 
a return to normal conditions. He recommended re-instate- 
ments, where possible, for those suspended for non-payment 
of dues. 

The Grand Master made some 18 visitations during the 
year, and laid corner-stones for a new Masonic Temple at 
Marengo, for a high school building at Moulton, and for the 
Longfellow School at Council Bluffs. He also dedicated the 
Temple at Marengo, and a hall at Danville. 

The Grand Master passed his opinion on several matters 
among which the following are of interest: 

(1) Regarding the "physical perfection doctrine," he 
said: "Personally, I find nothing in its favor except its 
antiquity." He admitted differences of opinion, but believed 
the local constituent lodge might be the final judge of 
physical fitness. 

(2) "A lodge cannot go to another city to confer a 
degree, although it may be permitted to hold a meeting for 
degree work in some other hall in the city where it is 
located." The latter would not be allowed in Ontario unless 
dedicated for the purpose. 

(3) A member who had killed a man and then commit- 
ted suicide was granted a Masonic funeral. 

(4) "It is my opinion that the only test of whether or 
not a brother is entitled to a Masonic burial is whether or 
not he is in good standing at the time of his death." This 
was at variance with the Code of Iowa which restricted such 
honor to Master Masons. 

(5) On the request of a lodge to change its regular 
meeting he reports, "I held that I was unable to grant it 
permission to hold its stated communication at any other 
time than that prescribed by its by-laws, and if its by-laws 
prescribed the hour of meeting, the meeting would have to 
be held at that hour , . . ." 

Evidently dispensations are hard to get in Iowa! 

(6) "In my opinion, unaffiliates and non-affiliates pos- 
sess only such rights as are specifically given in the Code, 
and I ruled that only a Mason in good standing can prefer 
charges." This referred to a demitted Mason who preferred 
charges against an E.A. The ruling seems reasonable. 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 29 

(7) "Residence within the territorial jurisdiction of the 
lodge has not been made a qualification for office in a subor- 
dinate lodge." This ruling referred to the holding of office 
by a Senior Warden who lived in territory beyond the juris- 
diction of his lodge. 

(8) Permission was granted to a Lodge to act as sponsor 
for a Boy Scout troop, provided that it did not involve any 
expenditure of lodge funds. 

(9) A Lodge with a very old charter requested permis- 
sion to place it in a fire-proof vault and to use a photostatic 
copy in the Lodge room. This was ruled impossible under 
the existing Code. 

The Grand Master advocated the printing of a digest 
of opinions and rulings when the Code was reprinted. 

Several visitations to and conferences with other Grand 
Bodies of Masons were recorded, and co-operation between 
these and the Grand Lodge of Iowa advocated. 

The Grand Master says, — "Iowa's system of teaching 
and maintaining ritualistic proficiency continues to be the 
admiration of the Masonic world." The work is done through 
a corps of District Lecturers and Masonic Instructors. The 
new slogan is, "A District Lecturer in every Lodge," and 
the aim, "Every Lodge a member of an active study circle." 
This activity is under the supervision of the Board of Custo- 
dians of the Grand Lodge. 

The appointment, in Ontario, of a "Custodian of the 
Work" seems to be a move in the right direction. 

A pamphlet explaining Iowa's method of ritualistic in- 
struction has been prepared and is available for distribution. 

The Grand Master recommended a "Service Director" in 
everj' lodge to see that an adequate service program is con- 
ducted and maintained as is the custom in North Dakota. 

Simultaneous meetings, at which the Grand Master 
broadcast a message, were held by 420 of the 548 lodges. 
A continuance of these meetings with certain suggestions 
as to programmes was recommended to the Service Com- 
mittee. 

Would such a scheme be possible in Ontario? 

Carl Claudy was praised for his excellent Masonic plays, 
and the many outstanding talks he has given. 

In dealing with Masonry in foreign lands the Grand 
Master remarks: 

"We cannot examine conditions in Europe without being 
shocked by what we find. Even the political totalitarians of 
that continent find that Masonry cannot exist side by side 
wih official racial arrogance and religious intolerance." .... 

"We must continue to reaffirm the age-old principles 
even though such reaffirmation may run contrary to current 
religious, social or political trends." 



30 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

The Grand Master has an Emergency Fund from which 
he made donations for the aid of Austrian Masons, and 
Masons stricken in the catastrophe in Chile. 

Iowa's centennial comes in 1944 and the Grand Master 
urged immediate preparations for its proper celebration. 

Near the end of the address the Grand Master empha- 
sizes: 

"The principles of Freemasonry, the lessons of morality 
taught by Freemasonry, are known and recognized by all 
men. What we need, what the entire Craft needs above all 
else, is the indomitable will to stand by those principles, 
no matter what the temptation may be to do otherwise or 
the harm that may befall us personally by reason of being 
true to them." 

His closing exhortation is: "Be Not Afraid." 
The official jewel of the Bicentenary of Freemasonry in 
Canada was forwarded to Iowa from Nova Scotia and has 
been placed in the Masonic Library as "a constant evidence 
of the fraternalism and good will that prevails between these 
great jurisdictions." 

Interesting reports on tbe Museum and Library were 
adopted. The latter contains 46,669 books and pamphlets 
and is used extensively. 

The following expenditures for benevolence are worthy 
of record: Grand Master's Emergency Fund, $1,709.76; Grand 
Charity Fund, $34,120.24; and Maintenance Fund of Masonic 
Sanitarium, $43,021.90. The endowment fund is $763,000.00, 
The reports of the several committees of Grand Lodge 
are very interesting, sbov.dng that Masonry in Iowa is very 
much alive. The report on Centennial Observance notes that 
the first chartered lodge in the United States was established 
in Boston, 1733. One hundred years later, a pioneer hamlet, 
in v/hat is now the State of Iowa, was named Burlington and 
here the first Masonic lodge was organized in the State. 
Burlington was selected for the Ninety-Seventh Annual 
Communication. 

Brother E. G. Williams gave a masterly address to the 
Grand Lodge entitled "Hewed Stones — Costly Stones", em- 
phasizing the "Granite of Truth" and integrity, the "Flint 
of Sacrificial Devotion", the "Alabaster of Compassion and 
Tolerance", and the "Marble of Faith in God", which con- 
stitute the essence of Religion — the source of democracy 
and international good faith. It was a scholarly, thought- 
producing exhortation of those things held in high esteem 
by all true Masons. 

Flag Day was observed on June 14 in a patriotic address 
by John W. Gaunaway, a Past Grand Master, concluding as 
follows: 

"The flag we honor to-day, my brethren, is the flag of 
peace and unity and good will. It is the flag of a people in 
whose hearts bums the fire of liberty. It is the flag of a 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 31 

nation illuminated by freedom's holy light. It is a flag that 
symbolizes the high social ideals and human relationships 
inculcated by our Masonry " 

Past Grand Master, E. R. Moore, was commended for 
his history of the Grand Lodge of Masons of Iowa from 1913 
to 1938 inclusive. 

The newly elected Grand Master — Homer A. Benjamin, 
Des Moines, and other officers were duly installed, and M. W. 
Bro. Ottesen was presented with a Past Grand Master's 
jewel. 

The Proceedings state that the total number of Masons 
in the United States is 2,521,651, a decrease of 35,377 from 
1938, and in the Dominion of Canada, 171,677, a decrease of 
1,977. 

Another feature of the Grand Lodge report includes 
pictures and short sketches of the newly-elected officers. 

The review of Fraternal Correspondence by Ernest R. 
Moore, P.G.M., of Cedar Rapids, is very complete and com- 
prises 204 pages, of which four are devoted to the Grand 
Lodge of Canada. 

IRELAND— 1939 

St. John's Day Meeting, 1938. 

The Earl of Donoughmore K.P., Grand Master. 

By a remarkable coincidence this meeting marked the 
close of the twenty-fifth year of the Grand Mastership of 
the Earl of Donoughmore and also the 150th Anniversary 
of the first election to the same office of his forebear 
Richard, the first Earl of Donoughmore. The event was 
signalized by the presentation of an old Irish silver loving 
cup to the Grand Master bearing his crest and- a suitable 
inscription. 

The esteem and love which the brethren entertain for 
their Grand Master was demonstrated by the brethren stand- 
ing in their places and cheering him for several minutes 
when he arose to deliver his annual address. 

In the course of his address he expressed his satisfac- 
tion that the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts had appointed 
a committee of their Past Grand Masters to draw up in 
concise form a statement of the aims of Freemasonry to be 
submitted to the annual conference of the Grand Lodges of 
the United States at their next meeting and which in sub- 
stance was to be in full accord with the declaration of the 
Grand Lodges of England, Scoland and Ireland. Our own 
Grand Master was so favorably impressed with this declara- 
tion that it was reproduced in full in his annual address in 
1939 and he caused a copy of it to be sent to every Lodge 
in our jurisdiction and many of the constituent Lodges had 
it reprinted for distribution and enclosed with the regular 
summons to every member. 



32 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

The Grand Master related the unique experience he had 
in opening a Lodge in the Tower of London. The Worcester- 
shire Regiment was at the time relieving the regular Guards 
during their three weeks absence on manoeuvres. The Lodge 
of the Regiment by permission of their Colonel and the 
Governor of the Tower held a special meeting in one of the 
dungeons of the Tower and initiated one of their colour- 
sergeants and the Grand Master said, "I am sure if the 
Grand Director of Ceremonies had been there he would have 
approved of the Vv'ork." So far as the records show, this 
is the first time a Masonic meeting was held in the ancient 
fortress. 

The Grand Master referred regretfully to the approach- 
ing retirement of His Royal Highness the Duke of Con- 
naught as Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of England, 
whom he designated as the "Grand Old Man of Freemasonry", 
a well deserved title which will be endorsed by every Grand 
Lodge in the world. 

R. W. Bro. Raymond F. Brooke, Deputy Grand Master, 
in fifteen pages of the Report gives a vivid description of 
the visit to Canada and the United States of the delegations 
from the Grand Lodges of England, Scotland and Ireland 
upon the occasion of the bicentenary celebration of the in- 
troduction of . Freemasonry in Canada. He concluded his 
interesting report as follows: 

"While the original idea was just the celebration of the 
bicentenary, from it there grew the further arrangements 
made to enable us to visit all the other Canadian Grand 
Lodges, and finally the Grand Lodges of Massachusetts and 
New York came in and most kindly asked us to visit them 
on our way home. This Masonic journey has been unique 
in the annals of English speaking Freemasonry. Never before 
have deputations from the three Home Grand Lodges travel- 
led together so far and never before has any group of rep- 
resentative Brethren visited so many Grand Lodges in one 
journey. The memory of the kindness we received and the 
friendships we formed will be with us till life's end, while 
the personal contact that we have made with our overseas 
Brethren will have done good to true Freemasonry all over 
the world and especially to the Grand Lodge of Ireland." 

V. W. Bro. Cyril Browne writes a very interesting report 
of a visit to the Irish Lodges in far away Rhodesia from 
which we quote the following: 

"In conclusion, I am happy to report that Freemasonry in 
Rhodesia, founded on the enthusiasm of the brethren, ap- 
pears to be in a thoroughly healthy condition. In spite of 
the difficulties due to the scattered character of the com- 
munity, and the great distances to be travelled, meetings 
are well attended. The ceremonies are performed with great 
care and an evident desire to preserve the dignity and sym- 
bolism of our ancient customs." 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 33 

The Proceedings contain reports from the Provincial 
Grand Lodges of New Zealand, Northern South Africa, 
Southern Cape and Natal and one from a Lodge in Shanghai, 
all of which make very interesting reading. 

St. John's Day Meeting 1939 

Owing to the absence of the Grand Master in England 
the Deputy Grand Master R. W. Bro. Raymond Brooke pre- 
sided over this Communication. He supplemented the re- 
marks made by the Grand Master at the meeting in 1938 
to the effect that if the present turmoil dies down it can 
only be by the triumph of the great principles that Free- 
masonry teaches, that men must love their neighbors as 
themselves, by the following pronouncement to which all 
right-minded men will heartily subscribe: 

"Brethren, the action of one man who suppressed all 
Freemasonry in his own country — Freemasonry which, in 
happier days we used to recognize as working within the 
bounds of the ancient landmarks — and who entirely put 
aside those principles which Freemasonry teaches, charity 
and brotherly love, has plunged the v>'orld again into all the 
horror and misery that war entails. We can only hope and 
pray that when the war is over, and peace has been restored, 
those whose duty it is to frame treaties will remember those 
great principles which we acknowledge, and will try to apply 
them to their task." 

He expressed his sympathy for and admiration of the 
splendid work carried on by Lodge Erin at Shanghai under 
most distressing and discouraging difficulties. 

The following quotation from the report of R. W. Bro. 
Phillip M. Street of Lodge Erin fully justifies the compli- 
ment paid that Lodge by the Deputy Grand Master. 

"In spite of the hardships inflicted by a continued fall 
in exchange which dropped from approximately $16.00 to 
the £ to $60.00, our membership has been maintained and 
new candidates provided ample degree ^vork to keep the 
Lodge busy at all meetings. The working throughout the 
year has been of the usual high standard which has won an 
enviable reputation for Lodge Erin throughout China. The 
keenness of our members is most gratifying and throughout 
the year an average of 75% of our local members attended 
each meeting. 

"Calls upon our Charity Funds have again been heavy 
as Shanghai is going through a most trying period, business 
conditions are very bad and to add to Shanghai's burden 
nearly seventeen thousand European refugees have arrived 
here during the year, a number of whom were members of 
the former Grand Lodge of Vienna. Despite prevailing con- 
ditions we are happy to have again been able to make our 
small contribution to the various Masonic Charities in 
Dublin." 



34 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

Although laboring under difficulties owing to war con- 
ditions all reports from the Provincial Grand Lodges indicate 
that Freemasonry in Ireland is flourishing. 

This Grand Lodge maintains a Masonic Female Orphan 
School with 105 pupils upon the roll, a Masonic Orphan Boys' 
School with 107 pupils enrolled and has a Victoria Jubilee 
Masonic Annuity Fund which provides substantial relief to 
245 annuitants. 



KANSAS— 1939 

The Eighty-Third Annual Communication was held at 
Wichita, February 15th and 16th, 1939. Four hundred and 
forty-nine lodges reported a membership of 60,854 with a 
net loss of 580. 

Grand Master Henry S. Buzick dealt with an important 
problem in his annual address, when he spoke to his Grand 
Lodge as follows: 

"The lessons portrayed in the degrees are deeper and 
more far-reaching than appears on the surface. Our newly 
admitted brethren should be taught that Masonry is not 
merely an organization of beautiful ceremonies and lectures, 
but is a philosophy which requires careful and long study. 
The ceremonial of conferring the degrees creates new mem- 
bers only. The new members become Masons when they 
have learned the lessons taught and applied them to their 
individual lives. We have too many members v/ho fail to 
complete this course of study. They learn to correctly answer 
a few questions and listen to many instructive lectures. 

Finally they receive their membership card. 

All of this indicates they are Masons and qualified to travel 
and work as such. As a matter of fact, if we permit their 
interest in the study of Masonry to end here, we have failed. 
Masonry embraces all the problems of the individual and 
society. The design of Masonry is to make its votaries wiser, 
better, and consequently happier. To accomplish this design, 
we must study and progress continuously. Our obligation 
to the newly admitted brethren is to instruct them in the 
fundamentals so they may realize that the beautiful philoso- 
phy will unfold to them through their own study and re- 
search. Thus will we fulfill our full duty as officers and 
leaders in the Fraternity." 

Arresting also was the Oration delivered by Bro. Arthur 
F. McCarty, from v/hose eloquent address we quote: 

"It is my conviction that, to every Mason, the needs of 
these times transcend the needs of any other times within 
the lives of those here; that the call and the challenge of 
today is to Masons to stand fast in this second third of the 
twentieth century more than at any time within 75 years; 
that NOW, here and in our own time, it is for our great 
Order to justify its honorable and scintillating past, its 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 35 

system of philosophy, its principles of liberty, equality and 
fraternity, and its teaching that the individual must shape 
his own destiny here on earth — or miserably fail and see 
the advances made by humanity toward enlightenment and 
freedom wiped out — those painful, laborious and sometimes 
bloody steps mankind has taken along the paths of history, 
which, in all truth, synchronize so completely with the 
growth and advancement of Masonry — see these all go for 
naught. 

"Is this the language of an alarmist? I do not want 
or intend it to be. I have a message of hope and assurance, 
rather than one of doubt and despair. But no message of 
hope will carry much weight unless it be predicated on the 
facts and the dangers, and no message of assurance can 
really assure unless it contains the directions for effectuating 
the assurance. So it appears fitting to make an examination 
of ourselves and of the situation in Vv'hich we find Masonry 
today, as it impinges upon the state, the nation and the 
world; to find out, if we can, what we can do and how to 
do it, to demonstrate anew that our Order was placed by 
Divine Providence in this human society for definite pur- 
poses, one of which, at least, is to save mankind from the 
dire effects of man's own folly." 

Claud F. Young, of Fort Scott, was elected and installed 
as Grand Master for the 1939-40 term. 



KENTUCKY— 1939 

One Hundred and Thirty-Ninth Communication held at 
Louisville on the 17th, 18th 'and 19th of October 1939. 
Chai-les P. Duley, Grand Master. 
Total membership— 42,289. 

The first impression we experienced when we received 
the Proceedings of this Grand Lodge was the probable mag- 
nitude of the task of reviewing a ponderous volume of 860 
pages. Some relief, however, was felt when upon opening 
it we discovered that 300 pages were devoted to lists of 
officers and members of every Lodge in the jurisdiction, with 
details also of those admitted, reinstated, demitted, suspend- 
ed and dead during the year. A further examination of the 
volume disclosed a number of excellent photographs of those 
high in authority. From a careful study of these it is 
apparent that good looks is an essential qualification for 
promotion in this Grand Lodge. In this and a few other 
jurisdictions the proceedings are prefaced with a biographical 
sketch of the Grand Master which is a great aid to the re- 
viewer in understanding the prominence and preferential 
treatment of certain matters. 

The Grand Master in his address devoted seven pages 
to the ceremony of and the social gatherings associated with 
the installation of H. R. H. the Duke of Kent as Grand 



36 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

Master of the United Grand Lodge of England. Being unable 
to go himself he made a wise selection in cTioosing as a 
substitute Past Grand Master John H. Cowles who presented 
to the mother Grand Lodge a beautiful gold scroll upon 
which were engraved in appropriate language the salutations 
and felicitations of the forty-three thousand Kentucky 
Masons. We quote the following from M. W. Bro. Cowles' 
Report: 

"No title is adequate to imply fully the marvelous oc- 
casions obtaining during the four days of the Especial 
Meeting of the United Grand Lodge of Freemasons of Eng- 
land, from July 18 to 21, 1939, inclusive, held in the City 
of London, the largest city in the world. Nothing like it 
has ever equaled it to this good day, nor is it likely to be 
excelled for many generations, if ever. From the moment 
of its initiation to the end of the last function everything 
was as perfect as human energy and ability could achieve." 

In lieu of the stereotyped Christmas card, which means 
so little, the Grand Master issued a proclamation to the 
members of his Grand Lodge and to all the constituent 
Lodges. It is a practice that we might well emulate. It is 
so beautiful in sentiment and language that we reproduce 
it in full. 

"Proclamations 

Morehead, Ivy., December 15, 1938. 

"To the Members of the Grand Lodge of Kentucky and 
the Lodges subordinate thereto: 

"As we approach the Christmas season, may we do so 
with hearts full of gratitude for the many blessings that 
are ours on account of the fact that we are living in a 
country where Freedom is an accomplished fact and not in 
a totalitarian state where there is no liberty for any except 
those whose will is being forced upon the masses. 

"In this land of ours we have freedom of thought in all 
matters and this v/as bought for us with the blood of many 
of our forebears, so let us strive to keep our banner high 
and live as Masons should, with the idea that no criticism 
can be leveled justly at the great fraternity which we all 
love so much and which had so great a part in writing the 
Constitution of our beloved Country. 

"Let us strive to emulate, in our small way, the virtues 
of the Christ, whose birth we celebrate at this season, and 
remember in our prayers those brothers less fortunate, 
across the water, who are now in dire distress. 

Fraternally thine. 

Grand Master." 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 37 

MAINE— 1939 

Grand Master — George F. Giddings. 
Grand Secretary — Convers E. Leach. 
206 lodges — 35,737 members, a net loss of 556. 

One Hundred and Twentieth Annual Communication at 
Portland, May 2, 3 and 4, 1939. 

Accredited representatives 293 from 198 lodges including 
James Abernethy representing the Grand Lodge of Canada. 

The Grand Master in welcoming distinguished guests 
commented upon the promotion of good fellowship and 
mutual understanding encouraged by visitations between 
Grand Jurisdictions. 

Due respect to the fraternal dead was paid in the read- 
ing of the section on Necrology and a moment of silence. 

The Grand Master expressed his regret over the decrease 
in membership, but made this significant remark: 

"The enormous gains during and immediately following 
the world war, resulted in a mushroom growth, caused by a 
rush of candidates, many of whom never became interested 
in the Order they had joined in the days of patriotic fervor. 
Consequently we should not become hysterical over the 
losses, because it is quality rather than quantity that counts 
and undoubtedly after all the 'dead wood' is eliminated, 
Freemasonry will become stronger and will continue in the 
future to be as potent a factor in world affairs as it has 
been in the past." 

The Grand Master urged that all subordinate lodges 
hold their annual meetings in December, and commented on 
their improved financial conditions. 

At present some 36% of the lodges in Maine have stated 
meetings controlled by the moon. The Grand Master says: 

"We hope that before long all will have abandoned that 
obsolete custom." 

During the year the Grand Master made 74 visitations 
including one to Nova Scotia celebrating the 200th anni- 
versary of the Founding of Freemasonry, July 9 to 13, 1938. 
On July 11, M. W. Bro. Giddings was presented v.-ith the 
Erasmus James Phillips Medal. On July 12, he proposed 
the "Toast to Canada" at a banquet tendered to the dele- 
gates and their ladies. 

Commenting on visits throughout his Grand Jurisdiction, 
M. W. Bro. Giddings remarks: 

"Only a small precentage of the lodges now furnish 
suppers without cost to members, and I hope before long 
that all of them will join the majority." 

Two special communications were held for the dedica- 
tion of masonic halls, and one for the laying of the corner- 
stone of the new Post Office at Dover-Foxcroft. 



38 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

The Grand Master emphasized the value of endowments 
for benevolent purposes, and recommended that masonic halls 
be kept for masonic purposes only. He commended the 
Masters of subordinate lodges for attempting to solve their 
problems through a study of the Constitutions and Regula- 
tions before referring them to him or to the Grand Secretary. 

On the use of the ballot the following pronouncement of 
a previous Grand Master was emphasized: 

"I have no hesitancy in saying that a violation of that 
trust and the casting of a ballot by a member for the pur- 
pose of enabling him to satisfy any personal feeling, is un- 
Masonic and, if clearly provable against such offending mem- 
ber, would furnish good cause for filing charges against such 
member for un-Masonic conduct." 

During the year the Grand Lodge paid $25,480.48 from 
its Charity Fund for the assistance of 313 persons. During 
the same period the subordinate lodges expended $12,746.00 
for relief of distressed brethren and their dependents. In 
addition to these sums, $5,202.36 was transmitted to the 
Swiss Grand Lodge for the relief of some 300 brethren who 
were ordered to leave Austria. The Charity Fund amounts 
to $230,181.83. 

The Grand Master favoured an amendment in the award 
of Veteran's Medals, to permit presentation to a member 
who had been a Master Mason for fifty or more years even 
if he had resided in Maine only a part of the time. (Our 
Grand Lodge approved a similar amendment in 1939). He 
also recommended the establishment of a bronze medal in 
memory of the late M. W. Bro. Josiah Hayden Drummond. 

The Grand Master concluded his address, in part, as 
follows: 

"It is a sad commentary upon, aye, an indictment 
against modern civilization that there should be rampant the 
spirit of intolerance, arrogance, greed, and racial hatred. 
These four are more responsible than anything else for the 
condition in which we find the world today. In view of that 
fact, we need a rebirth of character which is the cornerstone 
upon which true leadership is builded. True leadership is 
the product of high moral environment and the cultivation 
and growth of strong character through education. We need, 
as leaders, rugged men, and men v/ith courage; men who 
have backbone and are not afraid to express their conclusions 
and above all, brethren we need, as leaders, men who have 
a high regard for the truth." 

A copy of the invitation from the United Grand Lodge 
of England to send representatives to the Installation of the 
Grand Master in London, June 18 to 21, 1939 is included in 
the proceedings. The Grand Master and Grand Secretary 
were appointed to represent the Grand Lodge of Maine. 

The Grand Lecturer reported eleven schools of instruc- 
tion with a registration of 732 for the year. At these meet- 
ings some of the District Deputy Grand Masters, 25 in 



FRATEENAL CORRESPONDENCE 39 

number, were present and discussed such topics as examina- 
tion of visitors, rating the quality of degree work, and the 
ri£ual. The D.D.G.M. has a form on which to report the 
quality of the work — "Correct, fair, or poor according to 
the fact." A suggestion was made to add "excellent" as a 
rating. 

A resume of the procedure in Examination of Visitors 
is interesting, and the following points might be noted: 
Examinations. 

"The Master of any lodge may require of any person 
who may wish to be examined for the purpose of visiting 
such lodge, a voucher, under seal, that such person has been 
initiated in a regular lodge." 

Masters are urged not to allow any person to visit their 
lodges unless he is properly vouched for, or has been shown 
to be a mason of good standing by strict examination. 
Avouchment. 

A Mason cannot avouch for another unless he has sat 
in lodge with him. 
Procedure in Examination. 

1. Master appoints a competent committee (preferably 
3). 

2. Each visitor to be examined separately. 

3. Ask for credentials. 

4. Administer Tyler's Oath. (In Ontario 4 would come 
before 3). 

5. Check name and member of lodge against directory 
to make sure it is a regular lodge. 

6. Is visitor in good standing as shown by dues card ? 

7. Can he match the signature which appears or should 
appear on the dues receipt? 

8. Examine on ritual. 

(1) No set form. 

(2) Knowledge of grips and words of fundamental 
importance. 

(3) Purpose is not to stick or catch the visitor but 
to satisfy yourself that he is a Mason. 

The Committee on Masonic Education reported that 81 
lodges conducted programmes of an educational nature dur- 
ing the year. Ir each case there was a marked increased 
attendance. The Committee provides, upon request, copies 
of outstanding addresses, of Masonic plays, of material for 
addresses and lists of speakers. 

A Past Master's Diploma was approved, and is to be 
presented by the District Deputy Grand Master at the con- 
clusion of the Master's term of office. The Past Master's 
Jewel is the common award in Ontario. 

The Constitutions and General Regulations of the Grand 
Lodge of Maine were variously amended. The following 
points may be of interest to Ontario Masons: 



40 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

"1. No candidate shall receive the E. A. degree unless 
14 days have elapsed since he was accepted. An interval of 
14 days must elapse before a F. C. degree is conferred, and 
then 14 days before the M. M. degree is given." 

Evidently proficiency in the work of each degree is not 
emphasized in Maine, or else candidates can do the task 
more rapidly than in Ontario. 

"2. The fee demanded by a lodge . . . shall not 
be less than thirty dollars. No notes, or installments are 
allowed. 

"3. Fifty cents per year for each member and two dol- 
lars for every candidate initiated must be paid annually by 
each lodge towards the support of Grand Lodge. 

"4. Fifty cents per year is levied on each member for 
the Charity Fund of the Grand Lodge of Maine." 

M. W. Bro. Joseph E. Perry, Grand Master of Massa- 
chusetts, delivered a most inspiring and appropriate address 
at the annual banquet, a verbatim report being recorded in 
the Proceedings. 

Joseph R. Crocker, Hamilton, represents the Grand 
Lodge of Maine in Ontario. 

MANITOBA— 1939 

The Sixty-Fourth Annual Communication held in Winni- 
peg, June 7th and 8th, 1939. 

Robert Hawkins — Grand Master. 

Membership — 10,413. Number of lodges — 103. 

Manitoba is no longer "the West" as it was considered 
to be even twenty years ago. It is now actually, as v/ell as 
geographically, the centre of Canada. Air transportation 
and air mail have almost eliminated distance and Alberta 
is as close to Toronto as formerly Montreal was. Manitoba 
no longer seems a pioneer Province nor Winnipeg a pioneer 
city. 

The Grand Master was highly pleased with the ex- 
ceptionally large attendance at each of the ten District 
meetings held outside of Winnipeg in August, September, 
and October. The interest and the enthusiasm displayed were 
delightful. The meetings of the First and the Twelfth Dis- 
tricts, held in Winnipeg in January and February, proved 
to be equally gratifying. The Grand Lodge of Manitoba has 
a Benevolent Fund of $273,000.00 and is annually adding to 
it. Each year all the lodges are asked to make donations. 
We can learn much from our daughter Grand Lodge of 
Manitoba and our granddaughter Grand Lodges in Western 
Canada. We raised a large Memorial Benevolent Fund (not 
as large relatively as those of Manitoba and Saskatchewan) 
and we stopped there as if our duty had been fully done. 
They continue to add materially to their Benevolent Funds 
each year. 



FRATEENAL CORRESPONDENCE 41 

A new lodge, Manitouwapa Lodge, was instituted in May, 
1939, in a sparsely settled district. How Masonry is cherished 
by those who live and work on the frontiers of civilization! 
During the year the Board of General Purposes of Grand 
Lodge held only six meetings. "There were no special meet- 
ings, thanks to the completion of the Constitution, the de- 
termination of the Districts, and the general peace and har- 
mony that prevailed throughout the Jurisdiction.' 

"The advisability of changing our funeral service to 
meet inclement weather conditions was referred to the 
custodians of the work." 

Another quotation is this, from the Report of the Com- 
mittee on the Condition of Masonry: 

"Two truths must be pointed out here; young Masons 
should never forget the debt they owe to their proficient 
and lovable older brethren; older Masons should not lose 
sight of the fact that, while they may disagree with much 
that is done by the younger generation, there was a time 
when, as younger men, they were daring souls. But let young 
and old alike take notice that new membership in Free- 
masonry is possible only when an impression is left upon a 
community that, of all desirable things within it, to be a 
Free Mason is one of the best." 

Grand Master Nordbye of Minnesota addressed the 
brethren at luncheon on Thursday. One paragraph of this 
address follows: 

"To build, — not great cathedrals as did the operative 
Masons of old — but to build character; to build that house 
not made with human hands, eternal in the heavens. Once 
we forget that this is the mission of oui Fraternity, and 
when it comes to pass that Masons do not stand out among 
their fellows as men good and true, then our Fraternity 
will surely meet with the decay that befalls all mortal things 
in this world. It is the adherence to the idealism of Masonry 
that is the secret of its existence and long life. It is the 
love for the truths of Masonry arid a practical application 
thereof in our daily lives that is immortal, and will never, 
never die." 

From the Report of the Committee on Masonic Education 
this paragraph is taken. 

"At the beginning of the year the prepared material 
was sent to all Lodges. This included a series of topics on 
Masonic subjects v/ith suggested outlines as a basis for 
presentation, and also a list of questions and answers group- 
ed under the general headings History, Ritual, and Consti- 
tution. It was suggested that time might be taken at 
regular Lodge meetings for discussions on the topics sug- 
gested, or the questions might be used either for discussion, 
or according to the method of the popular "quiz" programme. 
It was hoped that by means of these questions and answers, 
the ordinary member, who had not made a definite study 
of Masonry, might be encouraged to give some thought to 



42 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

the meaning of various aspects of the Craft, and at the same 
time gain some idea of the need for understanding better 
the familiar things of our Ritual and Constitution." 

Two requests for recognition were complied with — the 
Grand Lodge Alpina of Switzerland and the Grand Lodge 
of Columbia. 

Somewhere at or near the border, there is, it appears, 
what is known as the "Masonic Island" to the upkeep of 
which the Grand Lodge of Manitoba and the Grand Lodge 
of North Dakota contribute. It might be interesting to have 
information regarding this project. 

Three fifty-year jewels were presented to veterans of 
the Craft, all of whom were initiated in Ontario: Bro. 
Charles R. McLachlan in Broome Lake Lodge, No. 211 (no 
longer on our Register) ; Bro. Andrew More in Clinton 
Lodge, No. 84; and Bro. Wm. E. Milner in Ionic Lodge, No. 
229, Brampton. 

The Grand Lodge of Manitoba is usually represented 
at our Annual Communications. M. W. Bro. Col. Royal 
Burritt, M. W. Bro. John T. Boyd and M. W. Bro. W. D. 
Lawrence have been with us in recent years. The present 
Grand Master of Manitoba is M. W. Bro. W. D. Lawrence, 
an energetic, forceful, and thoroughly competent officer 
whom it is a privilege to number among one's friends. To 
visit the Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of 
Manitoba and to read the Proceedings gives one a vivid im- 
pression of a virile Grand Lodge whose officers and members 
are fully aware of the dignity and high importance of Free- 
masonry. 



MARYLAND— 1939 

Grand Master — John H. Hessey. 
Grand Secretary — Claud Shaffer. 

121 Lodges — 28,424 members, a decrease for the year, 
but an increase of 33 for the last six months. 

An emergent convocation was held in Baltimore, April 
21, 1939 to attend the funeral of the late Brother and Grand 
Treasurer, Peter E. Tome. 

The Semi-Annual Convocation held at Baltimore, May 
16, 1939, was opened by the Deputy Grand Master, Harry B. 
Wright. About 400 representatives attended. 

The Grand Master spoke feelingly of the dead and of 
many who could not attend because of illness. 

He attributed a decrease of 611 in membership to the 
many suspensions necessitated by the requirement that su- 
bordinate lodges must suspend members who failed to pay 
dues for two years, a regulation confirmed in 1938 by Grand 
Lodge. 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 43 

The Grand Lodge held its annual divine service on 
January 8, 1939, in the Grand Lodge Room of Corinthian 
Hall. 

The Grand Master had visited 30 lodges during the pre- 
ceding six months. 

He regretted the unpleasant duty of declaring the elec- 
tion of a secretary void because of electioneering practices. 

The Grand Lodge buildings and equipment were valued 
at $896,291.93, and the Masonic Homes including farm, 
building and property at $862,871.21. The Endowment Fund 
of the Masonic Homes including "Bonnie Blink" farm was 
$335,194.89, producing a revenue of 3.38%. 

The Benevolent Fund, the income from which was used 
solely for benevolent purposes was $38,642.04. Expenditures 
from this fund were $1,571.50, and by the Board of Relief 
$646.19. 

The Grand Master emphasized the need of an auditorium 
and banquet hall, and of a new elevator. He called attention 
to the collection of historical items in the Museum, and ad- 
vocated additional expenditures for museum purposes. 

The Grand Master expressed appreciation of the co- 
operation of his officers, mentioning especially the Grand 
Secretary, Harry C. Mueller. 

The Grand Lecturer, Charles W. Skipper, visited many 
lodges and held several lodges of instruction and schools, 
including tv.'o summer schools, all of which were well at- 
tended. 

The Committee on Jurisprudence recommended an a- 
mendment to the Constitution permitting the Grand Master 
to appoint six Past Masters, "three of whom .-hall be con- 
versant with the German Language", as qualified instructors. 

Special communications were held at Hagerstown to lay 
the corner-stone of the new City Hall, and at Baltimore to 
witness the latest play of W. Bro. Carl H. Claudy, "Judge 
Not". 

An emergent communication was held, November 13, 
1939, to attend the funeral of the late Grand Secretary, 
Harry C. Mueller, who died November 10, 1939. 

The Grand Lodge of Canada deeply regrets the loss in 
one year of the Grand Secretary and the Grand Treasurer 
by the Grand Lodge of Maryland. 

One Hundred and Fifty-Third Annual Communication, 
November 21, and 22, 1939. 

The 121 lodges were represented by some 362 delegates. 
In addition, there were many other representatives and 
visitors. Harry B. Wright represented the Grand Lodge of 
Canada. 

The Grand Master's address was interesting and inspir- 
ing. The following quotations and comments give only an 
inadequate idea of its importance. 



44 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

"Out of a dim, distant past, almost too obscure to be 
discernible, through centuries of the progress of civilization 
to a great and glorious present, stands Masonry to-day, in 
full vigour, and ready by its teachings, principles and leader- 
ship to continue its influence in the stabilization of the 
world." 

"I wish for all a still greater measure of prosperity in 
the future, one filled with the riches and fruitfulness which 
come as a result of a life which absorbs and practises the 
principles of our great fraternity." 

"It has been my privilege to visit other jurisdictions, 
and even across the high seas, and to fraternize with breth- 
ren from all over the world, and I am happy to report a 
universal interest in the principles of Masonry. Although 
in some countries Masonry has been condemned and its very 
existence made impossible, yet its spirit will ever dwell in 
the hearts of all good Masons, and it can never be effaced 
from this Universe but will go on for time immemorial." 

The Grand Master attended the installation of the Duke 
of Kent as Grand Master of the United Grand Lodge of 
England in London, July 18 to 21, 1939. He was enthusiastic 
over the various ceremonies and comments in these words: 

"The reception which was accorded the King and the 
glory of this wonderful spectacle thrilled me and seemed 
to bring me closer to the British people. The King to his 
people is a symbol, just so much as the Stars and Stripes 
is to the American people." 

The supervision of the work and Masonic Education are 
looked after by Grand and District Grand Lecturers, and 
Grand and District Grand Instructors. The Grand Master 
commended highly their co-operation. 

M. W. Bro. Hessey commented on the fluctuations in the 
value of the various securities. Among these are the Endow- 
ment Fund of $321,495.39, and the Maintenance Fund of 
$120,427.56. These funds supply a satisfactory revenue. 

One of the yearly features is the corn-husking at the 
farm "Bonnie Blink". Several photographs of this event 
are reproduced in the Proceedings. The m.aintenance of the 
home and farm consumes considerable revenue but both are 
considered well worth while. 

The Grand Master's address closes with thanks to a wise 
Providence and a prayer for continued blessing on the Grand 
Lodge. 

Joseph Earl Perry, Grand Master of Massachusetts, was 
in attendance and presented the Henry Price Medal to M. W. 
Bro. J. Hessey. 

In the course of his remarks M. W. Bro. Perry com- 
mented upon the apparent undermining of things spiritual, 
and the disintegration of standards of conduct, morals and 
ethics, but he believed that the tide had now turned. He 
said: 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 45 

"The gathering forces of righteousness have already 
reached a balance, and before long we are going to see in- 
creasing evidences of the resurgence of things spiritual. 
Once more we are going to see that it is a fine thing for 
a man to be industrious and self-reliant and to have personal 
integrity. Once more friendship and morality, justice and 
tolerance, are going to be the things to be respected and 
admired. Those, whether in the Fraternity or outside, who 
conscientiously try to exemplify the higher things of life are 
going to find that less and less are they solitary, and more 
and more will they be finding others of likemind to stand 
by their side." 

M. W. Bro. T. Scott Purse, Grand Master of Delaware, 
in a brief reply to his presentation to the Grand Lodge, said: 

". . . . The time has come for Masonry to consolidate 
its forces and present to the world a united front, a united 
front of hearts and minds, for the principles for which 
Masonry stands. It has always been a stabilizing force in 
the world. Masonry has always emphasized the value of 
human personality. It has preached loyalty and established 
governments. Masonry as an institution stands for the finest 
things in life; but its power can only benefit the world 
through the channels of individual effort " 

Many other distinguished guests and representatives 
spoke briefly emphasizing the value of Masonry and the 
necessity of vigilance in prosecuting its work. 

Carl H. Claudy, Executive Secretary of the Masonic 
Service Association of the United States, an eminent writer 
on Masonic subjects, and a producer of many Masonic plays, 
commented briefly on conditions in Masoniy and the gradual 
spread of Masonic fraternalism. 

There are 37 District Grand Inspectors who represent 
the Grand Master, besides some 22 for Baltimore City and 
County, in addition to 12 District Grand Lecturers. This 
number of responsible officials for 121 lodges should keep 
the craft flourishing in Maryland. 

Maryland's representative to the Grand Lodge of Canada 
is H. R. H. Kenner of Peterborough, Ontario. 



MASSACHUSETTS— 1938 

The 1938 proceedings of the Grand Lodge of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts, M. W. Bro. Joseph Earl Perry, 
Grand Master, covers the minutes of quarterly and special 
communications and of the Stated Communication on the 
Feast of St. John the Evangelist, December 27th, the latter 
being the two hundred and fifth anniversary of this great 
Grand Lodge. The special communications included a meet- 
ing of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts on Canadian soil. 
This unique meeting took place at Halifax on July 11th, 1938, 
and was held in connection with the celebration under the 



46 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

auspices of the Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia of the two 
hundredth anniversary of the introduction of Freemasonry 
into Canada. 

Craft history tells us that the first meeting of Masons 
on the soil of what is now Canada was convened at Annapolis 
Royal in 1738 through the activities of Major Erasmus James 
Philipps, la young officer in the British Army who had been 
made a Freemason in the First Lodge at Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, less than a year before. Major Philipps acted 
under a warrant as Provincial Grand Master for Nova 
Scotia, issued by M. W. Bro. Henry Price, then Grand Master 
of Massachusetts. The Grand Lodge of Massachusetts 
has for that reason an intimate connection with the intro- 
duction of Freemasonry into Canada. It was, therefore, ap- 
propriate that they should take a special interest in the 
bi-centennial proceedings at Halifax in July of 1938. The 
special communication of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts 
held in Halifax on July 11th was convened for the purpose 
of unveiling, dedicating and presenting to the Grand Lodge 
of Nova Scotia a very handsome monument in Old St. Paul's 
churchyard erected in memory of Major Erasmus J. Philipps. 
In handing over this monument to the Grand Lodge of Nova 
Scotia, M. W. Bro. Joseph E. Perry referred in eloquent 
terms to the ties that bind Masons together, particularly 
the Masons of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts and the 
members of the Craft in Nova Scotia. The occasion was 
unquestionably particularly noteworthy in that representa- 
tives were present from England, Ireland and Scotland, all 
the Canadian Grand Lodges, and over twenty of the Grand 
Lodges of the United States. 

One might well say that to read the printed proceedings 
of Massachusetts is a liberal education in Masonic practice. 
One of the noticeable features of this printed Proceedings 
is the inclusion therein of historical sketches of constituent 
lodges who during the year have held important anniversary 
celebrations. The inclusion of the histories of these lodges 
will enable the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts to gradually 
build up an invaluable permanent record of Masonic activi- 
ties from early days up to the present throughout the whole 
of the Jurisdiction. It is to be regretted that in too many 
Jurisdictions, including our own, no special provision seems 
to be made for storing up within the archives of Grand 
Lodge the history of the constituent lodges. 

The Proceedings contain verbatim reports of the address- 
es made by Grand Master Perry, which are so eloquent and 
impressive as to merit extensive quotations in this report. 
An outstanding Masonic leader, endowed with the ability 
to clothe his thoughts in words constructively and impres- 
sively, M. W. Bro. Perry has been able during his term of 
office to make a real contribution to Masonic thought and 
Masonic endeavour, not only within his own Jurisdiction but 
also in many other portions of the Masonic world. 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 47 

Discussing the many important meetings of the Craft 
held in Massachusetts and elsewhere in recent months, he 
points out that the significance of any event or institution 
is largely determined by its surroundings in time or place 
or history. Viewed in that light our Masonic meetings cease 
to be merely an assembly of a few well-meaning individuals. 
Instead, these meetings become a symbol of an unseen army 
of thousands and hundreds of thousands of men of like mind 
and purpose all over the world. No Masonic gathering stands 
alone. It is reinforced and supported on every hand by a 
vast host of brothers. No longer does Freemasonry stand 
as merely a fraternal order; it becomes a symbol of all the 
individuals and all the forces that have made for higher 
standards and better conditions under all vicissitudes. 

Referring to the matter of Masonic education, Grand 
Master Perry points out that the purpose and the practice 
of Freemasonry are essentially educational, the teaching of 
•a better way of living, by example and by precept. He points 
out that there is an unending need for the education of our 
own membership, and further that there is an increasingly 
urgent need that the external world should be accurately 
informed about Freemasonry. It was in line with this con- 
viction that the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts in May of 
1938 employed for the first time a full-time Director of 
Education. It was their good fortune to secure for this 
important position W. Bro. J. Hugo Tatsch, recognized in 
the entire Masonic world as an outstanding authori.ty in the 
Masonic field. This distinguished brother's services as Direc- 
tor of Education came to an untimely end on his sudden 
death in England, in July of 1939, whither he had gone to 
attend the installation of His Royal Highness the Duke of 
Kent as Grand Master of the United Grand Lodge of 
England. 

It is impossible to cover the Proceedings of the Grand 
Lodge of Massachusetts without referring in terms of envy 
to the Service Department which is described as being an 
exemplification of the principle that, as the strength of 
Freemasonry is in the individual, every effort should be 
made to include just as many members as possible in some 
phase of Masonic service. The effectiveness of this effort 
is demonstrated in the fact that it is estimated that there 
are included among the Lodge Service Representatives and 
members of Service Committees some three thousand Masons 
(not officers of their lodges) who are taking part in some 
phase of Masonic activity beyond that which includes the 
officers of the lodge, thus co-ordinating the strength of the 
entire lodge as a background for the work of the Master and 
the officers. For thirteen years this work has been, develop- 
ing, and has shown a healthy increase each year, so that 
now the lodge without an active Service Committee is the 
exception rather than the rule. The wide range of activi- 
ties encompasses the whole field of fraternal endeavor,, from 
the simple gesture of a call upon a sick brother to the for.r 



48 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

mation within one district of a blood transfusion group of 
one hundred men. It is worthy of note that in many lodges 
a newly admitted candidate is given a definite place on the 
Service Committee, and is thereby given an opportunity to 
become an active participant, thus making real the lessons 
of the ritual which he has so recently learned. Increased 
attendance and greater loyalty to the lodge itself and a new 
allegiance to Masonry are the inevitable results of a v/ell- 
developed service effort. 

It is noteworthy that at the Grand Feast following the 
Stated Communication on December 27th, one of the prin- 
cipal speakers was our own Bro. H. J. Cody of Toronto, 
President of the University of Toronto. 

The Grand Secretary's recapitulation shows that 101,613 
members owe allegiance to the Grand Lodge of Massa- 
chusetts. 

M. W. Bro. Joseph E. Perry was unanimously re-elected 
as Grand Master for the ensuing year, a term of office which 
he has filled with useful service to the Craft. 

Massachusetts, we greet you well. 

MICHIGAN— 1939 

The Ninety-Fifth Annual Communication, held in Detroit, 
May 23rd and 24th, 1939. 

Francis B. Lambie — Acting Grand Master. 
Membership — 112,241. Number of lodges — 511. 

How close is the relationship between the Grand Lodge 
of Michigan and the Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province 
of Ontario! At every Annual Communication they are here 
and we are there. This time our Grand Master, our Grand 
Secretary, and our Grand Chaplain were there to see the 
inimitable Dr. Lambie, that Scottish-Canadian-American with 
the huge heart of gold, preside over his Grand Lodge after 
liis own fashion. What wonderful friends we have in the 
Grand Lodge of Michigan! As well known are they to us 
as many of our very own. Once the present reviewer, sitting 
in one of our lodges in Windsor, saw the Grand Master of 
Michigan brought in as an unexpected and welcome visitor. 
The embarrassed and nervous Director of Ceremonies said, 
"Worshipful Sir, allow me to introduce the Grand Master 
of the Grand Lodge of Michigan, in the Province of Ontario." 
Long may these bonds of genial and happy cordiality tie 
these two Grand Lodges together as with an indivisible 
chain! 

In the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Michigan 
there are no Reviews of the Proceedings of other Grand 
Lodges. There are many skilled craftsmen there who could 
write Reviews and perhaps some day Reviews will appear. 

The Grand Lodge was opened in an atmosphere of sor- 
row, for the Grand Master's chair stood vacant. M. W. Bro. 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 49 

Wirt I. Savery had been called, in the previous January, to 
the Grand Lodge Above. The brethren paid due and solemn 
respect to his memory, they honoured him for his good work 
v.'ell and faithfully done. 

The registered attendance was 1,226, of whom 707 were 
visitors. In the Grand Lodge of Michigan, as in most Grand 
Lodges, Past Masters are not members of Grand Lodge un- 
less they hold some office. To many it is surprising that, 
with us, every Past Master of every lodge has one vote_ in 
Grand Lodge. The following quotation from the Acting 
Grand Master's Address will interest some of our members: 

"The Order of DeMolay for boys is perhaps the greatest 
chance that Masons have to do something to develop the 
moral and spiritual upbuilding of the youth of the country, 
and we all agree that that duty is a necessity. Nevertheless, 
as Acting Grand Master, viewing the situation from a purely 
Masonic standpoint, I cannot see why every Master Mason in 
the state cannot give this worthy organization his moral 
support, without having it tied to Grand Lodge, because I 
realize that there are far too many organizations already, 
many of them humanitarian, tied to Free Masonry now. 
DeMolay has its own Grand Council and all machinery 
necessary for its proper administration. This Grand Council 
is supreme. 

"It appears to me that if some well-meaning Ma.=ons 
who are advocating the sponsorship of DeMolay would exert 
their surplus energy to the upbuilding of their own Blue 
Lodges, these same Lodges might not be in such financial 
distress." 

When we know that M. W. Bro. Hugh A. McPherson is 
Grand Treasurer, need it be said that the financial report he 
presented was an excellent one and that the finances of the 
Grand Lodge of Michigan are in good order? The Consti- 
tution was overhauled under the leadership of the Chief 
Justice of the Supreme Court with the co-operation of other 
famous and competent jurists; of course, this work was ef- 
fectively done. 

In his report M. W. Bro. Arthur J. Fox, Grand Lecturer, 
had this to say about the ritual: 

"Our ritual is a sacred poem, pouring forth to the 
Initiate an underlying inspiration to seek its greater knowl- 
edge; therefore in measuring its purpose, nothing should be 
omitted from it which might interfere with its effpct and 
nothing should be added which might impair its purity. Its 
architecture is distinctive and we do well if we but render 
in all its purity the ritual as it comes down to us. 

"There is an intrinsic value in its very language and 
every word eliminated therefrom and every attempt to 
modernize or dilute it would affect that value and destroy 
the Masonic force of that language. Therefore it is our 
duty to protect the ritual of Masonry from adulteration and 
protest against its emasculation." 



50 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

It was decided that "The Lodge System of Education" 
should be adopted and that an appropriation of $500.00 
should be made for the purpose of promoting this system 
of Masonic Education. M. W. Bro. Dr. Lambie is now Grand 
Master and M. W. Bro. William H. Parker is Chairman of 
the Finance Committee. These two have honoured us so 
often with their presence that an Annual Communication 
here would seem incomplete without them. 



MISSOURI— 1939 

One hundred and nineteenth Annual Communication held 
at St. Louis the 26th and 27th of September, 1939. 
Henry C. Chiles, Grand Master. 
Total membership— 87,678. 

The Grand Master was called upon during the year to 
give his rulings upon several important matters. In his de- 
cisions he displayed a judicial mind and a disposition to take 
a charitable view of the shortcomings of a brother which 
did not involve moral turpitude. We heartily commend his 
ruling that as a matter of courtesy a brother who has been 
suspended for non-payment of dues should be notified of the 
fact and of the conditions upon which he may be reinstated. 
Such a course would naturally imply an intimation that the 
Lodge still cherishes the hope that he may at some future 
date return to the fold. 

If the Grand Master was presented with the proverbial 
silver trowel every time he laid a corner stone he must have 
acquired quite a collection. During the year he personally 
officiated 'at twenty of the twenty-eight such ceremonies per- 
formed under the auspices of the Grand Lodge. 

The Committee on the District Deputy Grand Masters' 
Reports deplores the neglect of 284 out of the 630 Lodges 
to send in their reports on the regular form and further 
states that no reports had been received from ten out of 
the sixty districts. We may have a misconception of the 
nature of the "regular form" referred to which the Commit- 
tee evidently requires to be forwarded but if they bear any 
resemblance in form to the returns demanded in our juris- 
diction we are puzzled to understand the source of the 
material from which the Grand Secretary compiles his 
statistics. A similar difficulty, if such it be, has been suc- 
cessfully overcome in our jurisdiction by embodying in our 
constitution an enactment that no representative of any 
Lodge which has neglected to make its returns within the 
prescribed time shall be permitted to vote at any session 
of Grand Lodge until such returns have been completed. It 
is difficult to understand what appears to be a lack of co- 
operation upon the part of so many District Deputy Grand 
Masters in 'a jurisdiction which has produced and is still 
producing so many eminent Leaders in the Craft and is 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 51 

setting such a high standard in its benevolent work as is 
evidenced by the tribute paid to its Masonic Home by the 
unbiased observer Mr. Tom Collins who in commenting upon 
the provision for its 362 inmates says, "It's more nearly a 
real home than most private houses in the land." 

It may be that we are in error in our understanding of 
the premises upon which the foregoing criticisms are based 
but we tender them in a brotherly spirit and were prompted 
thereto by a statement of M. W. Bro. Ray V. Denslow in 
his admirable treatment of The Masonic World under the 
heading of Reviews. , 

"The general character of the Missouri proceedings, the 
constructive addresses of its Grand Masters, and our handl- 
ing of Masonic problems come in frequently for comment. 
In most instances the comment is favorable. In a few in- 
stances we have been criticized. It is only through criticism 
that we can reach our highest standards." 

To us Canadians who look for guidance and inspiration 
to the United Grand Lodge of England and are bound to it 
and the Motherland by the closest ties, especially in our 
present struggle for the maintenance of those principles 
which all Freemasons dearly cherish, the prominence given 
in the proceedings to that wonderful gathering in London 
upon the occasion of the installation of H. R. H. the Duke 
of Kent as Grand Master touches a tender and responsive 
chord in our hearts. The Grand Master in his address said, 
"I am deeply appreciative of the universal cordiality and 
manifestations of fraternal esteem with which the repre- 
sentative of the Grand Lodge of Missouri was received and 
entertained by our Brethren of the United Kingdom." The 
Grand Lecturer in reporting upon the Grand Master's des- 
cription of his experiences in England made the following 
comment: 

"His account of this historic event and of the series of 
Masonic meetings and social functions which followed it was 
fascinating, to say the least, and could not help impressing 
on the minds of his hearers the solidarity and unity of pur- 
pose of our Great Brotherhood and the fact that it is world- 
wide and a mighty influence for good in all democratic 
countries." 

M. W. Bro. Denslow devotes three pages and gives first 
place to this event in The Masonic World and quotes ex- 
tensively and approvingly from the London Times. We re- 
produce only two brief excerpts, first the description of His 
Majesty's entrance to Olympia where 10,000 enthusiastic 
Masons were gathered and twice as many more were denied 
admission. 

"The arrival of the King was then announced and a pro- 
cession was formed to escort him into Grand Lodge. An 
unforgettable moment followed. As a fanfare of trumpets 
sounded, his Majesty appeared alone at the head of the flight 
of stairs at one end of the hall leading from the balcony to 



52 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

the arena. Clothed in the regalia of Past Grand Master, 'he 
remained there while the National Anthem was played and 
then slowly descended to join the procession below. A storm 
of cheering broke out, gathering renewed volume as he 
passed each block of seats on his way to the raised dais." 

His Majesty's concluding remarks when addressing his 
brother were as follows: "This great and representative 
gathering of recognized Freemasons, who have come from 
all parts of the globe to greet you on this occasion, will 
indicate to you the support you may expect in the future. 
You know that you have my good wishes, and as a brother 
Mason I shall always follow with great interest your ruler- 
ship of the Craft and the progress of our Order." 



MONTANA— 1939 

The Seventy-Fifth Annual Communication of the Grand 
Lodge of Montana was held at Great Falls on the 16th and 
17th of August, 1939. 

M. W. Bro. Oscar A. Johnson, Grand Master. 
Membership — 17,805. 

Three Especial Communications were held during the 
year — one at Hardin for the dedication of a Masonic 
Temple; one at Butte to conduct the funeral of John Lee 
Carroll, P.G.M.; and one at Dillon to lay the cornerstone of 
a County High School. 

Among the distinguished guests present were M. W. 
Bro. H. M. Underbill, Grand Master of Saskatchewan, and 
R. W. Bro. Robt. A. Tate, the Grand Secretary. 

The Address of the Grand Master is a very businesslike 
document in which he reviews his numerous and varied 
activities throughout the year, including a fraternal visit to 
Vancouver, and concludes with the salutary advice: "If any- 
thing has been said or done worthy of imitation, adopt it. 
If anything said or done justifies criticism, criticise it but 
do these things masonically." 

The Grand Master suggests that their funeral service, 
when followed literally, is much too long, and a Committee 
was appointed to revise it and report on it at the next Annual 
Communication of Grand Lodge. 

The conference of Grand Masters held in Washington in 
February, 1939, is discussed at some length and the declara- 
tion of principles adopted at the meeting is reproduced. 

Several dispensations w^ere granted, including one giving 
permission to hold an open-air meeting in the Pines along 
the Missouri River near Glasgow, with an admonition to the 
brethren to provide strictly against the approach of cowans 
and eavesdroppers. 

A number of Grand Representatives were appointed 
during the year, including in the list Norway, Denmark and 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 53 

Chili. Applications for recognition from the Grand Lodge 
of Tamaulipas, the Grand Lodge of Paraiva, and the National 
Grand Lodge of Palestine were deferred until the next meet- 
ing of Grand Lodge, while a similar application from the 
Grand Lodge of Colombia was refused. 

In the section devoted to the question of Grand Lodge 
finances it is interesting to note an item of "Loans to 
Lodges." The whole financial situation is reviewed by the 
Grand Master at some length and the Finance Committee 
was directed to consider the whole problem and report at 
the next Annual Meeting. 

Likewise, a recommendation from the Grand Master 
that the history of Grand Lodge should be prepared was 
adopted and an Advisory Board was appointed to take the 
matter in hand. The question of a Grand Lodge publication 
was considered and, while there seemed to be a general 
feeling that such a publication might be of advantage to the 
Fraternity, the difficulties attendant upon such an enterprise 
seemed to be so great that it was decided that it should not 
be undertaken without careful consideration. Provision was 
made for a Committee to consider the matter and report. 

We detect a familiar note in a motion to change the 
date of the Annual Communication of Grand Lodge. In the 
masonic life of the writer a similar move has been made in 
our own Jurisdiction on different occasions, with the same 
result. The report says: "The motion was seconded. There 
was prolonged discussion and, on vote taken, the Grand 
Master declared the motion lost. There were further motions 
and continued discussions but finally all motions were with- 
drawn and the matter closed." In regard to this matter at 
least Grand Lodges seem to proceed on the Shakespearian 
philosophy — 

" 'Tis better to endure those ills we have 
Than fly to others that we know not of." 

The report of the Committee on Foreign Correspondence 
is a particularly interesting document. Nineteen pages of 
rather closely printed matter are devoted to a discussion of 
general topics followed by about 180 pages of reviews of 
particular jurisdictions. The Chairman of the Committee, in 
the concluding paragraph of his introductory matter, uses 
these words: "We have sincerely endeavored to present the 
outstanding features of the happenings m the Masonic 
World, and feel confident the reader will find the riches of 
Masonic knowledge and wisdom in Grand Masters', Grand 
Orators' and Committees' Reports. The confidence is 
justified. 

At the elections M. W. Bro. Edwin Fredlund of Chinook 
was elected Grand Master. They have a ceremony in the 
Grand Lodge in which the newly-elected Grand Master is 
presented with a signet ring which is passed on to his suc- 
cessor at the termination of his year of office. The pre- 
sentation was made by M. W. Bro. Johnson, after which a 



54 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

Grand Master's apron was presented to M. W. Bro. Fredlund 
by the Worshipful Master of his Mother Lodge. 



NEVADA— 1939 

The Seventy-Fifth Annual Communication was held June 
8th and 9th, 1939 at Sparks. Thirty-eight lodges reported a 
total membership of 3,076, a gain of 11. 

In his annual address Grand Master Elwood H. Beemer 
referred to economic and social problems facing the United 
States. Among other things he said: 

"But so long as we continue to tolerate the idea that 
government exists to support the people; that wealth can 
be created by fiat; that scarcity is the mother of plenty; 
that a sound fiscal policy can be based upon waste and ex- 
travagance; and that living beyond our national income does 
not entail the usual and well-known consequences, so long 
shall we Live in a dream-world until the inevitable, rude and 
painful awakening." 

And then he added: "There is a troubled state of affairs 
abroad. Efforts have been, and will continue to be, made to 
involve us. We want no part of it. Let the memory of our 
last abortive attempt to be the saviour of democracy keep 
us from becoming embroiled in the politics and racial hatreds 
of the Old World." 

Contrast the implications of this last paragraph with 
the following from the address of welcome to the Grand 
Representatives given by Bro. Carl B. Shelley, who, after 
referring to the destruction of Masonry in many parts of 
the world, pointed out that right at home we are too prone 
to take our liberties for granted, overlooking the fundamental 
truth that their acceptance involves the sacred duty of per- 
petuating these same blessings for those who will follow 
us. Said he: 

"It is not enough merely to believe in the right things. 
Passive opposition to injustice and wrong is not much better 
than no opposition at all. The man who fails to speak out 
his convictions or who refuses to lift his voice in defence 
of his ideals is exceedingly lax in his duty as a citizen and 
a Mason." 

We may be pardoned the expression of the view that if 
a sick world is to be restored to sanity it will be necessary 
for us all to do more than lift our voices. 

Although but a small jurisdiction, Nevada has in active 
operation a system of student loans, the report presented 
showing that nine young people thus assisted were still 
owing Grand Lodge for advances made towards the cost of 
their education. 

M. W. Bro. E. C. Peterson, Grand Secretary, presents 
a capable report on fraternal correspondence, and from his 
eloquent foreword, we quote this compliment: 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 55 

"When it comes to dispensing charity, our hats come 
off to the English lodges and those of the Dominion, Aus- 
tralia and the Colonies. Their charity is first taken care of 
and their pleasures later." 

Chas. A. Carlson, Jr. of Reno was installed as Grand 
Master for the ensuing term. 

NEW BRUNSWICK— 1939 

The Seventy-Second Annual Communication held on 
August 24t]i, 1939, in the City of Saint John. 
Grand Master — John Thornton. 
Membership — 5,159. Number of lodges — 44. 

As this Review was being written, information was re- 
ceived of the sudden passing of the Grand Master, M. W. 
Brother John Thornton. The Grand Lodge of Canada in 
the Province of Ontario sympathizes with its Sister Grand 
Lodge of New Brunswick in this great loss. We have not 
often sent a visiting delegation to New Brunswick nor have 
we often received one, but we really should form the habit 
of interchanging visits. M. W. Bro. Guy H. Humphrey 
visited us in 1938 and we found him a delightful guest. 
M. W. Bro. John Rowland has once visited the Grand Lodge 
of New Brunswick. 

When a Grand Master relinquishes his office in New 
Brunswick he becomes once more a Right Worshipful 
Brother. One wonders why. And it is only rarely that the 
Deputy Grand Master is elected Grand Master; the former 
holds office for one year and the latter for two. For the 
most part, it would appear, the Grand Master has not pre- 
viously held office in Grand Lodge. One wonders how they 
select him. But customs and traditions differ in different 
Grand Lodges. 

To authorize conferring degrees at short intervals the 
Grand Master issued seventeen dispensations; for church 
services, seven; and for funerals, twenty-nine. The Grand 
Treasurer reported an excess of receipts over expenditures 
of $1,549. The Fund for Benevolence has assets of over 
$75,000 from which, twenty-four grants were made, nearly 
all for $100 each but a few for lesser amounts. 

At the Annual Communication a letter was read from 
R. W. Bro. J. A. V. Preston of Orangeville, Ontario, who is 
Grand Representative of the Grand Lodge of New Bi'unswick, 
giving a report of our Annual Communication. One may be 
permitted to express the wish that all Grand Representatives 
would do likewise. 

On June 20th, 1939, in the presence of many officers 
of Grand Lodge, Brother Murray MacLaren, the Lieutenant- 
Governor of New Brunswick, and Brother Crawford, the 
Province's latest Rhodes scholar, were made Master Masons 
in Union Lodge of Portland, No. 10. 



56 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

Three paragraphs only can here be quoted from the 
Grand Master's address: 

"What are we doing to bring our suspended brethren 
back into membership? No Lodge can undertake a more 
worthy project than that of reinstating members suspended 
for non-payment of dues. Let us show such brethren that 
we have not forgotten them. I would urge that strong com- 
mittees from each Lodge be formed to interview these sus- 
pended members and endeavour to bring them again into 
good standing in their respective Lodges so that they might 
once more take part in our deliberations and lend active 
support to our work." 

"The first and most indispensable requisite for becoming 
a good Mason is regularity of attendance on the meetings 
and work of the lodge. The instruction of the lodge is de- 
livered orally, and therefore it can only be secured by hear- 
ing. The more frequently a brother appears in Lodge to 
witness the proceedings, the greater will be his love for 
Masonry. Every Free and Accepted Mason, who desires to 
understand the elementary principles of the Order, should 
be earnest in acquiring a competent knowledge of the 
lectures." 

"It has been brought to my attention very forcibly this 
past year that some of the brethren talk outside the lodge 
room concerning happenings within it. This must not be. 
These portions of the Antient Charges I have but just quoted 
are part of our Masonic Law and must be strictly adhered 
to. I have heard street talk concerning the doings within 
our lodge room and much harm can be done by such. Our 
tongues must be curbed and our thoughts withheld. We 
should practise those truly Masonic virtues, 'Silence and 
Circumspection'." 

Greetings and best wishes to the Grand Lodge of New 
Brunswick. In 1942 it will have completed seventy-five years 
of service to the Craft. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE— 1939 

One hundred and fiftieth annual communication held at 
the city of Concord on the 17th of May 1939. 
Alexander Mcintosh, Grand Master. 
Total membership 13,151. 

A semi-iannual communication was held at the city of 
Manchester on the 15th of November 1938. From a perusal 
of the proceedings it appears that this meeting is a sort of 
glorified Lodge of Instruction as the only work of the session 
was the exemplification of the first and second degrees and 
the conferring of the third degree in due form. It evidently 
is quite popular as there was a large number of present 
and past Grand Lodge officers in attendance and seventy 
of the eighty-one Lodges were represented. It is quite ap- 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 57 

parent that this jurisdiction aims at word perfect work in 
the conferring of the several degrees and they seem to be 
going about it in the right way to attain that end. Lodges 
of Instruction were held in six of the eight districts. Nearly 
all of the Grand Lodge officers attended these meetings and 
the Grand Master presided over five of them. As a rule all 
three degrees are conferred or exemplified. The work as 
rendered was criticized by the Grand Lecturer if present 
and he was present at four out of the six meetings and the 
District Deputy Grand Lecturer usually took part also ,in 
the criticism. In addition to this thorough training in the 
presence of so many Grand Lodge officers we find that one 
degree is either conferred or exemplified upon the occasion 
of the official visit of the District Deputy Grand Master to 
the Lodges in his District. He is invariably accompanied by 
the District Deputy Grand Lecturer and frequently by the 
Grand Lecturer, wbo tender their friendly criticism of the 
work of the officials of the Lodge. 

The most striking feature of this Annual Communica- 
tion is the recommendation of the Grand Master that the 
following enunciation of the principles and purposes of Free- 
masonry be placed in the hands of every prospective candi- 
date for admission to our order. 

"Freemasonry is neither a religion, a political organiza- 
tion, nor a social club. It interferes with none of these, but 
has for its foundation the basic principles of the Fatherhood 
of God and the Brotherhood of Man. It believes in a Supreme 
Being, the immortality of the soul, and that the Holy Bible 
is the inestimable gift of God to man as the rule and guide 
for his faith and practice. It is a fraternity or brotherhood 
pledged to the building of character, — thoughts, words, 
motives and deeds being the materials used. 

"Freemasonry strives to teach man the duty he owe.-^ to 
God, his country, his neighbor and himself. It inculcates the 
practice of virtue and morality in daily conduct, and conveys 
its teachings through rites and symbols. 

"The Masonic fraternity is in no sense an insurance 
society; neither does it pay benefits in case of sickness or 
death. In a correct and broad sense, it is both educational 
and charitable. It extends such assistance only as it is will- 
ing and able to grant. It knowingly admits none to mem- 
bership except those who are able to provide for themselves 
and those dependent upon them. It expects and requires 
that its members contribute to the support of the Masonic 
Home and other Masonic charities. 

"Freemasonry teaches, and gives opportunity to its 
members to inculcate morality, honesty and integrity in all 
walks of life, and renders assistance to w^orthy members to 
a limited extent. It expects its members to obey the moral 
law and to practice charity toward all mankind.' It believes 
its members should have a strong desire to aid their fellow 



58 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

creatures. It has its own laws, rules and regulations, and 
requires a strict obedience thereto. 

"Freemasonry is not to be entered into through mere 
curiosity, ambition for honors, or in the hope of personal 
gain or advancement. Admission must not be sought for 
mercenary or other unworthy motives. The aim of the true 
Freemason is to cultivate a brotherly feeling among men, 
and to help, aid and assist whomsoever he can. 

"The right to petition for the degrees of Ancient Craft 
Masonry is rarely denied to any man, but this right goes no 
further than granting the privilege of petitioning, and all 
who petition are not admitted. The Masonic fraternity does 
not solicit members, but wants and welcomes only men of 
high character and integrity, who seek admission entirely 
of their own free will and accord. Should a petitioner be 
accepted, he should understand that he will get no more out 
of Masonry than he puts into it, that to receive benefits 
from such a society one must devote himself to its interests. 

"I hereby certify that I have read the foregoing and 
fully understand the principles and purposes of the Frater- 
nity of Free and Accepted Masons as explained therein. 



Petitioner". 
The adoption of such a recommendation with such vari- 
ations as may appear appropriate is worthy of the careful 
consideration of any Grand Lodge. 



NEW JERSEY— 1939 

Membership, 75,497; number of lodges, 278. 

The One Hundred and Fifty-Second Annual Communica- 
tion v/as held at Trenton, April 19 and 20, 1939, with M. W. 
Bro. A. M. Dietrich, Grand Master, on the throne. Nineteen 
Past Grand Masters were present. Only four of the con- 
stituent lodges were not represented by delegates. Dis- 
tinguished visitors from Pennsylvania, Virginia, Connecticut, 
Rhode Island and Delaware were introduced and welcomed. 
Grand Representatives of Grand Lodges were welcomed by 
the Grand Master and acknowledgement on their behalf was 
made by the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Corres- 
pondence. 

The Grand Master in his address stated that he had 
visited the thirty-one districts of his jurisdiction and in ad- 
dition he enumerated with dates one hundred and thirty-four 
other masonic visits he had made to constituent lodges and 
eleven visits to meetings in other jurisdictions. Truly, a 
busy year of masonic effort, although the Grand Master made 
no comment that it was unusual or burdensome! He named 
Friday, November 27th, 1938, and the following Sunday as 
dates on which Masons of the jurisdiction should make 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 59 

special efforts to attend divine worship. "The response was 
most gratifying" but he very truly recognizes that "con- 
tinuous and sustaining effort is more effective than one which 
is spasmodic" and he recommends therefore "that an increas- 
ing and constant effort be put forth by the members of the 
Fraternity to aid and assist the work of the churches". The 
Declaration of Masonic Principles adopted by the Grand 
Masters' Conference in Washington for presentation to each 
Grand Lodge in the U.S.A. was recommended by the Grand 
Master for adoption. 

The Grand Lodge of New Jersey maintains a Masonic 
Home at Burlington and this it was said "continues to be 
the focal point of our charitable and Masonic endeavours 
and we can point with pride to the results which have been 
accomplished." Over several years sufficient funds have been 
contributed to permit of a considerable extension of the 
building and hospital services provided. The report of the 
Home shows an average number of 'guests' for the year of 
223. It showed also that there were at the time of the report 
forty-three patients in the Hospital. The Board of Trustees 
of the Home administers also a fund for the relief of want 
and distress throughout the Jurisdiction. 

The Grand Master recommended that the minimum ini- 
tiation fee be raised from thirty to fifty dollars. He also 
recommended that lodges be permitted to exempt from 
further dues in whole or in part members who had paid 
lodge dues for twenty-five years consecutively in one lodge. 
The Grand Master looked with alarm on the large number 
of suspensions for non-payment of dues which had taken 
place, particularly since 1931. From 1931 to 1938 the mem- 
bership of the Grand Lodge of New Jersey has fallen from 
97,000 to 75,000. During his term of office he had 'en- 
deavoured to stimulate the interest and rekindle the enthu- 
siasm and co-operation which are so necessary for the 
success of our Fraternity. For this purpose he has called 
the Craft from the long period of refreshment which has 
existed and has ordered them to resume their masonic 
labours. He has placed the burden of this great work upon 
the shoulders of the faithful ten per cent, who have borne 
the heat and burden of recent years and has asked them to 
carry at once the splendid teachings of our great Fraternity 
to those members who have grown lukewarm, and to exempli- 
fy by their lives and actions and conversation, when in the 
presence of those Forgotten Masons, the great warm appeal- 
ing heart of our Fraternity so that these men will once 
more desire to mingle with their brethren." The Grand 
Master argued strongly that large arrearages of dues against 
members should not be allowed to accumulate and recom- 
mended that no lodge should permit dues to accumulate 
against a member for more than three years. At the end of 
that time the dues should either be remitted, if circumstances 
warrant this action, or suspension should follow. This is 
sound logic and practice in our estimation. 



60 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

An admirable report was presented by the Committee 
on Foreign correspondence under the chairmanship of R. W. 
Bro. David McGregor. The sixty succinct reviews of foreign 
jurisdictions embodied in this report have been read v/ith 
much pleasure and profit by this reviewer. 



NEW MEXICO— 1939 

Grand Master — William M. Bickel. 
Grand Secretary — Alpheus A. Keen. 

55 lodges — 6,042 members, a gain of 143. 

Sixty-Second Annual Communication held at Gallup, New 
Mexico, October 16 and 17, 1939. 

W. Bro. Arthur C. Culver, Alburquerque, represented the 
Grand Lodge of Canada among some 180 accredited dele- 
gates. 

One of the most notable features of the year was a visit 
by M. W. Bro. Bickel to every lodge in his Grand Jurisdiction. 
Such enthusiastic interest cannot fail to benefit the Craft. 

Some twelve District Deputy Grand Masters assist the 
Grand Master. This number for 55 lodges seems rather 
large to Ontario Masons. 

Several decisions were made during the year. This one, 
"No petition can be withdrawn without the unanimous con- 
sent of all members of the lodge present when action is 
taken," differs from the procedure in Ontario where a peti- 
tion may not be withdrawn after it is presented to the lodge. 

The Grand Master recommended the bonding of the 
Grand Secretary, the Grand Secretary and the Secretaries 
and Treasurers of Constituent Lodges by a blanket bond. 
Later it was decided to leave the latter part of the sug- 
gestion to the discretion of the lodges. 

The Grand Master considered it unwise for New Mexico 
to ever have a Masonic Home in view of the experiences of 
other Grand Jurisdictions. 

This quotation probably reflects the attitude of the 
Grand Lodge of Canada in Ontario: 

"When our destitute Brethren come to the place where 
they need assistance, it seems to me that this assistance 
might better be granted as it is at the present time, where 
in the sanctity of a man's home he can live out the remaining 
years alloted to him surrounded by his family and friends 
of many years; . . . ." 

In dealing with the suspension of members for non- 
payment of dues, this occurs: 

"I feel very strongly that we should make every effort 
possible to reinstate those who have been lost to our mem- 
bership by reason of suspension for non-payment of dues; 
and, at the same time, should take into consideration that 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 61 

many of these suspensions were made during the depression 
years when former members simply could not pay for any- 
thing except the bare necessities of life." 

Several Special Communications of the Grand Lodge 
were held as follows: October 24, 1938, at Gallup to instal 
the Grand Chaplain, Robert W. Dennard; December 3, 1938, 
at Hot Springs to institute a lodge Under Dispensation; 
January 5, 1939, at Portales to lay the corner-stone of the 
new Court House of Roosevelt County; March 7, 1939, at 
Des Moines to dedicate and consecrate a new lodge hall; 
April 17, 1939, at Silver City to conduct the funeral service 
of the late M. W. Bro. William B. Walton; and September 
11, 1939, at Hatch to dedicate and consecrate a new building. 
These meetings were well attended. 

Among the recommendations at the conclusion of the 
Grand Master's address the following appear: 

"That the Grand Lodge authorize the publication of a 
Cipher Ritual." 

"That the Committee on Marking Graves of Pasi? Grand 
Masters be made a Standing Committee and their duties 
defined." 

The former was rejected and the latter approved by the 
Grand Lodge. 

Benevolence in New Mexico involves Masonic Relief 
Fund, Masonic Home Fund, Student Loan Fund, Masonic 
Tuberculosis Relief Fund and Grand Lodge of Nev.- Jersey 
Tuberculosis Relief Fund. Expenditures for these purposes 
totalled $4,946.24. The funds of the Grand Lodge amount to 
$173,552.96. 

The Grand Lecturer is an important official of the Grand 
Lodge of New Mexico and apparently inspects the work and 
finances of every lodge in the Grand Jurisdiction. R. W. Bro. 
George L. Machen spent 332 days at his duties, visiting 
every lodge and examining the books and records. Most of 
the lodges were in good condition. 

The Grand Lecturer was concerned about the improve- 
ment of ritual work. He cited several methods of procedure, 
discarding the use of cipher rituals, and recommending the 
issuing of certificates for accurary in ritualistic work. Types 
A. B. and C. in certificates would indicate the extent of pro- 
ficiency attained. He claimed knowledge of two brethren who 
could qualify for certificate A, proficiency in the ritual of 
the three degrees. 

The Grand Lodge supports a publication, "New Mexico 
Freemason," which had a circulation of about 6,100. Various 
articles on Masonry, items of Lodge news, and reports of 
meetings and conventions provide interesting reading and an 
historical record of the Masonrv of Nev/ Mexico. The cost 
to Grand Lodge was $2,189.20. ' 

A per capita tax of $1.95 for the ensuing Masonic year 
was approved as follows, — General Fund $1.55, New Mexico 



62 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

Freemasons $0.35, and Annual Communication Expense Fund 
$0.05. 

The new Grand Master, Louis C. Rockett was duly 
installed. 

V. W. Bro. William Bailey, Toronto, represents the 
Grand Lodge of New Mexico in Ontario. 



NEW SOUTH WALES— 1939 

The Fifty-first Annual Report covers the special and 
quarterly communications held from July, 1938 to June, 1939. 
Six hundred and eleven lodges reported a total membership 
of 61,009, being an increase of 932. 

To those of us in Canada who look upon our country 
as peculiarly affected by winter conditions and think of 
Australia as enjoying perpetual summer, it is interesting to 
note that at the meeting in September of 1938 the Pro Grand 
Master.suggested that it would be well for the Grand Lodge 
to decide whether in some cases it would be a wise thing to 
suspend the meetings of the lodges "during those times of 
the year when the weather is either very hot or very cold". 
He stated that in some portions of the jurisdiction the 
months of December, January and February usually include 
many nights when it is very uncomfortable to crowd together 
in hot lodge rooms, while in the mountain districts the 
months of June and July are frequently very cold. 

A special communication of the Grand Lodge for the 
commemoration of the 50th anniversary of its formation was 
held on the 5th of October, 1938, on which occasion also M. W. 
Bro. His Excellency Lord Gowrie, V.C, P.C, G.C.M.G., C.B., 
D.S.O., was proclaimed as Grand Master, having been re- 
elected after years of distinguished service to the Craft. The 
proclamation was preceded by a fanfare of trumpets followed 
by the customary Grand Honours and an anthem, "Lord, 
Our Grand Master Bless", sung by Grand Lodge. In the 
dignified and elaborate ceremonial that characterizes the in- 
stallation and proclamation of their Grand Master, our 
Australian brethren follow the tradition of English Masonry. 

As this was the 50th communication of the United Grand 
Lodge of New South Wales, an interesting historical address 
was presented by the M. W. Pro Grand Master, Col. F. A. 
Maguire, from which we note that the first appearance of 
Masonry in Australia was in 1797 when a petition was sent 
to the Grand Lodge of Ireland begging that a warrant should 
be issued to be held by the Australian corps in Port Jackson. 
This application was deferred. In 1802 a distinguished 
Masonic function was held in Sydney on a French man-of- 
war when a captain of the New South Wales regiment re- 
ceived one of the higher degrees in Masonry. Other sporadic 
Masonic gatherings were held in the next few years, includ- 
ing the laying of the foundation stone of a house with 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 63 

Masonic honours. It was not, however, until 1820 that the 
first lodge was established in Sydney, a charter being issued 
by the Grand Lodge of Ireland for a lodge called Australian 
Social Lodge, wliich held its first regular meeting later in 
the year at the Golden Lion Tavern. This Australian Social 
Lodge afterwards in 1878 became Lodge Australian Social 
Mother No. 1 on the books of the Grand Lodge of New South 
Wales. In 1920 it changed its name to Lodge Anticjuity, No. 1. 

The report of the Board of General Purposes mentioned, 
among other interesting cases, that a letter was received 
from a country lodge asking the Board to reconsider the 
case of a candidate whose admission to the Craft had been 
prohibited by the Grand Master. The report stated that it 
was resolved to inform the lodge (a) that no appeal against 
the decision" of the Grand Master can lie, and (b) that the 
action of its secretary in addressing communications in 
regard to the case to individual members of the Board was 
open to strong exception and must not be repeated. 

Another incident reported by the Board was a complaint 
against the action of the Worshipful Master of a city lodge 
in "allowing preferential voting to be used in the election 
of the Inner Guard and Stewards". Apparently preferential 
voting means something along the lines of proportional rep- 
resentation. The board upheld the complaint, and declared 
the election of the Inner Guard and Stewards invalid. 

The Grand Master's address at the meeting in March 
of 1939 contains the following rather interesting ruling: 

"It has been reported to me that in some of our Lodges 
it has of late been the practice to hold occasionally what 
are called 'Junior Officers' Nights,' at which the regular 
officers, from the Senior Warden downwards, are asked to 
vacate their chairs in favour of the Stewards. I desire to 
point out to the Masters and Secretaries of lodges that such 
practice is not consonant with the usages of our Order, as 
it is not only the right of every brothfer duly elected to 
office to carry out the functions of his position, but his 
duty to attend and to do so unless prevented by circum- 
stances beyond his control, in which case the Master may 
appoint some brother to act in his place. I may add that 
if one of the Wardens be absent, his chair should be occu- 
pied by a Past Master, or a Past Warden if available." 

Mention should also be made of the fact that at the 
communications of Grand Lodge held in December of 1938 
and the following March, one of the principal items of busi- 
ness concerned the quite acute problem of Royal Arch 
Masonry in Nev/ South Wales. It appears that no fewer 
than three different bodies claimed to rule in Royal Arch 
matters in that jurisdiction. In December the Pro Grand 
Master reported that he had come to the conclusion that it 
was necessary for the Grand Lodge to step in and deal with 
a condition that was not only affecting Royal Arch Masonry 
in particular but was also having a bad effect upon matters 



64 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

Masonic throughout the Jurisdiction. He therefore reported 
that he was convening a meeting of the rulers in Royal 
Arch Masonry and was endeavouring to set up a basis of 
union under which there would be but one recognized ruling 
body in Royal Arch Masonry throughout the Jurisdiction. At 
the March communication the Grand Master reported that 
the articles of union had been agreed to and that, as a result 
of the efforts of the Grand Lodge, there had been formed 
the United Supreme Royal Arch Grand Chapter of New 
South Wales. He added the hope that the time is not now 
far distant when complete unity and harmony will prevail 
in New South Wales. 



NEW ZEALAND— 1938 

Patron— H.R.H. The Duke of Connaught. 

Grand Master — Viscount Galway. 

Pro Grand Master — C. J. Ronaldson. 

Grand Secretary — Henry A. Lamb. 

302 Active Lodges — 25,788 members, a net gain of 298. 

Fortv-Ninth Annual Communication at Christchurch, 
November 23, 1938. 

Accredited representatives about 722. Sir Stephen Allen, 
the commissioned representative of the Grand Lodge of 
Canada, conveyed greetings in writing. 

The amount expended for general relief was £961 8s 3d, 
and for the Widows', Orphans' and Aged Masons' Fund and 
Special War Benevolent Fund an additional £7,946 Os Od; 
to the latter funds the lodges contributed £6,792 10s 3d, an 
increase of £1,112 9s Od over the previous year. 

J. H. Moir, chairman for the benevolent activities of 
Grand Lodge, emphasized the increasing demands on the 
funds and urged the lodges to make applications as early 
as possible. 

The per capita contributions towards benevolence in New 
Zealand are certainly most commendable. Among other 
benevolent enterprises in whicTi the Grand Lodge is interest- 
ed are the Kirkpatric Masonic Institute and the Papakura 
Masonic Home, both of which are apparently sufficiently en- 
dowed to be self-supporting. 

The Grand Jurisdiction of New Zealand is divided into 
11 provinces each presided over by a Provincial Grand 
Master, who corresponds to our District Deputy Grand 
Master. The Provincial Grand Master holds office for a 
period of three years, and is elected by the lodges in the 
province. The Grand Master visited in eight of the provinces 
during the year. 

The Grand Master addressed the Grand Lodge briefly 
after he had been installed for the second year in his office, 
and said, in part: 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENXE 65 

"Masonry is progressing and is one of the great stabil- 
izing factors in a v.'orld of unrest and although it is not 
entirely a Masonic affair, I am voicing my own feelings — 
and, I think, those of the brethren generally — when I ex- 
tend sympathy to those who are suffering under a tyranny 
which forbids freedom of thought — to people of whatever 
race they may belong to or religion they may profess who 
are living under very hard conditions and in most distress- 
ful times. But there is nothing that we can do except to 
extend our fullest sympathy and sincerely hope and pray 
that their sufferings may be abated and reason prevail, and 
that people may be allowed to live their lives in peace and 
security." .... 

.... "The work of Freemasonry does not appear on 
the surface — it would be wrong if it did — but I feel sure 
that all of you, representing the sterling worth of the Do- 
minion, will be able to produce something during the cen- 
tenary celebrations v.-hich will really redound to the credit 
and honour of the Craft all over the Dominion." 

The Grand Master thus closed his address by referring 
to the jubilee celebration scheduled for 1940. 

Several social functions were held including visits of 
the men to the Bowling Club and the ladies to the attractive 
mountain resorts near Christchurch. 

The reports of the Provincial Grand Masters summarize 
the year's activities and comment on the conditions of the 
lodges, practically all of which were in excellent form. 

The appendix summarizing the instructions and de- 
cisions of the Board of General Purposes contains much 
valuable information. Excerpts from it are mentioned as 
"food for thought" for Ontario Masons. 

"If it is desired to omit a regular meeting in any month 
special provision to that effect must be made in the By-laws." 

". . . . candidates for admission into the Craft should 
be asked to make satisfactory provision for their dependents, 
if they have not already done so, either by Life Insurance 
or through some Provident Society, etc." 

"That no brother holding a degree under that of Master 
Mason is entitled to vote." (Balloting for Candidates). 

"A member of another Constitution cannot be allowed to 
take the Chair in any of our Lodges, nor can he give the 
Ob. or communicate the Sts." 

"The Tracing Board or Boards of a higher degree should 
not be exposed during the working of the Lodge in a lower 
Degree." 

"When it is arranged for a sacred solo to be given in 
the Lodge room, the Master should previously acquaint him- 
self with its nature, and be satisfied that it is not of a 
sectarian nature, or such as may be likely to give offence 
to any brother." 



66 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

". . . . the apron should be worn with the belt outside 
the coat. The apron shall indicate the rank of the wearer. 
No Master Mason shall sit in a lodge in the third degree 
wearing an E. A. or F. C. apron; . . . ." 

More attention to the wearing of the apron would be 
advisable in Ontario. 

"The apron of the lower degree should be removed be- 
fore the investiture with the new apron takes place; the 
new apron should not be placed above the old one." 

". . . . the Board is strongly against the use of the 
words "Fourth Degree" in relation to the festive board." 

"No item should be permitted in the refectory which is 
not in complete harmony with the instructions given in the 
Lodge or which may tend in any way to burlesque the 
seriousness of that instruction." 

"The Board is of the opinion that the wearing of Masonic 
clothing and regalia both at religious services in churches 
and at places of entertainment, etc., when ladies and others 
who are not masons are present, should not take place." 

"A Craft Lodge cannot strike a levy on its members for 
a special purpose merely by passing a resolution in open 
Lodge, unless there is a By-law empowering it to act in this 
way." 

". . . . Secretaries should, when advising a brother in 
terms of Rule 178 or 180, (exclusion for non-payment of 
dues), point out to him that his exclusion will also involve 
his being struck off the roll of any other lodge of which 
he is a member." 

The salutes to officers include: Grand Master and Pro 
Grand Master, 11; Deputy Grand Master, 9; Provincial Grand 
Masters, 7; V. W. Brethren, 5; and others 3. 

The Board deprecates "chain prayers" and urges breth- 
ren who receive them to destroy the documents at once. 

The Board strongly disapproves of raising funds by any 
lottery, art union, sweepstake or other gambling device, and 
any brother infringing this ruling is liable to Masonic 
discipline. 

It is urged that the Tyler's Toast (in Ontario the J. W.'s 
toast) be given not later 'than 11.30 p.m. 

Every D.D.G.M. and most masons will support that 
suggestion! 

John Boyd, Toronto, is the representative of the Grand 
Lodge of New Zealand near the Grand Lodge of Canada. 

NORTH CAROLINA— 1939 

The One Hundred and Fifty-Second Annual Communica- 
tion, held in Greensboro, April 18th and 19th, 1939. 
Harry T. Paterson, Grand Master. 
Membership — 26,721. 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 67 

In his Address the Grand Master states that he removed 
a Master of a lodge from office because he had been negli- 
gent in performing his duties; and that he ruled that a 
lodge could not exempt clergymen from payment of dues. 
(Why did not some brother pay the clergyman's dues for 
him?) He also imparts the information that one-third of 
his District Deputy Grand Masters (appointed by him) did 
not realize the importance of their office and paid little or 
no attention to their work. Is this an argument in favour 
of our system whereby the Masters, Past Masters, and 
Wardens elect the brother whom they recommend to the 
Grand Master for appointment as District Deputy Grand 
Master — and elect him in keen contests, usually ? 

The new Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of North 
Carolina is an educationist, Superintendent of Schools for 
Warren County, and he teaches a Bible Class in Sunday 
School. M. W. Bro. J. Edward Allen has been foreign cor- 
respondent for his Grand Lodge for some years and his 
Reviews are the most interesting that can be found anywhere. 
Apparently, he conceived the idea of "functional reviewing". 
His style is "racy"; his language forceful and "peppy". He 
is a member of more organizations, orders, and societies, 
Masonic and non-masonic, than most of us have ever heard 
of. M. W. Brother Allen gives "A Bird's Eye View of 
Masoni-y in Foreign Countries", including England, Egypt, 
Australia, Tasmania, and parts of Canada, but he completely 
overlooks Scotland, Ireland, and Ontario. He travelled with 
the Overseas visitors from the Maritimes to Montreal but 
he left the party there. The present reviewer has met M. W. 
Brother Allen several times and has the highest regard for 
him. Could we induce him to visit our Annual Communica- 
tion in order that he may improve his knowledge of geog- 
raphy and learn also of the existence of the eighth in size 
of the Grand Lodges of the world? 

In North Carolina there is a Masonic Educational Loan 
Fund which is used for making loans to needy students in 
the colleges of the state. They have the same idea there 
that our Mount Sinai Lodge originated when it celebrated 
its twenty-fifth birthday by handing to the University of 
Toronto a cheque for $2,000 to be used for loan? to deserving 
students. 



Grand Master Paterson sums up as follows: 

"What I regard as of greater importance than a mere 
increase in numbers is the increased inter-est and enthusiasm 
of our present members as shown by larger attendance and 
greater activity at the constituent lodge meetings. It is, 
therefore, my happy privilege to report that ail is well v/ith 
the Craft in North Carolina", 



68 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

NORTH DAKOTA— 1939 

The Fiftieth Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge 
of North Dakota was held in the City of Grand Forks, June 
19-21, 1939, with M. W. Bro. Robert Edwin Trousdale, Grand 
Master, presiding. 

The total membership, as at January 1, 1939, was shown 
to be 11,143, a decrease of 313 from the preceding year. 

This was the Golden Jubilee Communication of the 
Grand Lodge of North Dakota which was instituted in 1889 
to succeed the Grand Lodge of Dakota Territory, The latter 
Grand Lodge was divided in 1839 into the Grand Lodges of 
North Dakota and South Dakota, 

Because of the presence at the communication of so 
many visitors from Canada, among them our present Grand 
Master, M. W. Bro. John A. Dobbie of Ottawa, the Grand 
Deacons bore the flags of the United States and Canada 
and the Grand Lodge enthusiastically sang one verse of 
"America", one verse of "God Save the King" and one 
stanza of "Two Empires by the Sea," 

The fiftieth anniversary gave opportunity to launch a 
movement to establish a Golden Jubilee Endowment Fund. 
The aim was to secure a total amount equal to one dollar 
a member. The campaign had not been concluded at the 
time of the Grand Lodge meeting but many of the lodges 
and districts reported that they already had brought the 
Fund to one hundred per cent, success. 

The Grand Lodge reports that there has been a steady 
decline in the necessity for continuing relief funds since the 
Social Security Act went into effect. The report goes on 
to observe that "we are coming to be relief-conscious and 
there is a growing feeling among thinking people that 
altogether too many are willing to sacrifice their freedom 
and much of their spirit of self-reliance if only they can 
have security. It will be a sorry day for America when we 
become dependent on public grants." 

The Relief Fund Committee made generous grants to 
assist Masonic victims of war conditions in Spain and 
Austria and also to afford assistance to sufferers from the 
Chilean earthquake. 

The Grand Orator, W. Bro. Alexander G. Burr, delivered 
a notable address in which he quoted with approval the 
statement of Lord Tweedsmuir that "Civilisation is always 
a matter of delicate adjustments, a conspiracy and a con- 
struction." The Orator then goes on to comment: "We see 
the conspiracy and the construction in deadly conflict, the 
duel being enacted before our very eyes. We are ready to 
believe that the civilisation and the destiny of the human 
race will stand or fall permanently according as the struggle 
ends. We overlook the fact that the conflict is but another 
step in the slow, laborious but upward climb of man in the 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 69 

pageant of existence. In the upward struggle of the race, 
through all the disasters which threatened to overwhelm, 
there has been the constant warfare for freedom of the 
individual man. This has expressed itself in myriad ways, 
many so startlingly different in form as to cause us to lose 
sight of the real issue involved and to fix our eyes upon 
the externals. But men of penetrating mind have seen below 
the surface and detected the prime cause. The tragedy of 
dying races is frequently expressed in the implacable conflict 
betv/een this longing for their freedom and the human ex- 
pression of belief that a superior race has a right to control 
and govern the lesser breeds within the law. The tragedy 
is there even if the inscrutable wisdom of a beneficent and 
loving Father permits the temporary workings and success- 
es of evil." 

Following the custom established many years ago, a 
delegation representing the Order of the Eastern Star was 
received. 

The Grand Lodge account of the proceedings contains a 
report of special activities and accomplishments of individual 
lodges. This constitutes a most interesting and helpful 
record and one which might well be imitated by other Grand 
Lodge reports. Shiloh Lodge of Fargo, for instance, gives 
two scholarships of $100 each at the State Agricultural 
College, hands $527 to the Masonic Welfare Association, 
makes a $100 contribution to the Grand Lodge library, went 
over the top in the Golden Jubilee fund, spends $57 on its 
Boy Scout troop and religiously observes the Special Nights 
outlined in the calendar. 

For five years the Grand Lodge has organised and main- 
tained an annual oratorical contest open to entrants from 
all over the state. Sixty-seven of the lodges took part in 
the contest or well over half the lodges constituting the 
Grand Lodge. 

The Grand Lodge report of proceedings concludes with 
a valuable condensed history of the Grand Lodge from its 
inception to the last communication. 



NOVA SCOTIA— 1939 

The Seventy-Fourth Annual Communication convened at 
Halifax on June 14th, 1939. Inasmuch as Their Most Gracious 
Majesties were in the Maritime Provinces and would reach 
Halifax during the day, the Grand Master called the 
Grand Lodge from labour to refreshment, to reassemble on 
June 16th, on which occasion divine service preceded the 
ordinary business of Grand Lodge, an example worthy of 
imitation by other Grand Lodges. 

Ninety-nine lodges reported a membership of 8,492, 
being a net loss of 154. 



70 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

In his annual address M. W. Bro. M. T. Avard referred 
to the outstanding success of the Bi-Centennial celebration 
of the Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia in 1938, and pointed out 
that Masonry in Nova Scotia was now starting out on its 
third century of service to the Province. Referring to the 
matter of finance, he stated that if the Grand Lodge was to 
return to the days of balanced budgets, ways and means of 
increasing membership must be found. He added that the 
reclamation of suspended members of worthy calibre ap- 
peared to him to be one of the main avenues for bringing 
this about. 

He recommended the approval by Grand Lodge of the 
Declaration of Masonic Principles already approved in 
several other grand jurisdictions. The Committee on the 
Grand Master's address made this interesting comment on 
this proposal: "However we believe we may with propriety 
state that while we consider that the document submitted 
presents an excellent summary of the leading traits of the 
character of Freemasonry, your committee hold the opinion 
that it should not be made public property, before being 
given careful consideration." The Committee's recommenda- 
tion was adopted, and it would appear that the matter was 
not further dealt with. 

It is an interesting comment upon conditions in no way 
familiar to us in Ontario to find that under date of January 
13th the Grand Master granted a dispensation to a lodge 
to elect and instal their officers for the ensuing year at their 
next regular meeting in February, owing to the fact that "a 
large number of their members are sailing away to the 
fishing grounds." 

The Grand Master reports also that in August he re- 
fused a dispensation to a lodge to instal a new secretary 
and a new tyler at their next regular meeting. He says: 
"An installed officer cannot resign during his term of office. 
The Worshipful Master can appoint some member to act 
during their absence." 

He refused a dispensation to have a Past Master open 
a lodge when the Master and Wardens were unable to attend. 
He also refused to grant a dispensation to the various 
lodges in Pictou to line the route of the King and Queen's 
procession wearing their regalia. 

It is interesting to note that the Board of Jurisprudence 
in discussing the Grand Master's decision later commented in 
connection with this last item that as the situation was not 
likely to recur, it need not perhaps be discussed. They did 
point out, however, that when in 1860 the Baron Renfrew 
(afterwards King Edward VII) then 18 years of age, visited 
Pictou as a representative of Her Majesty Queen Victoria, 
the route was in part lined by Masons headed by their Pro- 
vincial Grand Master, Alexander Keith. 

The Grand Master reports further that at a regular 
meeting of a certain lodge the W. Master was unavoidably 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 71 

absent. The Senior Warden was present, but felt that he 
was not competent to open the lodge, so a Past Master 
assumed the duty and the F.C. degree was conferred. The 
Grand Master held that the meeting was irregular and not 
in accordance with the constitution. He ordered that the 
Senior Warden be reprimanded and that all business transact- 
ed at the meeting was null and void. He did, however, 
confirm the passing of the candidate. 

M. W. Bro. R. V. Harris presented a very interesting 
report as Grand Historian. Among other things he ack- 
nowledged several gifts to the Library and Museum. The 
reference to the Museum maintained by the Grand Lodge of 
Nova Scotia reminds us that the Grand Lodge of Canada in 
Ontario has no such institution. Surely we, too, should have 
a museum or at least some central place where interesting 
historical relics might be properly preserved. 

The report of the Committee on the Bi-Centenary cele- 
bration, also presented by M. W. Bro. R. V. Harris, refers 
among other things to the gift of a magnificent case of 
gavels made from the hand-rails of the old Freemasons' 
Hall in London, England. The gavels were the gift of W. 
Bro. R. L. Loyd, M.C., O.B.E., who was a member of the 
English delegation that attended the Bi-Centenary celebra- 
tion. We in Ontario are also the proud possessors of a 
similar set of gavels, the gift of the late R. W. Bro. Sir 
George McLaren Brown. 

An exhaustive report is presented by the Grand Lecturer 
stressing the attempts made in the history of the Grand 
Lodge of Nova Scotia to attain uniformity in the work, and 
concluding with the statement that notwithstanding "rulings, 
resolutions, and attempts to achieve uniformity, there is still 
a great diversity of ritual among the lodges professing to 
practise the 'Ancient York Rite' so-called." 

A unique portion of the Proceedings is the report of 
the Trustees of the Curling Trophy. It would appear that 
this is a challenge trophy presented for competition among 
the lodges in Nova Scotia. Since the cup was donated there 
have been twenty-eight matches played, 

Angus J. MacDonald of Glace Bay was installed as 
Grand Master. 

We regret to notice that the Grand Lodge has decided 
to discontinue printing the reviews of the Proceedings of 
Sister Jurisdictions, notwithstanding the fact that our good 
friend, R. W. Bro. James C. Jones, the Grand Secretary, had 
his 25th annual report on Fraternal Correspondence ready 
to be printed, 

OHIO— 1939 

The One Hundred and Thirtieth Annual Communication 
of Grand Lodge was held at Columbus on the 18th and 19th 
of October, 1939. 

M. W. Bro. Harry Meyer, Grand Master. 

Membership — 173,318. 



72 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

621 Lodges out of a total number of 623 were represented 
at the meeting. 

Addresses of welcome were given by the local committee, 
by the Honourable John W. Bricker, Governor of the State, 
and by W. Bro. Andrew White speaking for the lodges of the 
Fourteenth Masonic District. An appropriate response was 
made on behalf of Grand Lodge by the Grand Orator R. W. 
Bro. Harry Schram. 

After the formal opening the Grand Master introduced 
the Grand Chaplain, R. W. Bro. M. H. Lichliter, who address- 
ed the brethren on the subject: "Freemasonry in the American 
Scene". One or two quotations will indicate the challenging 
character of the Address: 

"The maintenance of liberty and not the guarantee of 
security is the chief concern of Freemasonry in America." 

"Lord Russell said once that too often men go to the 
past for counsel and return with caution. Our ritual was 
born there. The forms of Masonry were shaped by historic 
forces. But Masonry is alive, and anything which is alive 
must be geared to inevitable change. That doesn't mean 
strange and unauthorized dramatic innovations: it does mean 
that we must make new and daring applications of old 
principles." 

The Address of the Grand Master presents a detailed 
and comprehensive review of his activities during the year, 
including references to his visit to the Conference of Grand 
Masters at Washington and to the installation ceremonies 
in England, where he was represented by M. W. Bro. Kissell 
and R. W. Bro. Sharp. 

He received two rather unusual suggestions, to both of 
which he refused consent. One was a suggestion that a writer 
of ability should be employed to contribute daily or weekly 
columns to one or more nev/spapers embracing the historic, 
patriotic, social and philosophic content in Masonry. The 
other one that he himself should deliver a Masonic talk over 
the radio. The reason for the refusal in both cases was that 
Masonry is not on the defensive and that it has nothing to 
fear so long as Masons are true to the principles which con- 
stitute its foundations. 

As was the case in other jurisdictions, he found that 
the most perplexing problems with which he had to deal 
were those arising out of the liquor situation, and an amend- 
ment to the Constitution was proposed dealing with the 
subject. 

An interesting question arose in connection with a mem- 
ber of a lodge in Czecho-Slovakia who was a resident of 
Cleveland and desired to visit some of the local lodges. He 
had his credentials for the years 1937-38 but no receipt for 
the payment of dues after that time because, when Germany 
took over his country, his Lodge, as well as the Grand Lodge, 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 73 

was suppressed. The Grand Master ruled that the produc- 
tion of a receipt for dues might be dispensed with and sug- 
gested that, as other similar cases were likely to arise, they 
should be referred to the then Grand Master pending the 
establishment of a rule by Grand Lodge. 

For almost half a century the jurisdiction of the Grand 
Lodge has been divided into twenty-five districts. When this 
division was made the total membership was about 38,000 
as compared with 173,000 today, and 495 lodges as against 
623. In order to meet the difficulties of administration that 
would naturally follow on such an increase in membership 
they have adopted the system not of re-dividing the districts 
but of adding to the number of District Deputies. During 
the year an additional Deputy was given to each of ten 
larger districts, bringing the total number of District 
Deputies up to 37. 

The report of the Grand Historian, M. W. Bro. Dr. Tyler, 
contains an interesting sketch of early Freemasonry in 
Portage and Summit Counties. 

The report of the Committee on Foreign Correspondence 
presented by M. W. Bro. Earl Stewart opens with a topical 
review dealing with a number of subjects of masonic interest 
and continues v.-ith individual reviews of some 68 Grand 
Jurisdictions, in which our own Grand Lodge receives very 
kindly and generous treatment. 

An interesting paper by 111. Bro. Hyde, 33°, issued as 
a Bulletin by the Masonic Service Committee of the Grand 
Lodge appears as Appendix 1 to the Proceedings. The sub- 
ject is "The Philosophy of Liberty." 

"There must be government which denies liberty; there 
must be liberty which defies government. The problem with 
which the centuries have wrestled is to find and establish 
a form of government strong enough to maintain the condi- 
tions of order under which men may work, without sacri- 
ficing the rights and liberties without which men will not 
v/ork." 

"With liberty, life means something, has purpose, res- 
ponsibility, obligation, opportunity. Without it, life is 
shallow, animalistic, meaningless — 'a tale told by an idiot, 
full of sound and fury, signifying nothing'." 

"That conflict will be settled, if at all, in the domain 
of reason, by full and free debate." 

M. W. Bro. Dillon Crist of Alliance was chosen as Grand 
Master for the ensuing year, and was presented by his 
brethren with a gavel, the handle of which was a black 
walnut grown on the estate of George Washington, and the 
head from an apple tree grown on the farm where he him- 
self was born. A photograph of the Grand Master, as well 
as a short biographical sketch of his numerous business and 
Masonic activities, appear in the opening pages of the Pro- 
ceedings. 



74 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

OKLAHOMA— 1939 

Thirty-First Annual Communication held at Tulsa, Okla- 
homa on the 14th, 15th and 16th of February 1939. 
John R. Abernathy, Grand Master. 
Total membership 45,544. 

No more presentable volume of Proceedings has come 
under the observation of this reviewer than that of the 
Grand Lodge of Oklahoma, consisting of four hundred pages 
of well arranged reading matter, printed in a clear type and 
bound in an attractive and durable cover. We gather from 
the remarks of the Grand Master that it was produced by 
the boys in their Masonic Home. What an inspiration the 
wholesome truths contained in the various addresses must 
have been to the boys as they were engaged in its prepara- 
tion and v/hat a comfort and satisfaction it must have been 
to the brethren to witness the interest manifested by their 
wards in this labor of love, which cannot fail to have a 
beneficial influence upon their young lives. 

It may interest our brethren to note the manner in 
which this and other Grand Lodges in the United States are 
opened. Instead of the Grand Lodge officers preceded by 
the Grand Master entering the auditorium in a body, as is 
our practice, the Grand Lodge is convened by the Deputy 
Grand Master who announces that the Grand Master is in 
waiting and directs the Grand Deacons and certain other 
Grand Lodge Officers to retire and conduct him to the Grand 
East. This being done the Grand Master is introduced, re- 
ceived with the appropriate Grand Honors and proceeds to 
open Grand Lodge in ample form. This method has its 
obvious advantages. Their Grand Lodge opens in the even- 
ing. The brethren are all in their places before the Grand 
Master enters and as he is the central figure in Grand Lodge 
it is fitting that he be received in a manner becoming his 
exalted rank. It obviates the confusion frequently witnessed 
in the opening of our Grand Lodge in allocating the Grand 
Lodge officers to their respective places and in admitting 
hundreds of delegates who defer their entrance in order that 
they may witness the imposing procession led by a pipers' 
band. Some day we may be emulating the practice of our 
brethren in Oklahoma if we can find a place to work in the 
pipers. 

The main features of the Annual Proceedings, apart 
from the regular business routine, are the addresses of the 
Grand Master and the Grand Orator, both of which are 
couched in eloquent language and indicate that these breth- 
ren are thoroughly imbued with the true spirit of Free- 
masonry. The Grand Orator's plea for "Liberty, Tolerance, 
Love" and the pathetic reference by Brother Dr. Abraham 
Shusterman to the abhorrent appeal of certain European 
nations "to their people to become a united people on the 
basis of hate" touches a sympathetic chord in the hearts of 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 75 

all Canadians. That the Order is held in high esteem by 
the general public is evidenced by twelve special communi- 
cations of Grand Lodge summoned for the purpose of laying 
corner stones, nearly all of which were in connection with 
religious or educational institutions. 

We are somewhat disappointed that reports from the 
District Deputy Grand Masters do not appear in the Pro- 
ceedings, especially as this Grand Lodge has no committee 
to report on the condition of Masonry. They are in close 
touch with the constituent Lodges and their reports, together 
with a summary of them by a competent committee, would 
make very interesting reading. 



OREGON— 1939 

The Eighty-Ninth Annual Communication assembled at 
Portland, June 14th, 1939. 

M. W. Bro. Franklin C. Howell presided. 

The address of the Grand Master indicates that he had 
a very busy year and to him great credit must be due for 
faithful and conscientious service to his Grand Lodge. 

He referred to their Masonic Home and said: "That it 
requires more thought and attention than all the other ac- 
tivities of the Grand Lodge combined". They had on the 
average about 82 guests in the Home at a per capita cost of 
$44.45 per month. The Grand Lodge contributed to the 
maintenance of about 42 on outside relief and the average 
donation was $16.03 per capita per month. There was a 
deficit of over $8000.00 in the operation of the Home and 
the cost of direct relief. 

He was concerned, as most Grand Masters are, with the 
amount of delinquent dues. We regret that space does not 
permit us to quote in full his frank, comprehensive and con- 
structive review of this important problem. He .<aid: 

"We are now experiencing the result of mistakes made 
over twenty years ago when our doors were too v.'ide open 
to those who sought entry. Admission was too easy. In- 
vestigating committees did not properly function. . . ." 

"I too well realize that some of our delincjuents did not 
have proper attention after they were raised. That is our 
shame, not their excuse. . . ." 

"When a brother feels that he can get along without his 
Masonry or that his Lodge means nothing to him he should 
be dropped. , . ." 

"I have heard a Secretary in a Lodge announce the 
doctrine: 'Once a Mason, always a Mason.' I do not subscribe 
to that theory. Masonry is work and action. Masonry is not 
passive. The theory and foundation of our Order is to give, 
not to receive. The only wages Masonry offers are the re- 
wards of service. The current flows from the individual to 



76 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

his Lodge and to his brethren and it continues to so flow 
until he is in distress or in need; then it is reversed and our 
duty is positive and continuing. The brother who can pay 
his dues and will not is no longer a Mason, because Masonry 
is of no use to him and he is of no benefit to the Order. 
There are many delinquents who spend unnecessarily each 
week sums greater than their Lodge dues. There are others 
who pay their dues to the so-called 'higher bodies' and 
neglect their Lodge dues. Lodge dues should come first and 
should not be remitted in cases where dues are paid to other 
bodies. 

Masters and Wardens, I urge that you take positive 
action. It is better that you clear rolls and start over again. 
Many of those whom you will drop will come back. The 
Lodge will be stronger by directing your efforts to new 
material. The question of numbers is of little importance. . . . 
It is quality, not quantity that is of consequence." 

It was reported that Grand Lodge had made an annual 
contribution to charity of $71,516.29 which was $2.96 per 
capita on their membership. This was a most commendable 
and praiseworthy effort in practical and constructive Masonry. 
They had 24,206 members on Dec. 31st, 1938, a net loss 
of 117 for the year and their annual cash receipts from all 
funds was $165,177.26 which is $2.96 per capita. This is 
another record on which the Masons of Oregon are to be 
congratulated. 

An excellent oration was delivered by W. Bro. Charles 
F. Walker. The whole address is well worth reading but we 
can quote only this one excerpt: 

"What is your faith? Not in terms of religion .... 
but in terms of conviction. What do you believe? . . . not 
what do you think or imagine .... but believe. Too many, 
if asked regarding themselves, their organizations, or their 
offices, to write their faith, would have blank papers." 

M W. Bro. Hagmeier, P.G.M. presented an interesting 
and comprehensive report on Foreign Correspondence. 

He reviewed our Proceedings of 1938 and made this 
comment on the address of our Grand Master: "He was out- 
spoken in his opposition to allowing any organization not 
absolutely Masonic to meet in the Lodge rooms of the Craft" 
and the Reviewer added "This writer is taking a long shot 
in the dark and were he a betting man would lay odds that 
eventually the girls will win". We suggest to Bro. Hagmeier 
that he is fortunate that his betting proclivities are re- 
strained as otherwise his long shot v/ould rot be profitable 
to him. 

The Reviewer gleaned many interesting iterns in his 
perusal of the activities of the Craft. We quote from his 
symposium on the address of the Grand Master of Kentucky: 

"If paid at the rate of 5 cents per mile, the rate allowed 
by governmental departments and private corporations in 
case where the car is owned by the individual, the Grand 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 77 

Master found that his expense account was entirely con- 
sumed by this item alone, leaving nothing for other expenses. 

"He therefore, recommended that Grand Lodge purchase 
a car for the incoming Grand Master which at the end of 
his term would be turned in on a new one for his successor. 
The car, however, to be used only in travelling on Lodge 
business. 

"The Committee looked with favor on the recommenda- 
tion and set a maximum of $800.00 as the price to be paid." 

M. W. Bro. Leif S. Finseth was elected and installed 
Grand Master for the ensuing year. 



PENNSYLVANIA— 1939 

Annual Communication held in Philadelphia, December 
27th, 1939, and four Quarterly Communications. 
Robert R. Lewis — Grand Master. 
Membership — 174,677. Number of lodges — 565. 

The full name is the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania and 
Masonic Jurisdiction Thereunto Belonging — a longer name 
than ours. The number of this Annual Communication is 
not given. At his peril let any Mason say that either the 
Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania or the Grand Lodge of Mas- 
sachusetts is the oldest Grand Lodge in North America. Both 
claim this distinction. 

In the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania the title "Most" 
is unknown. It is a Right Worshipful Grand Lodge and has 
a Right Worshipful Grand Master. It recognizes other 
Grand Lodges but does not exchange Grand Representatives 
v/ith them. Nor does it review the Proceedings of other 
Grand Lodges. There are twelve constituent lodges that 
have no names — only numbers. The Grand Master holds 
office for two years. In the record the first Grand Master 
is listed as having been elected September 25th, 1786. 

The Masonic Employment Bureau in Philadelphia placed 
445 persons in employment and the Bureau in Pittsburgh 
found positions for 320. To do this cost over $11,000; there 
were nearly 3,000 applications for employment. 

In forty years (1899-1939) the membership of this Grand 
Lodge increased from 54,890 to 174,677. In the year 1930 
its membership was 214,541. 

The Grand Master is a Judge of the Supreme Court and 
an eloquent speaker he is, as the present reviewer discovered 
at the celebration in Nova Scotia in 1938. At that time there 
was a great deal of good-natured chaffing about the name 
of our Grand Lodge. When his turn came to speak at the 
banquet in Halifax, the Grand Master of Pennsylvania 
proved to be a powerful protagonist for the Grand Lodge of 
Canada in the Province of Ontario. With the skill of a 
Cicero and the eloquence of a Demosthenes he defended our 



78 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

right to retain our historic name. He attended the Instal- 
lation of the Grand Master of England and devotes six pages 
of the Proceedings to a description of that ceremony. Here 
is part of his story: 

"The King was announced. A procession was formed to 
escort him. The sixteen trumpeters standing in front of the 
dais blew a fanfare. The music of the organ filled the hall. 

"My eyes were on the floor level entrance in the west. 
In the foreground of my vision the mass of human faces 
changed instantly to one of the backs of men's heads. After 
an instant's confusion my eyes followed their upward gaze 
to a sight I shall never forget. At the top of the western 
stairway, silhouetted against the gray wall, at the focus of 
its lines and the lines of the upper stairways, stood the King. 
Young, calm, slim, straight, tall, in dark morning suit and 
black tie. Resplendent in the gold-embroidered blue apron 
and gauntlets and collar of gold chain on broad blue ribbon, 
the regalia he wears by right of service as a Past Grand 
Master of a Provincial Grand Lodge. For a full minute he 
stood there while the organ sounded the National Anthem 
and the great assemblage kept silent. Then, amid wave after 
wave of continuous applause, he walked down the steps, 
along the centre aisle to the dais where he was greeted by 
the Pro Grand Master, seated on the Grand Master's throne, 
and received the Grand Honors of eleven. 

"The installation ceremony as conducted by HIS MA- 
JESTY THE KING was as well done as any Masonic cere- 
mony I have seen. It was followed by a most gracious act 
on his part. Having placed the newly-installed Grand Master 
upon the throne, he stepped down upon the level with his 
Masonic Brethren and joined them in saluting his Masonic 
Superior with the Grand Honors of eleven. 

"One other thing that he did will always remain in my 
memory. Retiring from the Grand Lodge, he paused at the 
top of the stairway, half turned to look back over the 
audience, paused an instant as if to fasten the scene in his 
memory, then waved his hand in friendly, informal farewell. 

"The entire affair was ornamented with that dignity of 
simplicity v/hich Pennsylvanians deem fitting in Masonry. 
No opportunity to enhance the dramatic effect of the historic 
event was missed, yet there was no over-emphasis or strain- 
ing for effect. 

"Certain other matters will long remain in my memory. 
The evident loyalty to King, Country and Craft with which 
that vast assemblage was vibrant. The unanimity of the 
English people and their calm, cool, cheerful courage in the 
shadow of the certainty of war. 

"God grant that shadow may not fall upon our nation. 
Should it come, I can wish no better thing for us than that 
we, with eciual loyalty, may face it as unitedly and with like 
courage." 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 79 

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND— 1939 

The Sixty-Fourth Annual Communication was held at 
Charlottetown June 28, 1939, with M. W. Bro. Donald Baker, 
Grand Master, presiding. Representatives from the Grand 
Lodges of Nova Scotia, among whom was the Grand Master, 
were introduced and welcomed. Grand Representatives of 
thirty-eight Grand Lodges near the Grand Lodge of Prince 
Edward Island answered the roll call. All of the lodges of 
the jurisdiction were represented at Grand Lodge. 

Membership, 1,075; number of lodges, 15. 

In his address the Grand Master spoke feelingly of the 
high importance of the recent visit of Their Majesties to 
Canada and to the United States. Every Mason in this juris- 
diction will hail with deep approval his sentiments. 

"Our loyalty is to the Crown and to the man who holds 
that high office — that we have a King whom we can also 
love is a matter for deep gratification. The charm of Queen 
Elizabeth has brought a wave of devotion from all." 

The Grand Master read the statement issued by the 
United Grand Lodge of England concerning the basic prin- 
ciples of Freemasonry and signified his wholehearted agree- 
ment. 

"Brethren, we are proud to belong to the British tradition 
and affirm our allegiance to those principles which have 
given character and stability to the Freemasonry of our 
inheritance." 

A full account of the celebrations in 1938 of the bi- 
centary of the founding of Freemasonry in Nova Scotia and 
the bicentary celebration in Prince Edward Island w^as given. 
That these celebrations have meant very much, particularly 
to the Masons of these jurisdictions, was emphasized both 
by the Grand Master and by the Chairman of the Committee 
which had charge of the bicentary celebrations for Prince 
Edward Island. The latter said: 

"It will go dov.-n in Masonic history that in 1938-39 the 
Masons of Prince Edward Island were honored with the 
presence of the most distinguished Masons in the world. I 
am sure that we who had any small part in this celebration 
felt well repaid for any efforts we put forth to help make 
this celebration the success we feel it has been and trust 
that its influence will long remain with us." 

The Grand Secretary in his annual report gave the total 
membership as 1075, a net loss of 9 for the year. He nointed 
out that the condition of Freemasonry in all of the lodges 
of the jurisdiction was good. He adds the interesting infor- 
mation that Grand Lodge had been asked by the Provincial 
authorities to assume the responsibility for lining with 
members of the Fraternity a portion of the route to be 
covered by their Majesties. "It seemed appropriate that the 
Masonic fraternity should be asked to assist in the enter- 



80 GEAND LODGE OF CANADA 

tainment of our gracious Sovereign, who is also a Past 
Grand Master of the United Grand Lodge of England," The 
request was transmitted to the lodges and the response was 
most gratifying. 

The Committee on Foreign Correspondence recommended 
for the second year in succession that their Grand Lodge 
enter into fraternal relations with the Grand Lodges of 
Norway and Sweden and the National Grand Lodge of Den- 
mark. The committee justly add: 

"The Brethren of the Scandinavian countries are closely 
allied with English-speaking Freemasonry and practise the 
same conservatism as we do." 

After noting with regret that Freemasonry has disap- 
peared from several European countries, the committee ex- 
pressed this firm opinion: 

"However, Freemasonry still survives in the countries 
where democracy prevails and a day will come when arma- 
ments v,'ill be cast aside for a Universal Brotherhood for the 
welfare of mankind and Freemasonry will play its part and 
flourish again from the seeds which are now only dormant." 

The year was saddened by the death of M. W. Bro. 
Ernest Kemp, Grand Master in 1935, who for thirteen years 
preceding that date had acted as Grand Secretary. 

Harlan P. Found was elected Grand Master. 



QUEBEC— 1939 

M. W. Bro. Duncan McLellan, Grand Master, presided at 
the 69th Annual Communication held in the City of Montreal 
on the 8th day of February, 1939. 

The Grand Master in his address gave a comprehensive 
statement of his faithful and efficient activities during the 
year. He said that: "The most outstanding event of the 
year was the Bi-Centenary Celebration of the founding of 
the first Masonic Lodge in Canada at Annapolis Royal". He 
reviewed the ceremonies held under the Auspices of the 
Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia, as well as the reception and 
entertainment of the Overseas Guests at Quebec and Mon- 
treal. He attended our Annual Communication and made this 
comment: "It was indeed delightful to witness the spon- 
taneous and enthusiastic welcome accorded to the British 
Deputation". He also mentioned "the splendid banquet 
v/hich was held in the evening at the Royal York Hotel". 

We are in accord with this decision of the Grand Master. 
He said: 

"I declined to grant a dispensation permitting a Lodge 
to re-admit a demitted brother, by a resolution of the Lodge, 
without the formality of an application, for the reason that 
it is the inalienable right of every member to determine who 
shall become a member of the Lodge, by a secret ballot, as 
specified in the Constitution." 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 81 

He made this interesting reference to his visit to St. 
Alban's Lodge, Mount Forest: 

"I received a cordial invitation, with the gracious con- 
currence of the Grand Master, to be present November 4, 
at the 70th Anniversary of St. Alban's Lodge, Mount Forest, 
in the Province of Ontario. My birthplace was within a few 
miles of that town, and as the days of my youth and early 
manhood were spent there, it was indeed a happy experience 
tq gather with friends of that earlier period of my life. The 
Grand Master for Ontario, M. W. Bro. W. J. Dunlop, who 
honored the Anniversary occasion by his presence, had 
selected as his birthplace the nearby town of Durham, and 
it was indeed significant that two Grand Masters should be 
present at a Masonic function in the locality wherein each 
first saw the light of day." 

In Quebec it is evident that Masonic Rank is given only 
as a reward for faithful and conscientious service. The Com- 
mittee on the State of Masonry reported that one of the 
D.D.G.M.s had failed to discharge the duties of his office 
and the Committee was "unable to recommend that the rank 
of Right Worshipful be granted." This report was adopted. 

Two important amendments to the Constitution were 
made at this Communication. It was resolved that: — "Every 
Lodge shall for each of its members pay towards the fund 
for Grand Lodge purposes seventy-five cents per Annum 
and for the purposes of the Permanent Benevolent Fund 
twenty-five cents per Annum." 

It was also decided to escape the rigour of the winter 
season and change the date of their Annual Communication 
from February to the third Wednesday in October, when 
motoring, the most popular means of transportation, can 
be more generally utilized. 

The Report of the Grand Secretary shovv'ed a member- 
ship of 13,996, a net loss of 117 during the year. He also 
reported that the loss since 1930 had been 2,246. 

One of the interesting features of the opening Session 
of the Grand Lodge of Quebec is the address of the Grand 
Chaplain. We take the following excerpts from the stirring 
message of R. W. Bro. F. Scott MacKenzie: 

"Innovations in Masonry are taboo; the ancient land- 
marks are inviolahde. And yet, notwithstanding the revolu- 
tionary changes that have taken place in the world of 
thought throughout the centuries of Masonic history, during 
all of which the constitution of Masonry has remained un- 
changed and its ancient usages and customs have been 
zealously preserved, it remains a living force still, an in- 
fluential factor in the life of society, attracting and holding 
the interest and devoted loyalty of a multitude of men of all 
ranks and classes and of all degrees of culture and learning. 
This is a simple fact, explain it how we may. And I for one 
refuse to believe that there is no explanation of it, that 



82 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

Masonry has just happened to survive, for no particular 
reason at all, amid so much that has perished and been 
forgotten in the onward march of history. The survival of 
Masonry is no accident." 

"We are w^itnessing today, in some of the high places 
in world affairs, the exercise of tyrannical authority, which 
is operating in such a way as to imperil all that we hold 
most dear in our social life. And our whole soul revolts 
against it. We consider no sacrifice too great for the preser- 
vation of freedom, v/hich is quite proper, so long as we have 
a clear idea of what freedom means. There is always a 
danger, however, that in recoiling from one extreme we 
swing to the other. And our Masonic knowledge ought to 
help us to keep our balance amid all the confusion by which 
we are surrounded, to see that freedom is not anarchy, and 
that without authority, properly constituted and respected, 
there can be no freedom worthy of the name. That social 
principle is permanently valid, and there never v/as a time 
in all the world's history when it was more vitally important 
that it should be clearly recognized than it is today." 

The Fraternal Correspondence is the efficient work of 
that thoughtful and experienced veteran, M. W. Bro. Evans. 
We quote with approval his reference from Alabama: 

"The Grand Master in his address recites his official 
acts, the noticeable features of which are his active interest, 
as Grand Master of Masons, in the Order of the Eastern 
Star, and his frequent visitations thereto, his strong advocacy 
of the Order of De Molay and his communication to the 
President of the United States urging him to call a con- 
ference of all Grand Masters of Masons so that "he make 
his voice heard for the preservation of peace." 

"Without going into details, the writer feels compelled 
to again criticize these actions of a Grand Master of Masons. 
The Order of the Eastern Star and of De Molay are not 
concordant Orders of Masonry and hence should not be 
recognized officially by Masons. Ancient Craft Masonry is 
non-sectarian, whereas the Order of De Molay is most de- 
cidedly so, and its teachings more or less objectionable to 
many of our brethren. Masonry is non-political, whereas 
the appeal to the President of the United States was of an 
undoubtedly political nature." 

Michigan also gives him an opportunity. The Grand 
Master recommended that Masonry should encourage the 
Order of De Molay and the Rainbow Girls, but Bro. Evans 
does not agree. He comments: 

"Are there not a large number of other organizations 
doing at the least equally good work ? Say the Boy Scouts, 
Girl Guides or Junior Leagues; these exist without any at- 
tempt to mislead the profane by claiming appendage to 
Ancient Freemasonry. Let our brethren stand by the old 
land marks and, whilst as individuals rendering assistance 
to all deservins: institutions, ignore and discourage those 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 83 

which improperly claim co-masonry as a basis for their 
existence." 

Our Grand Lodge was duly represented by their faithful 
and conscientious Grand Treasurer R. W. Bro. A. F. C. Ross. 



RHODE ISLAND AND PROVIDENCE 
PLANTATIONS— 1939 

Grand Master— Fred H. Barrows. 
Grand Secretary — Harold L. McAuslan. 

43 lodges — 15,639 members, a decrease of 463 from 
previous year. 

Semi-Annual Convention in Freemasons Hall, Providence, 
November 21, 1938. 

Fully accredited representatives 282. 

The proceedings are prefaced by a brief historical sketch 
of the Grand Master and his family. He has been, and is, 
active in business, social and religious circles. He has been 
interested in Masonry since 1913, and has been active in 
Capitular and Templar degrees as well as in the Scottish 
Rite. He is the 84th Grand Master of Rhode Island. 

The Grand Master expressed his pleasure at the large 
attendance and welcomed visitors from neighbouring juris- 
dictions. At the approach of the Thanksgiving season he 
reminded Masons that heartfelt thanks should be tendered 
to the Supreme Grand Architect for the blessings of health, 
strength and wisdom. 

A special committee on — "Penalty for Non-Payment of 
Dues and Assessments" recommended the following amend- 
ment to the Constitution: 

"On the first day of January in each year the subordin- 
ate lodges shall strike from the roll the names of all mem- 
bers who shall be delinquent in payment of dues or assess- 
ments to the lodge for a period of two years; and any mem- 
ber whose name shall be so stricken from the roll may be 
re-admitted to membership by a vote of two-thirds of the 
members present at any stated communication, and upon the 
payment of all dues and assessments owing at the time his 
name was so stri.-ken from the roll. 

"Life members shall be liable for special assessments 
and shall not be exempt from the provisions and penalties 
of this section. 

"It shall be the duty of the Secretary of each subordin- 
ate lodge, on or before the first day of November in each 
year, to notify, at the last known address, all members who 
may be liable to the imposition of the penalty of this section, 
on a form to be provided by the Grand Lodge for the pur- 
pose; but failure to receive such notice shall not invalidate 
the penalty of this section." 



84 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

This amendment was approved at the subsequent Annual 
Communication. 

The Committee on the Celebration of the Sesqui-Centen- 
nial of Grand Lodge reported that such a celebration should 
be an opportunity to strengthen and build up the fraternity 
in their Grand Jurisdiction, but were unwilling to proceed 
unless the Grand Lodge showed a desire for such forward 
movement. The Committee recommended and Grand Lodge 
approved, that the vote at the annual meeting in May, 1938, 
relating to the assessment of $1.00 per year for three years 
on individual members, be rescinded. Evidently the Masons 
of Rhode Island are not more enthusiastic for assessments 
than are those in Ontario. 

An enlarged Committee v/as appointed to plan the cele- 
bration at the subsequent Annual Communication. 

The One Hundred and Forty-Ninth Annual Communica- 
tion of the Grand Lodge of Rhode Island and Providence 
Plantations, Providence, May 15, 1939. 

Accredited representatives numbered 308. 

The Grand Master welcomed visitors and members, paid 
fitting tribute to the deceased, and gave a full and interest- 
ing account of his activities during the year. 

He enlarged upon the Grand Masters' Conference in 
February, and included the "Declaration of Principles" of 
Masonry approved at the meeting. He also gave a brief 
summary of various other items on the agenda. 

He was enthusiastic over his visit to Canada in July, 
1938, to celebrate the Bicentenary of Freemasonry in Canada, 
and included a copy of the complete programme in his report. 

He reported that the travelling Bible, presented to the 
Grand Lodge by M. W. Bro. Albert Knight, had been dedi- 
cated on the altar (5f forty Grand Lodges in the United 
States and also on the altar of ths Grand Lodge of Nova 
Scotia. 

The Grand Master was pleasecl with the increase in 
fraternal visits between lodges in the State and with lodges 
in sister jurisdictions. 

Among important decisions of the year the following 
appear: 
"Lodge Visitations to Exemplify and Confer Degrees. 

"The officers of a duly constituted Rhode Island Lodge 
may, upon the invitation and with the consent of the Grand 
Master, confer the degrees in any lodge in this Grand Juris- 
diction, but may not confer the degrees in any lodge outside 
this Grand Jurisdiction without the consent also of the Grand 
Master of the Grand Lodge of the Grand Jurisdiction in 
which the other lodge is located. 

• "Rhode Island Lodges visiting other jurisdictions may 
do actual work on Rhode Island candidates only, but may 
exemplify the degrees on others. Lodges from other States 



FRATEENAL CORRESPONDENCE 85 

visiting this grand Jurisdiction must either bring their own 
candidates or exemplify the degrees on others." 
"Degree Teams. 

"So-called "Degree Teams", not members of the Lodge, 
may exemplify any of the three degrees in any Lodge in 
this Grand Jurisdiction, upon the invitation of the Worship- 
ful Master and with the consent of the Grand Master, but 
must not actually initiate, pass, or raise real candidates." 

The procedure, re "Degree Teams", is evidently more 
strict in Rhode Island than in Ontario. 

Some 8,087 members were reported in arrears to the 
extent of $90,586.50. 

Benevolence is carried on through the Masonic Home 
Fund and Masonic Service Board. The disbursements for 
relief totalled $11,798.91. The various assets of the Grand 
Lodge amount to $201,321.14. 

The reports of the seven District Deputy Grand Masters 
deal largely with their visits and local matters including 
several Lodges of Instruction. 

The representative of the Grand Lodge of Canada near 
the Grand Lodge of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations 
is Charles P. Bearce, East Providence; and J. F. Reid, Wind- 
sor, represents Rhode Island in this jurisdiction. 



SASKATCHEWAN— 1939 

The Thirty-Third Annual Communication held in Regina, 
June 21st and 22nd, 1939; also an Especial Communication 
held at Regina on July 29th, 1938, to receive the visitors 
from England, Scotland, and Ireland. 

Stewart C. Burton, Grand Master. 
Membership, 12,367; number of lodges, 198. 

At this Annual Communication, Horace Melville Under- 
hill of Shaunavon, barrister and solicitor, was elected Grand 
Master. For many years he and this reviewer have corres- 
ponded intermittently on matters concerning Masonic Educa- 
tion and we have met several times. The first two pages of 
the Proceedings are given to a well-written biography of 
Grand Master Underbill. The writer thereof touches upon 
the real secret of it all when, in his final paragraph, he says 
this, to all of which this reviewer most heartily subscribes: 

"M. W. Brother Underbill is a practical and sane idealist 
who naturally leans towards a mystical philosophy of life 
in which the search for knowledge and the ultimate truth 
predominate. He is well known for his unfeigned kindliness, 
for his affable, courteous and companionable demeanour and 
for his unselfish devotion to the highest ideals of the great 
Fraternity of which he is an outstanding exponent. Sincere, 
capable, a man of integrity, a citizen without reproach, a 
faithful Mason, his brethren of Saskatchewan can look for- 



86 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

ward with confidence to sane, progressive guidance and in- 
spiration during his tenure of office as their Grand Master." 

Even if one did not know the Grand Master, a look at 
his photograph would confirm what has been quoted above. 
What more can be said of a man — than that he is kind ? Is not 
kindness the primary characteristic which includes all other 
virtues ? Not softness, not weakness, for a truly kind man 
can be stern, and even harsh, when circumstances require 
that treatment. For examples of this consult the V.S.L. 

Many of the finest of Masons, and the friendliest, are 
to be found in the Grand Lodge of Saskatchewan. Like our 
Grand Lodge, it is fortunate in having an energetic and 
efficient Grand Secretary; and in having also, as general 
advisor, his father, the former Grand Secretary. All Grand 
Secretaries this reviewer has met are of that type — efficient, 
energetic, kindly, helpful, industrious, conscientious, reliable, 
and never "too busy to work." 

At this Annual Communication the then Grand Master 
of our Grand Lodge was elected an honorary Past Grand 
Master of the Grand Lodge of Saskatchewan. To his great 
delight he found, in the Grand Pursuivant, the Mason who 
was Junior Warden of his own mother lodge when he (our 
then Grand Master) was initiated in 1908. Indeed, one 
obtains the general impression that most of the members 
of the Grand Lodge of Saskatchewan came originally either 
from Ontario or from Scotland. 

Saskatchewan has always led in Masonic education in 
this Dominion. Each month a mimeographed lesson goes to 
every lodge, and a real, timely, and interesting lesson it is. 
All ten of these are printed in the Proceedings; each is by 
a different author. The chairman of our own Committee on 
Masonic Education has used several of them in Ontario, 
ascribing due credit, of course. 

In Saskatchewan there are seventeen Masonic Districts, 
each under the guidance of a District Deputy Grand Master. 
In each District there is held annually a District meeting, 
usually attended by the Grand Master and the Grand Sec- 
retary. Conditions make it necessary that most of these 
meetings be held in July. In his Address the Grand Master 
says that not half the Masters, one fourth of the Senior 
Wardens, or one half of the Junior Wardens attended these 
meetings. For this he reprimands the absentees. Was it 
merely accidental, one wonders, that more Junior than Senior 
Wardens were present ? Some of the weaker lodges were 
conspicuous by reason of the absence of their representatives. 
But Saskatchewan has had difficulties which we in Ontario 
have never experienced. A visitor to their Annual Commu- 
nication is amazed that the Masons of that Province have 
done so well and are doing so well under such adverse cir- 
cumstances. What buoyant, optimistic, and competent breth- 
ren they are! 



FEATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 87 

In his Address the Grand Master congratulates Kinistino 
Lodge No. 1 in Prince Albert on attaining and celebrating 
its Sixtieth Anniversary. This Lodge began work in 1879 
under dispensation from our Grand Lodge as No. 381. In 
1882, for geographical reasons, it transferred its allegiance 
to the Grand Lodge of Manitoba and became No. 16 on that 
Grand Register. In 1906, when the Grand Lodge of Sas- 
katchewan was formed, with twenty-nine lodges, Kinistino 
was given first place. 

Very timely is Grand Master Burton's caution to breth- 
ren who are members of so-called women's organizations 
which claim to resemble Masonic Lodges. He found that 
some of these brethren forget somewhat the sacredness of 
their obligations and that their women relatives know al- 
together too much of what takes place in Masonic lodges. 
This serious situation he ascribes to the human relationship 
that exists. 

It seems that the practice has been growing up of ap- 
plauding in lodge an especially creditable rendition of some 
part of the ritual. The Grand Master very properly ruled 
that this must cease. The same ruling was made by one of 
our Grand Masters y^ars ago. Just imagine what lodge 
meetings would be if applause were permitted! In time not 
only creditable renditions but all renditions of every part 
of the ritual would be greeted with applause just as now, 
at other meetings, poor speeches are as heartily applauded, 
as a rule, as are good ones. 

This reviewer always has the greatest difficulty in un- 
derstanding a financial statement but, with that reservation, 
it would appear to be the case that Saskatchewan has a 
Benevolent Fund with investments amounting to $333,328.67. 
Consider that in relation to the membership figure of a little 
over twelve thousand and let us take off our hats to vigorous 
litle Saskatchewan, an example to us in more ways than 
one! Reverting once more to the Grand Treasurer's Report, 
an Educational Fund is discovered, with assets of $3,825.35. 
A statement of the purpose of this fund has not been found 
in the Proceedings, or has been overlooked, but the expres- 
sion "Advances to Teachers, $1,920.00" in the financial state- 
ment would seem to indicate that it is used to assist teachers 
(presumably, but perhaps not necessarily, members of the 
Craft) whose salaries have not been paid, or only partially 
paid, by school boards in the Province. If this inference be 
correct, perhaps our own R. W. Bro. Dr. Carson will agree 
that once more Saskatchewan sets an example for others to 
emulate! The Minister of Education for the Province is an 
active Past Grand Master. 

From the Report of the Committee on the Condition 
of Masonry the following is culled: 

"Some of our most progressive lodges are in hard- 
pressed districts while some lodges which show little or no 
progress are in comparatively favoured districts. Our con- 



88 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

elusion is that the condition of a constituent lodge depends 
largely on the zeal of its principal officers and the capability 
of the District Deputy Grand Master." 

So say we all! Our Grand Secretary may well be proud 
of the Grand Lodge of Saskatchewan which he represents 
near our Grand Lodge. 



SCOTLAND— 1939 

At a quarterly communication held in Freemasons' Hall, 
Edinburgh, on Thursday, the 2nd day of February, 1939, 
Bro. Brigadier-General Sir Norman A. Orr-Ewing, Baronet, 
Most Worshipful Grand Master Mason, presided. 

Grand Lodge was opened in full form with solemn 
prayer. 

Grand Lodge met in quarterly communications on Thurs- 
day, 2nd February, 4th May, 3rd August and 2nd November 
for 1939. Grand Lodge met for installation of Grand Office 
bearers and for the celebration of the Festival of St. Andrew 
on November 30th, 1939. 

At the quarterly communication held on the 2nd day of 
November, 1939, the Most Worshipful Grand Master Mason 
nominated The Right Honourable Viscount Trafrain in suc- 
cession to himself in the following words: 

"Brethren, it is my very great privilege to-day to 
propose Brother The Right Honourable Viscount Trafrain 
as Grand Master Mason of Scotland in succession to myself. 
Everyone knows Lord Trafrain. He is a grand Mason, a 
great man, and will be a fine Grand Master of Scotland. He 
will do his best for the cause, and I feel certain that no 
brother will be able to say that Brother Trafrain, who is 
at present serving liis country, will be lax in his duties." 
(Loud Applause). 

Brother W. Stevenson Cochran seconded the nomination 
and Brother The Right Honourable Viscount Trafrain was 
elected by acclamation. 

At the annual communication for the installation of 
officers held on Thursday, the 30th day of November, 1939, 
honorary membership was conferred on His Royal Highness, 
the Duke of Kent, K.G., K.T., who is the Grand Master of 
the Grand Lodge of England. After His Royal Highness had 
taken the oath of fealty he thanked the Grand Master Mason 
and the Grand Lodge in a very happy manner, for the honour 
conferred upon him. 

His Royal Highness was accompanied from England by 
a number of prominent members of the Grand Lodge of 
England. 

Most Worshipful Brother Trafrain was unable on account 
of an attack of tonsilitis to attend the installation ceremonies. 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 89 

He will be installed at a later communication. The other 
elected officers were installed. 

The Provincial Grand Masters made their reports with 
respect to their several Provinces which reports indicated 
that Masonry was flourishing. 

Bro. T. G. Winning, J.P. is the Grand Secretary, 



SOUTH AUSTRALIA— 1939 

The Fifty-Fifth Annual Communication of the Grand 
Lodge of South Australia was held in the City of Adelaide, 
on April 19, 1939, with M. W. Bro. Honorable Justice Napier, 
Grand Master, presiding. 

The total membership as at June 30, 1939, was shown 
to be 13,432, an increase of 110 members for the year. 

Masonry was established in the State of South Australia 
in 1834 but the Grand Lodge as now constituted was not 
founded until 1884. 

This jurisdiction has been building a group of Masonic 
Cottage Homes for worthy brethren and every year new 
units are added to the settlement. In this benevolent work 
the Grand Mark Lodge and the Supreme Grand Chapter 
have cheerfully co-operated. 

The Grand Master in his message warns against some 
other organizations which pretend to be Masonic. "I am 
informed," he says, "that there are two associations of this 
kind in Australia. It should be clearly understood that no 
Mason affiliated with this Grand Lodge is at liberty to 
associate with any irregular order v/hich pretends to make 
Masonry, in any form, a test of membership, or to attend 
any non-Masonic meeting at which Masonry is introduced, 
directly, or by implication. Neither is he to participate in 
any ceremony held under pseudo-Masonic auspices. It should 
be strongly impressed on the younger members of our 
Fraternity that anything of that kind must inevitably involve 
a serious breach of discipline and might render the offender 
liable to expulsion from the Craft. It should be remembered 
that in this respect we are following the lead given by the 
Grand Lodge of England." 

The Grand Master also touches upon a problem that is 
called the "Immigration of Freemasons." This in reality 
deals with the attitude of certain Masons towards political 
affairs and to the other problem involved in the recognition 
of other Grand Lodges which do actively or by implication 
become involved in politics. This further warning is handed 
out: "It should be understood that Freemasonry, as we know 
it, inculcates the duties of religion, loyalty and citizenship 
as duties of a personal character. It does not and must 
never attempt to dictate to its members any particular 
course of action in relation to political questions or theories 



90 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

of government. It admonishes to seek the truth, to do 
justice and to exercise charity towards all men. But beyond 
directing our attention to the Volume of the Sacred Law it 
leaves, and we must leave, the individual to work out the 
practical application of its precepts." 



SOUTH CAROLINA— 1939 

The Two Hundred and Second Annual Communication 
of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient Free 
Masons of South Carolina was held at Charleston, on March 
8th and 9th, 1939, with M. W. Bro. Walter F. Going, Grand 
Master, presiding. 

Membership 17,619, an increase of 171. 

The Grand Master after extending a most cordial wel- 
come in typical "Southern Style" to the many distinguished 
visitors, confessed that he was strongly tempted to outline 
what he thought is wrong with the world today. In this 
respect many of us must also plead guilty to a similar urge. 

Your reviewer who is intimately acquainted with Grand 
Master Going, his sterling qualities of leadership and his 
sincerity of purpose, commends his following words to you. 

"The world is suffering from the same contending forces 
as in all previous ages — liberty against autocracy — individual 
rights against centralized authority — right against wrong. 
Masonry has always fought, with many other forces as 
allies, for liberty and justice. I am not a prophet, however, 
I do not believe that the battle will be either lost or won. 
It will be a continuing struggle and our responsibility is to 
pass on to the next generation a strong, vigorous Masonry 
capable of maintaining its sector of the battle line. In brief, 
therefore, my philosophy is that Masonry should be militant 
but not unduly alarmed. Masonry passed the experimental 
stage many years before the current crop of dictators were 
born. I am not advocating complacency because our greatest 
danger is lack of interest from within, but I am trying to 
say that Masonry is suffering from no new ills, that we 
must quit "calamity howling" blaming the world and modern 
conditions with our shortcomings. We need only to redouble 
our efforts in our chosen field of service to our membership 
and the community in which we live. "Practical Masonry" 
and "Community consciousness" if you please. Masonry is 
a way of life, the combined virtues of individual lives, yours 
and mine; the good we do day by day." 

The Grand Master announced with considerable pride a 
gain in numerical strength for the third successive year and 
pointed out that more candidates were raised in 1938 than 
in any year since 1929. At the same time he drew attention 
to an improvement in the cash balance, a complete response 
by all lodges to the call for Grand Lodge returns and dues 
within time, and a "continued revival of interest" which 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 91 

"proclaims the healthy condition of Masonry in South 
Carolina". 

The Grand Master made an urgent appeal to all mem-, 
bers to give all possible assistance to the Library and 
Museum Committee by keeping a lookout for books, docu- 
ments, letters and old relics which were of considerable 
historic and sentimental value. The following document was 
thus obtained from the descendants of Captain C. C. Cooper. 
"To all whom this may concern: 

"We, the undersigned, certify, on honor, that Captain 
C. C. Cooper, of South Carolina, while in charge of us and 
other federal officers prisoners of war at Charleston and 
Columbia, S.C, and Charlotte, N.C., while he done his duty 
as an officer, did everything in his power to alleviate our 
sufferings by giving us, and many others money (to buy 
the necessaries of life) to the extent of his means. 

To reciprocate said favors we desire any federal officer 
or officers to treat him with due consideration as a gentle- 
man and a Mason should he ever fall into their hands." 

Henry J. McDonald, 

Capt. 11th Conn. Vols. 

Wm. H. Locke, 

Lieut. 18th Conn. Vols. 

Many dispensations were granted by the Grand Master 
during the year, among them being two to form new lodges. 
But he steadfastly refused requests for dispensations to 
confer more than five degrees on the same day except in 
cases where there appeared to be some emergency. One 
lodge was constituted during the year. 

As we would naturally expect, this Grand Lodge with 
over two hundred years of uninterrupted service in the 
State continued to support all worthy causes and officiated 
at the laying of the corner stone of a new building for 
Clemson College. The Deputy Grand Master, (now Grand 
Master) who is a great educationist and a member of the 
staff of this college, conducted the ceremony. The corner 
stone of the Library at South Carolina University was also 
laid by the Grand Master. 

The normal number of rulings was made by the Grand 
Master during the year, many of them such as in respect 
to "residence", "voting in the lodge" and "collective bal- 
loting," being quite familiar to us. But there is one decision 
which is particularly worthy of note because a similar 
situation might arise, if it has not already arisen in our 
Grand Lodge. A lodge was opened at 7.30 p.m. instead of 
the regular hour 8 o'clock and without dispensation. Ballots 
were taken and the lodge closed by 8 o'clock. Upon protest 
from a member who came to the hall at 8 o'clock, the Grand 
Master ruled the meeting illegal and the business transacted 
null and void. He further directed that a printed notice to 



92 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

this effect be sent to all members and that they be also 
advised that new ballots would be taken and all business 
confirmed. 

The jurisdiction is divided into twenty-five districts, 
each under a District Deputy Grand Master whose duties 
appear to be similar to those of our D. D.G.Ms. But a study 
of the membership of the subordinate lodges reveals some 
startling data. Of the 269 lodges the greater percentage 
have a membership of under 100; over fifty per cent, of 
these have under 50; many have under 20; and one has only 
8 members. It would seem to your reviewer that it would 
be almost impossible to legally open the lodge with the 
required seven members. In the latter case it would appear 
that all the members were officers. But there is evidence 
of some remedy in this respect because during the year 
three lodges with memberships under 18 consolidated with 
other lodges. 

A rather interesting amendment to the Constitution was 
recommended by the Grand Master in 1938 but before the 
vote was taken in 1939 the Grand Master recommended that 
such amendment be not adopted. His amendment made 
provision for giving each Past District Deputy Grand Master 
one vote in Grand Lodge. After studying the landmarks and 
ancient usages concerning this question of non-representative 
votes he concluded that no additional non-representative 
votes in Grand Lodge should be introduced. In 1893 for the 
first time Past Grand Masters were given votes and re- 
ceived the same pay as representatives. 

A worthy benevolent work is carried on by the Com- 
mittee on Public Education in assisting in the reduction of 
illiteracy in the State by providing clothing, books, glasses, 
etc., to children who, without them, could not attend school. 
M. W. Bro. S. Maner Martin, now Grand Master, told the 
following interesting story to the Grand Masters' Conference 
in Washington. It well illustrates the value of the en- 
deavours. 

"About three years ago we undertook the work of 
assisting our attendance teachers in getting the poor boys 
and poor girls in our jurisdiction into school. 

The story is that in one district they undertook the 
furnishing of shoes as their part of the project. They sup- 
plied a number of poor children with shoes. As to one little 
boy, it was his first pair of shoes; he had never had a pair 
of shoes before. He wore them to school and was so proud 
of them that he put his feet up on the desk. The teacher 
did not have the heart to tell him to take his feet down. 
She let him keep them there. 

The next day the teacher got a letter from that boy's 
mother which read something like this: 

"Dear Teacher: Won't you please tell Johnnie to take 
off his shoes when he goes to bed ? He is so proud of them 
that he wants to sleep with them on." 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 93 

Further benevolent work is conducted under a compe- 
tent Benevolent Committee which during the year expended 
$24,437.00 by contributing to the support of orphans in 
non-masonic orphanages, to orphans not in institutions, to 
one hundred and twenty-eight widows, and to sixty-eight 
Master Masons. 

The Review of Symbolic Freemasonry by R. W. Bro. 
and Rev. Henry Collins, now Junior Grand Warden, is a 
concise but complete report of the other Grand Jurisdictions. 
And to us he is especially kind and considerate. He pays 
his final tribute, although little did he know it at the time, 
to our late reviewer and Past Grand Master, M- W. Bro. 
W. N. Ponton. 

M. W. Bro. S. Maner Martin was installed as Grand 
Master. And may your reviewer be permitted through close 
acquaintanceship with him, to describe him briefly but none 
the less sincerely as a "real southern gentleman". 

Our Grand Representative A. A. Lemon, was as usual 
present to answer the roll call. 



SOUTH DAKOTA— 1939 

The Sixty-fifth Annual Communication was held at 
Mitchell on June 13th, 1939. M. W. Bro. William H. Hirsch, 
Grand Master, presided. 

From his lengthy and comprehensive address these 
quotations are made. 

"Grand Charity Fund: The last report of those receiving 
aid from the Grand Charity Fund discloses that we have 39 
cases, costing a trifle more than $1,070.50 a month. I realize 
that alleviation of the physical distress of our needy and 
afflicted is of paramount importance, yet I am wondering 
if we have not, in our enthusiasm, lost sight of the meaning 
of charity and relief? Have we not all too easily accustomed 
ourselves to delegating to others what we, as Masons, should 
do ourselves? Sometimes, often times, I wish that we did 
not look to the Grand Charity Fund to carry the burdens of 
our Constituent Lodges to such a great extent. The Grand 
Chariy Fund should be resorted to last and not first. The 
matter is one that each Lodge should ponder on. I, therefore, 
suggest that each personal application for relief be referred 
back to the Lodge of v/hich the brother is a member for a 
thorough investigation and action by the Lodge and report 
to the Board of Trustees. 

To the Constituent Lodges I want to issue this warning, 
— not to make application for assistance from the Grand 
Charity Fund, unless the case is first thoroughly investigat- 
ed, and it has also been found that the Lodge cannot give 
the required assistance from its own funds. 

Unless it affirmatively appears from the Report of the 
Board, I again recommend that a reinvestigation of all of 



94 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

the cases on the Grand Charity Fund be made as soon as 
possible and the above-mentioned plan followed hereafter as 
far as practical." 

He referred to the Consolidation of Lodges and evidently 
it had engaged the attention of their Grand Masters for 
several years. He made this comment: 

"It has been suggested to the brethren of several of our 
lodges that the interest of Masonry v^^ould best be served 
by consolidation of their lodge M^ith some good active lodge 
in a neighbouring community. In no lodge, however, has 
such suggestion received favourable consideration and it is 
apparent that the impelling force must come from sources 
other than the lodge itself. The Grand Lodge has a large 
number of lodges in small towns and villages so limited in 
membership, that they find it difficult to properly maintain 
and support themselves. Where Lodges, because of conditions 
over which they may or may not have control, utterly fail 
in their duties to their members and their communities, 
nothing is to be gained by permitting them to continue. The 
members of such Lodges would be much happier, and 
Masonry in general better served, if consolidation with some 
other Lodge was required. Improved highways and modern 
facilities for travel make many of our Lodges unncessary, 
and consolidation will impose no great inconvenience upon 
their members." 

He made this interesting observation on Masonic Edu- 
cation : 

"I believe that an informed and educated membership is 
of as much importance to Masonry as an informed and 
educated electorate is to our form of Government. We are 
living in an enlightened age and it is incumbent upon us 
to know more about things than ever before. We surely 
are in a position to give our members, new and old, far more 
knowledge of Masonry and we should grasp every oppor- 
tunity to do so. Intelligent Masons are not satisfied with the 
slight amount of Masonic information they receive through 
the medium of the three degrees. They should be encouraged 
to look deeper into the subject and it is an easy matter to 
provide the means. The Master of a Lodge is responsible 
for this phase of Masonry in his Lodge and the Master who 
complains of the lack of attendance can well ask himself 
whether he or the Lodge is at fault. Numerous examples 
could be cited of increased attendance due to the Master's 
personal interest in arranging programs for the members, 
and giving them further Masonic Education rather than de- 
pending upon the opening and closing of a Lodge and the 
occasional conferring of a degree." 

The Grand Master was much concerned regarding the 
number of members suspended for non-payment of dues. He 
referred to them as the "lost battalion" and he pointed out 
that the loss from suspensions was more than the increase 
in membership from all sources. He said that at one time 
we considered "them excellent material" and he made this 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 95 

pertinent query, "why did these members allow themselves 
to be suspended?" He answered, they are good citizens, they 
appreciate the teachings of the Order but he claimed "they 
just drifted away and drifting my brethren is a tragedy." 
He added that this "lost battalion was recently interested 
and if approached in a friendly, brotherly manner, their ap- 
preciation of that beauty, that dignity, that solemnity, that 
ideal of Masonry may be re-kindled." 

In the Grand Master's address he made a number of 
recommendations on different subjects. One suggestion was: 
"That this Grand Lodge decide whether this is the proper 
time for re-dedication of principles or re-definition of pur- 
poses." This part of the address was considered by the Com- 
mittee on General Activities. They reported: 

"No doubt there is room for thought in them, but we 
see no great purpose in taking affirmative action along these 
lines at this time. If we will study our Landmarks and 
ritual, master their principles, re-apply, re-dedicate and con- 
secrate ourselves to the teachings and purposes of this great 
Fraternity of Man, we can promote and exemplify the spirit 
and contents of these declarations without enunciating them 
publicly. We therefore recommend that no action be taken 
on these two matters at present." 

M. W. Bro. Crockett, the Chairman of the Committee 
on Foreign Correspondence, made this optimistic summary: 
"I have received, reviewed and briefed all of the 55 
Grand Lodge Proceedings, and have them at hand for the 
disposition of this Grand Lodge, in case ways and means 
are provided for the printing. In none of these Grand Juris- 
dictions is there complaint of retrogression; rather, optimism 
seems to prevail. Many show net gains, and more and more 
are the "strangers" knocking at our doors, seeking admis- 
sion. Suspensions fewer, reinstatements increasing and at- 
tendance decidedly improving. 

New members are injecting new blood into the body of 
our Lodges. When they are assigned to places of responsi- 
bility, they exhibit great enthusiasm and there is every 
evidence that they are raising the standard of the work. 
From far and near we read, "Give these young Masons work 
to do! They are the foundation of our future Masonic 
structure." 

The Grand Secretary reported the membership 14,478, 
a net decrease of 584. M. W. Bro. Chas. C. Smith was in- 
stalled as Grand Master and M. W. Bro. Hirsch, on retiring 
from office, was presented by Grand Lodge with an appropri- 
ate gift, a beautiful gold watch. 

TASMANIA— 1939 

The Forty-Eighth Annual Communication was held at 
Launceston on February 18th, 1939. M. W. Bro. Stanley 
Dryden, Grand Master, presided. 



96 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

Membership, 4,087; number of lodges, 47. 

The order of procedure differs considerably from that 
in our Grand Lodge. Following the confirmation of the 
minutes of the Half-Yearly Communication as well as of 
Special Meetings of Grand Lodge the President of the Board 
of Genera! Purposes presented its annual report. The Annual 
Report of the Board of Benevolence was then presented and 
this was followed by the admirably concise reports of the 
four Grand Inspectors of Lodges. These reports might well 
serve as models for our District Deputy Grand Masters. The 
Grand Treasurer and Grand Secretary presented their re- 
ports. The Election of Officers and auditors then took place. 
The retiring Grand Master was re-elected unanimously for 
a third year and was installed by M. W. Bro. His Excellency, 
Sir Ernest Clark, P.G.M. 

The newly installed Grand Master appointed the Pro 
Grand Master and the Deputy Grand Master, who were 
severally installed and invested. The Grand Master appointed 
the Grand Inspectors of Lodges, three Grand Directors of 
Ceremonies and three country members to the Board of 
General Purposes. The latter were appointed each to rep- 
resent certain designated lodges. Investiture of other officers 
then took place and the Grand Master delivered his address. 
At the conclusion of this address a benevolence collection 
was taken up and Grand Lodge was then closed, the pro- 
ceedings lasting in all about one and one-half hours. 

The Grand Master announced that among the first duties 
of Grand Lodge for its new year was the consecration of a 
new Lodge "United Service" making forty-seven lodges on the 
roll. He referred to the satisfactory condition of the finances 
of the private lodges. The Board of General Purposes had 
earlier presented a general analysis of the finances of the 
private lodges. This close supervision must be of great value 
both to the individual lodges and to Grand Lodge. The Grand 
Master and the Board of Benevolence alike pointed with 
pride to the fact that the Benevolent Fund amounted to 
£20,000, or approximately $25 per capita, surely a wonderful 
showing. Mention was made of the Jubilee Celebration of 
the United Grand Lodge of New South Wales which had 
occurred recently when six thousand Masons were present 
for the fiftieth installation of a Grand Master of that juris- 
diction. A similar Jubilee Celebration was to be held in 
March 1940 by the United Grand Lodge of Victoria and the 
Grand Master announced that plans were to be made for the 
Jubilee of the Grand Lodge of Tasmania to be celebrated 
in February 1941. 

The Grand Master referred to the statement issued by 
the United Grand Lodge of England on "Aims and Relation- 
ships of the Craft". He commended this statement and 'its 
admirable guidance' to the attention of the Craft. 

He pointed out the intimate connection that exists be- 
tween good citizenship and good Masonry and the pressing 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 97 

need today of taking our Masonry very seriously and to "be 
at the least just a little more earnest about it and its im- 
plications than v/e may have been in the past". 

Lack of space forbids more than passing reference to 
the inspiring orations delivered by V. W. Bro. Canon Wilson 
and V. W. Bro. Canon Barrett at the dedication of the New- 
Masonic Temple, Hobart, and the Consecration of United 
Services Lodge respectively. 



TENNESSEE— 1940 

Lindsay B. Phillips — Grand Master. 

Membership — 36,091. 

The 126th Annual Communication of Grand Lodge was 
held at Nashville on the 31st of January, 1940. 

The Grand Lodge of Tennessee has a provision under 
which two or more subordinate lodges may consolidate and 
unite as one lodge, and four such consolidations took place 
during the year. One charter was surrendered, and three 
were arrested, leaving a balance of 396 lodges in the juris- 
diction, of which 375 were represented at the meeting. 

One cannot read the Address of M. W. Bro. Phillips and 
not be impressed by his fine conception of the duties and 
responsibilities attaching to his office and of Masonry as a 
steadying force amid the swiftly moving changes of a con- 
fused and restless world. He reviews in some detail his 
activities during the year — dedications, installations, visits 
to district and other meetings, of which there were many, 
and one can readily accept his statement that there is more 
interest and enthusiasm in their subordinate lodges than 
there has been for many years, and that Masonry in Ten- 
nessee is on a firm and substantial foundation — a result to 
which, we venture to suggest, he himself made no small 
contribution. 

Tennessee follows a dual system in the exercise of its 
benevolence. While they have a Masonic Home its inmates 
constitute but a very small percentage of the total number 
of beneficiaries receiving assistance. Figures are quoted 
giving the comparative costs under their plan of outside 
maintenance as against maintenance within the Home, and 
the Grand Master expresses the view that their charity work 
is being handled in a most satisfactory manner, and at a 
lower cost than it could be handled by any other method. 
He suggests that money could be saved for use in their 
charity work by disposing of the Masonic Home propeity, 
and a resolution pertaining to the conduct of the Home and 
its possible sale was presented to the Grand Lodge and 
referred to the Jurisprudence and Ways and Means Com- 
mittees. 

The list of healings, of dispensations and rulings bears 
a striking similarity to corresponding lists in other juris- 



98 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

dictions. Invasions of jurisdiction occur, miscalculations are 
made, and candidates are advanced within the prescribed 
time, and the appropriate penalties have to be imposed. Dis- 
pensations are required and granted for well recognized 
purposes and reasons, and a number of rulings were made 
which met with the approval of Grand Lodge. One or two 
of these might be mentioned because of their special 
interest. 

Tennessee, in common with a number of the jurisdictions 
of the United States, has a regulation to the effect that no 
one engaged in the manufacture or sale of intoxicating 
liquors as a beverage shall be permitted to acquire or to 
obtain membership in a Masonic Lodge. A number of ques- 
tions arose as to the meaning and application of this pro- 
vision, and its proper interpretation. 

Invasions of jurisdiction are usually interesting, and 
they have ahvays been a fruitful source of Masonic law. One 
decision rendered by the Grand Master came in for review 
by the Committee on Jurisprudence, and was modified by 
them. One of ten lodges having concurrent jurisdiction in 
Nashville complained that a man residing within their terri- 
tory had been admitted and received his three degrees in 
an outside lodge. The complaint was well founded, and the 
Grand Master healed the brother but ordered the offending 
lodge to grant him a demit, and to pay over the fee collected 
to the complaining lodge. He also directed that the com- 
plaining lodge should receive and ballot upon his application 
for affiliation. The Jurisprudence Committee modified the 
decision in two respects. They said that the brother when 
he received his demit was a Mason at large and that the 
Grand Master had no power either to order him to apply 
to a particular lodge or to order a particular lodge to receive 
his application. They also said that inasmuch as there were 
ten lodges having concurrent jurisdiction over him there was 
no particular lodge which could be said to have any special 
claim to the fee which he had paid. They, therefore, ordered 
the fee to be paid over to Grand Lodge. Presumably Grand 
Lodge v7ould have authority to deal with it as seemed to be 
proper. 

Consideration was given to the matter of recognition of 
various foreign Grand Lodges, and fraternal relations were 
established with the National Grand Lodge of Denmark and 
the Grand Lodge of Para, Brazil. 

The Proceedings contain the Constitution of the Grand 
Lodge and the edicts as amended in 1940. 

An interesting report of the Committee on Fraternal 
Correspondence was presented by the Chairman, M. W. Bro. 
John T. Peeler. Our own Meeting in July 1939 is reviewed 
in a very kindly manner. 

At the elections which were held on the 2nd day of the 
Communication M. W. Bro. Paul Fisher Lanius of Nashville 
was selected as Grand Master for the coming year, A photo- 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 99 

graph of the new Grand Master, as well as a short bio- 
graphical sketch, appears in the opening pages of the 
Volume. 

TEXAS— 1939 

One Hundred and Fourth Annual Communication held at 
the city of Waco on the 6th and 7th of December, 1939. 
Grand Master — Lee Lockwood. 
Total Membership— 98,445. 

The Proceedings of this Grand Lodge are prefaced by 
an excellent photograph and biographical sketch of the 
Grand Master both of which will prove to be of great value 
to the future historian when compiling the history of the. 
Grand Lodge. 

Another feature of the Proceedings that attracted our 
attention is a verbatim report of the introduction to the 
assembled brethren of all the Past Grand Masters in attend- 
ance in the order of their seniority. These distinguished 
brethren after the expiration of their term of office in the 
Grand East no longer bear the title of Most Worshipful but 
are addressed as Right Worshipful. There appears to be a 
logical reason for this practice. The ceremony of their in- 
troduction followed the opening of Grand Lodge after the 
passing of a few formal resolutions. There was a fixed 
form.ula in the manner of their introduction. The several 
brethren introducing them were chosen for the purpose owing 
to their apparent fitness to perform that duty. The first to 
be presented was the veteran Past Grand Maser, W. Madden 
Fly, who was atending his fifty-fourth consecutive annual 
Communication. After his presentation at the altar he was 
conducted to the Grand East where he was welcomed by the 
Grand Master and given the gavel and the Grand Lodge 
was under his direction until the next Past Grand Master, 
in the order of seniority, was in like manner presented, in- 
troduced and received the gavel. There was no evidence in 
the reply of R. W. Brother Fly that his age had in any way 
impaired his mental faculties or sense of humor. He indulged 
in many reminiscences skilfully mingled with pathos and 
humor and frequently punctuated by his appreciative audi- 
ence with applause and laughter. In the course of his re- 
marks he paid a high tribute to the late brother, James H. 
Lockwood, a life-long and cherished friend of R. W. Bro. 
Fly and father of the Grand Master, and at the request of 
and in the name of the latter he presented to the Lodge a 
square and compass in memory of the Grand Master's 
father. Eighteen Past Grand Masters passed through this 
interesting ceremony. That these brethren were worthy of 
this unique introduction was graciously acknowledged by the 
Grand Master in the following eulogy: 

"Almost daily and in some instances during the late 
hours of the night I have imposed upon many, if not all, 



100 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

of our beloved and distinguished Past Grand Masters. I 
have sought their counsel and their advice on many and 
sundry subjects which to them may have appeared at the 
time trivial, but at the same time they were of importance 
to me. These men v/ho have given so many years of loyal 
and unselfish service, actuated by a love of the Order, have 
given to me personally much valuable and sincere assistance. 
Their timely advice and sympathetic understanding and their 
devotion to the cause of Masonry will always remain as one 
of my most cherished memories. May each of them be spared 
for many years to come, each one of them is needed now 
as probably never before." 

The first recommendation in the address of the Grand 
Master was a re-adjustment of the territory assigned to the 
District Deputy Grand Masters in five of the 121 Districts 
in the jurisdiction. The area of the State of Texas is only 
two-thirds of that of Ontario and our membership is about 
the same as theirs. Our 569 Lodges are served by 35 District 
Deputy Grand Masters or an average of 16 Lodges to a 
District while the 892 Lodges of Texas are served by 121 
District Deputy Grand Masters or an average of less than 
eight Lodges to a District. The five singled out for special 
treatment by the Grand Master have an average of a little 
short of 20 Lodges each which admittedly casts a heavy 
burden upon the District Deputy Grand Masters of these 
Districts. It would be interesting to know the duties of 
these officers as it is difficult to reconcile the disparity in the 
comparison illustrated by the foregoing figures. One con- 
clusion which plausibly suggests itself to the writer is that 
the duties of our Texas brethren are more onerous than in 
our jurisdiction. 

It is very comforting and with deep satisfaction that 
we clip the follov/ing from the address of the Grand Master: 

"We cannot be deaf to the constant warnings coming 
from those holding high government positions, who are con- 
stantly reminding us that mankind is today confronted by 
the alternative of civilization or barbarism and that civiliza- 
tion itself hangs in the balance; that the church of God is 
openly attacked, its members belittled, and in many in- 
stances persecuted; that family and home life is steadily 
being undermined and that selfish individuals seek world 
dominion. As Masons we believe in the great principles of 
free government, free speech, the equality of all men before 
the law, the sanctity of the home and the right to worship 
God according to the dictates of one's own conscience, be- 
lieving that only through fraternity, tolerance and truth 
can the happiness of mankind be achieved." 

In an eloquent address the Grand Chaplain, in dealing 
with the same subject, summed up the issues of the present 
war as follows: 

"To sum it up in a nut shell; decency, free education, 
the Church of God, and family life, as well as the other 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 101 

finer things of life, cannot advance in a world that is defi- 
nitely disintegrating and going backward and downward 
madly along the road to ruin and disaster; in a world whose 
scripture is: "Blessed is the nation whose God is Might, 
Military Strength, Naval Prowess, Ruthless Conquest, Covet- 
ousness. Power Politics, Moral and Spiritual Decay, Devalu- 
ating Personality, Racial and Religious Persecution, Dictator 
Deification and War" — instead "The Lord". 

His enduring faith in the uplifting power of Freemasonry 
was amply illustrated in his further remarks: 

"Here is something to be proud of and to be optimistic 
about. The principles of Masonry give us reason to stand 
upon our feet, to lift our eyes up to the Heavens above us 
and feel that truly we are linked with Deity in fulfilling the 
task that belongs to Masonry tonight; that of solving the 
terrific problems of the world and of changing its picture 
of darkness and barbarism into one of illumination and 
beauty." 

"Principles are powerful things. We should recognize 
those mighty, underlying principles of Masonry and their 
power to uproot human errors and lift mankind to a new 
level of nobler living. We can dedicate ourselves to the 
incarnation of those principles, and be assured that we are 
allied with everything that is high and holy in this world. 
There is something stimulating and worth while about that." 

The Grand Master represented his Grand Lodge at the 
Conference of Grand Masters held at Washington in Feb- 
ruary, 1939. At that conference it was suggested that each 
Grand Jurisdiction adopt a "Declaration of Principles" which 
in eleven paragraphs professes to clarify and specifically 
define the principles of our Order. The Grand Master in un- 
mistakable language was opposed to any such action by 
their Grand Lodge and said that they could not, by adding 
thereto or taking therefrom, make any simpler, any clearer 
or more emphatic the purposes of their Grand Lodge which 
reads as follows: 

"The purposes of this Grand Lodge are to control and 
regulate the practice of Freemasonry throughout the juris- 
diction, in accordance with the immemorial usages of this 
ancient and honoiable craft; to advance the moral and social 
interest of its membership; to foster good citizenship, honest 
industry and upright living; to cultivate the exercise of 
charity in its best and broadest sense; to assist the widows 
and orphans of its deceased members; to stimulate friend- 
ship, harmony and brotherly love and generally to promote, 
in its own way, the happiness of mankind — it is a Frater- 
nity of good men, linked together by honorable and indis- 
soluble bonds, to accomplish these noble purposes, eschewing 
all interest in factional politics and sectarian religion and 
free from the dictation of both." 



102 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

UTAH— 1939 

The Sixty-Eighth Annual Communication of the Most ^ 
Worshipful Grand Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons of 
Utah, was held in the Masonic Temple, Salt Lake City, on 
September 25th and 26th, 1939, with the Most Worshipful 
Brother William Littlejohn, the Grand Master, presiding. 

Twenty-three of the twenty-six Lodges of the Jurisdic- 
tion sent delegates who represented a total membership of 
4,467, a net loss of 44 members during the year. 

In this Jurisdiction, the Grand Master holds office for 
one year only. The general procedure is through the chairs 
of the Grand Junior Warden, the Grand Senior Warden and 
Deputy Grand Master, to that of Grand Master. 

The Grand Master of 1893 presented his successor in 
office with a signet ring, which has been passed to each 
succeeding Grand Master ever since, hoping that, if lustre 
has not been added to it, at least nothing has been done to 
detract from it. 

The report publishes in full the names of the Officers, 
the Past Masters, and an alphabetical list of the Master 
Masons of each lodge in the State of Utah. 

Each lodge had a visit from the Grand Master during 
the year. He felt that there was a steady growth in interest, 
in fellowship, and in activities touching Masonry, from which 
all could take courage. 

A new thought, with regard to the advancement of 
masonic education, is suggested by the presentation of 
masonic plays, apparently written by a Grand Lodge Officer. 
These are intended to teach some masonic lesson _ in a 
dramatic fashion and give the members an opportunity in 
training and experience for other things. 

During the year, each lodge produced from one to nine 
original papers or talks given before the lodge. This effort 
is very much worthwhile. The brethren who come to lodge 
expect something of the sort; then return home with some- 
thing to repay them, by way of constructive thinking, for 
their attendance. 

Pamphlets are prepared and mimeographed and distri- 
buted by the Grand Lodge at cost to the lodges each month, 
save one, during the year. 

The constituent lodges expended the sum of $5,569.00 
for charity, and Grand Lodge had undistributed contribu- 
tions from the Charity Fund of $20,446.00. 

In this Jurisdiction, the Grand Lecturer seems to have 
his finger on the pulse of Masonry. He appoints four Dis- 
trict Deputy Grand Lecturers, and twenty-six Lodge Deputy 
Grand Lecturers at the beginning of his term of office. 

They visit all lodges and report on the ritualistic work. 
They hold schools of instruction, and appear to function in 



FRATEENAL CORRESPONDENCE 103 

somewhat the same way as our own District Deputy Grand 
Masters. 

An interesting question regarding the rights of an un- 
affiliated Mason to visit in Utah was -discussed by the Grand 
Master. In a general way, the following practice prevails. 
Apparently such a Mason has an unlimited right to visit in 
Utah during the first six months of his sojourn in Utah, 
provided he can show a valid demit from a masonic juris- 
diction recognized by Utah, regardless of how long ago such 
demit was issued. After the Mason has been in Utah for 
six months, he loses all rights automatically until he becomes 
an active member of a recognized masonic lodge, either in 
Utah or elsewhere. In any case, he must be able to satisfy 
the demands of the Constitution or Code. 

This Grand Lodge uses the shorter form of Free and 
Accepted Masons. The longer form was used for the first 
twenty-five years by both the Grand Lodge and the con- 
stituent lodges — Ancient Free and Accepted Masons — be- 
cause the three Grand Lodges of Montana, Kansas and 
Colorado, which cTiartered the first lodges of Salt Lake City, 
used the letters A.F. & A.M. 

The question has been asked on several occasions — "Why 
and when was the change made?" There is nothing on 
record that gives a direct answer to it. 

It is quite probable that the Chairman of the Code Com- 
mittee, who was also Chairman of the Committee on Juris- 
prudence which passed on the new Code, knew the reason 
why the word "Ancient" disappeared from the name. 

The Grand Orator closed his admirable address to Grand 
Lodge with these words: 

"Brethren, I admonish you that the pathway to Liberty, 
Peace and Happiness is not always wide and secure. Ever 
keep in mind to cherish in your hearts the ideals for which 
our forebears and ancient Masonic Brethren lived, sacrificed 
and wrought. Defend against, as never before, every on- 
slaught upon our greatest heritage, the Constitution of the 
United States of America." 



VERMONT— 1939 

Membership, 16,592; number of lodges, 103. 

The One Hundred and Forty-Sixth Annual Communica- 
tion of the Grand Lodge of Vermont was held at Burlington, 
June 14 and 15, with M. W. Bro. Charles F. Dalton, Grand 
Master, on the throne. Eleven Past Grand Masters and 
twelve of the thirteen District Deputy Grand Masters were 
in attendance. Eighty-eight of the one hundred and three 
constituent lodges were represented at this communication. 
Distinguished guests from the Grand Lodges of Connecticut, 
New Hampshire, New Jersey, Quebec and Rhode Island were 



104 GEAND LODGE OF CANADA 

introduced and welcomed. Forty-eight foreign jurisdictions 
including our own were represented by their Grand Repre- 
sentatives. 

The Grand Master reported that Masonry in Vermont is 
in a healthy condition. A decrease in the total membership 
was looked on as "a by-product of the troublesome times 
through which we are passing. It is the spirit of Masonry 
rather than numbers which tells the story and that spirit 
has been evidenced again and again during the year". The 
Grand Master attended, in late September and October, dis- 
trict meetings in all of the districts. He was accompanied 
by the Grand Lecturer and other Grand Lodge officers to 
these meetings which were organized by the District Deputy 
Grand Masters. Some of these gatherings were severely 
affected by the hurricane which swept the New England 
States in the autumn of 1938. These meetings culminated in 
a special meeting held at Barre when, in their turn, the 
District Deputy Grand Masters exemplified the third degree. 

The Grand Master, in his address, devoted sonie atten- 
tion to masonic charity. He pointed out that, while some 
of his predecessors had enunciated the principle "that no 
Mason should be made the object of charity outside_ our own 
organization", nevertheless "the attitude of the public toward 
the acceptance of financial assistance has undergone a de- 
cided change in the past few years" and he therefore quotes 
with approval a declaration on the subject made by the 
Grand Lodge of Utah: 

"It is our judgment that the Fraternity can best carry 
out its purpose by requesting those present beneficiaries who 
are entitled to state and federal aid to seek relief from those 
sources, thus freeing Masonic funds for use among those 
who for one reason or another do not fall within the classes 
to be aided by the state or nation." 

"'To this end, an attempt should be made to point out 
to those who have been the recipients of our assistance, but 
have now become entitled to benefits under state or federal 
laws, that it is no longer considered a disgrace for them 
to accept the benefits thus offered them, and that by so 
doing they are performing a real Masonic service in assisting 
those in charge of our charity funds to use our income, which 
has been reduced by falling interest rates, for the benefit 
of those who are not, for one reason or another, entitled to 
assiscance under these state and federal acts." 

The rules of the Grand Lodge of Vermont provide that 
relief of distressed brethren is "first the duty of the local 
lodge but it is provided that the subordinate (sic.) lodge 
receives reimbursement for all payments over one dollar 
per capita member." 

Twenty-eight members received fifty-year buttons. 

The Grand Master recommended that the Declaration of 
Principles presented in 1939 at the annual session of the 
Grand Masters of the U.S.A. be adopted. This statement 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 105 

had earlier been adopted by the Grand Lodge of Massa- 
chusetts. This recommendation was adopted in principle, the 
exact wording being left until the next communication. 

The Grand Master recommended that the Committee on 
Masonic Education be discontinued since its work vras largely 
superseded by membership in the Masonic Service Associ- 
ation "whose publications are primarily for the purpose of 
distributing educational material". This recommendation was 
also adopted. 

In summing up his conclusions from his year's tenure 
of office the Grand Master said: 

"I have learned that Masons are to be trusted with the 
responsibilities and duties which rest upon them and, while 
Masons must necessarily be men with different dispositions 
and tendencies which men have, yet there is no doubt in 
my mind that Masonry does smooth off rough corners and 
softens the lives and thoughts of those who might otherwise 
be hard on their fellows. I have learned that Masonry is a 
living thing and my only regret is that more men cannot be 
brought under the influence of its tenets and teachings." 

The Grand Secretary reported the total membership as 
16,592, a net loss of 316 for the year. 

Fraternal relations were established with the Grand 
Lodges of Cuba, Norway, Sweden and with the National 
Grand Lodge of Denmark. 

The Committee on the Grand Master's address referred 
in considerable detail to masonic charity. 

"Social security embracing old age assistance, job in- 
surance and public works labor is not charity when the 
recipient is honestly entitled to receive it. Old-age assistance 
is a reward akin to actually earned wages which a grateful 
government and the younger members of society gladly pay 
to the elderly man or woman who has borne the brunt of 
life's battle, raised and educated a family, and who has been 
unable to save against old age, through no fault of their 
own, we hope, except perhaps a lack in knowledge of economic 
values and foresight. In any view we feel it to be the duty 
of every good Mason to avail himself of that to which he 
is honestly entitled before calling upon his lodge, leaving 
the lodge to meet whatever additional may be needed to keep 
their brothers comfortable. The duty remains however upon 
every Lodge to take reasonably good care of its needy 
brothers and their dependents." 

This committee apologized for the unusual length of 
their report, stating that they 'found so much real western 
beef in the Grand Master's address that the study and masti- 
cation process has been a refreshing pleasure.' 

The Grand Master and the Committee on Necrology 
spoke feelingly regarding the death of many members. Refer- 
ence was made particularly to the death of M. W. Bro. 0. W. 
Daly, P.G.M., whose portrait adorns the opening pages of 
the Grand Lodge Report. 



106 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

An able and instructive report on the Proceedings of 
other Grand Lodges is contributed by the Grand Secretary, 
M. W. Bro. Archie S. Harriman, who is also chairman of the 
Committee on Foreign Correspondence. The reviewer read 
it with great interest. One remark of his anent the proceed- 
ings of our jurisdiction for 1938 was noted proudly but 
sadly — "M. W. Bro. Ponton contributed another of his in- 
imitable and witty reviews". 

M. W. Bro. C. F. Dalton was re-elected Grand Master. 



VICTORIA— 1938 

The Quarterly Communication was held in Melbourne, 
March 16th, 1938, with the Grand Master M. W. Bro. His 
Excellency Lord Huntingfield K.C.M.G., Governor of Victoria, 
presiding. 

From the address of the Grand Master we quote: 

"Freemasonry in Victoria has made solid, though not 
spectacular progress in the last year. We have now 216 
Temples dedicated to Freemasonry, and six new Lodges were 
consecrated in the last twelve months. In our 525 Lodges 
we have 50,588 members. We have a credit balance of 
£325,000 in the Grand Treasurer's account, and in the 49 
years which have elapsed since the Grand Lodge was founded 
no less a sum than £120,000 has been expended by the 
Benevolent Fund. That is a great record." 

He also announced his appointment as acting Governor- 
General of the Commonwealth and expressed his regrets 
that it might be the last time he v/ould have the pleasure 
and honour of addressing Grand Lodge. 

The Board of General Purposes reported the awarding 
of six _ Scholarships. They also recommended that: "Each 
newly-initiated member shall prior to his initiation pay to 
the Lodge the sum of £l 10/- which shall be paid by it to 
the Hospital Fund of Grand Lodge." 

The Board of Benevolence considered forty applications 
and made grants of over £1454 during the quarter. 

The Board of Management of The Freemasons' Hospital 
presented the First Annual Report. This report stated that 
the cost of the Hospital building and expenditure on equip- 
ment and furnishings was £113,447. This Board also re- 
ported that: 

"The Staff has worked splendidly, and the Hospital has 
acquired a high reputation for efficiency, service and kindli- 
ness — a reputation favourably comparable with that of 
similar institutions of much longer standing. The Operating 
Theatres have evoked many encomiums in regard to their 
equipment, modernity, suitability for all purposes and the 
highly efficient sisters in charge." 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 107 

The report further commends, "the work and support 
of the Ladies' Auxiliaries which has been greatly valued." 

We notice in Victoria that members are excluded for 
non-payment of dues and "Brethren who have been excluded 
by the Supreme Grand Chapter of Victoria are automatically 
excluded from their Craft Lodges." 

At the Quarterly Communication held on June 15th, 
1938, the Pro Grand Master, M. W. Bro. W. Warren Kerr, 
C.M.G., C.B.E., presided. 

From a discussion on a proposed amendment to the Con- 
stitution we learned that: "Twelve Grand Stewards are ap- 
pointed annually by the Grand Master from nominations 
made by twelve lodges in rotation. These names are sub- 
mitted to the Grand Master for his approval." 

Under the physical disability clause of their Constitu- 
tion it was provided that the Grand Master was not author- 
ized to grant a dispensation for the initiation of a candidate 
who is "totally blind". At this communication an amendment 
was approved to delete the two words "Totally Blind". 

It was stated during the debate on this amendment that 
he Pro Grand Master of England in 1922 had expressed his 
opinion in a letter from which we quote: 

"I have never heard the question of the eligibility of 
sightless men raised in this country. I imagine that it must 
have been definitely decided long bef